Page 1

The Constitution Ben Emrich Winter 2010


Table of Contents DEMOGRAPHICS    

District………………….………..1 Community……………………….3 School ………………….………..4 Classroom………………….…......5

STANDARDS  Unit plan overview………………..8  Standards……………….………9  Overall unit goal……………...…12  Unit objectives…………….……13 STRATEGIES  Outline of work sample lessons…..17  Integration of related content…….18  Assessment matrix……………...19  Assessment data……………….20 RESOURCES  Resources list…………………..22 LESSONS  Lesson plans……………………23 FINAL NARRATIVE  Final Narrative…………………..62 APPENDIX 

Handouts, pre/post-test, parental communications………...64


THE CONSTITUTION 8th Grade Social Studies

1-5-2010 to 1-21-2010 Ben Emrich Concordia University 3-3-2010 Fall 2009

ML Social Studies

_____________________

DEMOGRAPHICS

___________________


DISTRICT Beaumont Middle School is located in the Portland Public School District. With over 46,000 students, 3,000 teachers, and 85 schools it makes up the largest school district in the Pacific Northwest. (Portland Public Schools, 2010)

SOCIO-ECONOMIC The median income in the Portland Public School district in 2000 was $52,337, (Teacher Portal, 2010) this compares favorably to the median income of the city of Portland which was $40,146. (U.S. Census Bureau , 2010) While the income of the district remains above the state norm there are still 45% of students in the district eligible for free or reduced priced meals (Oregon Department of Education, 2009) and 3.8% of the students are homeless. (Ingram, 2009)

DIVERSITY Portland Public Schools are more diverse than the greater Portland area and the state at large: 54% of students are white, 15% Hispanic, 14% African American, 10% Asian, and 6% multiple race or other. Students in the district come from homes where 72 different languages are spoken. 10% of the students are enrolled in ESL programs. (Portland Public Schools, 2010)


100 90 80 Percentage

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

District

Community

City

State

African American

14

4

7

2

Asian

10

4

6

3

Hispanic

15

2

7

8

Multiple/Other

6

2

2

1

White

54

88

78

87

MOBILITY Portland Public Schools allow for some mobility within the district. A transfer program allows students to apply to attend different schools throughout the district. The amount of students allowed to transfer to each school is varied depending on the individual school but all are done through a lottery system.

TEACHERS There are 2,541 teachers in the Portland Public School district. They have taught for an average of 13.8 years, 67% have a masters degree or higher, and 94.9% are considered highly qualified. There are 487 full time educational assistants to help with the 15.9% of students that are in special education programs. For the 2008-2009 school year the district did not meet the federal adequate yearly progress rating. 7 (7.7%) of the schools were identified for needing school improvement and 3 (3.3%) schools were identified for corrective action or restructuring. This does not compare well against the state as a whole where 4.3% of school were identified for school improvement and 1.3% were identified for corrective action or restructuring. (Oregon Department of Education, 2009)

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS The largest major development that may impact the students came in January when voters approved measures 66 and 67, two measures that will keep the level of funding at schools in Oregon stable. While not increasing budgets these bills have stopped the fear that teachers would again be asked to work for free or face early school closures and more firings. This will not fix the funding problems that Portland Public Schools face but it will at least stop the current bleeding.


COMMUNITY The Beaumont neighborhood runs from 33rd to 47th street in Ne. Portland. It runs along Alberta to the north and Vistaria to the south. It comprises of an area of 1.046 miles and has a population of 5,309 people. (Urban Mapping, 2010)

SOCIO-ECONOMIC Beaumont is a majority upper class neighborhood with a median household income of $83,242 and a median home price of $405,000 (Marthens, 2009) this is well above the Portland area as a whole with a median income of $50,979 and a median home value of $310,900. (Urban Mapping, 2010) The average rent is $996 compared to $695 in the metro area. Currently 4.4% of the population lives below the poverty level compared to 14.4% in the metro area as 500,000 a whole. 97% of the homes in the area are occupied and 87% of 400,000 the homes are owned by the occupants. (Urban Mapping, 2010) 300,000

HOUSEHOLDS

200,000 100,000 0

Median Median Beaumont is an area where families are beginning to Income Home grow. The average household size is 2.36, which is nearly Price identical to the 2.3% average of Portland. 22% of the residents are families with children, 29% are families without children, 9% are female households without a male, 3% are male households without a female, 11% are non-family members living together, and 26% are one person households. (Urban Mapping, 2010)

There is a strong sense of community in the Beaumont neighborhood with frequent meetings of the neighborhood association and a high level of civic involvement. In early August of each year, Beaumont Village hosts the "Fremont Fest", which includes live music, artists and craftspeople, sidewalk sales, face painting, horse and carriage rides, and a children's parade. (PortlandNeighborhood.com, 2009) There are seven parks within one mile in any direction from the center of the neighborhood.

ETHNICITY The diversity of the area is slightly less than that of the state in general and the city and much less diverse than the district as a whole. 88% of residents are white, 4.3% are African American, 3.5% are Asian, 2.3% are Hispanic, and 1.5% are multiple or other. (Urban Mapping, 2010)

Beaumont Portland


EDUCATION 80% of the adults living in the Beaumont neighborhood have completed a level of education above high school, 50% have a bachelor’s degree or higher, and 16% have a Graduate or professional degree. In the city of Portland as a whole 85% have completed high school or a higher level of education, 33% have their bachelor’s degree or higher, and 11% have a graduate or professional degree. (Urban Mapping, 2010)

Graduate or Professional

Portland

Bachelors or above

Beaumont Above High School 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%

SCHOOL The motto of Beaumont Middle school is AASABE, which stands for Academic Achievement for every student, Situationally Appropriate Behavior for Everyone. Beaumont Middle School is located at 4043 Ne Fremont in Portland, Oregon. There are currently 458 students in attendance. Due to recent district changes Alameda is the only feeder school to Beaumont. There are only 165 students from the neighborhood attending Beaumont which leaves 293 students coming from outside the schools boundaries. The attendance has been slowly shrinking through the years from 2004-2008 the attendance has dipped by 84 students; a decrease of 15% of the total student body. (Portland Public Schools, 2010) Beaumont is more diverse than the community around it, the city, and the state. 28% of students are African American, 6% Asian, 6% Hispanic, 56% White, and 4% are multiple or other. (Oregon Department of 100 Education, 2009) 90 Percentage

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

District

Communi ty

City

State

African American

14

4

7

2

Asian

10

4

6

3

Hispanic

15

2

7

8

Multiple/Other

6

2

2

1

White

54

88

78

87


SPECIAL NEEDS English is the primary language spoken at Beaumont with only 0.4% of students classified as English language learners. 12% of students are in special education programs and 20% are in TAG programs. (Portland Public Schools, 2010)

SOCIO ECONOMIC STATUS The students at the school have a lower socio economic level than the surrounding area would suggest. Beaumont receives title one funds. 164 (33% of the students) receive free lunch, 53 (11%) receive reduced lunch, and 217 (43%) receive low cost lunch. Although the 35% of students that receive free or reduced meals shows a lower status than the surrounding neighborhood would suggest, it is still less than the 45% of students in the district that receive the same. (Portland Public Schools, 2010)

TEACHERS 99.2% of teachers at Beaumont are classified as highly qualified compared with 94.9% in the district, 73.5% have a master’s degree or higher compared with 67% in the district, and the average years of experience is 13.7 which matches evenly with 13.8 in the district. In the most recent school report card Beaumont received an overall rating of outstanding one and met the federal yearly progress ratings. (Oregon Department of Education, 2009) The student to teacher ratio at Beaumont is 19-1 which is slightly higher than the district average of 18-1.

EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITES: Beaumont participates in the SUN program which provides a wide variety of before and after school activities these include band, volleyball, basketball, dodge ball, science club, Tae Kwon Do, hip hop dancing, badminton, cheerleading, garage band, chess, debate teams, movie making, robotics, international club and a fashion design club. Beaumont also has a before school ping pong area and a variety of study groups. (Portland Public Schools, 2010)

CLASSROOM


Mrs. Parrott’s classroom is located on the west side of the main building. The west wall of the room consists mainly of windows that look over the baseball fields.

SOCIO ECONOMIC STATUS The socio-economic status of the class is reflective of the district rather than the community. The students come from a variety of backgrounds ranging from well to do to lower income. One student had spent a short amount of time living out of the family car with his family the previous year.

DIVERSITY The ethnic background of the students is in line with the surrounding community. Out of 27 students 20 were white and seven were African American. English is the primary language of every student in the class. 18 of the students are male and nine are female. There are 27 students and two educational assistants, this fairs favorably with the school average of 19-1 and the district average of 18-1.

SPECIAL NEEDS There was one student in the classroom with Downs Syndrome, one student with autism, and two students with communicative disorder. No students were in the TAG program although many were encouraged to join. English is the first language of every student in the class.

CLASSROOM ROUTINES Every Monday the students completed their weekly planners with work that would be due during the week. After completing their planners the students are given “Parrott stamps” which they turn in at the end of the week for a weekly drawing in which the winner receives extra lunch time or extra credit. The students are also given 3 Parrott stamps on papers for every A they receive or 2 for every B. Most of the days the students would write in the social studies spirals the answer to a daily question. Every Thursday the students are given printouts that show their work for the quarter and what is missing. The students are given points for returning the print out the next day signed by the parents. Every Friday Mrs. Parrott calls the parents of students with missing work.

CLASSROOM MATERIALS The classroom library is well stocked thanks to Mrs. Parrotts efforts in procuring donations from parents and bringing in personal books. The library fills the north wall. The class is stocked with a document scanner, a projection screen, and a laptop. There are two laptops for special needs students as well. There is password protected internet access for the classroom.


The laptop is connected to the projector so it is used as the DVD player; it is connected to a set of speakers that are more than ample to provide sound for the classroom. There is a printer that was out of ink during my entire stay but the laptop is connected to the libraries computer which is only 3 doors down. Mrs. Parrott has a key to the library for the days that the librarian is not at the school. There is no classroom blog or web page but every Wednesday Mrs. Parrott sends out an email to the parents explaining what will be done during the upcoming week and what we just did in class the previous week.

CLASSROOM DISCIPLINE Mrs. Parrott refers to her disciplinary style as “firm but fair�. Students are first talked to, and then kept in for lunch, then given a time out in another room, then a referral. At the level of time out and above the students are given a phone call home. For the most part the students are well behaved with a few exceptions. Most of the days there were three students that would come in before class for extra help and to visit, this was often the case during lunch as well.

FACILITY Beaumont Middle School was built in 1926 and has the feel of a school built in that era with a more classic floor plan. The classrooms all have many windows that allow a lot of natural light and the library has an open feel. The main building is shaped like a squared W with two floors. The office is located on the bottom floor and sits in the middle line of the W. The bottom floor makes up the lower grade classrooms and the science and math labs as well as the gymnasium. The upper floor makes up the sixth through eighth grade classrooms with the library placed on top of the office as a loft. The facilities are generally well kept up but have problems that come up from time to time. This was evidenced on my first day teaching when school was called off halfway through the day due to the heating system not working. Connected to the south side of the building is a gymnasium that is used as a cafeteria and assembly spot. This building is also used to host conferences, the science fair, and a pre-school meeting area for the students. The facility is representative in the community in that it is kept clean and the style of building fits in very well with the surrounding area.


Bibliography Ingram, A. (2009, Sept. 18). News and Culture. Retrieved Feb. 2, 2010, from Willamette Week: http://blogs.wweek.com/news/2009/09/18/oregon-schools-see-spike-in-homeless-students/ Marthens, S. (2009). Guide to the Beaumont-Wilshire Neighborhood. Retrieved Feb 2, 2010, from Moving to Portland: http://www.movingtoportland.net/living_beaumontwilshire.htm Oregon Department of Education. (2009). 2008-2009 District Report Card. Salem: Oregon Department of Education. Oregon Department of Education. (2009). 2008-2009 State School Report Card. Salem: Oregon Department of Education. Portland Public Schools. (2010). About Portland Public Schools. Retrieved Feb. 2, 2010, from Portland Public Schools: http://www.pps.k12.or.us/about-us/index.htm Portland Public Schools. (2010, Feb 9). Beaumont. Retrieved Feb 11, 2010, from Portland Public Schools: http://www.pps.k12.or.us/schools-c/profiles/enrollment/enroll_out.php?rpt=381 Portland Public Schools. (2010). Beaumont-About Us. Retrieved Feb. 11, 2010, from Portland Public Schools: http://www.pps.k12.or.us/schools-c/profiles/?id=235 PortlandNeighborhood.com. (2009). Beaumont Wilshire Neighborhood Guide. Retrieved Feb. 2, 2010, from Portland Neighborhood: http://www.portlandneighborhood.com/beaumontwilshire.html Teacher Portal. (2010). Teaching in Portland Public Schools Sd 1 J. Retrieved Feb. 2, 2010, from Teacher Portal: http://teacherportal.com/district/oregon/portland-public-schools-sd-1j U.S. Census Bureau . (2010). State and County Quick facts. Retrieved Feb. 2, 2010, from U.S. Census Bureau: http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/41/4159000.html Urban Mapping. (2010). Beaumont (Wilshire) neighborhood in Portland, Oregon (OR), 97211, 97212, 97213, 97218 detailed profile. Retrieved Feb. 2, 2010, from City-Data: http://www.citydata.com/neighborhood/Beaumont-Portland-OR.html Urban Mapping. (2010). Portland, Oregon. Retrieved Feb. 2, 2010, from City Data: http://www.citydata.com/city/Portland-Oregon.html


Unit Plan Overview

CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich School Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML


CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle School Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML

_______________________________________CONTENT STANDARDS

NATIONAL NSS-C.5-8.3 PRINCIPLES OF DEMOCRACY -How are power and responsibility distributed, shared, and limited in the government established by the United States Constitution? -What does the national government do? -What is the place of law in the American constitutional system? NSS-C.5-8.2 FOUNDATIONS OF THE POLITICAL SYSTEM What are the Foundations of the American Political System? -What is the American idea of constitutional government? -What are the distinctive characteristics of American society? -What is American political culture? -What values and principles are basic to American constitutional democracy Standard 2B The student understands the economic issues arising out of the Revolution. Analyze the factors that led to Shay's Rebellion. [Analyze multiple causation] Standard 2A The student understands revolutionary government-making at national and state levels. Therefore, the student is able to Analyze the arguments over the Articles of Confederation. [Examine the influence of ideas]


STATE CCG: Historical Skills: Analyze cause and effect relationships, including multiple causalities. SS.08.HS.02 Distinguish between cause and effect relationships and events that happen or occur concurrently or sequentially. CCG: U.S. History: Understand and interpret events, issues, and developments within and across eras of U.S. history. SS.08.HS.06 Understand how individuals, issues, and events changed or significantly influenced the course of U.S. history post-American Revolution through 1900. CCG: Decoding and Word Recognition: Analyze words, recognize words, and learn to read grade-level text fluently across the subject areas. EL.08.RE.01 Read or demonstrate progress toward reading at an independent and instructional reading level appropriate to grade level. CCG: Informational Text: Demonstrate General Understanding: Demonstrate general understanding of grade-level informational text across the subject areas. EL.08.RE.17 Identify and/or summarize sequence of events, main ideas, facts, supporting details, and opinions in informational and practical selections. EL.08.RE.18 Clarify understanding of informational texts by creating detailed outlines, graphic organizers, diagrams, logical notes, or summaries. CCG: Read to Perform a Task: Find, understand, and use specific information in a variety of texts across the subject areas to perform a task. EL.08.RE.14 Read textbooks; biographical sketches; letters; diaries; directions; procedures; magazines; essays; primary source historical documents; editorials; news stories; periodicals; bus routes; catalogs; technical directions; consumer, workplace, and public documents. CCG: Define and clarify an issue so that its dimensions are well understood. SS.08.SA.01 Clarify key aspects of an event, issue, or problem through inquiry and research. CCG: Understand the roles of the three branches of government and explain how their powers are distributed and shared. SS.08.CG.03 Understand the powers of each branch of government as stated in the Constitution.


SS.08.CG.03.01 Understand the basic idea of checks and balances of each branch of the federal government. SS.08.CG.03.02 Identify the legislative, executive, and judicial institutions at each level of government. CCG: Understand the origins, purposes, and functions of U.S. government, including the structure and meaning of the U.S. Constitution. SS.08.CG.01 Understand the purposes of government as stated in the Constitution and the specific provisions that limit the power of government in order to protect the rights of individuals. SS.08.CG.01.01 Distinguish the purposes of government as stated in the Preamble. SS.08.CG.01.02 Understand how the power of government is limited in the United States. CCG: Speaking: Communicate supported ideas across the subject areas using oral, visual, and multimedia forms in ways appropriate to topic, context, audience, and purpose ; organize oral, visual, and multimedia presentations in clear sequence, making connections and transitions among ideas and elements ; use language appropriate to topic, context, audience, and purpose ; and demonstrate control of eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, inflection, gestures, and other non-verbal techniques. *Suggested speech length: Eighth Grade, 3-6 minutes. EL.08.SL.01 Develop a focus and present information to achieve particular purposes by matching the message, vocabulary, voice modulation, expression, and tone to the audience and purpose. EL.08.SL.03 Use credible and relevant information to convey message. CCG: Acquire and organize materials from primary and secondary sources. SS.08.SA.02 Gather, interpret, use, and document information from multiple sources, distinguishing facts from opinions and recognizing points of view. SS.08.CG.01.03 Recognize the provisions of the Bill of Rights (Amendments 1-10) that protect individual rights.

DISTRICT STANDARDS Use correctly the English language conventions. Use sentence structure that enhances meaning. Achieve a balance between documented, researched information, and original ideas.


CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle School Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML

________________________________________Overall Unit Goal By the end of this unit the eighth grade students will understand why the United States formed the government in the form of a republic and what the basic building blocks of our government are. The students will also explore how the three branches of government interrelate with each other and who chooses the people to fill those branches. The students will have an appreciation of the difficulty of the task that the founders had in forming our system.


CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle School Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML

_________________________Unit Objectives or Outcomes During a class activity, the eighth grade students will act out the problem of equal representation in different sized groups. (Affective, 1) P.I. Teacher observation during class activity. During a classroom discussion, the eighth grade students will compare the experience of the class with the experience of early Americans. (Affective, 3) P.I. Teacher observation during class discussion. Given a worksheet, the eighth grade students will categorize two major problems concerning representation and the effects of these causes. (Cognitive, 4) P.I Worksheet page. During a classroom discussion, the eighth grade students will compare the experience of the class with the experience of early Americans. (Affective, 3) P.I. Teacher observation during class discussion. Given a worksheet, the eighth grade students will categorize one major problem concerning the monetary system of early America and the effect of this problem. (Cognitive, 4) P.I Worksheet page. Given an excerpt to read, the eighth grade students will list the major events of Shays’s rebellion. (Cognitive, 1) P.I. completed workbook page After a class discussion and a short reading, the eighth grade students will develop an opinion of the actions that Daniel Shays took. (Cognitive, 5) P.I 3x5 exit card After paired readings, the eighth grade students will restate the positions of the main two opposing ideas concerning slavery and the Constitution at the Constitutional Convention. (Cognitive, 2) P.I. Workbook pages. After a paired study time, the eighth grade students will discuss the reasoning leading to the 3/5ths compromise at the Constitutional Convention.


(A2) P.I. Teacher observation during classroom discussion. After a discussion and reading, the eighth grade students will formulate an opinion concerning the justness of the 3/5ths compromise. (Cognitive, 5) P.I. Opinion paragraphs filled out in workbooks. During a study period, the eighth grade students will collect information on their chosen topic concerning the constitution (Cognitive, 5) P.I. Research notes page During a library study time, the eighth grade students will cooperate to find information on their group video project (Affective, 3) P.I teacher observation After a paired reading, the eighth grade students will identify the 3 major purposes of both houses of congress. (Cognitive, 2) P.I. Workbook page After a paired reading session, the eighth grade students will appraise the purposes of each house of congress. (Cognitive, 6) P.I. Workbook page After a paired reading session, the eighth grade students will participate in a group discussion of the legislative branch (Affective, 3) P.I teacher observation during class discussion After a paired reading, the eighth grade students will identify the major purposes of the executive branch. (Cognitive, 2) P.I. Workbook page After a paired reading session, the eighth grade students will appraise the purpose of the executive branch. (Cognitive, 6) P.I. Workbook page After studying at home, the eighth grade students will examine three cabinet positions. (Cognitive, 4) P.I. Workbook page After a paired reading session, the eighth grade students will participate in a group discussion of the legislative branch (Affective, 3) P.I teacher observation during class discussion After a paired reading, the eighth grade students will identify the 3 major purposes of the judicial branch.


(Cognitive, 2) P.I. Workbook page After a paired reading session, the eighth grade students will appraise the purpose of the judicial branch. (Cognitive, 6) P.I. Workbook page After a paired reading session, the eighth grade students will participate in a group discussion of the importance of laws over people’s decisions in our government. (Affective, 3) P.I teacher observation during class discussion After paired readings and a class discussion, the eighth grade students will appraise a Supreme Court case. (Cognitive, 6) P.I. Paragraphs written in Constitution workbook. After an individual reading session, the eighth grade students will list the nine ways that the branches of government check each other’s power. (Cognitive, 1) P.I. Worksheet page After an individual reading session the students will demonstrate a knowledge of how the branches of government check each other in real world situations. (Cognitive, 3) P.I. Teacher observation during class quiz. During the study session in the library, the eighth grade students will cooperate to find information on a specifically assigned section of the Constitution. (Affective -3) P.I Teacher observation of cooperative behavior. Given an assigned section of the Constitution, the eighth grade students will compose a short video on the assigned topic. (Cognitive -5) P.I. A short video due at the end of the unit During the practice session, the eighth grade students will practice their sections of a classroom documentary. (Affective -6) P.I Teacher observation of student dress rehearsals. Given an assigned section of the Constitution, the eighth grade students will compose a short video. (Cognitive -5) P.I. A short video due at the end of the unit. During a class trivia game, the eighth grade students will demonstrate an understanding of the key points to the constitution. (Cognitive, 3) P.I. Teacher observation during class trivia game.


CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle School Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML

______________________Outline of Work Sample Lessons

Lesson number/Title 1. Articles of ConfederationVideo. 2. Articles of ConfederationShays. 3. The 3/5ths compromise. 4. Video work day. 5. Legislative branch. 6. Executive branch. 7. Judicial branch. 8. Checks and balances 4. Video work day. 10. Video dress rehearsals. 11. Unit review.

Key Concepts/Topics

Key Teaching strategies

Problems with the Articles/Representation. Video introduction. Shays Rebellion, problems with the money system. The three fifths compromise, Video outline. Research for assigned group topics. The functions of the legislative branch of government. The functions of the executive branch of government. The functions of the judicial branch of government. How each branch of government relates with the other. Research for assigned group topics. Practicing video filming.

Classroom simulation.

Reviewing the unit in preparation for the final test.

Student activity.

Classroom simulation, group work. Group work, technology (video). Student research and art projects. Paired readings, discussion. Paired readings, group discussion, and video modeling. Individual readings, group discussion, and video modeling. Handout and group discussion. Student research and art projects. Art project.

______________________________Integration of Related Content We will be paying attention to root words and how to understand the meanings of new words through context and clues from previously known roots. To achieve this there will be key words in lessons 1, 2, 5, 6, and 7 which will be explored together in the classroom. In lesson 3 we will be practicing complex sentences.


CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle School Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML

_____________________________Resources, Materials, and Equipment Hart, D., & Alavosus, L. (2005). History Alive: The United States through industrialism. Boston: Twayne Publishers. Hooper, T. (Director). (2008). John Adams [Motion Picture]. Common Craft. (2008, August 02). Explanations in plain English. Retrieved December 27, 2009, from YouTube : http://www.youtube.com/user/leelefever#p/u/7/ok_VQ8I7g6I guerillabill. (2007, September 24). The Great Dust Storms - a Ken Burns style video. Retrieved December 27, 2009, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEYb9xjAhHI Teacher made workbook from personal file Executive and Legislative videos from personal file Document Camera DVD Player Projector Whiteboard Video Camera Tripod Scissors Sharpies Coloring pens Blank papers


CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle School Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML

_________________________________Assessment Matrix Lesson # Addressed Pre-Test

Diagnostic

Formative

Summative

Test 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 Post Test

Unit Objectives All

-Teacher Observation -Worksheet -Teacher Observation -Worksheet -Teacher Observation -Worksheet -Teacher Observation -Teacher Observation -Worksheet -Teacher Observation -Worksheet -Teacher Observation -Worksheet -Teacher Observation -Worksheet Teacher Observation

Representation Shays Rebellion 3/5ths compromise Individual assigned topics Legislative Branch Executive Branch Judicial Branch Checks and Balances

Video rehearsals Review game Test

Individual assigned topics Individual assigned topics All All


CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle School Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML

___________________________________________________________Assessment Preassessme nt

Workboo k part 1

Workbook part 2

Checks and balances handout

Video

Post assessme nt

Possible points Student # 1 2

40

43

67

7

80

40

10 11

36 43

35 67

7 7

80 80

32 34

+22 +23

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

7 6 5 17 12 11 3 20 3 5 6 6 2 0 11 14 5 4 8 12 6 12 4 0

42 42 42 43 32 43 43 40 43 43 15 38 43 43 43 43 20 38 38 42 41 41 27 43

48 66 58 64 47 63 43 50 67 64 40 54 67 26 67 54 26 55 39 60 40 67 37 67

7 7

7 7 7 7 7

80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80

28 38 36 36 36 38 31 36 33 36 32 33 36 20 38 34 35 25 29 34 32 38 23 7

+21 +32 +31 +19 +24 +27 +28 +16 +30 +31 +26 +27 +34 +20 +27 +20 +30 +21 +21 +22 +26 +26 +19 +7

27 Average

7 7.6

35 38.6

50 52.6

7

80 80

30 31.8

+23 +24.2

7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

Degree of change

Anomalies noted

Communicative disorderspecialized scoring

Autistic-specialized scoring

Spent much of unit suspended

Down syndrome-specialized scoring. Final test out of 9


Data and analysis Pre/Post Test Charts

40 30 20 Pre Test 10

Post Test

0 1

3

5

7

9

11 13

15

17

19

21

23

Pre Test 25

27

40 35 30 25 20

Pre Test

15

Post Test

10 5 0 1

3

5

7

9

11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27


CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle School Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML

___________________________________________________________Assessment data and analysis In looking at the assessment data I feel confident that the large majority of students were able to pick up the content that I was hoping they would understand. On average the students in the class raised their scores from the pre to post test by 24.2 points on a test worth 40 points. I tried to incorporate a variety of techniques throughout the unit such as simulations and art projects as well as more traditional methods of group work and private study time. I found that while the students had the most fun with the projects or simulations they seemed to learn the most from watching short videos and classroom conversations. This was somewhat of a surprise to me; I was surprised that the activities were not as fruitful as I would have thought because that seemed to be the most fun for the students, I was not surprised that the videos seemed to suit the students so well because that is the world that they live in now, one where they get much of their information from the History and Discovery channels. While the projects seemed to impart less knowledge on the students I do feel as though they are still important in that they keep students interested in the topics. This is often a problem with assessments; some of what is picked up by the teacher is an intangible and can be recorded in simple statistics. As a teacher will be important to never forget this so that I do not start to only see the students’ progress only as statistics. The workbook that had been set up for the students was the main tool for measuring progress. The workbook had been set up so that there was a mixture of thinking skills present on each page: There were a few questions presenting the basic understanding of definitions of the subject, and then a few concerning connecting to our lives, and then a few more where opinions were solicited to help the students analyze the data and use critical thinking skills. Throughout the unit we showed the students their progress by being prompt in grading, doing notebook checks, and sending home weekly progress reports that needed to be signed by the parents. We were also very good at tracking down students in the halls each morning and reminding them what they needed to have done, for this reason we had very few problems with late work and everyone turned in a final project. There is also a file holder in the classroom that holds all of the students past assignments that have been turned in, this helps the students be able to review but also allows them to have a copy close by in case an error was made in recording their grades in the grade book. Hopefully this helps the students get in the habit of keeping old assignments in future grades.


The cooperating teacher I was with was very detailed in laying out a point value for every question and having very specific guidelines for what was to be done. I see the importance in this so that there is no questioning after the paper is graded and no student can complain that they are being treated unfairly. This worked for most of the unit except that during the video project I found that there were a few problems on specifics that I had laid out not needing to be met for the project to be done well or there were things I had laid out that I had misjudged. When a situation arose on the video project where certain requirements needed to be changed I alerted the class immediately, this is yet another lesson in how important flexibility and pre planning are in this profession. What I would change for the next time I would teach this unit would be the frequency in which work is handed in. For this unit there was one main workbook that was turned in once a week, in the future it would be separate sheets to be done and turned in every day or every two days. Although I did do workbook checks throughout the classes I feel that having something to grade and turn back more often would give them more of a continuous showing of where they are in the class and what they need to work on. The other thing that I would change would be the grading system for the video; this was the first time I had done a project like this so I am confident that this will improve as I gain experience. The key is specific guidelines and doing the project from start to finish at home and detailing every step before you assign it so that you know everything that can come up. One of the most interesting challenges I came across was having a students with Downs Syndrome in my class. My cooperating teacher was a specialist in teaching children with disabilities so I was able to use templates that she had developed for him. For this student we broke the unit down to the key concepts; he would be given the key words for each concept to write in his own words and a place to draw a picture to help him remember what it was. For his post-test we gave him pictures of the branches of the government, what they were called, and what their jobs were with key words in a word bank. The student got 7 out of the 9 correct for his post test.


CU Candidate: Benjamin Emrich Cooperating Teacher: Kirsten Parrott Content Endorsement Area: Social Studies Grade Level: 8th Dates Taught: 1-5-2010 to 1-22-2010

School Site: Beaumont Middle School Supervisor: Peggy Taylor Topic: The U.S. Constitution Work Sample Length: 2 Weeks Authorization Level: ML

____________________________________Final Narrative

My experiences at Beaumont Middle school were truly eye opening. Going from sitting in a classroom and studying educational theory to actually being in front of a classroom and applying that theory was quite a shock but very informative. I learned more about education teaching this unit than in the last three years of college combined. Judging by the change in pre and post test scores I feel as though my objectives for the students during this unit were met. Using a test that had a 40 point maximum I saw the scores go from an average of 7.6 on the pre-assessment to an average of 31.8 on the post assessment. Beyond the scores I saw students that became involved in classroom discussions and seemed to genuinely care about the topic and build a good foundation for understanding the way that our government works. Looking at my own teaching style I see many things that went right and many things that I need to improve on. During the unit we made a classroom documentary explaining the fundamentals of how the Constitution works, this was the shining part of the unit for me. The students seemed to really enjoy this project and the end result came out great, my only regret with this is that we did not spend more time on it. While this project was a lot of fun and very informative for the students it helped me see how difficult doing a large project can be and how much planning is involved at every step of the way. I am glad I had the opportunity to do this for the first time while working under an experienced teacher so that I had some guidance; I feel that now I will be much better prepared for something like this when I try it in my own classroom down the road. I was constantly amazed at how much the students were able to pick up during the unit. As a class we had some very interesting conversations that I feel were more in depth than many conversations I have had with people my own age. I was especially proud of the students during our lesson on the judicial branch and the way they were able to take abstract ideas and apply them to concrete realities. I am excited by this since I am a big fan of learning through conversation and was unsure if I would be able to do that in a classroom setting since I am so used to talking one on one with people. While I feel as though I had my strengths in the areas mentioned above, this unit definitely exposed some of my weaknesses. I mentioned that I enjoy the conversations with students but in a way I enjoy them too much, I found that I have the tendency to ramble on and sometimes veer off topic because I am so excited about what we are learning and how it connects to other parts of life. This became less of a problem as the unit went on but it is still something I always need to be aware of in the future. My biggest problem came from classroom management issues. The students never got out of control and the class stayed fairly well behaved but there was a lot of little chatting that would happen and a


lot of students trying to test my boundaries. I feel as though I did not lay down the law early enough which set a bad precedent for the unit, in the future I need to be very aware that the beginning is the most important time for setting the tone of the classroom and that it is easier to relax the rules later in the year than it is to try to add rules all of a sudden. I have since came up with a more structured plan on how to deal with classroom management and feel confident moving forward. I am an older student and had taken seven years off of college to travel the globe, while this was great and helped me learn quite a bit about the world it also has its drawbacks. One of the drawbacks of living the lifestyle I had lived was that I became somewhat disorganized, my experiences at Beaumont and my cooperating teacher have been great in helping me see the importance of organization. The difference between me at the beginning of this unit and me now is quite simply amazing. I am not saying that I am perfect at this but I feel as though I have made great strides and will continue to do so. One of the most important lessons I learned at Beaumont was to expect the unexpected. At the beginning of the unit I had a nice tidy curriculum planned out with specific activities for every day, and then on the very first day of class school was cancelled due to the heaters malfunctioning. I had no idea how much such a small thing could throw all my plans off, it took me a week to get the lessons back to where they originally planned. When I was planning the video project I felt as though I had given the class ample in class time to prepare but when it came to sign up for filming days I learned that they all needed extra time to get ready. Luckily the students signed up to come in after and before class to film or to film during their lunch, this allowed me to give them an extra day of planning. Beyond the big issues of planning were smaller issues such as students completing in class work ahead of time and me not having something else for them to work on. I now bring extra things such as brain teasers for them to work on to keep them from being a distraction to the students still working. The next time I teach a unit similar to this there will be a few changes that I will make. First of all I will search for more interactive lessons; I saw how much the students enjoyed the video project compared to the worksheets and that made a world of difference in their involvement and how much they learned from each activity. I will also have more discussions but they will be more focused discussions; when we started talking more as a class I could see the students make more connections between the lessons and real life. Finally I will have the work split up more; this unit we worked on one handbook the entire time and while that covered the material I do not think that it allowed for much variety in learning styles. Next time I teach I will split the unit up to have some essays, some art projects, some presentations, etc. I cannot emphasize enough how much I feel as though I learned and grew during my time in front of the class. I am grateful that I had this opportunity with the students that I had at Beaumont and I hope they got as much out of this as I did. I am excited to take the next step of student teaching and having a class for a longer period and taking the lessons that I learned at Beaumont to the next level.

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