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MIDDLESBROUGH CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE’S PLAN 2011 - 2014


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

CONTENTS Foreword

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What Living In Middlesbrough Is Like For Children And Young People

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Working Together To Improve Outcomes For Children And Young People

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Children And Young People’s Trust Arrangements In Middlesbrough

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What Has Improved Over The Last Three Years?

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What Children And Young People Have Told Us

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Developing Our Key Priorities And Actions For 2011 - 2014

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Summary Of Our Key Priorities For 2011 - 2014

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Supporting Families Through Early Help To Prevent Problems Getting Worse

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Our Key Priorities And Actions For 2011 - 2014

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Reducing the Impact of Poverty on Children and Young People

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Safeguarding Our Children And Young People

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Reducing the Risk-Taking Behaviours of Children and Young People

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Improving The Health And Emotional Well-Being Of Children And Young People

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Creating An Integrated, Skilled and Confident Children’s Workforce

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Commissioning

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Resourcing the Plan through Joint Commissioning of Services

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How Will We Monitor And Review This Plan?

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Managing Our Performance

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FOREWORD Welcome to the latest 3-year multi-agency strategic plan for children and young people’s services in Middlesbrough. Since our first plan was published in 2006, Middlesbrough Children and Young People’s Trust (MCYPT) has made some significant improvements in outcomes for children and young people and are proud of the work we have undertaken.

We will, over the lifetime of this plan, work hard together to ensure we deliver on the promises made and improve outcomes for children and young people. We aim to give them the best possible start in life, providing them with the skills and knowledge to make the right lifestyle choices that promote good health, keep them safe and free from risk taking behaviours and lift them out of poverty.

This year we have decided to take full advantage of the Government’s legislative changes to Children’s Trust arrangements which offer local areas the flexibility to determine whether or not to produce a plan and its content. This has allowed us to reshape our plan around 4 identified key priority themes using the comprehensive strategic needs assessment recently undertaken. We feel this better reflects the local needs of children and young people in Middlesbrough. The 4 key priority themes are to reduce the impact of child poverty, safeguard children and young people, tackle risk taking behaviours and build resilience and improve children’s health and emotional well-being, all of which are underpinned by raising education attainment levels in the town. Middlesbrough faces many challenges made more difficult by the levels of deprivation in the town. The recent cuts to public sector budgets announced in the Government’s 2010 Comprehensive Spending Review will have a significant impact on how services are delivered in the future. Partnership working will play a major part in driving the work of MCYPT to deliver improved outcomes for all children and young people in Middlesbrough in a climate of diminishing resources and higher demands on services. Our partners remain firm in their commitment to partnership working and have agreed to continue to support the Children and Young People’s Trust in Middlesbrough, acknowledging the progress we have made so far.

COUNCILLOR MIKE CARR EXECUTIVE MEMBER Children, Families and Learning CHAIR Children & Young People’s Trust Board

GILL ROLLINGS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Children, Families and Learning


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

WHAT LIVING IN MIDDLESBROUGH IS LIKE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE Middlesbrough is one of five local authorities that make up the Tees Valley area and one of twelve local authorities in the north-east of England. Located in the south of the region the town is made up of 23 wards that are based within four locality areas. Middlesbrough is a small, predominantly urban and densely populated town with a total resident population of approximately 139,200. Although this shows a population increase of 4,300 since 2001 there has been an overall reduction from 158,000 in 1971. Children and young people make up the largest proportion of Middlesbrough’s resident population. Young people, up to the age of 24, make up approximately one in three of the total population (35%), whilst children up to the age of 15 account for approximately one in five of all residents (20%) and one in 15 people living in Middlesbrough (7%) are aged under five. The most recent data shows that the number of single parent households (2005) has increased to approximately 7,424 (12.7%) and the rate of children living in lone parent families, as a proportion of all households with children, is 42%, approximately two in five. Black and minority ethnic (BME) groups make up 8.7% of the population compared with 4.8% for the Tees Valley and 4.5% for the North East. Amongst the school age population this increases significantly to 15% amongst secondary school age children and 20% amongst primary school age children and in some areas of the town this is as high as 48% for primary school age children and 36% of secondary school age. Within the growth of local BME communities, there has been a significant increase in the proportion of children for whom English is not their first language. Between 2005 and 2010 the proportion has increased from 11% to 15% amongst primary school age children and from 9% to 14% amongst those of secondary school age. Unemployment in Middlesbrough is 7.7%, which is almost double the national rate (4.1%). Young people under the age of 20 accounts for approximately one in ten of all those unemployed (9.8%). The 2010 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) show that Middlesbrough is ranked 8th most deprived local authority out of 326 local authority areas and was ranked 9th IMD 2007 and 10th IMD 2004 showing a steady increase in deprivation. The 2010 IMD also shows that 13 wards in Middlesbrough are in the top 10% of deprivation nationally, 5 of which have increased deprivation levels when compared to the

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IMD 2007 position. The highest concentrations of deprivation are situated in the north and east of the town. Recent figures show that Middlesbrough has the highest rate of child poverty in the northeast at 34% compared with 23% regionally and 21.3% nationally. However, despite the high level of relative deprivation in Middlesbrough, residents have a very positive regard for the town and the area where they live which can be seen in the feedback from the National Place Survey 2009 and Middlesbrough Neighbourhood Survey 2009. Our children and young people are also feeling very positive about their future as indicated in the recent Annual Pupil Survey in which over 4000 pupils took part. The survey tells us that children and young people have high aspirations and feel that they will succeed at school and go onto further education and University. Education attainment in Middlesbrough is showing an upward trend across all key stages, with more young people achieving 5 A* - C at GCSE level, however, the numbers succeeding does not match the number aspiring to achieve as indicated in the survey, but the positive trend in education attainment continues to show year on year improvement. Children and young people also tell us that they feel that they lead a healthy lifestyle according to the Annual Pupil Survey. Again however, the reality does not match the perception, with the levels of obesity amongst reception and year 6 children showing no real significant change and still remaining higher than national and regional levels. The health of the adult population can be an indicator of future health prospects for our children and young people, which based on current trends show high levels of smoking, obesity and unhealthy diets leading to much shorter life expectancy than the rest of the country. Although death rates from heart disease, cancer and strokes have fallen, they still remain higher than the national average. If we are to reduce the risk of our children and young people experiencing health problems in the future we need to encourage and support families to adopt much more healthy lifestyle choices to improver both physical and emotional health.


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WHAT LIVING IN MIDDLESBROUGH IS LIKE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE The most recent inspection by Ofsted of Safeguarding and Looked After Children in Middlesbrough carried out in June 2011 acknowledges that the effectiveness of services to ensure children and young people are safe and feel safe is good and that the overall effectiveness of safeguarding is adequate. However, more work needs to be done as keeping children and young people safe is of the utmost importance particularly as children and young people in Middlesbrough are more likely to experience an admission to hospital due to intentional or unintentional injuries than most other areas in England. There are also high numbers of families who experience domestic violence exposing children and young people to a chaotic and complex family life. Domestic violence is also one of the major contributing factors for children being taken into care in Middlesbrough. There are also high and in some areas increasing numbers of children and young people who engage in risk taking behaviours. Early indications show that the recent downward trend in the reduction of under-18 conception rates is beginning to change and levels are now on the increase. Alcohol consumption amongst young people is also an issue with approximately 1 in 4 admitting to using alcohol, which can lead to anti-social behaviour and youth offending. Hospital admissions for alcohol and substance misuse are higher than the national average. Although self-reporting, through the Annual Pupil Survey, of smoking and alcohol consumption by young people show a decrease with drug use remaining the same. It is important to remember that the majority of children and young people in Middlesbrough grow up in safe, happy and secure family homes but there is a need to ensure that those who do not are identified at an early stage to enable appropriate help and support to be provided to them and their families and increase their chances of becoming healthy and economically active adults. MCYPT will continue to develop and promote a single assessment to identify the additional needs of children and young people that will help to provide the early help and support they need to prevent problems from escalating and getting worse. This will require a shift in resources to more targeted services and a better and more co-ordinated approach to service delivery and re-design.


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

WORKING TOGETHER TO IMPROVE OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE Middlesbrough has been working in partnership to improve outcomes for children and young people since 2004 and continues to work towards strengthening these arrangements through the MCYPT Board, which was established in October 2007. The Children and Young People’s Trust enables all those organisations with a role in improving outcomes for children and young people to come together and agree how improvements can be achieved by closer collaboration and co-operation across agencies and services. MCYPT is proud of the significant progress it has made in getting partners to work more closely together by agreeing collectively what needs to be done, deciding what each partner will do individually to improve outcomes and then signing up to this agreement through the Children and Young People’s Plan (CYPP). The Trust recognises that although strong partnerships are in place there is still some room for improvement and with this in mind a recent review of Trust arrangements was carried in 2008/09.

Trust arrangements in Middlesbrough have also been subjected to further examination through the Council’s Scrutiny processes and the findings were published in May 2010. The findings and recommendations of the Scrutiny Panel have been accepted by MCYPT Board and arrangements put in place to address the issues and actions identified. Key partner organisations played a full and active role in the recent review processes and acknowledged that the outcomes have and will continue to strengthen Trust arrangements in Middlesbrough. HOW DOES THIS HELP IMPROVE OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE? By bringing organisations together, MCYPT is able to negotiate and agree what are the most important issues that need to be tackled, taking into account the views of children, young people and their families. MCYPT is then able to decide who will do what and how much partners will contribute including budgets and staff and then continually reviewing how well we are doing through the performance management framework.

The review highlighted a number of strengths in the current arrangements including a strong sense of trust amongst partner organisations and a clear commitment to partnership working to improve outcomes for children and young people. The review also highlighted that the CYPP was a key driver for service delivery and demonstrated agreement by all partners to a set of identified priorities for improving children’s services in Middlesbrough.

This enables organisations to jointly target their resources towards the agreed priorities leading to better value for money, better information sharing and a much more integrated service for children, young people and their families. This helps avoid unnecessary waste and duplication of services and provides clarity on who should do what and when, enabling MCYPT Board to challenge and hold to account those organisations who fail to do what they committed to do in the CYPP.

The review acknowledged that in order to further strengthen MCYPT arrangements some improvements needed to be made including the establishment of an Executive to oversee the day-to-day operation of MCYPT and ensure that the vision and priorities agreed by MCYPT Board are acted upon. It was also recognised that there was a need to review membership of the Board to ensure that representatives of organisations are able to:

Working in partnership is key to achieving ongoing improvements in services. The current climate of diminishing budgets and reduced resources, including staffing, will continue to place additional burdens on individual organisations, therefore, coming together with other partners to explore better ways of integrating services and pooling and sharing of resources is the way forward.

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Speak for their organisation with authority; Commit their organisation on policy and practice matters; and Hold their organisation to account

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CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE’S TRUST ARRANGEMENTS IN MIDDLESBROUGH

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

MIDDLESBROUGH PARTNERSHIP

MIDDLESBROUGH SAFEGUARDING CHILDREN BOARD

MCYPT BOARD

WORKFORCE REFORM GROUP

MCYPT EXECUTIVE

TASK & FINISH GROUP

As determined by the Board and Executive

TASK & FINISH GROUP

As determined by the Board and Executive

TASK & FINISH GROUP

As determined by the Board and Executive

JOINT COMMISSIONING GROUP

TASK & FINISH GROUP

As determined by the Board and Executive

THE VOICES OF CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE, PARENTS AND CARERS

TASK & FINISH GROUP

As determined by the Board and Executive


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

WHAT HAS IMPROVED OVER THE LAST THREE YEARS? OUTCOME: ENJOY AND ACHIEVE ALL CHILDREN ENJOY PARTICIPATING IN LEARNING ACTIVITIES AND ARE ABLE TO ACHIEVE THEIR FULL POTENTIAL.

OUTCOME: STAY SAFE ALL CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE ARE KEPT SAFE FROM DELIBERATE, NEGLECTFUL OR ACCIDENTAL HARM AND EXPLOITATION.

OUR INDICATORS OF SUCCESS

OUR INDICATORS OF SUCCESS

Rate of fixed term and permanent exclusions.

Percentage of children who have experienced bullying.

School attendance levels.

Hospital admissions as a result of unintentional injuries to children and young people.

Percentage of young people leaving school with 5 A*-C GCSEs (including English and maths)

Percentage of children becoming the subject of a Child Protection Plan for a second or subsequent time.

Primary pupil progress in English and maths, at Key Stage 1.

Percentage of looked after children adopted during the year who were placed for adoption within 12 months of the decision to place them for adoption.

Secondary pupil progress in English and maths, at Key Stage 3.

Percentage of initial assessments for children’s social care carried out within 7 working days of referral.

The Foundation Stage Profile Scores of pre-school children.

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WHAT HAS IMPROVED OVER THE LAST THREE YEARS? OUTCOME: MAKE A POSITIVE CONTRIBUTION ALL CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE CHOOSE TO ENGAGE IN POSITIVE ACTIVITIES AND BEHAVIOURS AND CONTRIBUTE TO THEIR LOCAL COMMUNITY.

OUTCOME: ACHIEVE ECONOMIC WELL-BEING ALL CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE GROW UP IN AN ENVIRONMENT FREE FROM THE EFFECTS OF POVERTY AND GO ON TO ACHIEVE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE. OUR INDICATORS OF SUCCESS

OUR INDICATORS OF SUCCESS Young people’s participation in positive activities.

Percentage of 19 year olds who have achieved a level 2 qualification. (Equivalent to 5 A*-C GCSEs)

Percentage of children and young people who feel their views are listened to in decisions about their local area.

Percentage of 19 year olds who have achieved a level 3 qualification. (Equivalent to 2 full ‘A’-Levels A*-E)

First time entrants to the Youth Justice System aged 10-17 years.

The percentage of children and young people living in poverty

The level of substance misuse by young people.

The percentage of 16 to 18 year olds not in education, employment or training (NEET)


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

WHAT HAS IMPROVED OVER THE LAST THREE YEARS?

OUTCOME: BE HEALTHY ALL CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WILL HAVE GOOD PHYSICAL, MENTAL, EMOTIONAL AND SEXUAL HEALTH.

OUTCOME: VULNERABLE YOUNG PEOPLE

OUR INDICATORS OF SUCCESS

OUR INDICATORS OF SUCCESS

The rate of childhood obesity.

Services for disabled children.

The percentage of primary and secondary school pupils who state they are happy most of the time.

Key Stage 2 attainment for Black and minority ethnic groups.

The percentage of women smoking during pregnancy.

Key Stage 4 attainment for Black and minority ethnic groups.

The percentage of women who choose to breastfeed.

Children in care achieving 5 A*-C GCSEs (or equivalent) at Key Stage 4, including English and maths.

The percentage of young people (under 24 year old) who contract a sexually transmitted infection.

Care Leavers in employment, education or training.

The average number of decayed, missing and filled teeth in 5 year olds.

Care leavers in suitable accommodation.

The under 18 conception rate.

Young Carers receiving support through the Young Carers Project.

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WHAT CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE HAVE TOLD US YOU SAID

WE DID

cility “Provide a youth fa from le op where young pe ’ all areas can go

Developed a ‘state of the art’ youth facility ‘My Place’ due to open in 2011

YOU SAID

WE DID

n and ‘0nly 22% of childre onded sp young people who re rvey Su to the Annual Pupil to le felt they were ab their influence decisions in community’

Introducing Youth Forum s based in the four Middlesbrough Locality Areas to improve young people’s involvem ent in decision making in the town

YOU SAID

‘More joint working between the police and schools to help them understand more ab out crime and anti-socia l behaviour’

YOU SAID

le to ‘We want to be ab on ing go ’s at wh find out in le op pe for young Middlesbrough ’

WE DID

YOU SAID

g Together (PAST) Police and Schools Workin young people from Project introduced with Middlesbrough Schools to develop working with the Police better understanding

WE DID Established a young people’s website ‘Youth Unite’ designed by young people for young people to keep them up to date on what’s happening and how to get involved

‘Children in care and leaving care asked fo r more information on their health’

YOU SAID

services ‘Improve health access to er tt including be al health nt me d hospital an services’

WE DID are being Health Passports for children in care and ren child developed in consultation with and own their young people that will include family health history

WE DID Introduced the ‘you’re welcome’ sche me, to assess the quality of health services for young people verified by a team of young assessors


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

DEVELOPING OUR KEY PRIORITIES AND ACTIONS FOR 2011-2014 MCYPT has recently completed a children and young people’s strategic needs assessment and has used this to set the priorities for this Plan as well as to inform the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA) and the Child Poverty Strategy. The needs assessment describes the life experiences of children living in Middlesbrough and highlights the key issues on which we should focus to improve outcomes for children and young people in the town. The needs assessment has provided the foundation on which this 3-year plan has been developed. We recognise that the needs assessment raises a multitude of acknowledges that some of these are best tackled by single agencies of partners, however there are some which will benefit from a much approach and it is these issues that MCYPT will focus its work and lifetime of this plan.

issues and MCYPT or a small number broader partnership effort on over the

MCYPT has used an ‘Outcome Based’ planning model to decide on which of the priority areas would benefit from a partnership approach and would potentially have the biggest impact on improving outcomes for children and young people. We began by: •

Agreeing what our service outcome would be – the goal we want to reach

Determining our population outcome – what it is that we want to have an impact on and how will we know we have made a difference - what success will look like

Identifying what building blocks need to be in place – what actions we need to take to achieve our overall goals

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The population outcomes, which form the over arching themes of the plan, have been agreed by MCYPT Board, which are: •

All young people are safeguarded from intentional and unintentional harm

All young people to remain free from the harm caused by negative risk taking behaviour

All young people to grow up free from poverty

All young people to have good physical and emotional health

Underpinned by improved education and attainment levels

The results of the Outcome Based planning model are shown in the diagrams within each of the priority theme sections of the plan and the full needs assessment can be accessed here.


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CHILDREN RISK TAKING BEHAVIOURS

SAFEGUARDING

% Of pupils who have a trusted adults at school to talks to

Repeat incidents of domestic violence

Level of exclusions linked to risk-taking behaviours

The number of repeat runaways

% Of persistent absentees in secondary schools

The number of young carers

First time entrants to criminal justice system

The rate of offences against children & young people *

Crime and anti-social behaviour

The number of referrals to social care

Youth service contact and participation rates

Referrals through Common Assessment Framework (CAF)process*

Teenage conception rates

% Of referrals to social care going onto initial assessment

Alcohol and substance misuse CHILD POVERTY

HEALTH AND EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING

Free school meals

Waiting times for specialist CAMHS service *

Young people in education, employment or training

% Of exclusions due to bullying/ abusive behaviour towards other pupils

Participation in positive activities

Reduction in obesity levels (Reception year)

Achievement gap between pupils eligible for free school meals and their peers at KS2 and KS4

Participation in PE and sport

Foundation stage profile headline achievements

Immunisation levels

Achievement at KS2, level 4 in English and maths Achievement of 5 A*-C at GCSE including English and maths

UNDERPINNED BY IMPROVING THE EDUCATION ATTAINMENT LEVELS OF CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE IN MIDDLESBROUGH

THIS WILL HAVE A MAJOR IMPACT ON THE EVERY CHILD MATTERS OUTCOME THIS WILL HAVE SOME IMPACT ON THE EVERY CHILD MATTERS OUTCOME * Data collection relating to these indicators is currently under development

ECONOMIC WELLBEING

POSITIVE CONTRIBUTION

EJNOY AND ACHIEVE

KEY PRIORITIES AND INDICATORS

STAY SAFE

BE HEALTHY

ECONOMIC WELLBEING

POSITIVE CONTRIBUTION

EJNOY AND ACHIEVE

STAY SAFE

KEY PRIORITIES AND INDICATORS

BE HEALTHY

SUMMARY OF OUR KEY PRIORITIES FOR 2011-2014


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

SUPPORTING FAMILIES THROUGH EARLY HELP TO PREVENT PROBLEMS GETTING WORSE (EARLY INTERVENTION AND PREVENTION) Early help is not a new idea but it can often mean different things to different people and organisations. MCYPT have agreed that early help means ‘providing families with early help to prevent problems from getting worse’. Early help can happen at any time in a child or young person’s life and not just when they are very young. Early help requires services to plan and deliver together to improve outcomes for children, young people and families who are likely to experience difficulties. The long-term aim of MCYPT is to break the inter-generational cycle of problems that children, young people and families experience in Middlesbrough including poverty and unemployment. This requires a longer-term shift that focuses on the causes rather than symptoms. This approach will need organisations to change how they deliver services, getting involved earlier to prevent a problem becoming a crisis and investing more resources in prevention and early help. The impact of working this way will be improved outcomes for children, young people and their families who over time will not require such high levels of specialist services. Currently the number of children, young people, adults and families in Middlesbrough with high and complex needs is significant, with an increasing demand on high cost specialist services. WHY IS EARLY HELP SO IMPORTANT? •

It has been suggested that a reduction of just 1% in the number of offences committed by children and young people has the potential to generate savings for households and individuals of around £45 million a year.

A study by the London School of Economics for the Prince’s Trust has estimated that the cost to the economy of educational underachievement is around £18 billion a year.

The cost of poor numeracy is estimated to be between £4,000 and £63,000 per individual over a lifetime.

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It is estimated that by the age of 28, an individual with conduct disorder has cost an additional £60,000 to public services, compared to an individual without.

Statistics show that daughters of teenage parents are three times more likely to become teenage mothers, and 65% of sons with a convicted father go on to offend themselves.

A child living in poverty is more likely to have poorer health, lower attainment and less earning potential.

To support the identification and co-ordination of early help, organisations need to be able to determine the additional needs of children, young people and their families through a common multi-agency assessment process. MCYPT will work hard to promote and encourage the use of its single multi-agency ‘Common Assessment Framework – Threshold of Need’ to assist organisations to identify and provide early help and support to those most in need.


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OUR KEY PRIORITIES AND ACTIONS FOR 2011-2014 REDUCE THE IMPACT OF POVERTY ON CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WHY IS THIS A PRIORITY? The Government has set out its commitment to eradicating child poverty in its first Child Poverty Strategy – A New Approach to Child Poverty: Tackling the Causes of Disadvantage and Transforming Families’ Lives published in April 2011 to ensure everyone has the chance to do well, irrespective of their beginnings as detailed in its supporting document ‘Opening Doors, Breaking Barriers: A Strategy for Social Mobility.‘ Given the current economic climate and the levels of child poverty in the North East this will be a hard target to achieve.

Poverty wastes talent and opportunity and limits life chances, and this is often perpetuated across generations. Reducing child poverty is not simply about lifting children above an arbitrary income line; it is about transforming the experiences, living standards and life chances of disadvantaged families with children, in order to break cycles of poverty that persist across generations. Evidence and research shows that children from poorer areas are more likely to participate in risk taking behaviours such as taking drugs, drinking alcohol or become involved in crime. MIDDLESBROUGH - THE LOCAL PICTURE

Frank Field, MP was asked by the Prime Minister to lead an independent review of poverty and life chances by examining the best ways to reduce poverty and increase life chances for the most disadvantaged. The outcome of this review was published in December 2010 in a report, The Foundation Years: preventing poor children becoming poor adults. The report suggests that the best way to improve life chances is to shift the emphasis of child poverty towards investment in early years provision. The Review found that children’s life chances are most heavily predicated on their development in the first five years of life, and that family background, parental education, good parenting and the opportunities for learning and development in those crucial years matter more to children’s life chances than money. Child poverty affects many families in Middlesbrough and influences the lives of our children and consequently the economic wellbeing of the town. This places increasing demands on local services and budgets. Low income determines every aspect of family life and children’s development by influencing: •

Living conditions.

Levels of education.

The capacity to operate as a supportive family.

Community networks.

The stress resulting from the daily struggle to make ends meet.

In some neighbourhoods 59% of children live in households with an income defined as below the poverty line

30% of neighbourhoods are within the worst 10% in the North East

32% of children live in households where no one is working, compared to 20% nationally and 23% regionally

It is estimated that the number of children aged 0 – 16 living in poverty is approximately 9,373

9.6% of young people aged 16-18 are not in education, employment or training (NEET)

Eight wards account for over 60% of the NEET population, indicating a strong correlation with deprivation

36.9% of pupils achieved 5+ A*-C GCSE’s including English and maths, below the national average of 49.8%

Pupils with a statement of special education need (SEN) has reduced over the past 5 years to 3.6%, the national average is 2.7%


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

OUR KEY PRIORITIES AND ACTIONS FOR 2011-2014 REDUCE THE IMPACT OF POVERTY ON CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE SUMMARY •

In line with the overall pattern of deprivation, child poverty rates in Middlesbrough are well above national and regional averages, and are highest in the north and east of the borough where almost every other child lives in poverty.

Health and education outcomes are poorest where poverty rates are highest.

The spread and range of child care provision meets most of the needs of local parents but there are gaps around provision at weekends and during holiday periods and in the provision of lower cost child care options.

Young people generally have good perceptions about education provision and have positive attitudes and aspirations about their futures.

The aspirations achievements.

Despite good upward trends in educational achievement, outcomes in some key areas remain well below national and other comparator averages.

The development of communication, language and literacy skills is a major concern at all key stages, especially for boys.

Underachievement in both English and maths is a major barrier to progression for local school leavers.

The number of NEETs has reduced significantly, but the proportion of vulnerable young people in the NEET cohort presents a particular challenge for further reductions.

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With high unemployment and low attainment levels, Middlesbrough has significantly more challenges when tackling child poverty than most of our neighbouring authorities. Middlesbrough Local Strategic Partnership (LSP) acknowledges the contributions that a range of partners can make to help eradicate child poverty. The LSP Executive Board will act as the local Child Poverty Board and lead the co-ordination and monitoring of Middlesbrough’s Child Poverty Strategy. MCYPT will play a key part in contributing to the work of the LSP and will continue to target its efforts and resources to supporting the overall plan for Middlesbrough.


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ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO REMAIN FREE FROM THE HARMS CAUSED BY NEGATIVE RISK TAKING BEHAVIOUR

POPULATION OUTCOME (WHAT DIFFERENCE WILL IT MAKE?)

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE ARE SAFEGUARDED FROM INTENTIONAL AND UNINTENTIONAL HARM

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO GROW UP FREE FROM POVERTY

THE CONFIDENCE AND SELF-ESTEEM IN YOUNG PEOPLE WILL IMPROVE

FEWER CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WILL NEED A SOCIAL CARE INTERVENTION

MORE YOUNG PEOPLE WILL REMAIN IN EMPLOYMENT, EDUCATION OR TRAINING

THERE WILL BE A CLOSER MATCH BETWEEN THE ASPIRATION AND ACHIEVEMENT OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

THE LIFE EXPERIENCES OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WILL IMPROVE

MORE YOUNG PEOPLE WILL MAKE A POSITIVE TRANSITION INTO EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT OR TRAINING

MORE YOUNG PEOPLE WILL ACHIEVE A RECOGNISED QUALIFICATION BY AGE 19

THE SKILLS OF PARENTS WILL IMPROVE

SERVICE OUTCOME (WHAT IS OUR GOAL?)

REDUCE THE IMPACT OF POVERTY ON CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE MAKE GOOD PROGRESS THROUGHOUT THEIR TIME AT SCHOOL

BUILDING BLOCKS (ACTIONS?)

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO HAVE GOOD PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH

IMPROVE STANDARD OF EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS

IMPROVE LEADERSHIP, TEACHING & LEARNING SKILLS WITH SCHOOLS

IMPROVE TRANSITIONS ACROSS 0-14

IMPROVE LANGUAGE AND LITERACY

SUPPORT FAMILIES TO PROVIDE A STABLE AND FUNCTIONAL LIVING ENVIRONMENT FOR CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE

SUPPORT YOUNG PEOPLE TO MAKE A SUCCESSFUL TRANSITION FROM SCHOOL TO EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT OR TRAINING

IMPROVE BEHAVIOUR AND ATTENDANCE

IMPROVE PROGRESSION ROUTES TO EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING

INCREASE THE NUMBER AND RANGE OF APPRENTICESHIPS

PROVIDE GOOD QUALITY INFORMATION, ADVICE AND GUIDANCE

IMPROVE ENGAGEMENT WITH EMPLOYERS

PROVIDE A RANGE OF PARENT & FAMILY SERVICES TO MEET IDENTIFIED NEEDS

RE-SHAPE SERVICES TO FOCUS ON EARLY INTERVENTION AND PREVENTION

SUPPORT FAMILIES INTO EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT OR TRAINING (EET)

CREATE A POSITIVE AND SUPPORTIVE FAMILY ENVIRONMENT

IMPROVE ACCESS TO DECENT HOMES

IMPROVE YOUTH HOMELESSNESS


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

OUR KEY PRIORITIES AND ACTIONS FOR 2011-2014 SAFEGUARDING OUR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WHY IS THIS A PRIORITY? Keeping children and young people safe is extremely important. Protecting them from potential harm whilst giving them the freedom to experience life can be difficult to achieve. Most children and young people live their whole child and adolescent life free from harm and in a safe and loving family environment; however, there are still significant numbers who do not, leaving them vulnerable and more likely to engage in risk taking behaviours or become the subject of a child protection plan. Although the number of children and young people becoming the subject of a child protection plan in Middlesbrough is steadily reducing, we are seeing more children and young people with multiple and complex needs. The number of children who become looked after is increasing and the main cause continues to be neglect and domestic violence. Addressing the complex and multiple needs of children and young people provides an ongoing challenge as this requires a whole family approach which in turn means the involvement of a range of agencies providing support and interventions in a co-ordinated way to keep children and young people safe. The Government recognised the importance of safeguarding and commissioned Professor Munro to undertake an independent review of child protection and social work in England building on the work of Lord Laming’s Progress Report (March 2009) and the Social Work Task Force, drawing on the evidence submitted to these reviews and the informative extensive analysis undertaken. Professor Munro has now published a final report and made 15 recommendations recognising the uncertainty that is inherent in child protection work. The Government has accepted these recommendations, which will have significant and far-reaching implications in Middlesbrough. Improving our ability to intervene early to prevent problems from escalating is key to safeguarding our children and young people. The further development and increased use of the Common Assessment Framework (CAF) in Middlesbrough is of critical importance.

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CAF is the key process for determining the additional unmet needs of individual children and young people that supports the early help and prevention agenda. There are many issues to overcome if we are to truly protect and safeguard our children and young people. Middlesbrough Safeguarding Children Board (MSCB) is now firmly in place and developing close links with MCYPT. This is helping to provide an improved focus on safeguarding issues and clearer governance and accountability arrangements in relation to the MSCB and MCYPT Board.


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OUR KEY PRIORITIES AND ACTIONS FOR 2011-2014 SAFEGUARDING OUR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE MIDDLESBROUGH - THE LOCAL PICTURE •

During 2009/10, 187 children in Middlesbrough were taken into care, the majority of who lived in deprived wards.

The number of children with a Special Education Need (SEN) has risen by over 10% since 2006 with 2,270 pupils having a formal statement.

The number of children with a disability is increasing.

In March 2010 there was a total of 325 children being looked after by the Local Authority, a 19% increase from March 2009.

SUMMARY

At the end of March 2010, there were 344 children with a child protection plan, a 37% increase on March 2009 .

Domestic violence and neglect is a significant issue and has a major impact on safeguarding children and young people.

The number of referrals to children’s social care services has risen by 73% over the past five years.

Information sharing and improving the use of CAF across partner agencies is an important and critical element that supports early help and prevention.

The level of repeat referrals shows little change over the past five years and has been static at 15.9% for the last two years.

Middlesbrough has one of the worst hospital admission rates for injury in the country for under 18 year olds.

The rate of hospital admissions in children as a result of injury is over 60% higher than that of England.

Children and young people who are looked after or subject to a child protection plan are more likely to experience poorer outcomes such as health and education.

Middlesbrough has the highest rate of repeat attendances at Accident and Emergency Units with over 5,600 attendances during the period April 2007 to March 2010, accounting for 39.6% of the total repeat attendances.

Safeguarding children and young people requires a whole family approach by addressing the root causes and not just the symptoms.

During the period April to July 2010 there were 1,600 incidents of domestic violence recorded of which 814 were repeat victims.

The impact of the Munro Review and other government policy and legislative changes needs to be given serious consideration and plans put in place to meet the challenges they may bring.

Almost 80% of child protection cases feature domestic violence as the main or additional cause.

There is much to learn from the outcomes of serious case reviews which needs to be shared and acted upon to ensure the failings of services are not repeated.

Using the Home Office domestic violence calculator is it estimated that domestic violence costs Middlesbrough almost £13 million each year.

During the period April 2008 –March 2009 there were a total of 583 missing incidents involving 259 children and young people.

Investment in the children’s workforce is important to ensure practitioners are equipped with the appropriate skills and knowledge relating to safeguarding practices.

In 2009/10 9% of victims of crime were aged under-19, with 60% of victims being male.


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO REMAIN FREE FROM THE HARMS CAUSED BY NEGATIVE RISK TAKING BEHAVIOUR

POPULATION OUTCOME (WHAT DIFFERENCE WILL IT MAKE?)

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE ARE SAFEGUARDED FROM INTENTIONAL AND UNINTENTIONAL HARM

FEWER YOUNG PEOPLE ARE INVOLVED IN SERIOUS /COMPLEX BEHAVIOURS

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO GROW UP FREE FROM POVERTY

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO HAVE GOOD PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH

THE CONFIDENCE AND SELF-ESTEEM IN CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE WILL IMPROVE

CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE KNOW HOW TO KEEP THEMSELVES SAFE

FEWER CHILDREN GO MISSING FROM HOME

CHILDREN ARE ABLE TO STAY WITHIN A FAMILY

CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WHO ARE LIVING WITH DOMESTIC VIOLENCE FEEL SUPPORTED

CHILDREN ARE, AND FEEL SAFE AT HOME AND IN THEIR NEIGHBOURHOOD

SERVICE OUTCOME (WHAT IS OUR GOAL?)

CREATE AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE CHILDREN ARE FREE FROM HARM

PROVIDE FAMILY FOCUSED SERVICES

BUILDING BLOCKS (ACTIONS?)

IMPROVE AND INCREASE THE HELP AND SUPPORT OFFERED TO FAMILIES AND PROVIDE A WHOLE FAMILY APPROACH

PROVIDE NON-STIGMATISED FAMILY SERVICES THAT RECOGNISE EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY NEEDS

RE-SHAPE SERVICE TO REFLECT IDENTIFIED NEEDS WITH A FOCUS ON EARLY HELP AND PREVENTION

IMPROVE UNDERSTANDING OF COMMUNITY NEEDS, CURRENT SERVICES AND ESTABLISH A MORE CO-ORDINATED APPROACH TO DELIVERY

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SUPPORT FAMILIES TO PROVIDE A STABLE AND FUNCTIONAL LIVING ENVIRONMENT FOR CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE

SUPPORT FAMILIES TO CREATE A STABLE HOME

RECRUIT MORE FOSTER CARERS AND ADOPTERS

IMPROVE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SYSTEM AND PROCESSES THAT SUPPORT THE EARLY IDENTIFICATION OF ADDITIONAL NEEDS OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE (CAF)

IMPROVE THE ABILITY OF THE CHILDREN’S WORKFORCE TO IDENTIFY EARLY HELP TO PREVENT PROBLEMS FROM ESCALATING

IMPROVE INFORMATION SHARING AND INTELLIGENCE GATHERING ACROSS AGENCIES


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OUR KEY PRIORITIES AND ACTIONS FOR 2011-2014 REDUCE THE RISK TAKING BEHAVIOURS OF YOUNG PEOPLE WHY IS THIS A PRIORITY? Most young people living in Middlesbrough choose not to engage in risk taking behaviours such as taking drugs, drinking alcohol, offending or becoming teenage parents and most make a successful transition to adult life and go on to build successful careers and families. However, not all young people are on this path and many experience problems in their teenage years such as falling behind at school or getting involved with drugs, criminal and other unacceptable behaviour. Sometimes these problems are only temporary and are soon overcome, but for some young people, problems can prove more severe and entrenched. This can have serious consequences for their health, wellbeing and development and can lead to further problems in adult life such as unemployment, homelessness or long-term health problems. It can also impose significant burdens and costs on society and their families. Over the last few years Middlesbrough has seen some increases in young people engaging in risk taking behaviours such as those entering the criminal justice system, alcohol consumption and teenage conceptions. A recent needs assessment found that Middlesbrough has some of the highest rates of alcohol related harm in the country and a picture that is indicative of very high rates of young people aged under 18 years with alcohol related problems. This can lead to a number of other alcohol related problems such as criminal and anti-social behaviours which impact on the local community and their perceptions about children and young people generally. Evidence also tells us that children and young people whose parents participate in risk taking behaviours are more likely to follow in their footsteps and engage in similar risk taking activities and behaviours. Figures show that 2,275 young people in Middlesbrough are living with at least one parent/carer who is in treatment for drug use, and a further 680 young people live with at least one alcohol dependent parent or carer who is in treatment.

Although the latest official figures for teenage conception rates for Middlesbrough shows a decrease figures are still 35% higher than the England average and 12.2% above the North East average which means that Middlesbrough has the second highest rate in the North East region. The North East has the highest teenage conception rate in England and Wales. Early indications are that the number of teenage conceptions in Middlesbrough is on the increase. Young people engaging in offending behaviour is still a cause for concern and a recent study in Middlesbrough of the ten most prolific young offenders and nine offenders most at risk of serious harm showed they all shared common characteristics and poor life experiences that reduced their resilience to engaging in criminal activity and considerably enhanced their risk of re-offending. These characteristics included the area in which they lived, early entry into the social care system, not completing their education, special education needs or learning disability, mental health issues, drug and alcohol problems, bereavement or family loss including lost contact with biological father and parent criminality.


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

OUR KEY PRIORITIES AND ACTIONS FOR 2011-2014 REDUCE THE RISK TAKING BEHAVIOURS OF YOUNG PEOPLE MIDDLESBROUGH - THE LOCAL PICTURE •

Of the 1,580 offences referred to the Youth Offending Service in 2009/10, 83% were committed by young men.

The number of young people receiving their first reprimand in 2009/10 was more than twice the national average.

Over the last five years the number of first warnings, reprimands or convictions has fallen by 16%.

Secondary school attendance fell by almost 1% in 2008/09 to 90.1%, but shows an improvement of 0.9% over the last four school years.

Persistent absence shows sustained improvement over the last four school years, falling from 13.4% to 7.6%.

Unauthorised absence presents a particular problem for secondary schools, having risen from 1.9% to 3.3% in the last three years.

Primary school attendance levels are also down year on year, falling by 0.24% to 94.2%.

The latest full-year’s national figures for under-18 conceptions is for 2008, which shows Middlesbrough’s conception rate at 52.2 per 1,000 females aged 15-17. This represents a 21.4% reduction against the 1998 baseline year.

Middlesbrough’s teenage conception rate is 28% higher than the England average and 6% above the northeast average.

A third of local under-18 conceptions lead to abortion compared to a half nationally. For under-16 conceptions, 50% lead to abortion compared with 60% nationally

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SUMMARY •

Relatively high levels of absence and fixed term exclusion from school are evident, particularly in secondary schools, which has a significant impact on young people’s educational outcomes and increases the chances of them engaging in risk taking behaviours outside school.

The vast majority of young people do not engage regularly in risk taking behaviour. However, for a significant and growing minority, this is an important issue that can have a major impact on the outcomes they experience.

Young men are responsible for the vast majority of crime committed by young people and commit more than twice as many offences per offender. ‘Theft and handling’ is the most prevalent offence for both young men and young women.

Young people engaged with the Youth Offending Service, and who have the poorest outcomes, share many common characteristics and life experiences that signal the need for targeted early help to improve their resilience and resistance to engaging in criminal activity in the future.

Participation rates in positive activities outside of school have improved slightly but remain well below the national average. Lack of participation can diminish improvements in academic, preventative and development outcomes such as education standards, avoidance of risky lifestyles and increased self-esteem.

Participation in recreational activity and socialising is in line with key comparator figures, but young people have identified barriers to taking part in some activities.

Young people engage in decision-making processes at school but are less involved in the processes outside school. Young people are not convinced that their participation has any impact on the decisions being made about them.


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ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO REMAIN FREE FROM THE HARMS CAUSED BY NEGATIVE RISK TAKING BEHAVIOUR

POPULATION OUTCOME (WHAT DIFFERENCE WILL IT MAKE?)

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE ARE SAFEGUARDED FROM INTENTIONAL AND UNINTENTIONAL HARM

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO GROW UP FREE FROM POVERTY

YOUNG PEOPLE ENGAGE POSITIVELY WITH SCHOOL

YOUNG PEOPLE ARE PROTECTED FROM UNINTENTIONAL AND AVOIDABLE ACCIDENTS

YOUNG PEOPLE ARE ABLE TO SHARE THEIR CONCERNS OR PROBLEMS WITH AN ADULT OR PEER

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO HAVE GOOD PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH

PREGNANCIES ARE PLANNED

YOUNG PEOPLE UNDERSTAND THE IMPACT OF ALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE MISUSE

YOUNG PEOPLE ENGAGE IN POSITIVE ACTIVITIES

YOUNG PEOPLE UNDERSTAND THE RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF ENGAGING IN SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR

YOUNG PEOPLE HAVE AN INCREASED AWARENESS OF & RESILIENCE TO RISK TAKING BEHAVIOURS

CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE MAKE INFORMED CHOICES ABOUT RISK TAKING BEHAVIOUR

SERVICE OUTCOME (WHAT IS OUR GOAL?)

BUILDING BLOCKS (ACTIONS?)

PROMOTE SOCIAL NORMS TO SUPPORT A CHANGE IN PERCEPTIONS OF RISK AND BEHAVIOUR

INCREASE OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENGAGING IN POSITIVE ACTIVITIES

DELIVER EFFECTIVE DRUG / ALCOHOL / SEX AND RELATIONSHIPS EDUCATION

EXPLORE MORE CREATIVE WAYS OF ENGAGING YOUNG PEOPLE IN POSITIVE ACTIVITIES

PROVIDE GOOD QUALITY INFORMATION, ADVICE AND GUIDANCE

BUILD RESILIENCE IN YOUNG PEOPLE THROUGH IMPROVED CONFIDENCE AND SELF-ESTEEM

ACCESSIBLE AND VISIBLE SERVICES ARE IN PLACE

INCREASE CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S AWARENESS OF RISK

GATHER ACCURATE DATA AND INFORMATION TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THE NEEDS OF YOUNG PEOPLE

PROVIDE MORE TARGETED EARLY HELP SERVICES

SUPPORT PARENTS TO DEVELOP GOOD PARENTING SKILLS (EARLY YEARS)

IDENTIFY THOSE YOUNG PEOPLE AND GROUPS AT MOST RISK

ADOPT A WHOLE FAMILY APPROACH TO SERVICE DELIVERY

REVIEW AND EVALUATE CURRENT SERVICES TO BETTER UNDERSTAND WHAT WORKS

ESTABLISH ROBUST MANAGEMENT OF RISK TAKING BEHAVIOUR

SUPPORT YOUNG PEOPLE TO ACHIEVE THEIR ASPIRATIONS

DEVELOP A “RESPECT” APPROACH TO RELATIONSHIPS RAISE AWARENESS OF AVAILABLE SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

OUR KEY PRIORITIES AND ACTIONS FOR 2011-2014 IMPROVE THE WELL-BEING AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE WHY IS THIS A PRIORITY? A healthy start in life is critical to the overall health and well-being of children and young people and this includes emotional as well as physical health. There are strong links between good health in childhood and school attendance and attainment, which in turn can lead to, improved life chances such as employment opportunities. Many factors can affect a child or young person’s health, including lifestyle and socio-economic, cultural and environmental conditions. Children living in deprived areas are more likely to live in workless households and experience worse health inequalities than those living in less deprived areas. Children and young people need good physical health if they are to avoid the risks of serious health problems that may affect them in adulthood such as heart disease, diabetes, strokes and cancers. Parents and carers play a key role in children’s health and evidence shows that what happens at home can have a significant affect including parents’ own physical and mental health needs and behaviours. Obesity in children is becoming an increasing problem, being overweight in childhood can continue through to adulthood creating the risk of longer-term health problems. There is growing evidence that breastfeeding provides some protection against obesity and diseases and infections as well as improving the all-important bonding and attachment between mother and baby. The emotional health of children and young people is just as important as their physical health and unless a person is feeling mentally healthy it is difficult for them to have good physical health and a general feeling of well-being. Poor mental health is also associated with other major issues such as teenage conceptions, bullying, violent and criminal behaviour and substance and alcohol misuse. The latest children’s health profile for Middlesbrough produced by the Child and Maternal Health Observatory (ChiMat) working with North East Public Health Observatory (NEPHO)

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provides a snapshot of child health in the area, which highlights that the health of children in Middlesbrough is generally poorer than the England average. This is supported by our own strategic needs assessment, which indicates high levels of childhood obesity and poor health outcomes for very young children due to issues including low rates of breastfeeding and smoking during pregnancy, and potentially high levels of unmet need for young people with mental and emotional health problems. Healthy children are more likely to become healthy adults and it is therefore important that health issues for children in Middlesbrough are addressed at an early age if we are to improve health outcomes for them in later life. Addressing health issues in early childhood has also been shown to have a significant impact on the demand and cost of health services.


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OUR KEY PRIORITIES AND ACTIONS FOR 2011-2014 IMPROVE THE WELL-BEING AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE MIDDLESBROUGH - THE LOCAL PICTURE •

Using national prevalence figures for mental health disorders for under 18 year olds it is estimated that approximately 3,100 young people have some form of mental health need requiring a service from a trained mental health professional.

For the period 2007/2010 there were 229 reported incidents of self harm in under 18 year olds representing 12% of all incidents for this age group.

SUMMARY •

The prevalence across Middlesbrough of the key risk factors for poor mental health outcomes indicates that there is significant unmet demand for mental health support and that existing provision is unlikely to provide sufficient capacity if mental health support needs were translated into referrals.

Bullying continues to be a concern for many children and young people, however the number of children and young people who have experienced bullying has significantly reduced since 2008.

Bullying is a serious and persistent problem, particularly for children of primary school age.

The proportion of reception age children and year 6 pupils who are overweight or obese is higher than the regional and national average at 24.7% and 36.9% respectively (national average 22.8% and 32.6%).

Despite some very positive participation and perception outcomes, physical health outcomes for primary school age children are poor, with obesity levels above both regional and national averages.

High levels of free school meal eligibility and take up, a highly regarded school catering service and high levels of engagement in the healthy schools programme give schools an excellent platform to engage young people in healthy lifestyle initiatives. However, recent price rises have begun to undermine the potential of this position by reducing school meal take up.

Health outcomes for very young children are reduced by high levels of smoking and alcohol consumption during pregnancy and low levels of sustained breastfeeding.

29.1% of women in Middlesbrough smoke during pregnancy showing a slight reduction but this continues to be a challenge with the number of women who smoke during pregnancy in Middlesbrough being twice the national average.

9.5% of babies born in Middlesbrough have a low birth weight which can lead to a range of health problems.

Only 48% of new Mums began to breastfeed their babies compared to 56% across the North East and 73% nationally.

Based on the Annual Pupil survey most children and young people say they have good physical and emotional health (59%) and 89% say they know someone who they could talk to if they were worried about something.

The percentage of pupils participating in at least two hours of good physical education per week has shown year on year improvement reaching 90% in 2008/09.


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO REMAIN FREE FROM THE HARMS CAUSED BY NEGATIVE RISK TAKING BEHAVIOUR

POPULATION OUTCOME (WHAT DIFFERENCE WILL IT MAKE?)

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE ARE SAFEGUARDED FROM INTENTIONAL AND UNINTENTIONAL HARM

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO HAVE GOOD PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL HEALTH

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE TO GROW UP FREE FROM POVERTY

CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE ARE HAPPY

YOUNG PEOPLE HAVE GOOD SOCIAL NETWORKS AND POSITIVE RELATIONSHIPS

CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE MAINTAIN A HEALTHY WEIGHT AND DIET

THE CONFIDENCE AND SELF-ESTEEM IN YOUNG PEOPLE WILL IMPROVE

PARENTS AND CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE ARE MOTIVATED TO MAKE LIFESTYLE CHANGES

SERVICE OUTCOME (WHAT IS OUR GOAL?)

PROMOTE POSITIVE ROLE MODELS

BUILDING BLOCKS (ACTIONS?)

WOMEN EXPERIENCE A HEALTHY PREGNANCY

BABIES AND INFANTS ARE HEALTHY

ALL YOUNG PEOPLE LEAD A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE

INCREASE YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONFIDENCE AND SELF-ESTEEM

PROVIDE APPROPRIATE SUPPORT AND ACCESS TO SOCIAL NETWORKS THAT ASSIST GOOD EMOTIONAL HEALTH

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CHILDREN HAVE A HEALTHY START IN LIFE

INCREASE PARENTING SKILLS THAT SUPPORT A HEALTHY FAMILY LIFESTYLE

PROVIDE SUPPORT AND ADVICE DURING AND AFTER PREGNANCY

YOUNG PEOPLE EAT HEALTHIER

PARENTS HAVE KNOWLEDGE ON HOW TO PROVIDE A HEALTHY FAMILY ENVIRONMENT

FAMILIES HAVE ACCESS TO APPROPRIATE HEALTH RELATED SERVICES AT THE EARLIEST OPPORTUNITY BASED ON IDENTIFIED NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY

YOUNG PEOPLE RECEIVE EDUCATION IN HEALTHY EATING AND LIFESTYLES

YOUNG PEOPLE PARTICIPATE AND HAVE ACCESS TO AFFORDABLE SPORTS AND LEISURE ACTIVITIES

PROVIDE A RANGE OF YOUNG PEOPLE’S SERVICES THAT PROMOTE A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE

ESTABLISH EFFECTIVE PROCESSES FOR THE EARLY IDENTIFICATION OF HEALTH NEEDS AND APPROPRIATE REFERRAL ROUTES AND SIGNPOSTING TO SERVICES


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CREATING AN INTEGRATED, SKILLED AND CONFIDENT CHILDREN’S WORKFORCE Achieving improved outcomes for children and young people in a climate of diminishing resources and reduced capacity will require the transformation of existing services whose success will rely heavily on the skills, knowledge and competency of a flexible workforce. Middlesbrough supports the view that everyone who works with children and young people should be: •

Ambitious for every child and young person;

Excellent in their practice;

Committed to partnership and integrated working; and

Respected and valued as professionals.

A set of basic skills and knowledge needed by the workforce has been identified known as the ‘common core of skills and knowledge’ and includes six key areas: •

Effective communication and engagement;

Child and young person development;

Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of the child;

Supporting transitions;

Multi-agency working; and

Sharing information.

The common core will give everyone who works with children and young people the essential skills and knowledge they need to do their job effectively and improve outcomes for all children and young people. It is important to have a skilled and more stable workforce, in sufficient numbers, led and deployed effectively around the needs of children and young people. This workforce will work better in multi-disciplinary teams with an increasingly common language and understanding as well as having coherent career pathways across sectors. A clear focus on early

identification and prevention is required including the development of new roles and new ways of working for the benefit of children, young people and their families. To achieve this locally will require the involvement of a great deal of partnership working and success will depend to a great extent on the strength of those partnerships and increasingly on the capacity and quality of the people who plan, manage and deliver services at the front line. MCYPT is committed to reforming and supporting the children’s workforce to ensure the right services are in place delivered by the right people with the skills and knowledge to help improve outcomes for all children and young people in Middlesbrough. SUPPORTING THE WORKFORCE MCYPT has been gathering as much information about the core and wider children’s workforce in Middlesbrough to help understand what the needs of the workforce are and how to address them. Nationally there is a raft of initiatives, policy development and programmes aimed at improving the children’s workforce including the outcomes from the Social Work Task Force, the review of children’s social work headed by Professor Eileen Munro, schools remodelling and continuous professional development, young people’s workforce, health visiting and community children’s nursing services. It is important that MCYPT supports the work being undertaken in partner organisations whilst recognising that individually partners are responsible for the implementation of national policy and workforce development within their own organisation. MCYPT will focus on those issues that will help create a reformed and better-integrated children’s workforce that improves outcomes for children and young people and will begin to identify specific workforce groups which may require a more in depth focus due to local pressures or national policy developments.

The following issues will need to be included as part of any work undertaken by MCYPT in relation the children and young peoples workforce:


Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

CREATING AN INTEGRATED, SKILLED AND CONFIDENT CHILDREN’S WORKFORCE The following issues will need to be included as part of any work undertaken by MCYPT in relation the children and young people’s workforce: •

Recruitment and retention – to ensure that the right people with the right skills and knowledge are recruited into the children’s workforce.

Training and development – to provide appropriate training and development opportunities that ensure gaps in skills and knowledge are addressed.

Induction – to develop common induction standards across MCYPT and facilitate better integrated working across partner organisations.

Leadership and management - strong leadership and management are essential if integrated working is to be successful.

Integrated and locality working - to further develop our approach to integrated and locality working through better use of processes such as the common assessment framework and lead practitioner and better and more creative use of resources.

Workforce data and analysis – to continue to develop and improve mechanisms for gathering and analysing data.

INTEGRATED WORKING TO IMPROVE OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE AND FAMILIES Integrated working is about organisations work together in a co-ordinated and joined up way to ensure children, young people and their families can get easy access to the services they need when they need them. MCYPT fully supports a move towards a better-integrated workforce and aims to have more locally based integrated teams delivering better services for children and young people. Some progress has already been made and there is now a fully operational integrated youth support service (IYSS) delivering targeted services to young people in Middlesbrough. The social care teams are also working in locality based teams and there are a range of services being delivered from Children’s Centres across the town including early years, health and Jobcentre Plus. The intention is to build on this over the lifetime of this plan.

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COMMISSIONING MCYPT has established a Joint Commissioning Group (JCG), with membership from the Council, Primary Care Trust, and Voluntary/Community sector. The group aims to provide strategic advice, guidance and support to MCYPT in respect of all aspects of joint commissioning, and to investigate and promote innovative and new ideas in order to secure effective, value for money and high quality services that meet the needs of children, young people and their families. Work plans will be based on the MCYPT priorities. A Commissioning Framework is currently being consulted on. This sets out a definition of commissioning, and an agreed process for partners to follow, in order to promote a coordinated approach and achieve consistent standards in commissioning of services. The proposed standards are: •

All services will be planned and delivered in response to either a Common Assessment Framework (CAF), statutory requirement or a clearly identified need in the community;

Commissioners from MCYPT partner organisations will work together to assess local needs in order to inform agreed priorities and target resources;

Service planning and performance monitoring will have a clear outcomes focus;

Parents, carers and children and young people will be actively involved in the planning, designing and monitoring of services wherever possible;

Services will be designed to provide early help and prevention at the first signs of need;

Services will be designed to close the gap between the most disadvantaged and the rest of our community;

All commissioners will establish professional relations with the market in order to influence future service development and provide the ability for the market to be innovative and adapt to new service challenges; and,

All services are focused on providing easy access for children, young people and their families where it is possible to do so.

There are four basic steps to commissioning of services: Understand, Plan, Deliver and Review. The framework identifies the approaches to be taken in respect of each step. Commissioning can be regional, sub-regional, strategic, operational, or at an individual level, and therefore a wide range of people are carrying out a commissioner role. A toolkit is provided to help commissioners work through the four steps. MCYPT has agreed that the JCG will adopt the Health & Emotional Well-Being priority in order to establish an agreed approach for how joint commissioning will work in the future. An initial workshop to map out current provision and identify gaps and overlaps was very successful; a report is being produced in order to summarise the key issues arising from the analysis. This will inform the next steps of matching needs with the required services, with a particular focus on early help and prevention. Following a peer review of Emotional Health & Well-Being, work is also in progress to review Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAHMS) and related services. The results of this and the workshop analysis will inform further discussions on what services need to be commissioned, reviewed or decommissioned.


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Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

RESOURCING THE PLAN THROUGH JOINT COMMISSIONING OF SERVICES In order to make progress on the key priorities and outcomes identified in this plan resources will need to be reconfigured to ensure that sufficient funding is available. This will involve services considering how their exiting funding, staff capacity, skills and experience is deployed and consideration of different delivery models to ensure that the most effective and efficient services are available for children, young people and their families. The current financial climate requires us to redirect existing resources to enable the provision of early help services. The framework detailed below explains how MCYPT Executive and Board will look to implement the CYPP for 2011-14. REDIRECTING RESOURCES All services will be involved in reviewing what they do and how they do it. This will include identifying what is currently allocated to the different levels of need, considering what the delivery options are which might include commissioning external organisations, remaining with internal agencies or a combination of both. The CYPP identifies the ambition for moving to joint services, the commissioning approach to this will inform how these services will be developed. MCYPT will work with partners to begin to reconfigure their structures to direct appropriate resources into effective early help and preventative services. For example, working with Schools to develop joint approaches to providing early help services either through directly funded provision or jointly commissioning services. The transfer of responsibility for Public Health to Local Authorities via Health & Well Being Boards, and changes in the National Health Service, will place GPs and clinicians at the centre of commissioning decisions and provide opportunities to reshape services. The ultimate aim will be to improve outcomes for children, young people and their families through the provision of early help services and reduce the numbers of children and young people who require specialist services.

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Other approaches will also be adopted to ensure the efficient use of resources across MCYPT including: •

Supporting the voluntary and community sector in making coordinated external funding bids for major programmes;

Identifying where funding and staffing resources should be aligned across agencies to support joint commissioning of services;

Developing the market to ensure an appropriate choice of high quality services is available;

Ensuring an appropriate sharing of placement costs for children and young people with complex needs;

Joint working on workforce development, to ensure the right people with the right skills are in place to deliver high quality services;

Improve the use of data, management information and intelligence to improve our understanding of cost drivers and unit costs.


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HOW WILL WE MONITOR AND REVIEW THIS PLAN? Monitoring and reviewing this plan is about checking whether we did what we said we would do and asking ourselves whether this has made a difference in outcomes for children, young people and their families. It means constantly checking if we are still on track to achieve our improvement priorities and adapt our plan where necessary to respond to any new challenges or changes that may occur. Each year of the life of this plan MCYPT Board will review the actions and progress using the agreed Performance Management Framework to measure how successful MCYPT has been in improving outcomes for children, young people and their families. It will also review progress every six months to allow MCYPT Board to keep a close check on progress, identify best practice and take appropriate action where expected progress is below what has been agreed. It is important that children, young people and families are able to contribute and participate in the planning and review processes. MCYPT will continue to work with them to find out what difference the activities and services are making and to plan what it might need to do next.


Putting Children & Young People First - The Key to Middlesbrough’s Future

MANAGING OUR PERFORMANCE Partners are individually responsible for implementing this plan in the course of carrying out their normal functions. Regular monitoring of performance therefore takes place within each organisation through their own internal processes including scrutiny and formal inspections. MCYPT Board will form a collective view of the extent to which the priorities set out in this plan are being achieved and in particular how each partner is implementing the plan. It will do this by reviewing evidence, information and data relevant to each of the priority areas and will hold individual partners to account for their performance and provide challenge where necessary. MCYPT Executive will be responsible for collating, reviewing and evaluating performance against the priority areas and will report this to MCYPT Board on a regular basis and will continue to make use of the ‘Outcome Based Accountability’ model to support the performance management arrangements and help to move from ‘talk to action’.

MCYPT will do this by constantly asking a series of questions to help challenge and improve outcomes for children and young people. The questions it will ask are: 1.

What are the quality of life conditions we want for children, young people and their families (the outcome)?

2.

What do these conditions look like if you could see them (experience)?

3.

How will we know when we get there (indicators and measures)?

4.

How are we doing (where did we start and how has this improved over time)?

5.

Who are our partners that can play a role in doing it better?

6.

What is working and what is not?

7.

What do we need to do (action plan)?

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If you would like more information on the Children and Young People’s Plan for Middlesbrough or require a copy in a different language, large print, Braille or on audio tape, please contact:

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Lesley Spaven (Partnership Manager) 01642 728 080 lesley_spaven@middlesbrough.gov.uk


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