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Chapter 5: School Environment

The Technology Factor: Nine Keys to Student Achievement and Cost-Effectiveness

based on the forecasted improvements in connectivity. In several areas, including support of 3G-4G to students, some invention is required to reach desired price/functionality targets. Chart 5.11. Is your instructional network accessible to parents? (Q24)

Student Access to the Network 68% 61%

• Schools in the Central region are significantly more likely than schools in the Northeast to offer parents access to the network at home. • Schools with high school grades are significantly more likely than elementary schools to offer parents access to the network at home.

74%

74%

Demographic Highlights

58% 56%

51%

• Schools with low instructional materials expenditures are significantly more likely than schools with higher expenditures to offer parents access to the network at home. • Schools in the Northeast are significantly less likely than schools in other regions to provide parents with network access at school.

40% 35%

• Schools with high poverty percentages are significantly more likely than schools with lower poverty percentages to provide parents with network access at school.

At school 1:1

At home 2:1 or 3:1

Other locations 4:1 or higher

Percentage of Respondents by Student-Computer Ratio

Read As • Survey respondents report parents have less access to the instructional network than students or teachers. • Respondents in 1:1 schools continue to report superior access to the instructional network. 51% report that parents have access to the network at school, and 74% report that parents have access from other locations. • Only 35% of respondents in schools with 4:1 or higher studentcomputer ratios report that parents have access to the network at school, and only 56% provide network access to parents in other locations.

Implications Instruction Anytime/anywhere network access allows parents to see their child’s lessons, assignments, and progress instantly and allows teachers and schools to easily update parents about school events and activities. Unfortunately, not all parents have Internet access or a device with which to access the Internet. In 1:1 programs where families do not have a computer at home, parents and siblings oen use the school device. Public access in places such as community labs or public libraries can also provide valuable access. Finance Secure access for parents can help build communication between home and school. However, schools must recognize the challenges some parents face in accessing the network. Schools may need to budget for parent training or computer lab access for parents at school. Until all parents have reasonably simple access to the network, it will be impossible to abandon the traditional, less efficient, and more expensive forms of communication.

Projectred thetechnolgyfactor  
Projectred thetechnolgyfactor  
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