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OPS SPRING ISSUE 2018

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M A G A Z I N E

GRAY INSTITUTE | FREE MOTION | ONLINE EDUCATION | TRX | NUTRITION | ACTIVE BALL | TRIGGERPOINTâ„¢ | VIPR FOR KIDS SMALL GROUP TRAINING | IMMACULATE DISSECTION | COURSE OUTLINES w w w . o p s t u d i o h k . c o m


MAR - APR - MAY 2018 ISSUE

FEATURES 22

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FORWARD

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COURSE HIGHLIGHTS 2018 Check out what we have install for you in 2018

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SPECIAL ARTICLE - GRAY INSTITUTE CRB Relative from Real Shoulder Motions

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GRAY INSTITUTE OPS and GRAY INSTITUTE have aligned forces to bring you 3DMAPS & CAFS in 2018

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SPECIAL ARTICLE - REHAB TRAINER Strengths and Weaknesses of the Australian Personal Trainer Industry

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SPECIALISATION ONLINE Be the trainer you always wanted to be, with the NASM online specialisation courses. Mixed Martial Arts Conditioning Specialist

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NUTRITION Be the trainer you always wanted to be, with the NASM online specialisation courses. Mixed Martial Arts Conditioning Specialist

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COURSE OUTLINES Not sure which course is suited to you, this course outline should be able to shed some light on your ongoing education.

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FORWARD Welcome to our first issue of OPS Core magazine for 2018. We trust that you had a great New Years celebration. I know that we are all prepped and excited about our new education programs coming your way this year. First up, OPS has aligned itself with Gray Institute to be able to bring you, two brand new certifications. 3DMAPS and CAFS. There is more information in this issue about these new certifications. Dates for these courses will be posted online throughout the year. This month we are also very excited to bring you ANIMAL FLOW, this program was so popular that has already sold out, but if the demand calls for it, we will bring another level I certification and perhaps a level II certification later in the year. In July we will be also introducing an amazing new Anatomy workshop, entitled, Immaculate Dissection, be sure to look out for more promotional information coming soon, or use the link above to secure your spot. This course will be booked through Immaculate Dissection website. Later in the year, we will be introducing, 2 programs from Australian Strength Performance.

Hypertrophy and Fat Loss Specialisation, these two programs will be hosted from May 9 to May 13. For further details and bookings please click the hyperlinks above. For anyone that is interested in AIS Active Isolated Stretching techniques, we have just the course for you, this year for the first time we will be introducing an Intro to Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) Neuromuscular Conditioning, this course will be held on June 9, 2018. I have included a table of upcoming courses in this issue, with one click booking links to make securing your spot that much easier. Of course all our regular education programs will be scheduled throughout the year. Thank you for all your support throughout 2017.

Till we meet again, stay happy, healthy and remember… “Learn From Everything”.

Yours in Fitness Education

Wayne

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CRB – Relative from Real: Shoulder Motions February 06, 2018 by Dr. David Tiberio

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Shoulder joint motion (glenohumeral articulation) occurs when there is relative movement between the head of the humerus and the glenoid fossa of the scapula. Like all joints, real motion of either bone can occur, and often both bones are moving.  The shoulder is described as not only triplanar, but also triaxial.  Motion at the shoulder can occur in any of the three planes separately allowing for multiple three-dimensional combinations to facilitate complex functions. The glenohumeral articulation is considered an extremity joint.  Like all extremity joints, the relative joint motion is named by the distal bone’s relationship with the proximal bone.  Whenever both bones move in the same direction, if the humerus (distal bone) moves faster than the scapula, the real bone motion of the humerus and the relative joint motion at the shoulder will be the same.  This is easy for our eyes to see and our brain to interpret.  If the humerus is flexing faster than the scapula, the relative joint motion will be flexion.  If the humerus is externally rotating faster than the scapula, the relative joint motion will be external rotation.  The only source of confusion is the terms used for describing the real scapula bone motion.  However, the lack of consistent terminology in each plane creates greater confusion when the scapula is moving faster than the humerus.  The table below shows the real bone motions when moving in the same direction.

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When the scapula moves faster (in the same direction) than the humerus, then what we see the humerus do (real motion) and the relative motion at the glenohumeral articulation are not the same.  They are opposite.    One example from each plane using the Table above would be: When the scapula anteriorly rotates faster than the humerus extends, the relative joint motion is flexion. When the scapula downwardly rotates faster than the humerus adducts, the relative joint motion is abduction. When the scapula protracts faster than the humerus internally rotates, the relative joint motion is external rotation. During function, if the motion is driven by the hand, then the humerus usually goes faster. But when the motion is driven by the head, trunk or legs, then the scapula will often move faster. During functional activities the bones may be moving in opposite directions.  When this occurs, the relative joint motion is NOT determined by which bone is going faster.  If they are moving in the same plane, but in opposite directions, the proximal bone adds to the joint motion created by the distal bone, and the relative joint motion is the same as the distal bone motion. There is a special case of bones moving in opposite directions that is critical for function.   This starts with the bones moving in the same direction, but the proximal bone often reverses direction before the distal bone.  This occurs in what the Gray Institute calls the Transformational Zone.  This sequence of proximal before distal creates a powerful functional load to the muscles that is part of all functional movements.

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Optimum Performance Studio and Gray Institute have aligned forces, to be able to bring you the best education possible. Starting this year we will be running 3DMAPS and CAFS certiďŹ cation courses throughout Asia. These courses add to your tool kit and give you the conďŹ dence to aid and assist your clients on an even higher level. FIND OUT MORE

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What is 3DMAPS? Real life, real challenges. Whether your patient is a casual golfer or star athlete, determining the right approach to treatment can be challenging. That’s why the Gray Institute offers an innovative, effective, and comprehensive approach to patient rehabilitation. Three-Dimensional Movement Analysis and Performance System (3DMAPS) leverages movements that are authentic to everyday life by utilising all three planes of motion. This system allows the practitioner to examine, evaluate, and treat patients based on the philosophy that the influence of one part of the body effects another. 7

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What is CAFS®? Your clients are unique. Why settle for a treatment program that approaches every case the same? Arm yourself with the premier certification that gives movement professionals the tools to develop custom assessment, treatment, and training programs tailor made for each individual. CAFS® is the first certification of its kind that will empower the movement professional to create treatments and programs for the client’s specific needs based on their individual abilities and goals.

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MAXIMISING THE GROUP FITNESS EXPERIENCE - WITH MINIMAL EQUIPMENT. AMI MCMULLEN

The demand for group fitness experiences is booming. Participants are expecting more, but how can you meet these expectations with less? In a perfect group fitness world, we’d have all the best equipment, in every size, style, and weight, and we’d have enough to cover every participant who attends our classes or group trainings. But since we don’t live in a perfect group fitness world, we often have to make due with what we’ve got, and sometimes that means teaching a very packed class and not enough equipment to go around. In order to maximise the group fitness experience with minimal equipment, check out the following suggestions. Body Weight Exercises The easiest way to get around not having enough equipment is to not need as much of it. Plank variations, pull-ups, pushups, squat jumps, lunge jumps, wall sits, sprints, and shuttle runs are all great examples of moves that can be modified for multiple levels without needing any equipment. And never underestimate the power of the isometric hold! However, there are only so many pushups and squat jumps you can program until people start getting bored, which leads me to my next example:

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Circuit Formats Setting up a circuit class is a great way to maximise the equipment you do have. You can alternate stations that need equipment with ones that don’t need equipment. If you’re really in a pinch, partnering up enables two people to utilise the same piece of equipment. For example, two people can share one medicine ball and hand/throw it back and forth. Programming for Rest (And sharing!)  Whether you’re doing a circuit format or not, programming for rest periods allows participants to share equipment during class. Using a 1:1 work rest ratio, one partner will be working with the equipment while the other is resting (and providing coaching or motivation) and then they switch. You can do this for several sets before rotating on to the next exercise. Depending on how successful their performance is, try sets of 30 – 40 seconds. Extra: Creative Alternatives • Agility ladders are great, but another option is using masking tape on the floor to draw your own. It’ll save you time setting up and save you space on storage! You can even make one on each side of the room to have several small groups going at once, preventing traffic jams and leaving space in the middle for the other half of the class to do something else. • Head outside to take advantage of natural and urban landscapes: Step-ups on park benches, pull-ups on tree limbs, and cat walks on railings are just a few examples. People love variety! Even if you have enough equipment, challenge yourself to try some of these examples just to mix things up for your participants. Happy teaching!

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Things to remember: Make sure you program exercises that are difficult or intense enough that the participants will need rest after they’re done. Examples include squat/lunge jumps, pull-ups, isometric holds at end range. Partners & Groups Put everybody in groups of 3. Give them 3 exercises to rotate through. Do this two to three times and then switch exercises. An example: Partner 1 does shuttle runs. Partner 2 does a plank variation. Partner 3 uses the equipment.Â

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STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF THE AUSTRALIAN PERSONAL TRAINER INDUSTRY FROM A SPORTS PHYSIOTHERAPIST’S PERSPECTIVE (AS WRITTEN FOR THE SPORTS INJURY BULLETIN 2006)

In recent months Sports Injury Bulletin has been debating the strengths and weaknesses of the physiotherapy profession, and in particular the relative roles of physios and fitness trainers. For me, this is far more than just an academic debate, as it goes to the heart of work I am currently developing, as a sports physio, with the Australian personal trainer industry.

My own thinking is based on 10 years of extensive involvement with personal trainers and their clients, exposure to the machinations of personal trainer management systems, and work that I have done educating trainers in inservice forums and now in a new in-depth modular course called “Rehab Trainer”. What follows is a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, threats and opportunities) of the Australian personal trainer industry. I cannot claim that the analysis will hold equally true for other countries, but I suspect there will be many aspects that others will recognise in their own domestic situations. My hope is that this kind of debate and professional development initiatives such as “Rehab Trainer” will help to push the sports therapy world on into increasingly productive collaboration and satisfactory outcomes for our clients.

I STRENGTHS In Australia the personal trainer industry is booming. There are new gyms popping up all over the place; quality gym/health clubs are expanding rapidly and positioning themselves for further growth; and educational institutions are consequently enjoying huge demand for their Certificate III and IV personal training graduate courses. There has clearly been a big increase in the proportion of gym-goers wanting to work with a personal trainer on their fitness programmes. The average user attending a health club seems to view their exercise, and even having a personal trainer, as an integral part of a healthy lifestyle, rather than it being a luxury that they won’t afford. My own situation in Queensland bears out this trend. I am part of a large multi-disciplinary sports medicine clinic that serves as “pitt crew” to a huge number of Personal Trainers. I personally work very closely with 20 to 30 PT’s who ply their trade around the clock for 5,000 fitness-seeking mums and dads, plumbers, corporate executives, and even the odd athlete. And everyone seems to win.

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These days clients tend to focus as much on maintaining physical health as on having a ‘great’ body. Personal training has become a lot more than your basic machines and exercises; it encompasses a vast selection of lifestyle and dietary options, outdoor activities, functional exercises, flexibility and core stability regimes, and there is always new equipment being designed to push the body in new ways towards its optimal state. From my perspective as a sports physiotherapist working hard to keep the clients on track with their chosen fitness regimes, the arrangement gives me no end of satisfaction, because the dovetailing of the allied health and the personal trainer professions results in a rapid return to training for injured body parts. If an injury is more severe, it is only a very rare situation where the client is advised to stop altogether visiting the PT, as their positive momentum and psychology depends on maintaining some exercise routines. Anecdotally there is no question in my mind that an injured client who belongs to a gym and is a regular exerciser with a personal trainer is much more likely to be motivated in their injury rehab. They are also therefore less likely to become over-dependent on the clinician to give them temporary feel-good treatments. I am spending a lot more time with clients these days in the gym, watching them do a particular exercise, or discussing with a personal trainer the poor technique or poor movement issues that are intimately connected to the client’s pathology. With a personal trainer on board, the client is much more likely to be encouraged to keep up their training, even in a modified form, until an injured body part becomes functional again.

I WEAKNESSES Personal trainers, however, increasingly face three challenges in this context of injury, challenges that I believe will require them to evolve in order to hold their own beyond the short term. Firstly, far too many clients seem to get overuse injuries. Some clients bring injuries with them into the gym; these will test the developing relationship between client and trainer at an early stage. However, my impression is that people do not seem to stay injured for as long as they used to (most injuries I see associated with personal training regimes could not be described as persistent or severe), but it is striking how easily gym goers seem to get injured, particularly in the first few months, as bodies are pushed to their limits, forced to adapt and remodel. Could it be that as a greater proportion of the population seek out a healthier lifestyle, the newcomers to the gym are more high-risk to start with -- people who would in the past never have dreamt of acquiring a regular exercise habit but who are now seeking direction and advice to back up their best efforts? As a personal trainer do you immediately send all your keen new recruits off to a physiotherapist or chiropractor for remedial work, and risk never seeing them again? Secondly, there is usually an implicit expectation among gym-goers that their minor ongoing injuries are going to get better simply as a result of their getting into a routine, becoming fitter and working with a personal trainer. Put another way, it seems that people increasingly expect personal trainers to be able to sort out their grumpy lower back or niggling knee injury. Are personal trainers aware of this? And are they qualified for this challenge? Unfortunately the current baseline standard of training for personal trainers makes it truly a gamble as to whether the client’s injury will improve, stay the same or even deteriorate as they get into their new fitness regime. Many personal trainers are unaware of the key fact that physical training in the context of pain changes everything. Much higher levels of specificity, caution and biomechanical understanding are necessary if the trainer is to have a beneficial rather than a detrimental effect. Thirdly, while no research has yet confirmed this, it is highly likely that injury plays a part in the high drop-out rate of clients from regular gym-going. They get frustrated, lose their exercise momentum, and either stop seeing the personal trainer because they have lost confidence in them, or probably more commonly, stop going to the gym altogether.

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I OPPORTUNITIES Winning client loyalty As years of experience and continuing advanced professional development are built up, personal trainers become more confident and competent at knowing what to do about injuries. This in turn attracts longer-term loyalty from clients, especially where the trainer has played a positive part in their rehabilitation from injury. Greater client satisfaction is the key to the sustainability of personal training businesses. This is the direction in which the whole personal training industry needs to move, not just those trainers who opt to specialise more in rehab work. Why? Because the general public are asking for it, and because, I believe, it is the right way to go: it is better that members are steady users of gyms and personal trainers than of allied health services. I know in one sense I am talking myself out of a job!

Greater work satisfaction To be an active part of helping to free people from pain is rewarding work; much more so than slaving solely to amass money in the bank, or, for that matter, just handing out the latest “rehab drill’ without understanding what its purpose is. With new competence will come new confidence in what the trainer is doing with an injured body part. Alongside greater skill acquisition comes greater intellectual stimulation for the trainer, as they come to understand how injuries are created, what movement patterns need to be corrected, and how to work with referrers. And personal trainers will be able to help create a virtuous circle. Their training approach will be safer and more geared to injury prevention as they understand the details of which movement patterns predispose to injury.

New skills Personal trainers must continue to develop their skills of exercise prescription, functional muscle training, postural assessment, and their repertoire of flexibility and fitness modalities. But there is a separate and different stream of knowledge which will up-skill them towards safer training of the injured client. It is a small movement towards the physiotherapy skill-set, but should not alarm physios who know what they are good at (see below ). Remember that I am not addressing here those trainers who specialise in elite level sports, or those who undertake strength and conditioning work with the kinds of clients who would be expected already to have reasonable athletes (with very good baselines of strength and co-ordination). Rather, my concern is with general personal trainers who are running their businesses in gyms across the world specifically they need more of the following skills in order to manage injuries: •

Greater competence and confidence in screening a client’s injury into “low injury risk” or “high injury risk” profiles (through specific questions and tests) for the purpose of knowing the priority and direction of referral.

Greater knowledge of functional anatomy, injury/pain behaviour, and how patho-mechanics and bad technique create injury. All clinical therapists, from physiotherapists to Alexander technicians, chiropractors, massage therapists and osteopaths, must have some understanding of patho-mechanics, in order to re-educate and retrain clients successfully for long-term recovery. But what about the trainers on the front line? They, as much as any on the allied health spectrum, need a good grounding in how to pick up the often subtle indicators of poor muscle control.

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Enhanced analytical skills to detect poor or pathological movement patterns. While some trainers have a vague sense of this skill, the vast majority hardly even understand the concept, reflecting primarily the priorities of the institutions that educated them. Yet this is the critical observational skill-set, which will ensure that a personal trainer isn’t training their client towards an injury. Without it, they cannot meaningfully contribute to the rehabilitative process of any overuse injury.

New training principles that are safe and effective in the context of injury. These would emphasise quality of movement for an injured body part as well as performance enhancement.

How to use these principles (with support from a physiotherapist) to design customised rehab strategies and exercises using equipment readily available in the gym.

Setting clear boundaries It is also paramount that trainers clearly understand the limits of their role and professional abilities. Their credibility and their clients’ wellbeing depend on it. This is crucial to my belief in the upskilling of trainers. Personal trainers need to know confidently which injuries to refer on(call them “high risk profile” if you like), namely those that should be primarily managed by a physio or other allied health professionals. The rest can be termed “low risk profile” injuries, and while often needing some referral and allied health support, would be primarily managed by the trainer through to an optimal state. My views are pretty clear on this: unless a personal trainer has achieved certain higher levels of Chek certification, or done other postgraduate courses that qualify them to do so (and these need to be scrutinised very carefully), they should not be dabbling at all in “diagnostics” or tonic/postural muscle activation for injured body parts. Any seasoned clinician will appreciate the depth of knowledge and experience that a physiotherapist must acquire to be successful in diagnosing a labral tear or re-educating a dysfunctional transversus abdominis muscle. So these skills should remain the sole domain of the physiotherapist (as well as the litany of treatment modalities useful in promoting healing around a pathological structure).

I THREATS For trainers, the problem of injury is not just about improving their own education and their clients’ standard of service; it runs a lot deeper.: In the short term, the biggest concern is the alarmingly high rate of fallout of trainers from the industry. In the Australian context, two leading industry professionals have confirmed for me the same drop-out figure of about 60% within the first 18 months of qualification. Remarkably, this is occurring at a time when demand for personal trainers is hugely outstripping supply, and even relatively inexperienced trainers can make a good living from the job. We need research into why these drop-out rates are so high, but there is every possibility that a few too many injured clients not showing up for training gradually takes its toll. In the medium term, litigation is on the increase. It is not hard to see how a personal trainer who is careless or unaware can suddenly find themselves having to consult a lawyer for defence against an injured client. Yet there is no doubt that much training work still focuses on pushing through “the pain barrier” to get results. Few trainers would be able to mount a credible defence using that approach these days. Moreover, the wider health profession will never contemplate making formal referrals or treating as partners an industry that cannot defend its basic professional competence against legal challenge.

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In the long term the worst case scenario is that the very viability of the personal training industry may be at stake. Gyms and trainers are riding a great wave of public approval and enthusiasm in Australia at the moment, as people chase lifestyle and health improvements. But a spate of high-profile injuries could very quickly shift the public mood. A backlash would inevitably cause a drop off in client numbers for personal trainers and leave a wonderful industry struggling to recover from mass public scepticism. So, here is where the Rehab Trainer attempts to fill this knowledge gap. The 4-day Essentials and follow-up 2-day Masterclass are designed to create a new skill-set that bridges the gap for all Exercise Professionals.

This article has been written and provided by Ulrik Larsen, on behalf of RehabTrainer. Rehab Trainer is the leading provider of short courses especially designed by elite Sports Physiotherapists to meet the needs of Personal Trainers and Exercise Professionals. Reducing injury frustration for clients and trainers is the number one goal of Rehab Trainer. Using interactive technology, practical gym tools, and cutting edge techniques, you will learn how to recognise and understand your client’s pain, and know exactly what to do about it.

Can you afford not to increase your confidence and competence in dealing with client injury? 98% of Rehab Trainer Graduates have reported an increase in client retention since completing the course. 15 CEC’s in your capital city

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Health and Nutrition Tips That Are Actually Evidence-Based There is a lot of confusion when it comes to health and nutrition. People, even qualified experts, often seem to have the exact opposite opinions. However, despite all the disagreements, there are a few things that are well supported by research. Here are some health and nutrition tips that are actually based on good science.

NUTRITION

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1. Don’t Drink Sugar Calories Sugary drinks are the most fattening things you can put into your body. This is because liquid sugar calories don't get registered by the brain in the same way as calories from solid foods. For this reason, when you drink soda, you end up eating more total calories. Sugary drinks are strongly associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and all sorts of health problems. Keep in mind that fruit juices are almost as bad as soda in this regard. They contain just as much sugar, and the small amounts of antioxidants do NOT negate the harmful effects of the sugar.

2. Eat Nuts Despite being high in fat, nuts are incredibly nutritious and healthy. They are loaded with magnesium, vitamin E, fibre and various other nutrients. Studies show that nuts can help you lose weight, and may help fight type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Additionally, about 10-15% of the calories in nuts aren't even absorbed into the body, and some evidence suggests that they can boost metabolism. In one study, almonds were shown to increase weight loss by 62% compared to complex carbohydrates.

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3. Avoid Processed Junk Food (Eat Real Food Instead) All the processed junk foods in the diet are the biggest reason the world is fatter and sicker than ever before. These foods have been engineered to be "hyper-rewarding," so they trick our brains into eating more than we need, even leading to addiction in some people. They are also low in fibre, protein and micronutrients (empty calories), but high in unhealthy ingredients like added sugar and refined grains.

4. Don't Fear Coffee Coffee has been unfairly demonised. The truth is that it's actually very healthy. Coffee is high in antioxidants, and studies show that coffee drinkers live longer, and have a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's and numerous other diseases.

5. Eat Fatty Fish Pretty much everyone agrees that fish is healthy. This is particularly true of fatty fish, like salmon, which is loaded with omega-3 fatty acids and various other nutrients. Studies show that people who eat the most fish have a lower risk of all sorts of diseases, including heart disease, dementia and depression

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6. Get Enough Sleep The importance of getting enough quality sleep can not be overstated. It may be just as important as diet and exercise, if not more. Poor sleep can drive insulin resistance, throw your appetite hormones out of whack and reduce your physical and mental performance. What's more, it is one of the strongest individual risk factors for future weight gain and obesity. One study showed that short sleep was linked to 89% increased risk of obesity in children, and 55% in adults.

7. Take Care of Your Gut Health With Probiotics and Fibre The bacteria in your gut, collectively called the gut microbiota, are sometimes referred to as the "forgotten organ." These gut bugs are incredibly important for all sorts of healthrelated aspects. A disruption in the gut bacteria is linked to some of the world's most serious chronic diseases, including obesity. A good way to improve gut health, is to eat probiotic foods (like live yogurt and sauerkraut), take probiotic supplements, and eat plenty of fibre. Fibre functions as fuel for the gut bacteria.

8. Drink Water, Before Meals Drinking enough water can have numerous benefits. One important factor, is that it can help boost the amount of calories you burn. According to 2 studies, it can boost metabolism by 24-30% over a period of 1-1.5 hours. This can amount to 96 additional calories burned if you drink 2 litres (67 oz) of water per day. The best time to drink water is half an hour before meals.

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9. Don’t Overcook or Burn Your Meat Meat can be a nutritious and healthy part of the diet. It is very high in protein, and contains various important nutrients. The problems occur when meat is overcooked and burnt. This can lead to the formation of harmful compounds that raise the risk of cancer. So, eat your meat, just don't overcook or burn it.

10. Avoid Bright Lights Before Sleep When we're exposed to bright lights in the evening, this disrupts production of the sleep hormone melatonin. An interesting "hack" is to use a pair of amber-tinted glasses that block blue light from entering your eyes in the evening. This allows melatonin to be produced as if it were completely dark, helping you sleep better.

11. Take Vitamin D3 If You Don't Get Much Sun Back in the day, most people got their vitamin D from the sun. The problem is that most people don't get much sun these days. They either live where there is no sun, or they stay inside most of the day or use sunscreen when they go out. According to data from 2005-2006, about 41.6% of the US population is deficient in this critical vitamin. If adequate sun exposure is not an option for you, then supplementing with vitamin D has been shown to have numerous benefits for health. This includes improved bone health, increased strength, reduced symptoms of depression and a lower risk of cancer, to name a few. Vitamin D may also help you live longer.

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12. Eat Vegetables and Fruits Vegetables and fruits are the "default" health foods, and for good reason. They are loaded with prebiotic fibre, vitamins, minerals and all sorts of antioxidants, some of which have potent biological effects. Studies show that people who eat the most vegetables and fruits live longer, and have a lower risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and all sorts of diseases.

13. Make Sure to Eat Enough Protein Eating enough protein is incredibly important, and many experts believe that the recommended daily intake is too low. Protein is particularly important for weight loss, and works via several different mechanisms. A high protein intake can boost metabolism significantly, while making you feel so full that you automatically eat fewer calories. It can also cut cravings and reduce the desire for late-night snacking. Eating plenty of protein has also been shown to lower blood sugar and blood pressure levels.

14. Do Some Cardio, or Just Walk More Doing aerobic exercise (or cardio) is one of the best things you can do for your mental and physical health. It is particularly effective at reducing belly fat, the harmful type of fat that builds up around your organs. Reduced belly fat should lead to major improvements in metabolic health.

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WHAT IS IMMACULATE DISSECTION? Immaculate Dissection was developed to help enhance your understanding of gross anatomy, as it applies to clinical application with palpation and corrective exercise. Many anatomy courses teach the anatomy without carrying it over into how it clinically applies to the student. In this course, we will direct a discussion of basic bony landmarks, give detailed descriptions of functional anatomy of the intrinsic and extrinsic abdominal core musculature, and lead you through guided palpation of abdominal core musculature. We aspire to help solidify anatomy knowledge by learning the structural anatomy, through visualisation and through feel. Using body painting, the anatomy is visualised on a live model, so palpation is also more solidified. Corrective exercises focusing on the anatomy are then described in detail, demonstrated, and perfected. In addition we will have discussions of “clinical pearls� of the functional anatomy of the core and guide you through proper cues for corrective exercises, associated with the abdominal core musculature.

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CLOSING Well there you have it, another issue of OPS CORE magazine.

with the most changes, with our New Studio Upgrades.

Our new studios are now complete, and if you are an OPS trainer, we hope that you will be able to take advantage of what the new studio facilities have to offer, to enhance you and your clients training experience. If you’re not currently using our studios, for your training business, but are thinking of renting space here at Optimum Performance Studio, please call us at 2868 5170 and we would be happy to assist you.

Optimum Performance Studio is the Premier Education and Functional Training Studio in Asia, bringing you the best education from around the globe.

Please take a moment to check out the new OPS Small Group Training Schedule as it has had a complete overhaul and we really feel that it is something worth talking about.

Till next time,

2017 will surely go down as one of the busiest years we have had education wise, as well as a year

Wayne

We pride ourselves on staying ahead of the curve, by sourcing and expanding our repertoire of education programs, and providers, so that YOU, the Personal Trainer, can make your mark and stand out from the crowd.

Thanks for reading. Yours in Fitness Education & Training.

MAR - APR - MAY 2018


OPS ‘Train the way you play’ OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE STUDIO 1st - 2nd FLOOR, WORLD TRUST TOWER 50 STANLEY STREET CENTRAL HK +852 2868 5170 info@opstudiohk.com www.opstudiohk.com

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OPS CORE MAGAZINE SPRING 2018  

The newest edition of the OPS CORE MAGAZINE, Spring 2018. Filled with education and product information, along with informative articles and...

OPS CORE MAGAZINE SPRING 2018  

The newest edition of the OPS CORE MAGAZINE, Spring 2018. Filled with education and product information, along with informative articles and...

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