Cherryville Eagle 3-24-21

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We the People

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Volume 115 • Issue 12

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Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Doran is one of five finalists for “Principal of the Year” by MICHAEL E. POWELL Editor michael@cfmedia.info

At left is Monica Canipe, of the Adult Nutrition Program of Gaston County, and the Award Recipient. On the right is Linda Slade, President of the United Way of Gaston County, who is presenting her with her award. (photo provided)

Canipe receives Governor’s Volunteer Service Award Monica Canipe honored for outstanding work and 15 years of loyal volunteer service by MICHAEL E. POWELL Editor michael@cfmedia.info

At Tuesday night’s, March 9, Adult Nutrition Program’s Board of Commissioner’s meeting, Ms. Monica Canipe of the Adult Nutrition Program of Gaston County was presented the 2020 Governor’s Volunteer Service Award. The Award was presented to her by Linda Slade, President of the United Way of Gaston County. The award was for her outstanding work and for her 15 years of loyal volunteer

service. Canipe, of Cherryville, volunteers with the Cherryville Meal Site, on top of working with Allen Family Living Services. Amanda Dawson, volunteer supervisor at the Adult Nutrition Program, nominated Canipe for going above and beyond the duties that one would normally expect from a volunteer. In a media release, Dawson said, “During her time as acting site monitor, she effectively coordinates volunteers delivering for that week, ensures timeliness in executing programs for our congregate meal participants, calls in accurate meal orders, and maintains an immaculately clean meal site.” Connie McDermid, site supervisor for the Cherryville Meals on Wheels, said of Ms. Canipe, “For the people that she serves, she has become

a member of the family. Her passion to ensure nutrition, safety, and spreading compassion is evident in her commitment to volunteering.” Cherryville’s Meals on Wheels is located at 201 S. Dixie St., in the community building at the Cherry Manor Apartments. McDermid said the group continues to do their home deliveries and the group picks up their week’s worth of frozen meals on Mondays. “The group homes and certain volunteers chose to stop volunteering for the safety of their clients. Monica is a one-on-one worker for a disabled adult,” she noted. Canipe said she got involved in working with Cherryville’s Adult Nutrition Program because the individual she works with “…was already a Meals on Wheels volunteer and that is how I See CANIPE, Page 9

Guthrie receives lifetime achievement award Gaston County Board of Education member Dot Guthrie is the recipient of the prestigious Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement that is presented by the American Library Association (ALA). A veteran educator with more than 40 years of dedicated service as a teacher, school librarian, central office administrator, and Board of Education member, Guthrie is “the epitome of an educational leader who goes beyond the call of duty to do what is best for children,” according to Superintendent of Schools W. Jeffrey Booker, who wrote a recommendation letter in support of Guthrie’s award nomination. Long before becoming

MRS. DOT GUTHRIE the Gastonia Township representative on the Board of Education, Guthrie worked for Gaston County Schools for more than 30 years. She served as the district’s library/media services director and was named the Media Coordinator of the Year for three consecutive years. After retiring from Gaston County, she served as a librarian in the neighboring Clover, South Carolina school district.

Well-known and respected in the community, Guthrie wrote the book, “Integrating African-American Literature in the Library and Classroom,” and coordinated the first Gaston County Diversity Book Fair. She has served as a leader, conference presenter, and contributor for the ALA, and two years ago, she was instrumental in founding the first African-American history and culture museum in Gaston County. Additionally, she is active in Tabernacle Baptist Church in Gastonia, serving as an associate minister. In 2019-2020, the North Carolina School Boards Association acknowledged Guthrie’s many contributions by presenting the School Board Member Leadership Award to her. Perhaps most of all, Guthrie is known for her love of books, reading, and See GUTHRIE, Page 9

Like many in his profession, CHS Principal Kevin Doran doesn’t go around seeking the spotlight or trying intentionally to be in the public eye. However, being nominated as one of five finalists for Gaston County Principal of the Year 2021-2022 is quite an honor, and Doran is no exception when he admits he is pleased to have been nominated. As he said via email, “I am honored to be a finalist, but there are other, much more deserving candidates. I just appreciate my peers putting me in the conversation.” In addition to Mr. Doran, the other four nominees are Jill Payne, Hawks Nest STEAM Academy; Loretta Reed, Woodhill Elementary School; Torben Ross, Robin-

KEVIN DORAN CHS Principal son Elementary School; and Tyler West, Pinewood Elementary School. According to the Gaston County Schools’ web site, the winner “…will be revealed this spring during our 'Evening of Excellence’ program, which is being sponsored this year by Truist Bank.” Doran, who is from Pittsburgh, PA, graduated from Mt. Lebanon High School in

1994, and is a 1999 Marshall University graduate (Education degree). “I graduated from Gardner Webb in 2009 with a Masters in Educational Leadership.” Kevin said he moved to Gaston County in 1999, “… right out of college to get out of the cold weather and stayed because of the community and meeting my wife. I have two daughters, Riley 10, and Ryan, 6.” He said, “I started at Cramerton Middle School in the 1999-2000 school year,” and taught Math at Cramerton Middle School (GCS system). He then taught Science at Northeast Middle School (CMS system), became the Assistant Principal at Forestview High School (GCS system), then came to Cherryville High School (GCS system) as the Principal. Said Mr. Doran, “When See DORAN, Page 2

2021 Cherry Blossom Festival cancelled by MICHAEL E. POWELL Editor michael@cfmedia.info

According to a March 19, media release, Cherryville Chamber of Commerce Vice-President Mary Beth Tackett said that in order to comply with COVID-19 restrictions still in effect by the state of North Carolina, the Cherryville Events officials have made the decision to cancel Cherryville’s 2021 Cherry Blossom Festival, which was originally scheduled for April 16, through the 17. Said Mrs. Tackett in the

release, “The State of North Carolina still has restrictions in place to help slow the spread of the coronavirus, which includes limiting outdoor gatherings to only 50 people. This restriction stays in effect until March 31, 2021. She continued, “Our Cherry Blossom Festival was set to take place just three weeks after that marker on April 16, and 17, leaving us with insufficient time to plan this event if the above-mentioned restrictions were to be lifted. We felt we had to make a decision at this time that is

in line with the guidelines in place. We apologize for any inconvenience.” The Cherry Blossom Festival is a product of the Cherryville Main Street Program, which is a part of the City of Cherryville, and the Cherryville Chamber of Commerce. Tackett noted that all vendor fees will be transferred to next year’s festival or to a rescheduled festival later this year. “This will be of the vendors’ choice, unless other directions are made,” she added.

Puzzling numbers on who received Group 1 vaccines in North Carolina Nearly 600,000 vaccine doses beyond the original estimate for health care worker vaccinations were administered to individuals who identified as Group 1 by LAURA LEE Carolina Public Press

When the COVID-19 vaccines entered the last stages of development, North Carolina officials submitted a vaccine plan to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention outlining their intention to give the first available doses to a population hit hard

Vaccine vials to be administered at the FEMA-supported mass vaccination at the Four Seasons Town Centre in Greensboro. (photo by Clare Grant/Carolina Public Press) by the pandemic: health care workers with in-person patient contact.

The plan estimated this top-priority group would be about 102,000 to 117,000 individuals who would choose to be vaccinated, and an additional 180,00 to 220,000 non-frontline health care workers would be vaccinated. But data obtained from the state Department of Health and Human Services shows that, as of Feb. 24, more than 930,000 North Carolinians received first doses of COVID19 vaccines as part of Group 1, nearly triple even the highest original estimates of first doses needed for state’s health care workers, raising See VACCINES, Page 5

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