Issuu on Google+

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KONG / RSWEDEN SOUTH H HONG O N G KO N G / /B UBURUNDI R U N D I / O/ NONTARIO TA R I O / PA I S / SW E D/E N / O R EAFRICA G O N / S/OOREGON UTH AFRICA

PILOT

5 TIPS for planning your family reunion

// FROM US

We love this Bon Voyage Travel Journal from Boygirlparty! Snag a copy in time for your next big adventure.

At the heart of Wayfare is a desire to inspire people to go and do. When I read “The Daily Grind” or “Hong Kong,” what I love most is that these stories reflect a journey. I revel in the way travel used to be in “Retro Fly,” nostalgic for the days when flying was a privilege, not an obligation.

Wayfare is made up of a team of travelers, developers, expats, writers, photographers, and creative folks who bring their unique view to travel. They set out to present you with inspiring ideas and ways to make the most of your far-flung and everyday adventures. Our team is not only passionate about travel, but we’re eager to move online media forward without losing the impact and editorial voice that traditional publications offer. Not a single person here is a travel expert or social media visionary. Every element of what we do benefits from collaboration and passion. I invite you to get lost in these pages, discovering new places and the people behind each story. As the Wayfare team embarks on this new online adventure, please join us. Your contributions and insights are what will make us great. We have so much more to share with you in the coming months, but for now, we hope you enjoy your trip dotting the globe.

HAPPY TRAVELS!

IMAGES & STYLIN G BY REN ÉE CH ARTIER / J OURN ALS BY BOYG IR LPARTY

// FIELD GUIDE

Welcome to the first edition of Wayfare! Rather than designing

Colored arrows that look like this direct readers to the WEB SIT E , BLOG , or RE SOURCE noted.

We’ve incorporated a range of elements to make the magazine interactive, clickable, and participatory. Pages no longer turn, but rather screens slide. There is sound, video, pop-ups, and hyperlinks throughout, so you can not only learn more about the people and places featured, but also about the amazing contributors behind the articles. As Wayfare grows and expands to iPad, we look forward to incorporating more interactive features.

These Ws refer to BON US information linked to Wayfare. This may include recipes, extended interviews, additional images, contests, and more!

a magazine for print and sticking it on the web, we wanted to rethink the way we engage with digital media and content.

Use this field guide and the travel tips located throughout the magazine for getting the most out of the Wayfare experience. Above all else, have fun and enjoy Wayfare!

—  A NNE & L AU R E N, TH E D E S I GN TE AM

TRAV E L TI P S guide readers to getting

T R AV E L T I P / S E E M O R E BY C L I C K I N G T H E D OT S

the most out of Wayfare.

Welcome to Wayfare!

H YP E R L I NKS within articles are bolded,

and they provide additional information.

BY WAY FA R E

W

ROLLOVERS may come in a few forms,

but look for icons like these on iPad (and TRAVEL TIPS ) to find more information.

Dots in the bottom right corner indicate ADDITION AL IMAGE S . Tap on the next dot to view more on iPad.

We thought it would be fun to include the voices of some of our authors. Look for this icon to hear SOUND BIT E S.

BYL I NE S of authors, photographers,

VIDEOS have been integrated into the

and illustrators are all hyperlinked to their websites for additional props.

layout of the magazine to help you learn more about a topic in a dynamic form.

// CONTRIBUTORS

ERICA DUBLIN

co-founder / editor-in-chief

JOSEPHINE COURANT co-founder / publisher

ELIZA SARASOHN executive editor

NICOLE ROGERS

MEGHAN M c EWEN

contributing writer

ANNE STARK DITMEYER art director / editor

LAUREN O'NEILL

art director / designer

ERICA NIKOLAIDIS copy editor

editorial assistant

WE'RE ON A MISSION

We recognize that travel is not defined by how many miles you cover. It’s about finding inspiration along the journey and celebrating the everyday moments. It’s about the spirit of discovery — breaking out of your routine to unwind, connect, and learn. It’s this desire to go, to celebrate, and to experience that drives everything we do.

// GUEST CONTRIBUTORS

sfo

to

LAURA BRUNOW MINER Editor, designer, and lover of photography, Laura decided to take her passions and expertise and create Pictory, an online photojournalism magazine. The idea is that anyone can submit a photo — themes range from love, loss, family, and travel — which is then curated into polished photo essays and shared online. Laura and Pictory shared some of our favorite images from the Best of Small Town America.

/ / / / / / / / / / / / /

SAN FRANCISCO

BEN + KRISTY CARLSON A Midwest American girl at heart, Kristy, “the camera girl,“ and her husband Ben, “the coffee guy,” moved to Burundi and created the Long Miles Coffee Project. Kristy beautifully captures their family’s adventures in central Africa as they work with coffee farmers to improve their lives through fair trade. One look at Kristy’s photos and we had to learn more about this project, and the Carlson family.

LEELA CYD ROSS PEGGY WONG Award-winning designer and former deputy art director at Martha Stewart Living, Peggy launched her own studio in 2009. With a great visual eye, she shares her passion for photography through her visual blog, on bluepoolroad. In late 2011, she launched her photography site full of beautiful locations around the world captured with style. We invited Peggy to share Hong Kong through her eyes and shoot our first cover.

When Leela got married, she and her husband didn’t ask for gifts; they asked to go around the world for their honeymoon. You can regularly find her work as a features contributor for Apartment Therapy’s The Kitchn and ReNest. Her images have also appeared in The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, and Portland Monthly. Leela joined us truffle hunting in Oregon and captured all the family fun.

// PLACES WE HEART E RI CA D UB LI N , E DI TO R-I N-C HI E F

places we heart I MAG E BY K R I ST I A N A S PAU L DI N G

My Aunt Jean’s beach house in Ensenada, Mexico. This is where I spent summers as a kid; playing Frogger and consuming packets of Fun Dip in the local cantina after a long day of surf fishing with my mom. The house was nothing fancy — one room, one loft — but it houses some of my fondest memories of growing up.

I am in the midst of looking for a Wayfare SF office but I keep coming back to the idea of renovating an Airstream trailer. Corkboard walls for endless storyboarding; a popdown conference room; the ability to pick up and go the first chance we get. Dreamy.

E LI ZA SA RAS O H N , E XEC U TI V E E D I TO R

The Boulder Dushambe Teahouse in Boulder, Colorado. Alongside Boulder creek, it’s filled with amazing light, and feels like walking into a jewel box. I waited tables here during college and wish I had managed to swipe the topsecret AMAZING chai recipe.

The open air dining pavilion at the Chedi Club, Tanah Gajah in Ubud, Bali. This is where we went on our honeymoon; sipping freshly squeezed papaya juice at sunrise surrounded by a 360 degree view of bright green rice paddies swaying in the breeze is still one of the standout experiences of my life. Total serenity.

// PLACES WE HEART A N N E STA RK D I TM EYE R , A RT D I R EC TO R

The American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland is a place that has always made me smile, with work from untrained artists who can show us all a new way of looking at the world.

places we heart

I’m always drawn to really mundane things and places when I travel. I love going to grocery stores and markets. The packaging in this vending machine in Osaka, Japan caught my eye.

LAURE N O ' N E I LL , A RT D I R EC TO R I MAG E BY B E N FI N K / SA L LY DAV I ES

Obsessed with design and mass transit systems, one visit to the London Transport Museum had me itching for more. A peek at the original Tube Map, some Underground art collaborations, and dozens of vintage promotional posters was enough for me to "mind the gap" until my next visit.

A trip to New York City would not be complete without brunch at my favorite East Village spot, Veselka. This 24-hour, Ukranian eatery is home to some top-notch challah French toast and delicious pierogis. Regardless of your cravings, you'll be set for a day of exploring in the Big Apple.

SW E D E N O N TA R I O

OREGON SEA RANCH

DETROIT N E W YO R K

PA R I S

A M ST E R DA M

H O N G KO N G

H AWA I I THAILAND VIETNAM

S A I L B OAT

BURUNDI

SOUTH AFRICA

PATAG O N I A

T R AV E L T I P / C L I C K A D OT & J U M P TO A STO RY I N T H AT D E ST I N AT I O N O R C O N T I N U E O N  .  .  .

NEW ZEALAND

// SOUVENIRS

3 4

1

2

YOU AR[T] HERE

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We confess: vacation photos are a dominant theme in our approach to home decorating, but they’re not the only way to display your affinity for adventure. We traversed the world (wide web) to uncover these map-themed finds for showcasing your travels, near and far.

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7

on top Custom Letters by Little White Dog on Etsy, $40 / Manhattan Double Bottle tote by Maptotes, $22 / Handmade ImagineNations globe / Oliver Jeffers' America map, $120

on bottom Wonderful silk-screened map by Best Made Co., $140 / Stitching postcards, $10 / Les Robes Géographiques by Elisabeth Lecourt

TRAVEL TIP / STAY TUNED ON THE WAYFARE BLOG FOR MORE ABOUT EACH CREATOR

// AWAY WE GO

AMSTERDAM R O U N D U P BY C A R O L I N E D U K E a k a G R E E DY G I R L

pe

Who says you actually have to go somewhere to dress the part? As the bike capital of the world, this Dutch city is always on the go but never frenzied. Dressing the part of an urban Amsterdammer should reflect that same mobility: an ensemble that looks as polished on the street as it does in a cozy corner booth. Away we go to Amsterdam — chic, calm, and comfortable!

s tf irt or c k r u i s i ng i n l o ng s

!

r

fe c

for her Pocket Sweater by A.P.C. at La Garconne, $340 / Slowdance Skirt by Madewell, $138 / Diamonte, Silver, Bronze, & Wood Ring by surevolution at Bird, $85 / Golden Brogues by Joe Fresh, $79 / Blackburn Cove Frames at Eyefly, $99 / Messenger Bag by Claire Vivier at Otte, $364 / Fur Trim Neck Warmer by Timo Weiland at Les Nouvelles, $150

for him Fletcher Shirt by Rag & Bone, $475 / Growl Chino by AllSaints Spitalfields, $125 / Utility Pack at Steven Alan, $275 / Alpine Flap Hat by Jack Spade, $145 / Glenn Boot from Grenson at Toast, £195 for both Tour Basic Bicycle by Gazelle, $999

for more Amsterdam inspiration

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O U R F IVE FAVORI T E D U TC H ST Y LE B LOGS

// ESCAPE ARTISTS

PAINT THE TOWN Over the last year, Jordan (the crafty blogger behind Oh Happy Day!) along with her husband, Paul Ferney (a painter), loaded up their stuff in a storage unit, packed a few bags and their two boys, and left San Francisco to live in Paris for a year. We caught up with Jordan and Paul to find out how life in Paris has influenced them. How has living in Paris changed or enhanced your creative approach?

What has been the greatest surprise?

Of course Paris has a reputation for attracting artists and creatives and while I can’t deny how ridiculously beautiful everything is, I think I was more inspired by the change of scenery than Paris. We had been living in San Francisco seven years, and it's easy to get used to things. In Paris you get lost on a regular basis, and it forces you to be childlike and keep a sense of discovery. It is so inspiring.

There are lots of ways to do things. I suppose I already “knew” this, but it's compelling to see people live completely different than how it's done in the US and still grow up healthy and happy.

What has been the biggest challenge?

The language. We don’t speak French. We’ve picked up a decent amount, but it's difficult unless you go to school or work in French to really learn it.

What are your three favorite places in Paris?

Walking in the Marais down Rue Vieille du Temple towards the Seine at night. There is nothing more beautiful. Artazart is my favorite art and design bookstore. La Droguerie has an endless supply of trimmings and ribbon. I spend hours in there without realizing it. Where do you feel most inspired?

I get a lot of inspiration when I get away from my computer and get out to explore.

S EE MORE OF PAUL' S PA R I S I A N IN S PI RAT I ON ON I NSTAG RA M

View more of Paul’s latest project, Little Paris Paintings, inspired by some of their favorite everyday scenes.

// VICARIOUS TRAVELER

from paris, with love

As much as we’d love to hop on a plane to Paris tomorrow, we know it’s not always possible. So we compiled a list of our favorite tunes, apps, books, and blogs to share some of the spirit that make this city so special. Hopefully, they’ll help you feel like you’re there.

for the playlist

for the blogroll

With albums Pop Up and Safari Disco Club, the French group Yelle brings electro pop to life while having a lot of fun.

PICSELO

A look at special spots around Paris through the eyes and ears of a French stylist.

PRÊT À VOYAGER

Full of mini Paris guides, don’t miss the “Tour de France” arrodissement project, and expat tips.

PARIS VS. NYC

for the smartphone France's tastemaker, My Little Paris gives you a daily dose of what's happening around the capital city in style. Available for iPhone and iPad.

for the bookshelf Nichole Robertson, aka Little Brown Pen, started a Paris color series on her blog that was a huge hit. First there was an online shop, and now there is a book you can pre-order, due out in April 2012.

Nº 1

PARIS BY MOUTH

Find the best eats with practical information and handy guides for the numerous French holidays.

GARANCE DORÉ

Photographer and style maven capturing the latest street style, in French (and English, too).

T R AV E L T I P / T H E R E ’ S M U C H M O R E TO CO M E O N T H E B LO G !

TOURI ST DE STI N ATI O N

A visually engaging comparison between Paris and New York City by French designer Vahram Muratyan.

THE NUMBER OF PARISIAN TOURISTS EACH YEAR according to 2011 US News Travel

15.1 MILLION

// TIME TRAVEL

RETRO FLY

R O U N D U P BY L AU R E N O ' N E I L L

With PanAm in-flight and Mad Men (soon-to-be) back on the airwaves, we're filling our carry-on bags with all the necessities. From San Fran to New York to Paris, we're jetsetting in full retro fly fashion. Take note before you take flight and tune in for another on-air season.

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// TIME TRAVEL

JE T S E T

4 TERS I MET A ND

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L IK E D

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from top left Selima Sun速 for J.Crew Sophia sunglasses at J.Crew, $128 / Vintage white gloves via Etsy, $18 / Ole Caliente nail polish by Essie, $8 / Harrison Street passport cover by Kate Spade, $68 / "Jetsetters I Met and Liked" by Archie Grand at Dormify, $11 / Adventurous Red Supercalifragilipstick! at Kate Spade, $24 / Diana F+ camera at Lomography.com, $99 / Pan Am Blue Orion bag by PanAm, $89 / Vintage '60s Vera Neumann scarf via Etsy, $15 / "Are We There Yet" luggage tag by Flight001, $18

// FAMILY AFFAIR

sea ranch reunion E S S AY BY E R I CA D U B L I N /

I M AG E S BY E M I LY SA R A

or me, travel has always been about Fdoing something new. I’ve always loved visiting new places, trying new things, and meeting new people, but it wasn’t until my son was born that I began to understand how satisfying it is to return to the same, familiar spot, often at the same time, year after year.

As a new mom I’ve found a whole new appreciation for our annual (week-long) family trip to Sea Ranch. My husband’s family traditions, etched through decades of family history and stories in this seaside resort, suddenly have new meaning for me. Slowly, they are becoming my stories and family history now. Located one hundred miles north of San Francisco, The Sea Ranch is rugged ten-

mile stretch of land that runs along the Sonoma County coast. It was here that my husband’s great-grandfather first took his family to camp. Over the years, the resort has changed somewhat, but not by much. Instead of open land, you’ll now find a speckling of private homes that are similar in style, which consist of modern, timberframe structures designed to withstand prevailing weather and to not disrupt the neighbors' views. Surrounded by my in-laws, I'm pictured here with my husband and son to the left.

// FAMILY AFFAIR

The tradition continues. Each year, cousins and kin gather for five days to spend time at Sea Ranch, reconnecting and enjoying each other’s company. Young and old, we look forward to Friday night lasagna, morning hikes along the bluffs, and hunts for sea creatures in the abundant tide pools. Like a beach stone washed by the tides, with each annual trip to Sea Ranch my heart is shaped and stolen by this tiny ocean community. Sea Ranch allows me, year after year, to retrace my son’s footsteps in the sand, and after he is grown, it will be a place for him to return with his family one day. Erica Dublin is co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Wayfare. She and her husband raise their son in San Francisco.

My husband’s family traditions,  etched through decades of family history and stories in this seaside resort, suddenly have new meaning for me. A daily visit to walk on beach (pictured above) is the highlight of the trip.

// FAMILY AFFAIR T I P S F O R P L A N N I N G YO U R FA M I LY R E U N I O N

// Sponsored Advertising Section

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let’s stay together I MAGES PROVIDED BY CROSB Y ST R E E T H OT E L

// CHECK-IN

I MAG E BY P E T E R LU N DSTR OM, W DO / TR E E HOTE L . S E

FRO M T H E SWEDE S Forget setting up a flimsy tent and sleeping on the ground. The Swedes seem to have it all figured out: primitive forest huts, log cabins, and tree houses that take their aesthetic cues from the surrounding forest. While it’s not exactly camping (and definitely not glamping), this simple brand of birch-tree travel is all about peace, quiet, and wilderness. Designtripper rounds up three idyllic spots in Sweden where you can satisfy your primal urge to sleep among the trees — without completely sacrificing all manner of comfort and style. WO R D S BY M E G H A N M c E W E N

// CHECK-IN

I MAG E BY E LG E R L I N DGR E N / BIL DKL IPP. S E

TreeHotel This growing collection of tree houses (pictured on the previous page) was an instant internet sensation even before it opened last year. Designed by well-known Swedish architects and designers, each modernist tree cabin is innovative in its own way: the Bird’s Nest is almost entirely covered with branches, while the Mirrorcube reflects the trees from the forest in its mirrored surface, making it strikingly imperceptible. LUXURY Prices start at $450 a night; make reservations at treehotel.se.

Kolarbyn Self-anointed “Sweden’s most primitive hotel,” these traditional grass-and-vine-covered forest huts are located by the shore of Lake Skärsjön. There’s no electricity (only candles), and guests cook meals over the fire. Besides the pleasure of waking up surrounded by nature, the best amenity is a floating sauna on the lake. BUDGET Prices start at $60 per person per night; make reservations at welcomebeyond.com.

// CHECK-IN

Urnatur From the creative husband-and-wife team behind the furniture design company and sprawling nature lodge, Urnatur, the primitive structures are completely handmade. When you are visiting, you live like the name — which means ancient nature — suggests: building fires, picking mushrooms in the forest, chopping firewood, and taking wood-fired bath soaks. Even the fences are handmade from spruce and juniper. MODERATE Prices start at $206 per hut per night; make reservations at urnatur.se.

SO U VENIRS

souvenirs from the top Ekobo "Elements" Sustainable Bamboo Bowls from 15 Euros, $40 / Cole & Son's Woods Wallpaper at Anthropologie, $198/roll, Rund Bricka Ground Moss Plate, $55 / Elisabeth Dunker's OK Pillow Case, $58 I MAGE BY ULRIKA KRY NITZ / UR N AT UR . SE

// MEMENTO

✖ G O L D E N B AY, N E W Z E A L A N D

LEFT TURN

✖ CHIANG MAI, THAILAND ✖ PATAG O N I A , S O U T H A M E R I C A ✖ H O C H I M I N H C I T Y, V I E T N A M

It’s become cliche: we travel to “get away,” to “escape.” But the best trips change our lives in lasting ways we didn’t see coming. Stepping out of our routines (even for a short while) often sets off a domino effect that alters our perspective forevermore. We asked four fascinating writers and photographers to share a memorable trip and how it changed his or her life for the better.

W E T R AV E L , I N I T I A L LY , TO LOS E O U R S E LV E S , AND WE TR AV E L , N E X T , TO F I N D O U R S E LV E S . — PICO IYE R

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S H A R E YO U R L I F E - C H A N G I N G T R I P A N D H E A R OT H E R I N S P I R I N G STO R I E S O N O U R FAC E B O O K PAG E

// MEMENTO

HOW TO QUIT YOUR JOB BY S U S I E H A R R I S O N

M

y travel story doesn’t start at a Goan spiritual retreat or on a rugged hilltop of Mayan ruins, but in the unlikely setting of a small farm in Devon on England’s south coast. My boyfriend and I had both decided to start freelance businesses and wanted a break from our busy working lives and tiny, expensive London apartments. Our bucolic Devon hideaway was just the tonic we needed to focus on work projects and afforded me more time for photography, developing green fingers (I had a garden!), and sheep whispering.

After a year, businesses more established and our feet itching, we booked flights to Australia. After all, we could run our businesses from a remote farm in Devon, so why not Bondi Beach? The six months we spent in Australia and New Zealand were an amazing adventure. Many friends assumed we were doing the “grown-up gap year” thing, had won the lottery, or were in the midst of

✖ G O L D E N B AY, N E W Z E A L A N D

late-20s crises. In fact, we continued to work full-time from our antipodean locations. The time difference meant we could be out exploring all day and work in the evening. We rented rooms with creative locals and embarked on a slower exploration of destinations including Melbourne’s cool Fitzroy neighborhood, the bubbling volcanic pools of Rotorua on New Zealand’s North Island, and white-sanded beaches at Golden Bay in the south. Almost three years on, we have continued to live this way and made homes in Paris, Stockholm, Berlin, Copenhagen, and Lisbon. During this time, the “lifestyle design” or “digital nomad” movement has grown, becoming more recognized and (hopefully) respected. Call it what you will, at each stop we’ve rented apartments, explored the culture, made friends, and had amazing experiences. The lifestyle isn’t for everyone, but I feel so lucky to have eschewed expectations of office life and mortgages to create and follow my own dreams.

Susie Harrison is a writer, photographer and London-born world wanderer. Follow her adventures at suzanneharrisonphoto.com.

// MEMENTO

LOST BUT NOT ALONE BY N I K DAU M

ai, a small Thai town north of Chiang Mai, is usually a scenic two- hour scooter drive. But as J and I discover, a single missed turn spirals into an extended adventure.

P

Suddenly, an ancient farmer comes inside. His expression changes from startled to confused. In Thai, he asks where we are going. We look at our soggy map and shrug.

We leave town at 10:30 am and drive north, then turn onto an eastward shortcut. But after passing pepper farms and elephants, we realize it’s the wrong way. Then another wrong turn leads us through increasingly smaller towns until we literally hit the end of the road.

The rain stops, and the man mumbles something before disappearing into the cabbage.

Instead of backtracking, we turn down a promising-looking road. It meanders uphill, turning into paving stones, then mud. Assuming the mud was temporary, we continue through deep ruts and around tire busting stones. Up and down the hills we fishtail. Now too far to turn back, we decide to keep going at a clumsy 10km/h. A sudden downpour starts. We skid to a stop, jump a fence, and duck into a rickety shelter overlooking the cabbage-covered hills.

Onward, the sun sets as we run out of gas and coast into a tiny valley town where the locals shoot us WTF looks. A man uses a hand pump to fill our gas tank. Another hour later we’re back in the known world. The roads are paved again, but unlit. And cow patties are everywhere. After nearly hitting a cow in the darkness, J becomes the cow spotter, scanning into the turns for the glint of bovine eyes. We fly through the musky star field of splattering bugs and reach Pai twelve hours after we began. I never told J this, but that journey was the first time I knew I wanted to be with her forever.

Nik Daum is hilarious. He is also a blogger, artist, and photographer. Read the whole story of his scooter misadventures — complete with photo series — here.

✖ CHIANG MAI, THAILAND

// MEMENTO

CAPTURE THE SPIRIT BY G E M M A I N G A L L S

A

ndy and I took a trip to South America in December 2010, where we spent a week backpacking in the national parks of Patagonia. This was to be the last of this type of adventuring before the birth of our son, Oliver, in November of 2011. Below is a bit of writing from the trails: Today we saw two gauchos on horseback with flat felt berets herding unshorn sheep across the green and tan pampas. They waved into the wind as we passed, their black and white dogs running up alongside the tires. The milky blue river flows through. And at its edge, a red-roofed white estancia is tucked, with its scarce scattering of out buildings, and cypress pressing against the wind. Some magnetic field must have drawn people here before the first fencepost was planted, out into the vast tracts of land, sky, and water.

✖ PATAG O N I A , S O U T H A M E R I C A Gemma Ingalls is photographer and co-creator behind The Epicures, a breathtaking online travelogue of adventures she shares with her husband, Andrew.

Two days ago, we hiked twenty miles of trail, circling round the clear blue glacial lakes at the base of Torres del Paine, ascending up through the single track beech forest trail, Lupin and Buttercup, and Violet springing up all around. Resting at a lookout, we hear the rumble of the hanging glacier, cracking in the sun, even as the water flowed down and built it

up again. Traipsing along a dwarf forest ridge, the persistent chirp of a young bird in a carved-out tree burl. One fuzzy orange beak peeking out, then two, and finally three on a vertical line, crying for mother's worm. We reach Campamento Guardas well after 10pm, the day’s light finally fading from the sky. We eat in silence on a log with our headlamps lighting our laps, then burrow in to sleep. Waking early, we watch over the field of blue ice below; the clean pale blue on the surfaces bleeds into a deep turquoise in the shifting ravines. Our bus bumps along the dirt track. Light leaks through the clouds, and moves across the dusty green grasses now illuminated, flowering yellow. A band of light hovers at the edge of the steppe, where mountains make their steep, purple descent. Two roads intersect, where we pick up a hitchhiker with a small, worn pack and a guitar. As we traveled through the vast space, the sheer size and scale of the nature around us had a profoundly calming effect. It became an elemental and essential journey, which left us in awe of the planet and ready for our next adventure in parenthood. The spirit of the place is still very much with us.

// MEMENTO

HOW TO CROSS THE STREET BY A N N E STA R K D I T M E Y E R

B

y the age of 21, one would think one has acquired the skills and knowledge about how to cross a street, but on a trip to Vietnam I learned otherwise. Of the ten ports we visited around the world on the study abroad program Semester at Sea, the arrival briefing in Ho Chi Minh City was the most memorable. As in each location, a diplomat boarded the ship to welcome us and inform us of the current political climate in the country. In this case, he also felt it necessary to teach us how to cross the street: Most important, look left, look right, look left again. When crossing the street maintain a consistent speed. Think of a squirrel who darts out in traffic; if you maintain your speed, you are less likely to be hit. Anyone who has crossed a street in Vietnam will understand what sound advice this really is. I took this advice to heart every single time I crossed the street in Vietnam, and it has stuck with me ever since.

Fast forward to my first job interview out of college. I was in New York City visiting a friend and picnicking in Central Park when I got a call from National Geographic, which was holding a position open so they could interview me. Long story short, I didn’t get the job (and I know why), but I did get to the interview, where they quoted my cover letter in which I talked about darting squirrels and crossing the street in Vietnam. It stuck with them, too. Now, ten years laters, I see how these most mundane of experiences have shaped the way I see things. I started my blog, Prêt à Voyager, with the idea that “travel is not about where you go, but how you see the world.” These days I may not be working for that other publication, but being a part of the launch of Wayfare is pretty exciting on its own. One never knows where the roads may take you and what you may pick up along the way.

Anne Stark Ditmeyer, aka Prêt à Voyager, is a designer and editor with a love of travel. She is also a contributing editor for Design*Sponge, and an art director for Wayfare. H O C H I M I N H C I T Y, V I E T N A M

Hong Kong is a city of juxtapositions: old & new, east & west, yin & yang. Through the lens of photographer and designer Peggy Wong, we embark on her annual trip to her homeland, where she shares visions of childhood memories and the ever-changing landscape of this breathtaking island city.

T R AV E L T I P / L I ST E N TO P E G GY ' S R E F L E C T I O N S O N H O N G KO N G BY C L I C K I N G T H E AU D I O B U T TO N P H OTO G R A P H Y & AU D I O BY P E G GY WO N G

HONG KONG

Taking a ferry ride is a nice escape from all the hustle and bustle of the city.

One of my favorite things to do when I visit is a ride on the Star Ferry. Just a short five-minute ferry ride across the Victoria Harbour, you’ll find striking images of the skylines of Hong Kong.

Temples give me a sense of peace, and the quietness is really what draws me in.

Visitors flock to the Wong Tai Sin Temple in search of fortunes using an ancient practice called “kau cim.� You light incense sticks, kneel before the main alter, and shake a bamboo cylinder of fortune sticks until one or more fall out. The stick is then exchanged for a piece of paper bearing the number of sticks, which is handed to the soothsayer to read your fortune.

I spend my days revisiting places that I frequented when I was young, but I also have a great time exploring new ones. I think the best way to experience a city is to walk it. I discovered this doctor's office while wandering the backstreets. In contrast, the Landmark (pictured right) is one of the swankiest places to shop in Hong Kong, my old stomping ground.

Hong Kong is full of skyscrapers, so it is a real treat to happen upon a historic temple like this on a corner of a crowded street.

The stands for lighting incense sticks pictured here are at Wong Tai Sin Temple. Pleasantly surprised to find such simple and clean lines in such a traditional environment. Pictured left, the Hung Shing Temple in Wan Chai is a Grade 1 historic building, meaning it is under the protection of the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance.

The city hiding behind layers of mist is quite beautiful.

Another discovery on one of my walking adventures in the backstreets of Hong Kong. To the right, the taxi stand at the Star Ferry Pier in Tsim Sha Tsui is brilliant. Notice the Chinese and English characters together that fit perfectly in the curve.

Store front of Australia Dairy Company, a popular breakfast spot in Jordan. Queues would often wrap around the block for a taste of this local favorite. Pictured left, the Chinese character "noodles" drawn here is typically used on a restaurant’s window to show that it's a noodle place.

With an unobstructed view of the harbour, the ISOLA bar + grill is a favorite hideaway place in the afternoons.

I grew up on Blue Pool Road in Happy Valley, and (as seen here) this was my tram stop! Much of the neighborhood is very different now, but I still enjoy a visit now and again. When you are young, the simple pleasures of everyday activities, like taking a tram ride, are often overlooked. And that's precisely why Blue Pool Road holds a special place in my heart — when it came time to naming my design studio, I decided on the name "bluepoolroad."

the daily grind

LIVING DAY-BY-DAY IN BURUNDI

Ben and Kristy Carlson were just a couple of Midwestern lovebirds who shared a passion for coffee — and adventure. Fast forward five years and they’re living in the rural heart of East Africa, working to secure fair wages for coffee farmers, and raising their two little boys in the shadow of the coffee trees. P H OTO G R A P H Y BY K R I ST Y C A R L S O N / I N T E RV I E W BY E L I Z A S A R A S O H N

There are quite a few destinations right on my doorstep that I can’t wait to show my boys. Many places in Tanzania, the Gorillas in Rwanda, the flowers of Namaqualand.

When you were first moving out of the country, did you think you would end up raising your family abroad? Yes. It has been one of my dreams to give my kids an upbringing full of adventure, travel, and interesting experiences in far away places. For me, the biggest joy of parenthood is adventuring together. Truth is, this lifestyle can be lived anywhere. I think an adventure can be made out of the silliest things, and without even leaving the house. You don’t have to move to the middle-of-nowhere Africa to instill a spirit of adventure in your kids, but it sure doesn’t hurt!

What do you hope your children will learn from living abroad? I know that by living abroad our kids are gaining life skills that will serve them well in whatever future they choose. We believe in them as people… deeply. Giving them exposure to this other world is part of what makes raising them so much fun.

I think an adventure can be made out of the silliest things, and without even leaving the house. You don’t have to move to the middle-of-nowhere Africa to instill a spirit of adventure in your kids.

How long will you stay in Burundi? We are the “put down roots and stay awhile� kinds of people (who just happen to love adventure). We have been in Burundi for five months now, and we hope to stay long enough to see coffee farmers getting a fairer price for their coffee. We have a bah-zillion and one dreams for change here, but Burundi can be a difficult place to implement plans! We hope to feel a sense of accomplishment before we would consider moving on.

W

FIND OUT WHO SE LLS BURUNDI COF F E E

WAYFARE | DRAFT

I had a few friends as a kid who grew up in cool and interesting places and I thought that they were the most amazing people I had ever met.

While Burundi is not entirely stable, we feel pretty safe in our day-to-day lives. We do see a lot of military and police with big guns, but they have slowly become a part of the fabric of our lives here.

What few first experiences made you doubt your decision to move there? What convinced you that moving there was the right choice? I was just talking to Ben about the importance of looking back. The importance of remembering all that you have gone through, so that you can see how far you’ve come and make adjustments for the future. We had a pretty rough beginning. On the blog, you can see the strain in every

post early on. In fact, I would often be unable to sleep, writing (and crying) in the middle of the night. Not only were we in a completely new place, but we couldn’t speak a word of French, we had a film crew following us around everywhere, and our house was under construction when we arrived. Despite all these challenges, I was sure in the most absolute part of my being that we had made the right choice. We had made the decision to move not only with an adventurous spirit, but with

faith and hope in God and with a purpose we believed in. I am passionate about becoming the kind of person I want my kids to be. Having a dream and pursuing it is a huge part of that for me. It’s scary to discover what you want out of life, and to go get it. But, if we can’t show them what it looks like to have a dream and work hard to achieve it, I can’t really expect that they will turn out to be men who are capable of that.

If you left Burundi tomorrow, what would you most miss? I’m realizing that in just five short months of being here, there are plenty of things that I would miss! I would miss hearing my oldest spew out French words with a perfect accent, seeing the mountains in the DRC across Lake Tanganyika, the friendships we have made, but most of all … I would miss working towards our giant coffee-covered dream of helping coffee farmers. We are here to accomplish a goal.

How often do you visit the states? How regularly do you get to see friends and family? One of our best friends from South Africa, Thobe, has made it up for a visit, and the film crew is about to make its fourth trip out to us. They are going to arrive with an assortment of cheeses, South African wine, and chocolate. We can’t wait! We try to get to the States as much as possible, but with the price of tickets

for our family resembling the price of a new car, we end up getting there about every other year. On a good stretch we make an annual trip. Being Midwest kids, we usually try to make it there during the summer to avoid the chill. This year marks the first time we will be bringing the kids home for Christmas. Our kids have never seen snow, so we can’t wait to go sledding and beat our kids in a snowball fight … our two year old is going down!

Burundi is home to 800,000 coffee farmers laboring under some of the poorest working conditions around the world.

I’m passionate about becoming the kind of person I want my kids to be. Having a dream and pursuing it is a huge part of that for me.

What can our readers do to support your mission in Burundi? Stay in touch. We really value connecting with people who understand and appreciate our vision for helping coffee farmers. Also, this is a biggie, know where your coffee comes from. And, of course, DRINK BURUNDI COFFEE!!!

VIS IT T HE LO NG M IL ES COFFEE P R OJ EC T B LO G F O R M ORE I NFO

THE THRILL

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY L E E L A CY D R O S S / T E X T BY E R I C A D U B L I N

of the

HUNT

Truffle hunting isn’t just for fun; it’s a family affair in western Oregon. Stefan Czarnecki, fourthgeneration truffle connoisseur, along with his wife, Meghan, and their three children, team up with his father and brother to show us how to slow down and enjoy the delicate flavors Oregon has to offer.

N

ovember to late spring is truffle season in the wet

woods of western Oregon. But the Czarnecki family thinks truffles all year long. “The truffles we find during the long rainy days of winter carry our family through the entire year,” said Stefan Czarnecki, fourth-generation truffle forager. Stefan is the son of Jack Czarnecki, a wild mushroom pioneer and founder of the award-winning Joel Palmer House restaurant in Dayton. “Truffles are treasures for our family and the others fortunate enough to live here.” Foraging, harvesting, and preparing the local delicacy require skills and trade secrets fiercely guarded by a long lineage of proud outdoorsmen chefs. Part of the truffle mystique is that you can only find them by digging on private ground, with the

left Before the day begins the family makes time to visit with one another, sharing agendas for the day, and enjoying the morning light over breakfast. below At Fox Farm, Stefan Czarnecki is fed, happy, and ready for the hunt to begin.

aid of an experienced guide who knows the best spots to look. Lucky for us, we had Jack and Stefan by our side. Our truffle hunt began 45 minutes north of Portland at Fox Farm, the Czarnecki family’s quaint rental cottage in the heart of Oregon wine and truffle country. Aidan, age 7, Bridget, age 5, and Zinabu (“boo”), age 2, greeted us with piping-hot apple muffins topped with brown sugar and hazelnut crumb,

fresh salmon quiche prepared with eggs gathered that morning, and steaming cups of coffee. As food warmed our bellies and the sun warmed our frozen fingers and toes, Meghan Czarnecki, wife of Stefan, told us more about truffle hunting as a way of life. “Food is central to every family gathering,” said Meghan. “Our family connects around the table, and everyone is involved in the local food industry in some way.

Even the kids help out — in the dining room at the restaurant, in the forests hunting truffles and mushrooms, and at home in the kitchen.” Fortified by our beautiful breakfast and the infectious energy of three children under the age of ten, we piled into two mud-caked trucks and proceeded to bump along unpaved, unmarked side roads. We passed picturesque goat farms and artfully falling-down barns, finally stopping at the edge of a Douglas fir grove. With four-prong rakes in hand and old milk cartons tied to our belts, we followed Jack and Stefan into the dense forest. While you only have to go as far as your nearest specialty food store these days to get a bottle of truffle oil, there’s something a

right My sister, Nicole Rogers, and I felt right at home with our old milk containers and rakes. far right The smell of wet woods and the penetrating cold of the morning heightened our senses.

W

G ET R EC IP ES F R O M O U R P R E- HU NT B R EAK FAST

left Fourth-generation restaurateur and chef, Christopher Czarnecki (not shown), carries on the family’s passion at the Joel Palmer House, where menus revolve around wild mushrooms and truffles, while his brother, Stefan (left), and father, Jack (right), spend their time foraging, harvesting, and preparing the truffles that are used at the restaurant and in their line of truffle oils. far left Deciding if we had indeed found a truffle or just a white rock!

little different about truffles coming out of Oregon. Gaining in popularity and comparing favorably with their European cousins, the Oregon white truffle (Tuber gibbosum) and the Oregon black truffle (Leucangium carthusianum) grow under folds of Douglas fir from late October to late spring. Instead of dogs and pigs, which are used in Europe to find the famed French black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) or the renowned white truffle (Tuber magnatum) of Alba, which is found in the Piedmont district of Italy, Oregon truffles depend on small rodents to remove them from below the surface of the earth.

V ISI T T HE JOE L PA LME R H O U S E F O R A DE LI C I OUS T RUF F LE- I N S PI R E D ME A L

(Some Oregon truffle hunters, however, do you use dogs to find ripe truffles.) Small freshly made holes at the base of the fir are excellent indicators that animals have been digging for fungi and the starting point for our hunt. We used our rakes to pull back mossy green tufts and decomposing leaves that lined the base of the tree trunks. Before long, I was down on hand and knee wiping away rich earth to reveal my first find: a dime-sized truffle that smelled like moldy laundry and looked like a dirty white rock. Despite its underwhelming size, color, and aroma, I was elated. I couldn’t wait to show off my prize.

right The long rainy winters in Oregon are the reason for the wild mushrooms and truffles that grow in the forests. far right The primal instinct to forage for food, and the complexity behind harvesting truffles continue to push seasoned hunters like the Czarneckis to unearth these culinary treasures for the rest of us to enjoy.

We all unearthed white truffles that day, most the size of pebbles, but when one lucky digger found a two-inch ripe truffle, we all gathered round taking turns smelling the little beauty, ooh-ing and ahh-ing over the intoxicating aroma. When a truffle is ripe — unlike the young ones the rest of us had found that still needed a few days to mature — it begins to emit complex gases that give off the delicious smell most of us are used to when we order a truffle dish off a menu or integrate fresh truffle shavings into our dishes at home. That night, our wild fungi haul went to mature for a few days in air-tight containers, while a batch from the previous week found its way into a threemushroom tart at the Joel Palmer House, prepared Chris Czarnecki, the head chef. Still high on the thrill of the hunt, we all agreed it was one of the most deeply satisfying dishes we’ve ever eaten. “The excitement of finding truffles and the craftsmanship of preparing them is an adventure from earth to plate,” said Jack Czarnecki. “That’s what makes the experience of truffles so rewarding for everyone involved.”

from the photographer You know what's so compelling about searching for one of the world's most coveted, intensely flavored foods? The obsessives who go the distance in search of them. The Czarnecki family has been scouting wild mushrooms, with truffles as their pièce de résistance, for a lifetime — intergenerational foraging amidst secret Douglas fir forests, five-hour meals celebrating this earthy delight, legends surrounding the one that got away or "the big find." Mushrooms are the glue that binds this tribe together. To be let in, even if just for twenty-four hours of raucous fun, is a lesson in grand treasure hunting and whole-hearted enjoyment.

— L E E L A CY D R O S S , P H OTO G R A P H E R

visual meditations on the beauty of off-season from the shores of Ontario

P H OTO G R A P H Y & WO R D S BY J E N N I F E R S Q U I R E S R O S S

The beach is a quiet and magical place in the winter. No one around, no clear distinction between where land ends and water begins. Just solitude, snow, and ice as far as the eye can see. Minimalism at its finest, silence interrupted only by thoughts and wind. Less than an hour south of London, this sandy stretch is inundated during the summer months with throngs of heat seekers looking to rest and play in the short season of warmth. Before long it will be a blur of relaxation, refuge, and frolic, but for now we see the shoreline, vacant basketball courts, barren beaches, and unoccupied waters.

PORT STANL EY / Nยบ 4

WAYFARE | DRAFT

Recently we found ourselves on the beach in Port Glasgow, Ontario. The water was high and rough. Many of the interesting rocks were submerged and there wasn’t much land left to perch my camera on. But it still made for a lovely, peaceful evening, watching the sunset and having a picnic dinner in the car while staring out over the water. Made me think this must be nature’s drive-in.

LAKE ER IE / Nº 14

LAK E O N TAR I O / Nº 4

I used to live in Toronto, long before I began my series of seascape photographs — it almost seems like another lifetime now. I captured this scene on my recent travels to Toronto, early on the first morning I was there. Ridiculously early in fact — I believe it was some time to the tune of 5 am. I love waking up to a city so quiet.

LAKE ER IE / Nº 12

I captured this photograph in July on the night of the full moon in Erieau, Ontario, Canada, about an hour and forty-five minutes southwest of London. Darren and I had big plans to photograph the moonrise, but it wasn’t long after we arrived that we realized there would need to be a change of plans.

H OW JE NNI F E R' S S EASCAPES ARE M A D E

WAYFARE | DRAFT

I took this frozen winter seascape at the end of February 2008 in Port Stanley, Ontario, just as Lake Erie was beginning its spring thaw. It was a beautiful, sunshiny, blue-sky day on a winter beach with hordes of people trailing out to the humps of frozen waves. The splendor rendered me speechless.

F E BRUARY BLUES / Nยบ 1

LA K E O N TAR I O / Nº 6

I got up bright and early to capture this photograph at 4:55 am, before the sun was up, so I could catch the glitter of the lights. My vantage point was the sidewalk of a bridge that passes over the Humber River. I got all set up in the dark, in the perfect position . . . then waited for the light to be just right. Traffic driving on the bridge I was standing on was shaking the tripod, causing the image to appear out of focus. All I could do was hope for the best and make some attempt at timing things so that when my shutter was open for over four minutes, there weren’t many large trucks driving over the bridge. But lucky I was!

WAYFARE | DRAFT

VIS IT J ENNI FER'S S EASCAP ES J OURNA L

One couple’s photographic take on a South African table-in-farm fairytale The super-talented Chicago-based photographer Bob Coscarelli and his wife, Karen Valentine, spent a single night at the storied Babylonstoren in South Africa’s wine country. Here, a visual tour of what happens when an ambitious, highly stimulated photographer traipses around — wine glass in one hand, camera in the other — eight lush acres of edible gardens shooting everything in sight. Not only are the photos a testament to the beauty of the region, but they’re also definitive proof that no experience is too short to thoroughly enjoy. P H OTO G R A P H Y BY B O B COS C A R E L L I & K A R E N VA L E N T I N E / WO R D S BY M E G H A N M c E W E N

‘‘

With the garden at the heart of Babylonstoren farm, the guest cottages have been designed to allow as much of its beauty and surrounding landscape to follow you indoors. The whitewashed walls of the Cape Dutch architecture coupled with the natural fibers and organic shapes of the charming interior blend perfectly with the environment,” according to Valentine. VIS IT KA REN'S B LOG R OAM & HOM E

Wrapping up a two-week trip of safaris, game drives, and volunteer nonprofit work, seasoned travelers Coscarelli and Valentine knew immediately upon reading about the farm hotel in the heart of the Cape Winelands that they wanted to visit — however briefly. Opened by former magazine editor Karen Roos and her husband, Koos Bekker, a year ago, Babylonstoren is a collection of thatched-roof buildings in the Cape Dutch tradition with eight acres of fruit and vegetable gardens. The sprawling vineyards and adjoining farm cut a majestic impression from the foothills of the Drakenstein Valley mountains.

Upon arrival, the giddy couple made a pitstop in their modernist, beautifully furnished farm cottage (one of fourteen) to get oriented and pour two glasses of wine, before heading out into the perfect near-dusk light and solitude of the land. “It’s the new farm-to-table,” says Coscarelli. “What’s it called when the table’s in the farm? You can look out the glass windows and you’re right there in the gardens. Everything here is about connecting you to the land.” After strolling the grounds — “a magical fairytale for anyone who appreciates food and where it

comes from,” says Valentine — dinner was delivered as a beautiful antipasta tray, including cured meats, vegetables, bread, cheese, fruit, and wine, much of it directly from the gardens they just explored. Coscarelli and Valentine pulled the tray to a blanket on the floor in front of the fire, opened a bottle of red and a bottle of white, and did everything they could — including a bath with herbs from the garden — to draw out the experience. “I almost cried leaving our breakfast in the morning,” relays Valentine, “It’s like utopia here. Everything is perfect.”

‘‘

We were quick to check into our cottage so we could get out into the garden to explore before the sun went down. The manager of the property was so adorable, she suggested that we fill our wine glasses to enjoy our stroll. It was a perfect suggestion,” says Valentine.

N OTICE D E TAI LS

Coscarelli loved how the trellises and arbors took a modern approach to very classic hardscaping. “The fruits and vegetables are very nicely delineated,” he says. “But there’s still a handmade feel to it.”

US E AL L YO U R S ENS ES

“Every single plant in the garden is edible, and the smells are incredible. The smell of rosemary and citrus is so intense.”

PAY AT T ENT IO N

They give you an amazing topographical map with every garden bed, so you can walk around and identify all the plants.

‘‘

A magical fairytale for anyone who appreciates food and where it comes from.’’

DO N 'T BE AFRAI D TO TOU CH The lemons and limes are so big and textured, they look like cauliflower.

WA K E U P E A R LY, SAVO R B R EAK FAST Fresh-squeezed orange, beet, and ginger juices are made with fruits and vegetables pulled straight from the garden.

SC R IB B L E D OW N YO U R M ENU

Homemade butter with thinly sliced radish, salmon wrapped around beans and asparagus, dill cream cheese, cured meats, bread wrapped with twine and dill, local roasted chicken, and sweet potato wrapped in meat.

Can't quite make it to South Africa? Try these other farm stays for a variety of experiences.

1

2 3

Work the land at Salt Water Farm in Lincolnville, Maine. Farm-cooking workshops teach the culinary delights and tools of a simpler time. Each workshop focuses on cooking and gardening basics for true farmhouse fare (blueberry cobbler, Haddock chowder, brioche dough, ricotta-making, and knife sharpening). Celebrate where your food comes from with Outstanding In The Field, a roving culinary adventure that hosts over-thetop farm dinners that bring together farmers, celebrated chefs, and eager diners alike. Get your hands dirty — in a fun-for-thewhole-family way — at Weatherbury Farm nestled amid the rolling farmland in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Kids join farmer Dale (his real name) for morning chores: pumping water, bottle-feeding lambs, and collecting eggs.

VIS IT T H E OFFI C I A L BABY LONSTOREN SI T E

// CLOSE TO HOME

THE TRIP THAT STARTED IT ALL

Meghan McEwen of Designtripper shares her inspiration for Honor & Folly, a B&B of her own in Detroit, Michigan.

It wasn't one specific trip — it was a bunch of trips. I cherrypicked ideas that created a great travel experience. Places that inspired me along the way — Longman & Eagle in Chicago; Fair Folks & a Goat in New Orleans; the Olde Bell Inn; Concept Hotel in Brussels. All these places contributed little tidbits of inspiration in some form, but as a whole, they all have something in common: they tell a story about the place they're located. The stories are different — reflecting the local design, culture, and food. They made me want to tell the story of my own city, my own neighborhood.

A L L I MAG ES BY MA RV I N S H AO U N I

The two-bedroom apartment is decorated with goods made by Detroit and Midwest-based designers and artisans — much of which is also for sale online.

// CLOSE TO HOME

honor & folly favorite finds

TRIPT YC H The founding director of Detroit’s new Signal Return print shop, Megan O’Connell’s triptych is crafted from handcast, dyed, and carved paper suspended in Italian beeswax.

// CLOSE TO HOME

honor & folly favorite finds

CO U N T E R STOO LS Rough-hewn counter stools for the island by Zeb Smith, which he crafted entirely from scrap wood.

// CLOSE TO HOME

honor & folly favorite finds

MAIL BAG I was meeting my friend, Chicago photo-grapher Liza Berkoff, in Sawyer, Michigan, so she could hand off the painted photo-graphs (a collaboration with Lora Fosberg) on the left wall, when we came across this antique leather mailbag at Marco Polo.

// CLOSE TO HOME

honor & folly favorite finds DAY B E D I discovered this discontinued quiltlike fabric in the inspired maze that is Schindler’s fabric store in Cleveland (family-owned since 1938). The antique daybed was pulled from a dusty, lonely corner of Detroit’s Eastern Market Antiques for a song.

P I L LOW Architecture school grad/graphic designer/mom/bandmate (former member of Pascal, current member of Computer Perfection), Amy Bem, also makes the Honor & Folly house collection of linens, aprons, and fabric pillows.

WOV E N B E N CH Made from walnut and found packing tape, this woven bench was handcrafted by Hayes Shanesy from Cincinnati’s Brush Factory.

// Sponsored Advertising Section

CHECK-IN:

THE CROSBY STEET HOTEL The Crosby Street Hotel is, without a doubt, one of our favorite hotels in New York’s vibrant SoHo neighborhood. Situated on a quite cobbled street, it boasts a prime location, spacious, light-filled and luxurious rooms, at-your-beck-and-call service, and an unmatched spirit of refinement. The interior design by Kit Kemp is worth a visit alone. If you're looking to splash out on a memorable weekend, or a stylish spot to hold an event, the Crosby is the way to go.

W IN A T AB L ET P L U S M EM B ER SHI P

This section is brought to you by Tablet Hotels, the cure for boring travel. Click here for more details www.tablethotels.com.

I MAGES COURTESY OF TAB LET HOT E LS/C R OSBY ST R E E T H OT E L

// ON THE GO

must reads

36 H O U RS

MA PS

I WAS HER E

F R O M HER E TO T HER E

AB OVE A LL ELSE

The ever popular New York Times column "36 hours" has been turned into a beautiful book published by Taschen to share the best getaways for 150 weekends in the US & Canada.

Pentagram designer, Paula Scher, takes her creativity into the large scale painting of imperfect typographic maps. If there’s no room on your walls, her work now comes in a beautiful coffee table book: MAPS.

First there was Mundane Journeys, a local guide by Kate Pocrass, to help explore San Francisco in new ways. Now she’s teamed up with Chronicle Books to create a journal and guide to help you explore locale in the most mundane fashion.

With all the groups out there, the Hand Drawn Map Association may not be at the top of your list, but they’re the ones behind From Here to There, a delightful collection of these unexpectedly charming hand drawn maps.

Alan Abond captures views from above with his stunning aerial photography. A captivating and weightless look at the world up above as taken by Abond on flights from 2002 to 2011.

// ON THE GO

M I DN IG H T I N PARI S

SA LMO N F I S H I N G I N TH E Y E ME N

U R BANIZ ED

J IR O D R EAM S O F S U S HI

D OW NTON A B B EY

Woody Allen not only takes his characters to Paris, but also back in time to meet the likes of famous faces. Now available on iTunes & DVD.

An upstream journey proving the impossible is possible in this drama & romcom starring Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt. In theaters March 9, 2012.

First there was Helvetica, then Objectified, now director Gary Hustwit looks at the flow of cities in this design documentary. Now available on iTunes & DVD.

Love what you do. From a tiny sushi bar in a Tokyo subway, this documentary is the story of Japan’s greatest sushi chef, Jiro Ono. In theaters March 9, 2012.

Travel back in time to aristocratic England and see what everyone is talking about in the new season of Downton Abbey. Sunday nights on PBS.

G OO P CITY provides guides from the lifestyle site of Gwenyth Paltrow.

TR I P PY lets your friends share travel tips and ideas for your next vacation.

AIR B NB lets you stay anywhere and this app makes reservations a snap.

F O O DS P OT T ING is an essential for the foodiephotographer on the go.

K NOW W HAT shares the go-to favorite places of creative people in the know.

// HAPPY TRAILS

sAILBOAT AROUND THE WORLD W

e do not ask for our dreams: those images and ideas that haunt our thoughts, that push us on. They come to us of their own accord and their own tenacity — they are journeymen in their own right, fated to find us somehow. Just over two years ago, in July of 2009, I launched one of the earlier projects on Kickstarter. It was admittedly a shot in the dark, an effort to rally support around some wild dream I’d been having: to sail one tiny boat right round the world. Alone. And then a sort of unbelievable thing happened: it worked. Support poured in, during the campaign, after the campaign, and even now two years later. Incredibly, 13,000 miles down this wild blue road, I still regularly get emails from people somehow inspired by this idea of a little boat floating silently through the night. Emily Richmond Bobbie Rounds the World

DE STI N ATI ON DI STA N CE TRA N S PORT

THE WORLD 13,000+ MILES SAILBOAT

// HAPPY TRAILS

STATS 13,456

400+

30 lbs.

+1

N AU TI CA L M I L E S TRAVEL ED

DONORS on Kickstarter

RICE CO NSU MED

600+

$8,142

20 lbs.

+4

+6

DAYS AT S EA

A M O U N T D O N AT ED

during Emily's first Kickstarter campaign

OAT MEAL CO NSU MED

AND MORE

$7,200

100+

transmission coupling, sails, bent prop shaft, modem, 2 laptops, 2 GPS, water pump, boom gooseneck, steering quadrant, all navigation lights, 2 autopilots

during Emily's second Kickstarter campaign

(to stay busy & sane)

BRO KEN PA RTS

A M O U N T D O N AT ED

* Stats according to Emily as of December 2011

VIDEOS O N VIMEO

DO G Rapa Nui named Aku

SALVADOR EAN CRICKE TS

COSTA R ICAN H ERMIT C RAB S

ILLUSTRATION S BY FE LICE Q. CLEVE LAND

// HAPPY TRAILS

ROUTE

PO RTS SIN CE DEPART URE : Los Angeles, CALIFORNIA, USA Cabo San Lucas, MEXICO La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, MEXICO Barra de Navidad, MEXICO Bahia del Sol, EL SALVADOR Bahia Santa Elena, COSTA RICA Drake Bay, COSTA RICA Golfito, COSTA RICA Pearl Islands and Panama City, PANAMA Puerto Ayora, Isla Santa Cruz in Galapagos Islands, ECUADOR Pago Pago, Tutuila Island, AMERICAN SAMOA

W H ER E IN TH E W O RL D IS EM ILY? char t her current position

Rapa Nui, aka Easter Island, CHILE Bounty Bay, Pitcairn Island, UNITED KINGDOM

CO MIN G UP: Madang, PAPUA NEW GUINEA Darwin, AUSTRALIA BALI COCOS KEELING MAURITIUS Durban, SOUTH AFRICA

Follow Emily’s voyage at bobbieroundstheworld.com and @eerichmond on Twitter.

// HAPPY TRAILS

REFLECTIONS I NE VE R FE LT FU RT HE R FR O M HO M E TH AN W HE N. ..

I RE AL LY FE LT LI KE I WAS N. .. “L IV IN G TH E DR EA M ” W HE IF M Y FR IE ND S BA CK HO M E ’D CO UL D SE E M E NO W, TH EY BE M OS T SU RP RI SE D BY... W HE N I GE T BA CK HO M E , I CA N’ T WAI T TO ... AS LO NG AS I LI VE , I’L L NE VE R FO RG ET...

m the closest bit of land fro les mi 0 60 n ea oc e th on g I was sittin st. with no engine and a broken ma t like fruit off a tree. fee me at g llin fa re we s de du d on Easter Islan y and tan. And at what terrible I suppose I’m a bit more muscle. haircuts/lack of a haircut I have d iced coffee! And an ls ge ba en th d An d! foo ai Th eat vegan food! And then I’ve thought about this a lot... d! foo ai th re mo en Th ! e's Jo er then go to Trad g fish guts — literally I swallowed tin ea o int me lk ta de du me so that I let give me my momona to ed os pp su s wa It h. fis a of t the intestines ou e if it worked. (power) . . . I’m still waiting to se

// SLIDESHOW

The Best of Small Town America, from Pictory, a curated collection of personal photo stories. Share your story.

Yolo County, California I grew up in beautiful California, but I didn’t surf or live near a beach. I grew up in the crops of Yolo County, near Davis, California. People know about University of California Davis, but they don’t know about the hilly farmland, the crisp rivers, and the golden light nearby. — JA ME S B E S S E R, P H OTO GRA P HE R / P RO F E S S I O NA L / SA N FRAN CISCO, CA

VIEW T HE FULL S ET ON P I C TORY

// SLIDESHOW

The Best of Small Town America, from Pictory, a curated collection of personal photo stories. Share your story.

Covelo, California This is a photograph of my Uncle Tim in front of the saloon he built next door to his house, and overlooking the ranch where he breeds bucking bulls for the rodeo. I spent my youth playing in the fields, catching tadpoles in the river, and soaking up the family history around. I will still always cherish this patch of the world. — AR I A N A G I LLRI E , P H OTO GRA P HE R / NO MA D / TO RO NTO, CAN

VIEW T HE FULL S ET ON P I C TORY

// SLIDESHOW

The Best of Small Town America, from Pictory, a curated collection of personal photo stories. Share your story.

Hot Springs, Arkansas My family usually takes summer trips far away from our native Austin: Paris, London, Cancún, or Vancouver, for example. This summer, we stayed in the South and went to Hot Springs, Arkansas, instead. The solitude, the sun, and the easy familiarity of the place made it a perfect summer spot. — I SMAE L S O B E K , P H OTO GRA P H E R / STU D E NT / AUSTI N, TX

VIEW T HE FULL S ET ON P I C TORY

// SLIDESHOW

The Best of Small Town America, from Pictory, a curated collection of personal photo stories. Share your story.

Waimea, Hawaii My parents raised my brother and I to be city kids ... So when they up and left us and the city for Waimea, Hawaii, I thought they would be back in a year. But the beauty of Waimea gives them reasons to be outdoors all the time and the smallness has given them a community they never had here. Now they’re showing us how to slow down and find our own happiness. — AL L I S O N A LLB E E , P H OTO GRA P H E R / GRA D STU D E NT / OAKLAN D, CA

VIEW T HE FULL S ET ON P I C TORY

While it may be winter, we're dreaming of the warm, lazy days ahead, so . . . BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR WAYFARE NO. 1 SPRING / SUMMER 2012

and in the meantime . . .

share the #placesweheart & treat your travel bug on PINTEREST / BLOG / TWITTER / FACEBOOK

WAYFARE | DRAFT PHOTO GRAPH Y BY JENN I FER SQ U I R ES R OSS


Wayfare Pilot Issue