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PM#0382659799

Moose Cree celebrates Gathering of our People PAGE 10

Klik-lovin’ Bunnuck returns to entertain PAGES 4 & 11

Actor Gary Farmer takes to teaching PAGE 8 August 4, 2011

Vol. 38 #16

9,300 copies distributed $1.50 Northern Ontario’s First Nation Voice since 1974

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Protecting the home front

On the move again

Sandy Lake chief stays behind during evacuations Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

Completed by: Javier Espinoza

6 COL x 21 AGATES

July 30, 2009

Sandy Lake Chief Adam Fiddler applauded the efforts of 20 community members who stayed behind with him after the rest of the community was evacuated due to smoke from forest fires. “If they were not here with me, I would have sunk,” Fiddler said during a July 28 interview. “It was as if we were in a big canoe – they were the ones paddling and all I was doing was steering. If they were not here with me, we would have gone nowhere, so I really appreciated those 20 people who stayed with me.” The community members stayed behind to help keep the power plant and water treatment plant operating as well as patrol the community. Sprinkler systems were set up to protect the homes and many of the larger buildings. Fiddler said it was his responsibility as chief to stay behind and look after the community in a July 21 YouTube video press release, which was posted to keep evacuated residents informed of the situation in their community. “I fill more than an administrative role,” Fiddler said. “I have a traditional obligation as chief to protect and ensure the safety of all of the members of the First Nation as well as the community.” Fiddler and the 20 community members felt as if they were “on edge” due to the forest fire. “But we were also very heavy and very tense knowing our people were going through a lot out in the different evacuee host sites,” he said. Most of Sandy Lake’s 2,700 community members were evacuated July 18-21 due to smoke from a forest fire about nine kilometres from the Sandy Lake power plant. As of July 21, the fire was about 3,500 hectares in size. Fiddler planned to stay in the community until the last possible moment. “I knew there were MNR (Ministry of Natural Resources) crews here if we had to leave when the fire got close,” Fiddler said. “I also have a boat down at the lake and that would have been an option as well.” Fortunately, the forest fires did not approach the community. A few days of cool weather helped with the fire fighting efforts in the area, stopping the fires from getting any closer to the community. About 100 support people who left July 21 returned July 27 to help prepare for the return of the rest of the community beginning July 29.

“When they arrived on Wednesday (July 27), it was just emotional for me,” Fiddler said. “I was very tense, but when they landed it just took a big load off my shoulders. It was the first time I felt relived since they left knowing I had that support back in the community.” As of Aug. 1, about 1,213 Sandy Lake evacuees had returned home. Sandy Lake’s Melody Manoakeesick was glad she was evacuated July 19 after she saw a photograph of forest fire smoke billowing over the Northern Store in her community. “I didn’t want to go, but after seeing that picture I was glad I just went to the airport,” Manoakeesick said the day after she and her three-yearold son were evacuated. “I just threw stuff in a bag and went to the airport because they said the plane was going to be there in half an hour. And I realize I didn’t pack enough stuff. It was a rush. It was unreal. It didn’t feel real at first.” Manoakeesick and about 250 other community members from Sandy Lake were lodged at the Victoria Inn in Thunder Bay as part of their community’s July 18-19 phase-one evacuation. About 750 community members were also evacuated from Sandy Lake during that phase of the evacuation. About 1,000 community members were evacuated July 20-21 to locations across Ontario, including a group who were sent by bus during the middle of the night to Wawa. The remaining community members had already been out of the community before the evacuation or had left on their own before the official evacuations. “They’re really hospitable, the staff here (at the Victoria Inn), and the meals provided are wonderful,” Manoakeesick said. “They’re just like full course meals, even breakfast right up until supper. Everybody is very helpful at the Victoria Inn.” Manoakeesick appreciates all the work being done to protect her community during the evacuation, including the setting up of the sprinkler systems to protect buildings. “My husband is one of the last support people that are going to (leave) Sandy Lake,” Manoakeesick said. “He was told that he is in the last possible loads because he is helping the other groups.” Manoakeesick is concerned because her husband has been told the last groups to be evacuated could be sent to Kitchener, in southern Ontario. see EVACUATIONS page 2

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

A four-engine Hercules aircraft is nearly loaded with a group of Deer Lake phase-one evacuees and their luggage July 21. About 500 phase-one evacuees were scheduled to be evacuated to a location near Toronto. It was the second time the community was partially evacuated due to smoke from forest fires in the area. See story on page 3.

ᐁᐱᒥᑲᓇᐁᐧᐣᑕᐠ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᕑᐃᐠ ᑲᕑᐃᐠ ᐊᐧᐊᐧᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐃᐧᓇᐣ

ᓀᑲᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ ᐅᑭᒪᑲᐣ ᐊᑕᑦ ᐱᐟᓫᐊᕑ ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᑯ ᐅᑭ ᑭᒋᓇᓇᑯᒪᐣ 20 ᐅᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒪᐣ ᑲᑭᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᑯᐨ ᐁᑲ ᑫᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧ ᑲᑭᐅᐣᒋᓇᑲᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᐊᐱᐣ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐠ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑲᐃᐡᑲᐧ ᒐᑭᒪᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ ᐁᐧᓴ ᐁᔭᓂᑲᐡᑲᐸᓱᐊᐧᐨ ᐯᔓᐨ ᑲᐱᓴᑭᑌᓂᐠ. “ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐁᑲ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᔑᐊᐧᐸᐣ, ᐊᒥ ᐱᑯ ᒋᑭᑯᓴᐱᓭᔭᑭᐸᐣ,” ᐱᐟᓫᐊᕑ ᐃᑭᑐ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᐅᐸᐡᑯᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 28 ᑲᑭᑲᑫᐧᒋᒥᐨ ᒋᑎᐸᒋᒧᐨ. “ᐊᒥ ᑕᐱᐡᑯ ᑲᑭᐃᓀᐣᑕᑲᐧᐠ ᐱᒋ ᑭᒋ ᒋᒪᓂᐠ ᐁᑭᐊᔭᔭᐠ - ᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧ ᐁᐱᒪᑲᐧᔑᐁᐧᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᑲᐧ ᓂᐣ ᐁᑕᑲᐧᐦᐊᒪᐣ.

ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐁᑲ ᐅᐣᒋᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᔑᐊᐧᐸᐣ, ᒥᐱᑯ ᐁᑲ ᓇᐣᑕ ᒋᑭᐃᔑᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᑎᓱᔭᑭᐸᐣ, ᒥᑕᐡ ᑲᐅᒋ ᓇᓇᑯᒪᑲᐧ ᐅᑯᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᓂᔑᑕᓇ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᑲᑭᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᔑᐊᐧᐨ.” ᐅᑯᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᑲ ᑲᑭᐅᐣᒋᒪᒐᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᑲᓇᐁᐧᐣᑕᓇᐊᐧ ᐱᒥᐸᓂᒋᑲᓂ ᒋᐱᒥᐱᑌᓂᐠ ᒥᓇ ᐃᑲᐧᐦᐅᐸᓂ ᒋᐱᒥᔭᓄᑭᒪᑲᓂᐠ ᐯᑭᐡ ᑲᔦ ᐁᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᓇᓇᑲᒋᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᐧᑲᐦᐃᑲᓇᐣ. ᐅᑭᐊᔭᑐᓇᐊᐧ ᑲᔦ ᐅᐣᒋᑲᐃᐧᒋᑲᓇᐣ ᐃᒪ ᐊᐧᑲᐦᐃᑲᓇᐣ ᑲᐃᔑᐸᐸᑕᑭᑌᑭᐣ ᒥᓇ ᐱᑯ ᒥᔑᐣ ᑭᒋᐊᐧᑲᐦᐃᑲᓇᐣ ᐁᑲ ᒋᐅᒋᐸᓯᑌᑭᐣ. ᐱᐟᓫᐊᕑ ᐃᑭᑐ ᐃᐧᐣ ᐅᑭᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᒥᑯᐣ ᑲᐅᑭᒪᑲᓂᐃᐧᐨ ᐁᑲ ᒋᓇᑲᑕᐠ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᐃᐧᓂᑯ ᒋᐅᐣᒋ ᑲᓇᐁᐧᐣᑕᐠ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᐅᐸᐡᑯᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 21 ᐅᑎᐸᒋᒧᐃᐧᐣ

ᑲᑭᐸᑭᑎᓂᑲᑌᓂᑭᐸᐣ ᒪᒪᐣᑕᐃᐧ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᐠ, ᑭᐸᑭᑎᓂᑲᑌᐸᐣ ᒋᐅᐣᒋ ᑭᑫᐣᑕᒧᓂᑕᐧ ᑲᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ ᐊᓂᐣ ᐁᓂᔑᐡᑲᒪᑲᓂᐠ ᑲᓴᑭᑌᓂᐠ ᐯᔓᐨ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ. “ᑲᐃᐧᓂᐣ ᐃᑯ ᐁᑕ ᐃᒪ ᐸᐣᐟ ᐊᐸᐢ ᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑫᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐠ ᐃᓀᑫ ᐣᑎᔑᓂᑲᓂᑕᒪᑫᓯᐣ,” ᐱᐟᓫᐊᕑ ᐃᑭᑐ. “ᐃᒪ ᑲᔦ ᐁᐧᐡᑲᐨ ᑲᑭᐱᔑ ᓂᑲᓂᑕᒪᑫᐨ ᐅᑭᒪᑲᐣ ᒋᐅᐣᒋ ᑲᓇᐁᐧᓂᒪᐨ ᒥᓇ ᐁᑲ ᓇᐣᑕ ᒋᔑᒪᒋᓭᓂᐨ ᑲᑭᓇ ᐅᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒪᐣ ᒥᓯᐁᐧ ᑲᐊᔭᓂᐨ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᓂᑎᓇᓄᑭᑕᒪᑫ.” ᐱᐟᓫᐊᕑ ᐃᑭᑐ 20 ᐅᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒪᐣ ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᑭᓴᓯᐣᑌᐣᑕᒥᐃᑯᓇᐊᐧ ᑲᑭᓴᑭᑌᓂᐠ ᐯᔓᐨ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ. ᐃᓇᐱᐣ ᐸᑭᑭᓂᑲᓂᐠ 3


2

Wawatay News

August 4, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Family returns to Sandy Lake, home burned down Chris Kornacki

Wawatay News

A Sandy Lake First Nation family who were part of the full evacuation of the community returned home to discover their house destroyed by a fire. Bradley Kakegamic and Savannah Rae, along with their 10-year-old son and five-yearold daughter, evacuated the community after forest fires in the area posed a threat of reaching the community. They fled the community with none

of their belongings. The fire started on the morning of July 31. The cause of the fire is under investigation. According to a Sandy Lake press release, the community has a lack of housing. About 150-200 families are on a waiting list for a new home. As a result, the community cannot afford to replace the family’s home at this time. To help the family, a bank account has been set up for donations from the public: Canadian Imperial Bank of

Commerce, 50 Front Street, Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1A3, Sandy Lake Flow-Through Account, Transit 00387, Account 32-05614. The community will administer the funds to make sure the family can buy new furnishings, clothing and children’s toys. Sandy Lake First Nation was fully evacuated starting July 18 and evacuees began returning home July 27. It is hoped that most of the community’s 2741 residents will be home by Aug. 3. WAWATAY NEWS

Thank You

July 27, 2011Melody Manoakeesick and her niece check out a photograph of forest fire smoke billowing Sandy Lake’s Size: the Northern Store July 19 on her iPad after she and her three-year-old son were evacuated to Thunover COL July x 55 18 AGATES der3 Bay during a phase-one evacuation. Completed by:

Matthew Bradley

Vezina Secondary School of Attawapiskat would like to thank the DreamCatcher Fund for their 2010 generous donation to the 2011 Vezina grad trip. The donation was used for bus travel from Timmins to Sudbury to join other First Nation students from Ontario and Quebec at Cambrian College to explore college life, as well as look into further choices in careers. The trip was an excellent experience for our graduates that participated. DreamCatcher Fund greatly assisted in this success. A special thanks to them from Vezina Secondary School.

Evacuations ‘hard’ on all involved ID:

________________________

From: _____________________

about 10 kilometres southwest of the community. “It’s a long ways,” ManoaIn all, about 3,500 commukeesick said. “I miss him very nity members were evacuated Choose 1 of the following: much.” due to smoke or forest fire Run as is Many other evacuees are also threats from 11 First Nation Run ad with changes concerned about being split up communities across Nishnawbe (no additional proof required) from their family members durAski Nation (NAN) territory. Require new proof NOT RUN AD said Charles ing theDO evacuation, Cat Lake and Koocheching (in for quote only) Kakegamic, a health support were fully evacuated while Ad cost: ______________________ worker for Sandy Lake. Deer Lake, Eabametoong, To“They’re run: _______________________ worried about famKasabonika, Kingfisher Lake, ily members being separated,” Mishkeegogamang, North Spirit WAWATAY NEWS ______________________________ Kakegamic saidApproval July 19. “They Lake and Wawakapewin were Signature of Client’s keep asking when is the next partially evacuated. Date Completed: Note: Ad proofs may notin, print out the are they load coming where NAN Grand Chief Stan Feb 23, 2010 same size as they will appear in going to be at in the city. But Beardy has never been so the newspaper. weSize: don’t always know the exact scared in his life as he was due location where theyAGATES are going to the forest fires threatening 3 COL x 55 to be registered.” NAN communities. Kakegamic’s brother Den“Never have I been so scared, nisCompleted Kakegamic by: travelled with I can’t sleep at night,” Beardy Javier Espinoza a group of evacuees by bus to said July 22 during a forest fire Wawa the night. evacuations news conference To: during ________________________ “They left about 9 (p.m.),” at the Thunder Bay airport. “I ________________________ Kakegamic said. “With elderly was getting calls Monday (July people being in the bus that 18) night and Tuesday morning From: _____________________ long, it’s hard on them. It’s hard from my people from 19 com@ Wawatay News on everybody, obviously.” munities telling me we can’t see Keewaywin was also fully across the road, the smoke is so Please proof your ad and return evacuated July 17-18 due to thick we cannot breathe.” it today by fax, otherwise your ad potential fire risk from a fire He also received calls from will run as it is on this fax. @ Wawatay from page 1 News

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people saying they saw flames from a distance to their community. “I asked them where the fire was coming from but they said ‘we don’t know, there’s fire and there’s smoke everywhere,’” Beardy said. He said the Elders told him they had never seen forest fires of this magnitude. According to the MNR, about 575,000 hectares have burned from fires in northwestern Ontario. Last year, about 14,500 hectares of forest had burned from fires. Beardy had called for a state of emergency July 19 due to the threat from forest fires and smoky conditions across NAN territory. Evacuees began returning home July 26, starting with Mishkeegogamang and Eabametoong. As of Aug. 1, about 2,582 evacuees had returned to their communities. Emergency Management Ontario estimates all evacuees would be back home by Aug. 3.

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Wawatay News August 4, 2011

Canadian Rangers play key role in evacuations Peter Moon

Special to Wawatay News

A total of 55 Canadian Rangers went on active duty in five communities and another 136 on standby status in 14 communities during the recent evacuations of about 3,500 residents of First Nations threatened by forest fires in northern Ontario. Rangers played key roles in the evacuation of Sandy Lake and the partial evacuations of Eabametoong, Kasabonika Lake, Kingfisher Lake and Deer Lake. The partial evacuations were for the elderly, sick, pregnant mothers, and mothers with children. “It was really good, all the Rangers were excellent, and they did a fantastic job,” said Capt. John McNeil, operations officer for 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group at Canadian Forces Base Borden, which commands the 500 Rangers in northern Ontario. “They showed leadership and the value of the Rangers to their communities and to Canada.” The Rangers helped prepare aircraft passenger manifests, notified evacuees and got them to evacuation aircrafts. They worked with the military aircraft crews to help fly most of the evacuees to safety. Some Rangers remained in their communities to liaise with First Nation and other government agency officials.

“We only got three or four hours sleep. But it’s what we’re here for.”

3

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Deer Lake endures second evacuation Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

Heavy smoke conditions in Deer Lake have caused havoc for the community. “Yesterday was very smoky, but the wind has shifted,” said Deer Lake councillor Cory Meekis July 21. “We couldn’t even see 50 feet in front of us when we were driving.” He had just watched a fourengine Hercules aircraft take off from his community with a load of phase-one evacuees and their luggage. Meekis said the lower smoke conditions on July 21 provided a good opportunity to evacuate about 550 phase-one evacuees from the community of about 1,100 people. “It was very rough yesterday,” Meekis said. “I could feel myself getting short of breath while I was running around checking up on people, especially with the Elders, making sure they were OK.” Meekis said all the Deer Lake phase-one evacuees are being evacuated to a location near Toronto. “It will be a different life,” Meekis said. “Going from the reserve life to the city life.” The heavy smoke conditions on July 20 caused smoke and carbon monoxide alarms to go off all day in the community. Meekis said the nearest fire was located just outside the Ministry of Natural Resources’s 16-kilometre protection area. Two fires that had been burning with the zone were officially out, according the MNR staff. Deer Lake councillor Johnny Meekis was scheduled to head out with the phase-one evacuees as a counsellor. “I don’t want to leave but if we have to then we have to look after the people who are there,” Johnny Meekis said. “Some of them have never been out there before.” Deer Lake has been living with the conditions for most of the month of July as forest fires

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Names are checked off as Deer Lake community members are evacuated July 21 during a partial evacuation of eldery, sick and parents with children. About 500 people were scheduled to be evacuated from the community of about 1,100 residents. burned nearby. The community was evacuated July 7 due to smoke conditions, with evacuees returning home July 13. “That’s what it’s been like for the last couple of weeks because we had fires all around us,” Johnny Meekis said. “We had lots of smoke yesterday. We couldn’t even go outside; we stayed indoors all day.” The fire situation eased in the Deer Lake area due to about 20 millimetres of rain over a 24-hour period July 20-21. “As a result of that the fires are ranked number one and

number two, which is smouldering ground fire, very little fire activity, not a lot of open flame,” said Robert Krause, incident commander for the Sandy Lake-Deer Lake complex. “The fires that are closest to the community within the 16-kilometre area are being held at this time and crews are mopping up and in some cases removing gear because we are getting ready to call those fires out.” Krause said most of the fire crews in the Deer Lake area have been moved to the Sandy

Lake area to fight those fires. Most of the smoke in Deer Lake is coming from fires east of the community and outside the 16-kilometre protection area. Beardy said most of the people being evacuated are at high risk: little children, their mothers, the sick and the Elders. “Anytime there is thick smoke or direct fire, those are the people they have to move out right away,” Beardy said, noting that about 3,000 people from 19 NAN communities had been evacuated as of July 21. “In Sandy Lake, the majority of

the people have been moved.” He said about 2,500 people were evacuated from Sandy Lake and about 550 from Deer Lake. One Deer Lake band employee expressed numerous concerns about leaving his community. “How would you feel if you had to leave your home,” said Gary Meekis, a Deer Lake resource worker. “We don’t even know when we’re coming home. We don’t even know where we’re getting sent. I hope everybody is well taken care of.”

– Carson Fiddler

They were also a vital military link between their communities and a special operations centre established for the emergency at the Canadian Ranger headquarters at CFB Borden. Many Rangers flew with evacuees to various reception centres across the province where they acted as liaison officers with local authorities and aid agencies. Three Rangers flew from Lac Seul to assist in the partial evacuation of Deer Lake. “They were deployed because Deer Lake, which doesn’t have a Ranger patrol, is in our area of responsibility,” Capt. McNeil said. “It was a great experience to be able to help Deer Lake,” said Sgt. Brad Ross of the Lac Seul patrol. “I think the military aircrew were a bit surprised to see us but they were glad that we were there to help them.” For Rangers in Sandy Lake, which underwent a complete evacuation, it was the second time they have played a vital role in a fire evacuation. The first was when a forest fire forced the community to evacuate in 2002. “It was a good feeling to see the Rangers serving Sandy again,” said Sgt. Carson Fiddler in Sandy Lake. “The first few nights this time we only got three or four hours sleep. But it’s what we’re here for.” Sgt. Peter Moon is the public affairs ranger for 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group at Canadian Forces Base Borden. See www.canadianrangers.ca.

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Deer Lake’s Gary Meekis talks with national and local media about the situation in his community as residents prepare for a partial evacuation July 21.

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

A group of Deer Lake community members help load luggage for a group of phase-one evacuees July 21.

ᓀᑲᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ ᐅᑭᒪᑲᐣ ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᐅᑐᐣᒋᓇᑲᑕᓯᐣ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᑲᑭᒪᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᒥᐨ ᐅᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒪᐣ ᐃᒪ ᐅᒋ ᐸᑭᑭᓂᑲᓂᐠ 1

“ᔕᑯᐨ ᑲᔦ ᐣᑭᑯᓯᑫᐧᐣᑕᒥᐣ ᒥᓇ ᐣᑭᒥᑯᐡᑲᑌᑕᒥᐣ ᐁᑭᑫᐣᑕᒪᐠ ᐣᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒥᓇᓂᐠ ᒥᐢᑕᐦᐃ ᐁᑭᒋᐊᓂᒥᓭᐊᐧᐨ ᐸᑲᐣ ᐁᐧᑎ ᑕᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᑲᑭᐊᐃᔑᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ,” ᑭᐃᑐ. ᑫᑲᐟ ᑲᑭᓇ ᓀᑲᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ 2,700 ᑲᑕᓯᐊᐧᐨ ᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧᐠ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᐅᐸᐡᑯᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 18 – 21 ᑲᐃᓇᑭᓱᐨ ᐊᐱ ᑲᑭᔭᓂ ᑭᒋᑲᐡᑲᐸᑌᐠ ᓇᐣᑕ ᐱᑯ ᓴᑲᓱᑎᐸᐦᐊᑲᐣ ᐁᐱᓯᓇᑲᐧᓂᐠ ᑲᓴᑭᑌᓂᐠ ᐁᐧᑎ ᐱᒥᐸᓂᒋᑫᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐠ ᑲᐃᔑᐊᑌᓂᐠ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ 21 ᑲᐃᓇᑭᓱᐨ, ᑭᔭᓂᓇᐣᑭ ᓴᑭᑌ 3,500 ᐦᐁᑐᕑᐢ ᒥᓂᑯᐠ. ᐱᐟᓫᐊᕑ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐅᑭᐅᓀᐣᑕᐣ ᐁᑲ ᒋᓇᑲᑕᐠ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᐸᓂᒪ ᐱᑯ ᐊᐱᐣ ᐁᑲ ᑭᐃᔑᓇᑲᐧᓂᐠ. “ᐣᑭᑭᑫᐣᑕᐣ ᐁᑭᐱᑕᑕᑯᔑᓄᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᒥᑯᑭᒪ ᐅᑕᑕᐁᐧᐦᐃᑫᐃᐧᓂᓂᒪᐣ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐊᐸᐣ ᐊᓂᐅᓴᒥᐯᔓᓇᑲᐧᐠ

ᑲᓴᑭᑌᐠ,” ᐱᐟᓫᐊᕑ ᐃᑭᑐ. “ᐣᑕᔭᐣ ᑲᔦ ᒋᒪᐣ ᐁᒉᑭᓯᐠ ᓇᓯᐱᐠ ᒋᐅᐣᒋᐳᓯᐸᓂᐦᐅᔭᐣ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐃᐧᐣ ᐊᐸᐣ ᐃᓯᓭᐠ ᒋᔭᐸᒋᑐᔭᐣ.” ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᑕᐡ ᒋᐅᐣᒋ ᐱᔕᒪᑲᓂᐠ ᐃᐡᑯᑌᓂ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ. ᐊᒋᓇ ᑲᔦ ᑭᑕᑫᐣᑕᑲᐧᐣ ᐁᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᑯᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᑕᑕᐁᐧᐦᐃᑫᐠ ᐁᑭᐅᒋ ᐅᐣᒋᑭᐱᑎᓇᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᑲ ᐯᔓᐨ ᒋᐱᑕᑭᑌᓂᐠ. ᐃᒪ ᓇᐣᑕ 100 ᐅᑕᓄᑭᐠ ᑲᑭᒪᒐᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᐅᐸᐡᑯᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ ᑭᐱᑭᐁᐧᐡᑲᐊᐧᐠ 27 ᑲᐃᓇᑭᓱᓂᐨ ᐁᐱ ᐊᐧᐃᐧᒋᐦᐊᐧᐊᐧᐨ ᒥᓇᐊᐧ ᑲᐃᐧᐱᑭᐁᐧᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ ᑲᑭᒪᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ ᐊᐱ 29 ᐃᓇᑭᓱᓂᐨ. “ᐊᐱ ᑲᑕᑯᔑᓇᐠ ᑲᐊᐱᑕᐊᐧᐠ (ᐅᐸᐡᑯᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 27), ᒥᐢᑕᐦᐃ ᐣᑭᐱᐣᒋᐡᑲᑯᐣ ᒧᔑᐦᐅᐃᐧᐣ,” ᐱᐟᓫᐊᕑ ᐃᑭᑐ. “ᑲᐯᐦᐃ ᐁᑭᐱᒥ ᓴᓯᐣᑌᐣᑕᒪᐣ, ᐁᑲᐧ ᐊᐱᐣ ᑲᐱᐸᐳᓂᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᐸᐣ ᑲᐸᑭᒋᐊᐧᓀᐦᐃᑯᔭᐣ ᐣᑭᐃᓇᒪᒋᑐᐣ ᓂᑎᑎᒪᐣ. ᒥᐱᑯ ᐸᔦᐡ ᐁᑭᐸᑭᑌᐣᑕᒪᐣ

ᐊᐱᐣ ᑲᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧᐸᐣ ᐁᑭ ᑭᑫᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᐃᐧᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᑯᐃᐧᐣ ᐁᑭ ᑭᐁᐧᑌᐱᓇᒪᐣ ᐣᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ.” ᐁᑲᐧ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᐅᐸᐅᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 1, ᐃᒪ ᓇᐣᑕ 1,213 ᓀᑲᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ ᐊᔕ ᑭᑭᐁᐧᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧᐠ. ᓀᑲᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐃᐧᑫᐧ ᒣᓫᐅᑎ ᒪᓄᑭᓯᐠ ᐃᑭᑐ ᐁᑭᑌᐱᓇᐁᐧᓯᐨ ᑲᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᐨ ᐅᐸᐡᑯᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 19 ᐊᐱ ᑲᐃᐡᑲᐧᐊᐧᐸᐣᑕᐠ ᐁᒪᓯᓇᑭᑌᓂᐠ ᑲᐃᔑᓴᑭᑌᓂᐠ ᐁᑭᒋᓴᑲᐸᑌᓂᐠ ᐃᒪ ᐊᑲᐧᒋᐠ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᐊᑕᐁᐧᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐠ. “ᑲᐃᐧᓂᐣ ᒋᐃᐧᒪᒐᔭᐸᐣ, ᐁᑲᐧ ᐊᐱ ᑲᐃᐡᑲᐧ ᐊᐧᐸᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᑲᒪᓯᓇᑭᑌᐠ, ᒥᐱᑯ ᑲᐃᔑ ᒪᒥᓀᐧᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᐱᒥᓭᐃᐧᐳᓂᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᐁᐃᔑᐃᐧᓂᑯᔭᐣ,” ᒪᓄᑭᓯᐠ ᐃᑭᑐ ᐁᔭᓂᐊᐧᐸᓂᐠ ᐊᔑᐨ ᐁᓂᓱᔭᑭᐃᐧᓀᓂᐨ ᐅᑯᓯᓴᐣ ᑲᐃᐡᑲᐧᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ. ᔐᒪᐠ ᐃᑯ ᑌᐱᓇᐠ ᐣᑭᐸᐱᓇᐦᐃᑫ ᑫᒪᒋᐃᐧᑐᔭᐣ ᓇᑫ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᐃᐧᓂᑯᔭᐠ ᐱ ᒥ ᓭ ᐃ ᐧ ᐳ ᓂ ᐃ ᐧ ᓂ ᐠ

ᐁᑭᐃᑭᑐᓇᓄᐊᐧᐠ ᐱᒥᓭᐃᐧᐣ ᒋᔭᓂᒪᒋᑯᑌᐠ ᐊᐱᑕᐃᐧᑎᐸᐦᐃᑲᐣ. ᐊᐸᐣ ᑲᑭ ᑭᑫᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᐅᐨᑦ ᐸᐣᑭ ᐁᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᒋᑫᔭᐣ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᒋᐅᐣᒋᑌᐯᐧᔦᑕᑲᐧᐠ. ᓂᐢᑕᑦ ᐅᑎ ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᒋᐅᐣᒋᑌᐯᐧᔦᐣᑕᑲᐧᐠ.” ᒪᓄᑭᓯᐠ ᒥᓇ 250 ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐠ ᓀᑲᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑭᑲᐯᔑᐦᐊᐊᐧᐠ ᐱᑕᐧᕑᐃᔭ ᐃᐣ ᐁᐧᑎ ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ ᐃᑭᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᓂᑲᐣ ᑲᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᓱᐊᐧᐨ ᒋᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ ᐅᐸᐡᑯᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 18-19. ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᑭᔭᐱᐨ 750 ᑭᔭᓂ ᓇᐣᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧᐠ ᓂᑲᐣ ᑲᑭᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᓱᐊᐧᐨ. 1,000 ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧᐠ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᐅᐸᐡᑯᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 20 – 21 ᑲᐃᓇᑭᓱᓂᐨ ᐊᐣᑎ ᐱᑯ ᑌᑎᐸᐦᐃ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᐁᑭᐊᐃᔑᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ, ᐊᔑᐨ ᒥᓇ ᐃᒪ ᐅᑕᐸᓂᐠ ᐁᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᐳᓯᐦᐃᐣᑕᐧ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᑲᐊᐱᑕᑎᐱᑲᓂᐠ ᐁᐃᔑᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ ᐊᐧᐊᐧ ᑲᐃᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᐣ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐠ ᐊᔕ ᑭᐅᐣᒋᒪᒐᐸᓂᐠ ᑲᒪᐧᔦ ᐅᓇᑌᐠ ᒋᒪᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ

ᓇᐣᑕ ᒥᓇ ᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧ ᐱᑯ ᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑎᓱᐊᐧᐠ. ᐃᒪ ᓇᐣᑕ 3,000 ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᐧᓴ ᑲᑭᑲᐡᑲᐸᑌᓂᐠ ᓇᐣᑕ ᐯᔓᐨ ᑲᑭᐱᑕᑭᑌᓂᐠ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐃᒪ ᐯᔑᑯᔕᐠ ᐃᐡᑯᓂᑲᓇᐣ ᐅᒪ ᑌᑎᐸᐦᐃ ᐊᓂᔑᓇᐯ ᐊᐢᑭ ᑎᐯᐣᒋᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ. ᐱᔑᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ ᒥᓇ ᑯᒋᒋᐣᐠ ᑲᑭᓇ ᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᐁᐧᑎ ᐊᑎᑯᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ, ᐊᐸᒪᑐᐠ, ᑲᓴᐸᓇᑲ, ᑭᐢᑭᒪᓂᓯᐊᐧᐳ, ᒣᐡᑭᑲᐧᑲᒪᐠ, ᒣᒣᑫᐧᔑᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ ᒥᓇ ᐊᐧᐊᐧᑲᐱᐃᐧᐣ ᐸᐸᐣᑭ ᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᒪᒪᒋᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧᐠ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᔕᑯᐨ ᐅᐁᐧ ᒣᑲᐧ ᐅᐸᐅᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 1 ᑲᐃᓇᑭᓱᐨ, ᐃᒪ ᓇᐣᑕ 2,582 ᑲᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ ᐊᔕ ᑭᑭᐁᐧᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧᐠ ᐅᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ. ᐅᑯᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑲᐊᓄᑲᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᑎᓀᐣᑕᓇᐊᐧ ᑲᑭᓇ ᑲᑭᒪᒋᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ ᐊᔕ ᒋᒐᑭ ᑭᐁᐧᐃᐧᓂᑕᐧ ᐅᐸᐅᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ 3 ᐃᓇᑭᓱᓂᐨ.


4

Wawatay News

August 4, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Historical photo 16-5th Avenue North P.O. Box 1180 Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1B7 Serving the First Nations in Northern Ontario since 1974. Wawatay News is a politically independent bi-weekly newspaper published by Wawatay Native Communications Society.

ᓂᐢᑕᑦ ᑲᑭᒪᑕᓄᑲᑌᐠ 1974 ᐁᐅᒋᐊᓄᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᑭᐧᐁᑎᓄᐠ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᑕᐃᑦᔑᑫᐧᐃᓇᐣ. ᑕᓱᓂᔓᐱᒥᑯᓇᑲ ᐅᔑᒋᑲᑌ ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐧᐃ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑲᐧᐃᐣ ᐅᓇᔓᐧᐁᐧᐃ ᑲᓇᐧᐊᐸᒋᑫᐧᐃᓂᐠ ᒋᐃᔑ ᐸᐸᒥᓯᒪᑲᐠ ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓂᑫᐧᐃᓇᐣ. NEWS DIRECTOR Brent Wesley

Commentary

Bunnuck is ‘back large time’ Brent Wesley Wawatay News

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hat Klik-lovin’ Cree who entertained crowds and audiences across northern Ontario has returned. Bunnuck made an appearance at the Gathering of our People July 15 in Moose Factory. Leading up to his appearance, he was seen throughout Moose Factory with a film crew in tow. Plans are in the works to produce new video skits to be posted exclusively online at www.bunnuck.com. Bunnuck is the creation of Stan Wesley. In the 1990s, Stan worked with Wawatay TV to produce video skits while in character. For many years, Bunnuck was in hibernation as Stan moved on in his career. He travels the country as a speaker and facilitator, bringing a positive and fun approach to his work – entertaining and teaching at the same time. In some ways, his work is an extension of the humour Bunnuck shared with audiences. Laughter and humour often provide Native people with the strength and determination to endure life’s many challenges. I’ve worked and spent some time with Stan over the years. I never asked him about Bunnuck or why he stopped making appearances. He got asked that question a lot and endured many Klik jokes (especially from people in northern Ontario, where the character is best known). But secretly, I always hoped Bunnuck would return. I was 12 years old when I first saw Bunnuck. He performed at a stay-in-school conference organized by Matawa First Nations in the early 1990s. That live performance was the most entertaining and funniest act I’d ever watched. Even to this day. In a way, it was the first time I felt proud to see another Native person entertain and make other Native people feel good to be who they are. That’s the power of humour. So, I was pumped when Stan first told me he was bringing the character back. And he was doing it in grand fashion with a performance at the Gathering of our People in his hometown. He said he wanted to try something different and

something big by including the community. Prior to the performance, he and a crew spent three days shooting new material. He said it generated a lot of buzz. Over 500 people were in the audience for the performance, which featured a mixture of a live routine and the video shot earlier in the week. Stan said he couldn’t believe the response. “It was a wicked response,” Stan said after the gathering. “It was overwhelming.” But there was one thing he wanted to be sure of: is Bunnuck still relevant today? Judging from the response of the crowd, it appears so. Stan believes it as well. “Man, we pulled it off.” And people are flocking to Bunnuck’s Facebook page. As of Aug.1, Bunnuck Klikman (Facebook profiles need first and last names) has 1,375 friends. “He’s back large time,” Stan said. Marilyn Mcleod, a counsellor at Moose Factory Ministik Public School, attended the Bunnuck performance July 15. She used to watch the character on Wawatay TV, so she was excited about the show. She said tragedy struck the community recently – three people died (two elders and a youth). Despite that, the timing of Bunnuck’s return was exactly what the community needed. Mcleod said she was laughing so hard her facial muscles were hurting afterwards. It helped to deal with the tragedy. “I enjoyed the Native humour,” she said. “It was so nice to see Bunnuck back in his community.” She said his message was positive and empowering. And she was impressed with the effort Stan put into his character. “He gave it all he had,” she said of the performance. She looks forward to seeing more of what Bunnuck has to offer. Fortunately, she, and the rest of us, will get to see more of the character and his antics. New content will soon be posted to the website. And Stan is working on transferring the old Bunnuck tapes to digital to post them online as well. But where has Bunnuck been all these years? Well, since Bunnuck has joined the digital age, Wawatay has been emailing him to find out exactly what he’s been up to. Aside from joining Facebook, Bunnuck has taken up yoga. See the discussion and photos on page 11.

Sachigo Lake First Nation, Sept. 1983.

Wawatay News archives

Many displaced by forest fires in region Xavier Kataquapit Under the northern sky

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love this hot and dry summer we are having but it comes with a price. The problem is that many forest fires have been burning throughout Ontario and in particular northern Ontario. This is a great time of the year for all of us to enjoy the outdoors but we must be aware that when the fire hazard is high we should not be having any campfires. It is necessary to remember that during these very hot and dry months the forest is like a giant tinderbox. The smallest ignition can result in a terrible fire that causes damage over thousands of hectares of wilderness forest. We don’t only lose the trees but huge fires also negatively affect animals. They lose their habitat and in many cases are trapped and die in roaring blazes. In the worst-case situations First Nation communities and towns are threatened and sometimes homes are ravaged by forest fires. Forest fires are not easy to fight and it requires a lot of investment, time and money

to deal with this problem. Firefighters put their lives on the line to protect our forests and homes when blazes become out of control. All kinds of technology is involved in fighting fires and many First Nation people make up the teams deployed to extinguish these hot spots. Most fires are actually caused by lightening so there is not much we can do to prevent those. However, many are started because people are not careful in making sure their campfires are properly extinguished. I never light a fire in a high fire hazard condition. When the conditions are good I make sure that when I am finished with my campfire I stamp it out and then pour water on the fire until I am sure it is out. I do not leave the fire site until I am sure of this. My people, the Cree of James Bay, always had great respect for fire and Native people in general see life as revolving around fire. This element has always been a part of our traditional and cultural life and has helped us survive over thousands of years. It gives us light, warmth and we use it to cook our food. Our Elders and ancestors have always had great respect for fire and we have always been aware that fire has to be tended, controlled and cared

for. If fire is unleashed in an irresponsible way then it can be very dangerous and destructive. We have many legends that deal with fire. This summer First Nation people have had to deal with the out of control rage of many forest fires. More than 3,500 First Nation people from several communities have had to be evacuated from their homes. Some of these First Nations included Cat Lake, Keewaywin, Koocheching and Sandy Lake. It is really difficult for people to leave their homes and this is very hard on the elderly, sick and children. I am sad to see so many people uprooted from their First Nations and flown out to find shelter and safety in other towns and cities. It is great that they are finding a safe place to escape to but at the same time I know these people are frightened, anxious about being forced out of their homes and they are worried about their possessions back in their communities. Thank goodness we have so many caring, giving and kind people in communities like Matachewan First Nation, Greenstone, Kapuskasing and Smith Falls who have organized to assist so many people who have been evacuated. In my area I give a heartfelt thanks (meegwetch) to

Matachewan First Nation Chief Alex (Sonny) Batisse and councillors Jean Lemieux, Leonil Boucher, Eleanore Hendrix, Robert Batisse and Gail Brubacher. It is not easy to volunteer to organize and care for so many evacuees on short notice. This is a huge challenge for a small First Nation like Matachewan and for the other towns involved. There are all kinds of support services that have to be put in place and people have to dedicate a lot of time, money and energy to make sure the evacuees are safe and comfortable while away from home. Thanks must also be given to all of those courageous Ministry of Natural Resources firefighters and personnel who are dedicated to keeping our people and forests safe. You can go to www.mnr.gov. on.ca for information on forest fires to find out what the fire hazard level is for an area and to see what fires are active. It seems like the worst of the fire season is over and people are returning to their homes. We can only hope that somehow Mother Earth provides us with a balance for the rest of the summer so the fire hazard level is low and we can still enjoy many warm and sunny days. www.underthenorthernsky.com

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NEWS DIRECTOR Brent Wesley brentw@wawatay.on.ca

Sales Representative James Brohm jamesb@wawatay.on.ca

WRITER/PHOTOGRAPHER Rick Garrick rickg@wawatay.on.ca

Circulation Evange Kanakakeesic evangelinek@wawatay.on.ca

STUDENT REPORTER Tim Quequish timq@wawatay.on.ca

Translators Vicky Angees vickya@wawatay.on.ca

ART DIRECTOR Roxann Shapwaykeesic roxys@wawatay.on.ca

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Contributors Paul Chakasim John Cutfeet Xavier Kataquapit Chris Kornacki Peter Moon Richard Wagamese Mandy Wesley Guest editorials, columnists and letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the views of Wawatay News.


Wawatay News August 4, 2011

Challenges face source water protection in northern Ont. John Cutfeet Noopemig

Ed. Note: This is the second of a two-part article. Part one was in the July 21 edition of Wawatay News.

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o add to the call for greater scrutiny at what is taking place in the James and Hudson’s Bay lowlands, the Matawa Chiefs Council, whose communities will be directly impacted by the activities in the Ring of Fire have also written a letter to federal Environment Minister Peter Kent and Ontario Environment Minister John Wilkinson, calling for a “Joint Review Panel Environmental Assessment (EA) for Mining and Enabling Infrastructure in the traditional territories of the First Nations within the Matawa First Nations.” The letter states: “The cumulative effects of these mining and infrastructure projects (road, rail, hydro, and telecommunications) on the traditional territories of our First Nations will profoundly affect our communities and the future of all of northern Ontario. The sensitive aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of this area, with its high water table and many rivers and streams will be significantly impacted by these developments. This is especially true for those remote First Nations closest to the Ring of Fire and infrastructure areas.” The Matawa Chiefs state that companies have submitted project descriptions to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) and that, “Our First Nations were not consulted in these project descriptions and per Supreme Court of Canada Decisions (Mikisew, Haida, Taku River Tlingit, et cetera) the Crown is to consult with First Nations.” For a number of years now,

Supreme Court of Canada jurisprudence says that if the Crown contemplates conduct that will impact Aboriginal and treaty rights, (Section 35-Constitution Act-1982), it must consult and accommodate the rightsholders prior to the impacting of said rights. In May 2008, the Ontario Court of Appeals, upon releasing the Ardoch Algonquin and the KI-6 to time served, ruled that there was a “duty to negotiate to reconcile Aboriginal interests with competing interests.” (Six members of Kitchenuhmaykoosib, including Chief Donny Morris, were jailed in 2008 after refusing to adhere to a court order allowing junior mining company Platinex to drill in KI’s traditional territory. Members of Ardoch Algonquin in southern Ont. were also jailed in 2008 for a similar matter.)

One-fifth of the world’s freshwater is in Canada and roughly four per cent is located in the north of Canada. It was shortly after the Court of Appeals decision that two pieces of legislation were introduced at Queen’s Park to deal with mining and related issues (amended Mining Act) and land use planning (the Far North Act), to reflect the public outcry against the incarceration of First Nations as a result of an archaic Mining Act. Premier Dalton McGuinty stated: “Our plan will ensure that mining potential across the province is developed in a sustainable way that benefits and respects communities. We will ensure that our mining industry remains strong – but we also need to modernize the way mining companies stake and explore their claims to be more respectful of private landowners and Aboriginal communities. The Ontario Government

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INSPECTION Notice of Aerial Herbicide Spraying Trout Lake Forest

believes exploration and mine development should only take place following early consultation and accommodation of Aboriginal communities.” Indigenous peoples have made declarations and have been holding Mother Earth Water Walks since 2003 to call attention to the sacred gift of water, the source of our life, the source of all life. They want action into the Indigenous Declaration on Water made in the summer of 2001. The declaration states: “As Indigenous Peoples, we raise our voices in solidarity to speak for the protection of water. The Creator placed us on this earth, each in our own sacred and traditional lands, to care for all of creation. We stand united to follow and implement our knowledge, laws and self-determination to preserve water, to preserve life.” On July 5, Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug (KI) held a referendum on a water declaration to “protect all waters that flow into and out of Big Trout Lake, and all lands whose waters flow into those lakes, rivers, and wetlands, to be completely protected through our continued care under KI’s authority, laws and protocols.” They voted overwhelming to protect their watershed. It is estimated that one-fifth of the world’s freshwater is in Canada and roughly four per cent is located in the north of Canada. So it is under these challenging circumstances that watershed protection efforts are coming to the Far North. The four major rivers and the surrounding watersheds in the Far North appear like arterial blood veins as they provide water and nutrients to an ecosystem that provides life to watersheds and lands, including throughout the Ring of Fire, along the way to Hudson’s and James Bay in Noopemig.

The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) invites you to inspect the MNR-approved aerial herbicide spray project. As part of our ongoing efforts to regenerate and protect Ontario’s forests, selected stands on the Trout Lake Forest (see map) will be sprayed with herbicide to control competing vegetation, starting on or about August 15, 2011. The herbicides Vision (PCP registration #19899) and Vision Max (PCP registration #27736) will be used.

The approved project description and project plan for the aerial herbicide project is available for public inspection at the Domtar, Dryden Office and on the MNR public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning July 14, 2011 until March 31, 2012 when the annual work schedule expires. The Ontario Government Information Centre at 227 Howey Street, Red Lake can provide access to the Internet. Interested and affected persons and organizations can arrange an appointment with MNR staff at the MNR District office to discuss the aerial herbicide project. For more information please contact: Janet Lane, RPF Domtar Inc. Postal Bag 4004 Dryden, ON P8N 3G7 tel: 807-223-9156 fax: 807-223-9401

Dave New, RPF Ministry of Natural Resources Red Lake District Office P.O. Box 5003, 227 Howey Street Red Lake, ON P0V 2M0 tel: 807-727-1383 fax: 807-727-2861

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BREAK THE CYCLE OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

John Cutfeet, from Kitchenuhmaykoosib, is the Aboriginal Watershed Program Coordinator for CPAWS Wildlands League.

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at these locations Aroland First Nation Band Office Atikokan Native Friendship Centre Attawapiskat Northern Store Balmertown Diane’s Gas Bar Balmertown Keewaytinook Okimakanak Batchewana First Nation Band Office Bearskin Lake Co-op Store Bearskin Lake Northern Store Beaverhouse First Nation Band Office Big Grassy First Nation Band Office Big Island First Nation Band Office Big Trout Lake Education Authority Big Trout Lake Sam’s Store Big Trout Lake Tasona Store Brunswick House First Nation Band Office Calstock A & J General Store Calstock Band Office Cat Lake First Nation Band Office Cat Lake Northern Store Chapleau Cree First Nation Band Office Chapleau Value Mart Cochrane Ininew Friendship Centre Collins Post Office Couchiching First Nation Band Office Couchiching First Nation Gas Bar Curve Lake Rosie’s Variety Deer Lake Northern Store Dinorwic Naumans General Store Dryden A & W Restaurant Dryden Beaver Lake Camp Dryden Greyhound Bus Depot Dryden McDonalds Restaurant Dryden Northwest Metis Nation of Ontario Dryden Robins Donut’s Ear Falls Kahooters Kabins & RV Park Emo J & D Junction Flying Post First Nation Band Office Fort Albany Band Office Fort Albany Northern Store Fort Frances Gizhewaadiziwin Health Access Centre Fort Frances Sunset Country Metis Fort Frances United Native Friendship Centre Fort Hope Corny’s Variety Store Fort Hope First Nation Band Office Fort Hope John C. Yesno Education Centre Fort Severn Northern Store Geraldton Thunder Bird Friendship Centre Ginoogaming First Nation Band Office Gogama Mattagammi Confectionary & Game Grassy Narrows J.B. Store Gull Bay Band Office Hornepayne First Nation Band Office Hornepayne G & L Variety Store Hudson East Side Convenience & Cafe Iskatewizaagegan Independent First Nation Band Office Kapuskasing Indian Friendship Centre

Kasabonika Chief Simeon McKay Education Centre Kasabonika First Nation Band Office Kashechewan First Nation Band Office Kashechewan Francine J. Wesley Secondary School Kashechewan Northern Store Keewaywin First Nation Band Office Keewaywin Northern Store Kenora Bimose Tribal Council Office Kenora Chiefs Advisory Office Kenora Migisi Treatment Centre Kenora Ne-Chee Friendship Centre Kenora Sunset Strip Enterprise Kingfisher Lake Omahamo Hotel Complex Kingfisher Lake Omahamo Store Kocheching First Nation Band Office Lac La Croix First Nation Band Office Lake Nipigon Ojibway First Nation Band Office Lansdowne House Co-op Store Lansdowne House Northern Store Long Lake First Nation Band Office Michipicoten First Nation Band Office Migisi Sahgaigan First Nation Band Office Mishkeegogamang First Nation Band Office Mishkeegogamang Laureen’s Grocery & Gas Missanabie Cree First Nation Band Office Moose Factory Echo Lodge Restaurant Moose Factory GG’s Corner & Gift Store Moose Factory Northern Store Moose Factory Weeneebayko General Hospital Moosonee Air Creebec Counter Moosonee Native Friendship Centre Moosonee Northern Store Moosonee Ontario Northland Railway Moosonee Polar Bear Lodge Moosonee Tempo Variety Moosonee Two Bay Enterprises Muskrat Dam Community Store Muskrat Dam First Nation Musselwhite Mine Naicatchewenin First Nation Band Office Namaygoosisagon Band Office Nestor Falls C & C Motel Nicikousemenecaning First Nation Band Office North Spirit Lake Cameron Store North Spirit Lake First Nation Band Office Northwest Angle First Nation Band Office Ochiichagwe’babigo’ining First Nation Band Office Ogoki Trappers Store Ojibways of Pic River Nation Band Office Onegaming Gas & Convenience Onegaming Public Library Pawitik Store

Pawitik Whitefish Bay Band Office Pays Plat First Nation Band Office Peawanuck First Nation Band Office Pic Mobert First Nation Band Office Pickle Lake Frontier Foods Pickle Lake Winston Motor Hotel Pikangikum Education Authority Pikangikum First Nation Band Office Pikangikum Northern Store Poplar Hill First Nation Band Office Poplar Hill Northern Store Rainy River First Nation Band Office Red Lake Indian Friendship Centre Red Lake Video Plus Red Lake Wasaya Airways Counter Red Rock First Nation Band Office Rocky Bay First Nation Band Office Sachigo Lake Co-op Store Sachigo Lake First Nation Sandy Lake A-Dow-Gamick Sandy Lake Education Authority Sandy Lake First Nation Band Office Sandy Lake Northern Store Saugeen First Nation Band Office Sault Ste. Marie Indian Friendship Centre Savant Lake Ennis Grocery Store Seine River First Nation Band Office Shoal Lake First Nation Band Office Sioux Narrows Anishinaabeg of Kabapikotawang Slate Falls Nation Band Office Stanjikoming First Nation Band Office Stratton Kay-Nah-Chi-Wah- Nung Historical Centre Summer Beaver Nibinamik Community Store Taykwa Tagamou Nation Band Office Timmins Air Creebec Counter Timmins Indian Friendship Centre Timmins Wawatay Native Communication Society Wabaskang First Nation Band Office Wabigoon First Nation Band Office Wabigoon Green Achers of Wabigoon Wabigoon Lake Community Store Wahgoshing First Nation Band Office Wapekeka Community Store Washaganish First Nation Band Office Wauzhusk Onigum First Nation Band Office Weagamow Lake Northern Store Weagamow Lake Onatamakay Community Store Webequie Northern Store Whitedog Kent Store Whitesand First Nation Band Office Wunnimun Lake General Store Wunnimun Lake Ken-Na-Wach Radio Wunnimun Lake Northern Store

Landmark Inn Metis Nation of Ontario Native People of Thunder Bay Development Corporation Negahneewin College of Indigenous Studies Quality Market, Centennial Square Redwood Park Opportunities Centre Seven Generations Education Institute Thunder Bay Indian Friendship Centre Wawatay Native Communications Society

Wequedong Lodge 1 Wequedong Lodge 3 Westfort Foods Fort William First Nation Band Office Fort William First Nation Bannon’s Gas Bar Fort William First Nation K & A Variety Fort William First Nation THP Variety and Gas Bar

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Please proof your ad and return ividends quarterly it today by fax,are otherwise your ad will run as it isfrom on this payouts a fax. company

to its shareholders. Choose 1 of the following: And today’s healthy dividend Run as is yields are eclipsing those of Run ad with changes money market funds and the (no additional proof required) bond market. Their advantages Require new proof are numerous and they carry DO NOT RUN AD great potential. Along with the (in for quote only) principles of investing in stocks cost: ______________________ we Ad discussed in the last article, a dividend investment strategy To run: _______________________ is an important method many have used to successfully invest ______________________________ in the stock of market. Signature Client’s Approval So just how powerful is a Note: dividend investment strategy? Ad proofs may not print out the Income-focused investors same size as they will appear in thelook newspaper. often to dividend-paying stocks – typically large-cap companies that are less volatile – as a source of stability and income and as a way to diversify their portfolios. Although companies are not obligated to pay dividends to investors, most continue to do so. In fact, all of the largest Canadian banks are known to maintain their dividend payouts to investors instead of reinvesting them and today the big five banks’ average yield is about 4.4 per cent (Globe Investor). Some investors see dividend payments as a signal of the company’s confidence in its future earning power, particu-

larly in tenuous markets. They also help to mitigate stock market downturns, particularly in the wake of the financial crisis. According to Standard and Poor’s, dividends have contributed to about one third of S&P 500 total return since 1926, while capital appreciations have contributed two thirds. Therefore, both sustainable dividend income and capital appreciation potential are important to total return expectations. Closer to home, and more recently, dividends have contributed 2.5 per cent of the average 7.5 per cent total return of the S&P/TSX Composite Index (Jan. 31, 2009, Morningstar) annual compound total return for S&P/TSX Composite Index from 1988-2008). Today, because stock valuations are lower, the dividend yield (the dividend paid per share divided by the share price) on the S&P/TSX Composite Index is higher. Many stocks make automatic dividend reinvestment plans (DRIPs) available, through which investors can reinvest their dividends for future growth (and more dividends) instead of spending them. Suppose you invest $100 initially and an additional $75 per quarter, at an anticipated stock price appreciation of seven per cent and an anticipated dividend yield of two per cent. In 20 years, you would have invested a total of $6,025 and reinvested dividends of $2,324.88 for a total cost basis of $8,349.88. Your capital

gain would be $8,166.42 – and your total value would be $16,516.29. Dividends received from Canadian corporations are effectively taxed at a lower rate than interest income, due to the dividend tax credit that is applied to the federal and provincial tax payable. This tax credit is meant to recognize the Canadian corporation paying the dividends has already paid tax on its earnings, which are now being distributed to its investors. Dividends from foreign corporations do not receive the same dividend tax credit and are taxed at a higher rate than those of Canadian corporations. For example, if you earn more than $126,000 in annual taxable income and receive $1,000 in dividend income from a Canadian company, you keep approximately $775 after federal and provincial taxes – less the dividend tax credit. By comparison, $1,000 in interest income will net about $555 after taxes – the same for $1,000 in foreign dividend income, because it is not subject to the tax credit for Canadian corporations and is taxed at a higher rate. Gordon Keesic is a Lac Seul band member and an Investment Advisor with RBC Dominion Securities Inc. Member CIPF. This article is for information purposes only. Please consult with a professional advisor before taking any action based on information in this article.

INSPECTION Notice of Aerial Herbicide Spraying English River Forest The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) invites you to inspect the MNR-approved aerial herbicide spray projects. As part of our ongoing efforts to regenerate and protect Ontario’s forests, selected stands on the English River Forest (see map) will be sprayed with herbicide to control competing vegetation, starting on or about August 11, 2011. The herbicide Vision, registration number #19899 and VisionMax, registration number #27736 Pest Control Products will be used.

Thunder Bay Outlets Central News Chapman’s Gas Bar Confederation College Satellite Office, 510 Victoria Ave. East Dennis F. Cromarty High School Hulls Family Bookstore John Howard Society of Thunder Bay & District Ka-Na-Chi-Hih Treatment Centre Lakehead University Aboriginal Awareness Centre

The approved description and plan for the aerial herbicide project is available for public inspection at the AbiBow Canada Inc. office and on the MNR public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning July 13, 2011 until March 31, 2012 when the annual work schedule expires. Ontario Government Information Centres in Toronto and the appropriate communities of the MNR Region, district and/or area offices provide Internet access.

Sioux Lookout Outlets 5 Mile Corner Al’s Sports Excellence Best Western Chicken Chef DJ’s Gas Bar Drayton Cash & Carry Fifth Avenue Club First Step Women’s Shelter Forest Inn Independent First Nations Alliance Jeremiah McKay Kabayshewekamik Hostel Johnny’s Fresh Market

Lamplighter Motel Mascotto’s Marine Nishnawbe-Gamik Friendship Centre Northern Store Pelican Falls First Nation High School Pharmasave Queen Elizabeth District High School Robin’s Donuts Sacred Heart School Shibogama Tribal Council Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre Sioux Lookout Public Library

Sioux Lottery Sioux Mountain Public School Sioux Pharmacy Slate Falls Airways Sunset Inn & Suites Travel Information Centre Wasaya Airways Counter Wawatay Native Communications Society Wellington Inn William A. Bill George Extended Care Wilson’s Business Solutions Windigo Tribal Council

Interested and affected persons and organizations can arrange an appointment with MNR staff at the MNR District or Area office to discuss the aerial herbicide project. For more information, please contact: Bill Wiltshire, RPF Agent of AbiBow Canada Inc. RW Forestry Inc. 61 Mona Street Thunder Bay, ON P7A 6Y2 tel: 807-629-0993 fax: 807-939-2251 office hours: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. e-mail: wiltshir@tbaytel.net

John Coady, RPF Area Forester Ministry of Natural Resources Ignace Area Office Corner of Highway 599/17 Ignace, ON P0T 1T0 tel: 807-934-2255 fax: 807-934-2304 office hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. e-mail: john.coady@ontario.ca

or call toll free: 1-800-667-1940 and ask to be forwarded to one of the contacts above. Renseignements en français : Sylvie Gilbart au 807-934-2262

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Wawatay News August 4, 2011

Falling through the cracks of the system Richard Wagamese One Native Life

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ou spend your whole life growing and experiencing. By the time you reach my age, the mid 50s, you gain some hope that things in the world might change and we’ll all live in a better place. But sadly, life is life and like the Rolling Stones said, you can’t always get what you want. It’s hard not to wish for that though, particularly when it comes to things like hope and peace, love and folks doing the right thing. Recently, a friend of mine has gone away. His name is Zack and he’s a foster kid. He hasn’t had the best start in life and he’s got a host of emotional, psychological, spiritual and social issues to deal with at the age of nine. He reminded me a lot of myself at that age; a skinny, knock-kneed, tow-headed kid with shining eyes and a rampant curiosity. Despite all his problems Zack was just a kid and when I taught him how to chuck a baseball he showed a great athletic talent. Zack came to stay with friends of mine down the road just about a year ago. He settled in well, got his feet under him and tried to get along. The school he went to is in a tiny rural community where kids go until they get old enough to ship into town by bus. It’s a small, protective community and strangers, especially strangers with issues aren’t exactly warmed up to fast or understood. Zack fought gamely to fit in but his issues made him an outcast. Here in our community he rode his bike and explored the bush alone. Our friends have been fostering kids for years and they’re loving, kind, spiritual people who genuinely care. The home he was given to live was bright and cheerful with the lake mere steps away. Zack had all the ingredients for a good home. But social services never really seemed to want to give him what he needed most and that was proper psychiatric care. Zack needed help to come to grips with horrendous trauma he’d suffered in his young life but he couldn’t get it. The best B.C. social services could offer was a pediatrician. That’s fine if you have a fever but moot if you struggle with inner demons.

So Zack went untreated and unhealed and eventually had to be moved because of overt behaviour problems. My friends are sad and they’re angry. They’re sad because they’d become a family in Zack’s time there and angry because despite all their pleading, letter writing and urgent telephone calls they couldn’t get Zack the help he needed. When social services made the decision to relocate him to a more secure setting it was like a piece of them had been ripped away. Now there’s another displaced kid shunted from one home to another carrying feelings of inadequacy, unworthiness and feeling unloved and unwanted. Now there’s another young soul rent asunder by a bureaucracy that refuses to see him as a human being and not a statistic or a page in a caseload. Now there’s another potential human disaster waiting to happen. Now there’s a kid who needed care who never got it and another sad statistic aimed for prison, the streets, addiction or an early grave. Sometimes, it seems to me, the people who need to remember the most forget that foster care includes the word ‘care.’ They forget that the word ‘foster’ means to instill and with kids it means to instill love, hope, security, belonging and hope. It’s not enough to stuff kids away in homes. Kids like Zack need psychiatric care, spiritual care, emotional care and the irreplaceable physical care that comes with love. To offer any less is to offer nothing at all. I know that because I was a foster kid too. To offer less is to victimize those kids all over again – and it’s victimizing foster parents too. For all the tirades and rebuking of the system, there are foster parents like my friends who are in it for the love they can give to kids. They’re in it because they actually see kids. They hear them. They feel them and they want to celebrate their energy and their emerging spirits. When the system comes and arbitrarily makes decisions without consultation and then blames the failure of the foster situation on loving people, it fails completely. There was no treatment plan for Zack and there needed to be – anyone could see that. Or at least anyone who cared enough to really look. No social worker ever called to see how he was doing or if he needed anything. He did. He needed the full, unconditional support of the system that is supposed to care.

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Wawatay News

August 4, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Farmer leads students through acting lessons Tim Quequish

Wawatay News

Aboriginal actor Gary Farmer was in Sioux Lookout July 12-29 to teach drama to students enrolled in Northern Nishnawbe Education Council’s bachelor of education program. The five-year distance education program is credited through Brock University. Farmer and the students were brought to Pelican Falls First Nation High School near Sioux Lookout for their education. Students were from Bearskin Lake, Sandy Lake, Kasbonika, Deer Lake, Pikangikum, and the Lac Seul region. Farmer has acted in over 90 movies including working alongside Holllywood actors in movies such as Smoke Signals with Adam Beach, The Score with Robert Deniro and Dead Man with Johnny Depp. He is a Six Nations band member and was born in Oshweken, Ont. He received the best actor award in 1989 and 1997 at the American Indian Film Festival. During the drama course, Farmer said he fed the students information but the ideas were products of the students. He talked to the students about the Ring of Fire issue that is big in northwestern Ontario. “It’s all their words, its all their themes, its all their character development,” he said. He feels that approach is why he got a high level of commitment from them. He said the group decided to do a radio play because they feel television and Internet are draining people of their imagination. “I feel we’ve accomplished a lot in a short time,” Farmer said.

Tim Quequish/Wawatay News

Gary Farmer coaches his students during a radio play July 28 at the Wawatay Radio Network studio in Sioux Lookout. Farmer was teaching a drama course for students in Northern Nishnawbe Education Council’s bachelor of education program. The students rehearsed and performed a play in the Wawatay Radio Network studio July 28. Farmer said that one of the difficulties he faced in working in Sioux Lookout was the language barrier. He said there were students in his class that spoke Ojicree. Despite the challenge, he enjoyed immersing himself in

the language as best he could. “It doesn’t matter what language you speak,” he said. “It’s all communication.” Farmer said he would teach drama through the distance education program as much as he could, if the role was offered. He considers himself an artist, and wants others to enjoy the arts as much as he does. He thinks the program is a good

way for people living in distant communities to get a Bachelor of Education. Farmer said teleconferencing has revolutionized education for Native people, helping people get educated from far distances. “It’s amazing that you can be sitting in your community being taught by teleconference from a professor that is 2000 miles

away,” he said. Farmer said when he was younger the arts never migrated to the northwestern area because there was a lack of interest. He said he was glad to see that the arts were finally extending to northwestern Ontario. Farmer said that he felt a lot of racial tension in Sioux Lookout, but believes that race rela-

tions can be fixed with the arts. Loretta Mickenack of Bearskin Lake said one of the challenging things she had to do during the three-week course was become a character and perform in front of a crowd. She started the program in 2007. She heard about the program through the vice-principal at an elementary school in her community. After graduating from high school she signed up for the program. She said the program would allow her to teach in her home community. She enjoys watching children learn, which motivated her to become a teacher. Mickenack said she had a lot of support from co-workers at her school, friends, and her husband. Cherish Kakegamic of Sandy Lake is an undergraduate in her fourth year. She has been in the program with several other students, including Mickenack. She said the only real difficulty she’s faced is trying to stay dedicated to the program. She said the drama course was a great experience. In one part of the play the class wrote, Kakegamic had to sing Johnny Cash’s ‘Ring of Fire’. She said she felt confident about her performance, and that she said she enjoyed the drama segment of her distance education. “Normally, I wouldn’t go up and act,” Kakegamic said. But she saw it as something she could integrate into her educational curriculum when she starts to teach. “It’s fun, he makes us work hard,” said Kakegamic of the class and Farmer.

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Did you know your telemedicine appointment is just as important as a regular visit with your doctor?

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When it comes to your health there is virtually No Difference.

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Wawatay News August 4, 2011

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Bake-off champs

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Platinum Sponsors

Bearskin Airlines, CIBC, CKDR, CN, Department of Canadian Heritage, DMTS, Dori’s Sewing Studio & Quilt Shop, Johnny’s Fresh Market, Municipality of Sioux Lookout, Ministry of Tourism & Culture, NOHFC, Service Canada, Sioux Lookout Chamber of Commerce, Sioux Travel

Gold Sponsors

Brent Wesley/Wawatay News

The First Nations of Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority team claimed first place at this year’s Bannock Bake-off organized by the Sioux Lookout Anti-racism Committee. Second place went to the K-Net Pirates and third place went to the Shibogama Loonie Bannock Bakers.

Abram Lake Park/Lincoln Park, Alex Wilson Coldstream Ltd., Forest Inn & Conference Centre, Tbay Tel, The Salvation Army, The Sioux Lookout Bulletin, Wawatay Native Communications Society

Social, economic initiatives taking off in Lac Seul Tim Quequish

Wawatay News

Construction to pave the road to Lac Seul First Nation has begun and is set to be complete by December 2012. The new road is expected to go to all the Lac Seul communities of Frenchman’s Head, Whitefish Bay and Kejick Bay. Chris Southwind, community activator, said that he talks with a lot of educators and businesses in the area. He said the general response he has heard is that they don’t like coming to the community because of the bad road. “With this new road coming in, I’m hearing comments like ‘Wow you’re making a road to Kejick and Whitefish Bay? I’ll go up there now,’” Southwind said. He believes economics in Lac Seul would improve with the construction of the road. Southwind also said he and his wife go through a lot of tires, windshields and bottomend mechanisms on their vehicle because of driving on the Lac Seul road. Elvis Trout, a band councillor with the community, is also happy about the new road. “People are excited about the road construction, they’re tired of changing tires,” said Trout. Lac Seul is also working with True Grit Consulting Ltd. to

construct an arena and conference hall in Frenchman’s Head. Southwind said the advantage of having an arena in the community is that residents won’t have to travel an hour to the closest arena in Sioux Lookout. Instead, Lac Seul residents will be able to drive five to 20 minutes to be able to skate. He also said the arena would create jobs for community members, as they will need staff to maintain and operate it. Trout suspects that the arena won’t be completed until next year. He said that Lac Seul is also in talks about getting a cement plant along with a cement crusher to further their economic assets. As well, Lac Seul is planning to build a youth and Elders drop-in centre by the community health centre. “We figure it’s going to benefit our younger generation, they’ll have something to look forward to,” Trout said. Southwind is one of 14 community activators in communities across northwestern Ontario. The community activator project is a pilot from the Government of Ontario to enhance sport and physical activity. He is excited for the planned conference hall and arena, which would be used for bigger

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All Occasion Caked by Althea, Lac Seul First Nation, Rotary Club of Sioux Lookout Shibogama First Nations Council, Sunset Inn & Suites, The Wellington Centre, Wasaya Airways LP

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conferences and bringing the community closer together. Southwind said he wants to organize activities such as golf, archery and snowshoeing in the near future. Southwind said he has heard Elders say the community used to get together and help each other. But now that quality of being together is missing from the current generation. Southwind hopes recreational initiatives will bring the community closer together. “In this day and age, with texting, internet, X-box, you start to lose interpersonal skills,” he said. When you’re in front of somebody, it’s different, he said. So he wants to revive the sense of community in Lac Seul. He said Lac Seul used to have a radio station about 20 years ago. When he approached chief and council if they would support a new radio station he said they were fully supportive. “I assembled a team, we got our resources together, and right now we’re live in Kejick Bay,” he said. He figures radio will be in Frenchman’s Head sometime this month. He said the purpose of the radio is to harmonize the community and to preserve their language.

MUSHKEGOWUK ELECTIONS 2011

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Nishnawbe Aski Nation XXX Keewaywin Conference

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Notice of Election For the Positions of Grand Chief and Deputy Grand Chief

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Matthew Bradley ID:

Email Resolutions to: csimard@nan.on.ca and/or lhunter@nan.on.ca

20110804 Mushkegowuk Election 60 day July 29, 2011 9:09 AM

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For more information on the Conference contact: fmckenzie@nan.on.ca, jwheesk@nan.on.ca, or ibeardy@nan.on.ca

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Wawatay News

August 4, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Gathering of our People

Paul Chakasim/Special to Wawatay News

Moose Cree First Nation held its annual Gathering of our People July 12-15 in the community. The four-day event featured peformances by Sierra Noble, Lawrence Martin, Vern Cheechoo, Ceramony, Jason Chamakese and Robert Gladue. Former NHLer Theoren Fleury was also a guest speaker at the gathering. The Canadian Wrestling Federation was also on the schedule as well as a performance by the character Bunnuck (see next page). TOP: Bannock is fried over a fire at the cultural camp area. ABOVE: A group of kids entertain as they dance to fiddle music. ABOVE RIGHT: The cultural camp area of the gathering. RIGHT: Elders prepare fish for a fish smoking workshop.


Wawatay News August 4, 2011

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ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Return of Bunnuck

Interview by Brent Wesley Photos by Mandy Wesley

Bunnuck on his Moose Factory 4-wheeler.

Bunnuck was in love? And he’s now on Facebook? Whatever happened to his old shack? He reveals all in this exclusive interview with Wawatay News. Q. What have you been up to all these years? A. It’s hard for me to talk about it eh. Well, since I’m not talking and I’m typing I guess I can tell you part of the story eh. A few years ago, at a hockey tournament, I met this girl from Fort Albany and she really like me hard real fast eh. She said she loved me and I moved der with her. The Chief told me not to go, Leo and Ester told me not to go but I did anyway. The Chief wanted me to stay eh to help with the community’s Klik affairs but I went anyways. I’m still kind of embarrassed me you know, so dats all I’m gonna say for now. Ed. note: Check out www.bunnuck.com for the complete story. Q. How happy are you to be back? A. At firsht, it was hard eh, because the camera crew found me and asked me questions and keeped looking at my shorts. I didn’t want to talk about it, but I guess me it was important to tell my story eh. But now that I’m home and I’m back working with the Chief on Klik affairs. I’m really happy. Even more happy than before you know, because I nevered realized how great my community was until I missed it from way up der. Now, my buddy Andrew lemme borrow his 4 wheeler so I can take some girls for a ride. It’s an exciting time eh. Q. What did you miss most while you were gone? A. Leo and Ester really I guess me. They are my bestest friends. When Ester isn’t mad at me for taking her bloomers to make a screen and Leo isn’t bossing me around to take his garbage down the dump we get along great eh. Everybody needs friends eh, and dey are mine. Q. Where do you stay now? Do you still have your shack? A. I don’t have my shack anymore you know, but dats okay. It got klik infested with rats and mice eh. So now me, I’m in between shacks and I’m staying here and der. But usually I’m in da bush staying at my camp eh. I come to town a few times ever week and pick up some supplies and use the Chiefs computer to check my facebook. Esss, ever thought I was hi-tek me using a computer. Sanks eh, Chief for learning me how to use it. Hey, how to I get the www thing at my camp. Maybe Knet can help me. Q. What do you think of all this Technology today? A. I sink it’s cool but it’s making Leo lazy. All he does is sits der and types on his computer. Even when I want to tell him a story, he says to go home and facebook him. Ever dat guy, just talk to me LEO. I’m a face to face kinda of cree me you know. Dis is cool stuff, but don’t let it get

in da way of being a human being. Too many robots out der now a days. Go outside and do somesing! Q. So, why is Bunnuck doing Yoga? A. When I go to bingo, the people at the evening session are not just playing eh, they are competing, studying, and stressing out. Some of dos people are play 36 cards, tearing Nevada tickets, rubbing der troll and eating all at the same time. Whew, that’s tiring man. Ester tells me her friend Josephine comes home all grumpy sometimes. You know what? We need to find time to relax eh and take a time out. Your kids aren’t the only ones who need to stand in the corner, you know. I like dis yoga thing cause it gives me time to relax and think about nothing. Hey, why do they call bingo a session, it’s not counseling. Or is it? Whoa, ever deadly! Q. We heard you had a big show at the Gathering of our People. How did it go? A. Leo thought since I came home it would good to get back involved eh. Leo wanted me to join the new millennium eh, even though I’m 11 years late. So he wanted me to do a multi-media show using video and a live show Victor Linklater from Minoshen Productions and Jonathan Kapeshesit from Goose Call Productions filmed a whole bunch of stuff eh for the community. We showed all the new videos and I made an appearance during the show on Friday night. Holy mack, der was about 500 people dat showed up eh. It was deadly, real deadly. I even gave away Klik sangwiches.

Bunnuck at his quiet place practicing yoga. He finds it relaxing being around peoples garbage. Bunnuck believes to never give up on anything, even garbage.

Q. We also heard you had a wrestling match. What happened? A. It was with dis guy, the Hickster from the Canadian Wrestling Federation. I was interviewing him for my show and I guess I showed a little too much neck for him. He looked at me and ask what I was doing, I told him I was waiting for a hicky. I guess he didn’t like dat eh and he challenged me to a match. I told him as long as I could do my Klik moves. Den, I was in the ring and did my move and before I finished, he picked me up eh and body slammed me. I didn’t even hear the bell eh and it was finished. I don’t want a rematch though, my wrestling career is over. Too deadly for me. Q. What do you want to say to all the people that missed you while you were gone? A. Ummm, I really dat big built guy who was this robot in a movie and he said, I’ll be back. I guess that since I’m back now, I guess I’ll say, I’M BACK ME! I look forward me to being around for a long time again, lots more fun to come okay.... I promise.

Bunnuck with Frances Moses and her granddaughter making history, the first ever Klik sagabon


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Wawatay News

August 4, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Generating economic, governance success Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

Titus Semple and Alanna McKenzie are looking to create greater success for First Nations people through their roles with Crupi Consulting Group in Thunder Bay. “I have always felt that one way for our people to continue to succeed will be through business,” said Semple, who joined Crupi as a business development consultant about two months ago. “We are committed to building positive, mutually-beneficial relationships and opportunities with the full participation of First Nation individuals, businesses and communities.” The Kasabonika band member who has a background in marketing enjoys his work with Crupi, explaining that every day is different. “No two days are ever the same,” Semple said. “One day I could be meeting with clients to discuss a project we are working on or I could possibly be out meeting with new potential clients.” Semple’s focus is to generate economic and business development opportunities with Crupi’s clients. “We specialize in business and economic development, and the team is great at what they do,” Semple said. “We have many years of experience working in the First

Nation economic development sector.” Semple also wants to help First Nations to explore business opportunities outside of northern Ontario. “There are many business opportunities out there that could potentially be lucrative for our people to explore and to capitalize on, and I would very much like to have the opportunity to work with them and assist them on those opportunities,” Semple said. McKenzie has been working with Crupi over the past two-anda-half years, mainly in the governance field. “I don’t work here full time,” said the Muskrat Dam band member. “I just come in on special governance projects. I’m pretty busy throughout the year.” McKenzie enjoys working with the wide range of professionals at Crupi, noting they have a good working relationship with their clients. “What I like about this group in particular is that it gives me an opportunity to work with people from other treaty areas, not just my own,” McKenzie said. “I’m hoping to expand the client base with governance.” McKenzie currently works on governance issues, such as assisting chief and councils to develop their work plans for their term in office and current administrative

issues in the band, with Treaty #3, Robinson Superior, Nishnawbe Aski Nation and independent communities. “I’ve worked in the Union of Ontario Indians; I’ve seen their nation building process,” McKenzie said. “I’ve worked in NAN; I’ve seen their nation building process. I watch all of these different groups across Canada to see what they have done, what kind of structure they have put into place and how is it functioning and at times, what are the different problems that they are encountering.” McKenzie and Semple both noted that the staff at Crupi are very knowledgeable about where to obtain financing or funding for projects. “A lot of the projects that they worked on here, the cost to the community is very limited, if there is any cost for them,” Semple said. “They have a complete idea of where to get their funding, where to get their financing.”

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Titus Semple recently joined Crupi Consulting Group as a business development consultant to create greater success for First Nations people through business.

Creation of new reserve celebrated WAWATAY NEWS

Date Completed:

July 22, 2011

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20110804 Olympic Congratulations July 22, 2011 9:23 AM

To: ________________________ ________________________

From: _____________________ @ Wawatay News

Please proof your ad and return

it today by fax, otherwise your ad Rick Garrick will run as it is on this fax.

Wawatay News

CONGRATULATIONS WEENUSK FIRST NATION On the 25th anniversary of your relocation to Peawanuck in 1986. It was our pleasure to work with you on that project and we look forward to our continued partnership and the next 25 years.

Bob Topp, Manager Rod Falk , Sales Consultant 1783 Dugald Rd. Winnipeg, MB R2J 0H3 P. (204) 661-8600 F. (204) 654-8848 TF. (800) 665-8666

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Bingwi AnishinaaRunNeyaashi as is bek First Nation the Run ad with celebrated changes (no of additional proof required) creation its new reserve on the southeast of Lake NipRequire shore new proof igon July DO15. NOT RUN AD quote only) “This(in for agreement lays the groundwork for a brighter Ad cost: ______________________ future for our members,” said To run: _______________________ Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek Chief Paul Gladu. “This ______________________________ reserve will assist us in buildSignature of Client’s Approval ing a vibrant community, proNote: our current members viding Ad proofs may not print out the and future with a same size as generations they will appear in the newspaper. healthy and safe environment in which to live and flourish.” John Duncan, minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, and Chris Bentley, minister for Aboriginal Affairs, congratulated Gladu and the 197 band members on the creation of the 986.650 hectare reserve, which will provide them with a permanent home for the first time. “The establishment of this reserve demonstrates the government of Canada’s commitment to work with the people of Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek and other partners to improve the prosperity of the First Nation,” Duncan said. The celebration recognized several years of collaboration, which began in 1996. The next phase is to develop the new community base. “Ontario is pleased to be a partner in the creation of this reserve for Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek First Nation,” Bentley said. “We look forward to continuing our relationship with the First Nation and the federal government in order to foster economic growth and to help achieve positive outcomes for Aboriginal communities in Ontario.”


Wawatay News August 4, 2011

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Design your own ad contest Prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place! EPIC WIN! Design your own ad around the topics of either: • • • • •

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All ads will be used throughout Wawatay Native Communication Society’s media outlets! Deadline: September 2011 Submit ads to: Chris Kornacki Misiwe Minoyawin Project Co-ordinator 807.344.3022 (office) 1.888.575.2349 (toll free) 807.344.3182 (fax) chrisk@wawatay.on.ca

Sponsored by:


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Wawatay News

August 4, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Walkers begin trek to TRC event in Halifax WAWATAY NEWS

Date Completed:

October X, 2010

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Matthew Bradley ID: 2010_10_28 MagaFon

To: ________________________ ________________________

Residential school memories @ Wawatay News flooded back for Patrick EtherPlease proof your ad and return it today by fax,Sr. otherwise ad ington atyourthe beginning of will run as it is on this fax. his latest walk Choose 1 of the following: Ethering and a group of Run as is youth are walking 2,200 kiloRun ad with changes metres to the Truth and ReconRequire new proof ciliation Commission (TRC) of DO NOT RUN AD Canada national event in Halifax, N.S. Oct. 26-29. Ad cost: ______________________ “We went to Kirkland Lake To run: _______________________ and a lot of memories came up ______________________________ in regards to survivors of resiSignature of Client’s Approval VISA/MASTERCARD Accepted dential school, including me, that went to (Kirkland Lake Collegiate and Vocational Institute),” said Etherington, one of seven walkers who set out July 29. “So this is the kind of effect that is happening with this walk.” Although the school no longer exists, the residential school survivor from Moose Cree First Nation said the building was still there. “The young people that are with me saw the effects of the memories,” Etherington said. “It was very emotional for me.” Three youth from Attawapiskat, one youth from Peawanuck and one youth from Moose Cree From: _____________________

(no additional proof required)

in for quote only

REVIEW Review of Long-Term Management Direction Abitibi River Forest (2012–2022) Forest Management Plan The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR), First Resource Management Group Inc. and the Cochrane Local Citizens Committee (LCC) invite you to review and comment on the proposed long-term management direction for the 2012–2022 Forest Management Plan (FMP) for the Abitibi River Forest. The Planning Process The FMP takes approximately two years to complete. During this time, five formal opportunities for public and Aboriginal involvement are provided. The first opportunity (Stage 1) for this FMP occurred on September 30, 2010 when the public was ‘Invited to Participate’ in the development of the plan. This ‘Stage 2’ notice is to invite you to review and comment on:

are walking with Etherington and Frances Whiskeychan. “Some of the young people also felt some healing, especially one young person,” he said. Etherington, Whiskeychan, Patrick Etherington Jr., Christopher Paulmartin and Jorge Hookimaw’llillerre completed a 31-day 1,600-kilometre walk last year to the TRC’s first national gathering in Winnipeg. “Now, walking in your own territory brings up quite a bit more,” Etherington said. “So that is what we are trying to share.” While the walkers received accommodations Aug. 1 in Matachewan First Nation, they had to sleep outside one night so far on their journey. “We slept outside, and it’s hard when you’re walking,” Etherington said. Whiskeychan said the hot sun has been difficult so far during the walk. “It’s been 30 (Celsius) for the last three days,” Whiskeychan said. “So I’m just getting scorched.” -RG

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• the proposed long-term management direction for the forest • the areas that could reasonably be harvested, and the preferred areas for harvest operations during the 10-year period of the plan • the analysis of alternative one-kilometer-wide corridors for each new primary road which is required for the next 20 years • the background information and previously unmapped values information to be used in planning

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How to Get Involved

ᑭᒋᓀᐣᑕᑲᐧᐣ ᐅᐁᐧ ᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᒋᑭᑫᐣᑕᒧᓂᑕᐧ ᐱᑯ ᐊᐁᐧᓀᓇᐠ

To facilitate your review, a summary of the proposed long-term management direction for the forest can be obtained from the company and MNR locations listed below. A summary map(s) of the preferred and optional harvest areas for the 10-year period of the plan and primary road corridors for each new primary road which is required for the next 20 years will also be available. In addition to the most current versions of the information and maps that were available at ‘Stage 1’ of the public consultation, background information and sources of direction available includes the following:

1. ᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᐣ ᑲᐃᐧᐣᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᐊᐱ ᑫᐃᔑᐊᐧᐸᒥᑯᔭᐣ 2. ᑭᑕᑯᓯᐃᐧ ᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᐣ 3. ᑭᒪᐡᑭᑭᒪᐣ 4. ᑲᐧᔭᐠ ᒋᐃᔑᓇᑲᐧᑭᐣ ᑫᑭᑭᐡᑲᒪᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑭᒪᑭᓯᓇᐣ

The summary of the proposed long-term management direction and the supporting information described in this notice will be available at the First Resource Management Group office and at the MNR Cochrane District Office, as well as the locations shown below, during normal office hours for a period of 30 days from August 5 to September 6, 2011. Comments on the proposed long-term management direction for the Abitibi River Forest must be received by Cory Wiseman of the planning team at the MNR Cochrane District Office, by Tuesday, September 6, 2011.

ᒥᑫᐧᐨ ᑲᐱᒥᓂᔕᐦᐊᒪᐣ ᑲᐃᔑᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᑯᔭᐣ.

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Cochrane Local Citizens Committee 2-4 Highway 11 South P.O. Box 730 Cochrane, ON P0L 1C0

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Anytime during the planning process, you may make a written request to seek resolution of issues with the plan author, the MNR District Manager or the Regional Director using a process described in the 2009 Forest Management Planning Manual (Part C, Section 6.1.4).

201108 Augus

To: ___

Important Notice to the General Public

Stay Involved There will be three more formal opportunities for you to be involved. These stages are listed and tentatively scheduled as follows: Stage 3 – Information Centre: Review of Proposed Operations Stage 4 – Information Centre: Review of Draft Forest Management Plan Stage 5 – Inspection of MNR-Approved Forest Management Plan

Please it today will run

~ ᐊᐧᓂᓇᐊᐧᑲᐠ ᒥᓄᔭᐃᐧᑲᒥᐠ

Meetings with representatives of the planning team and the LCC can be requested at any time during the planning process. Reasonable opportunities to meet planning team members during non-business hours will be provided upon request. If you require more information or wish to discuss your interests and concerns with a planning team member, please contact one of the individuals listed below: Bree Andrews, RPF First Resource Management Group Inc. P.O. Box 550 Englehart, ON P0J 1H0 tel: 705-544-2828 ext. 231 e-mail: bree.andrews@frmg.ca

___ From:

ᐊᐱ ᐃᐧᐱᔕᔭᐣ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐠ, ᑭᒋᓀᐣᑕᑲᐧᐣ ᒋᐱᑐᔭᐣ ᐅᓄᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᑲᔭᓂ ᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᑌᑭᐣ:

• draft Aboriginal Background Information Report • summary of public comments and submissions received to date and any responses to those comments and submissions • a summary report of the results of the desired forest and benefits meeting • environmental analysis, including use management strategies of the alternative corridors for each new primary road • maps that portray past and approved areas of harvest operations for the current FMP and the previous 10 years • criteria used for the identification of areas that could reasonably be harvested during the 10-year period of the plan • summary report of the activities of the LLC to date

Cory Wiseman, RPF Cochrane MNR 2-4 Highway 11 South P.O. Box 730 Cochrane, ON P0L 1C0 tel: 705-272-7195 e-mail: cory.wiseman@ontario.ca

201108 Augus

November 2011 June 2012 November 2012

If you would like to be added to a mailing list to be notified of public involvement opportunities, please contact Cory Wiseman at 705-272-7195.

___ From:

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When you are coming to the hospital, it is important to bring the following:

The Ministry of Natural Resources is collecting your personal information and comments under the authority of the Crown Forest Sustainability Act. Any personal information you provide (address, name, telephone, etc.) will be protected in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act; however, your comments will become part of the public consultation process and may be shared with the general public. Your personal information may be used by the Ministry of Natural Resources to send you further information related to this forest management planning exercise. If you have questions about use of your personal information, please contact Denis Clement, Ministry of Natural Resources Information Management Supervisor at 705-272-7122.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Renseignements en français : Denis Clement au 705-272-7122

appointment letter health card medications proper clothing and shoes

Thank you for your cooperation. BLEED

~ Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre

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Wawatay News August 4, 2011

Constance Lake, Zenyatta settle New Aboriginal curator in Thunder Bay Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

An artist’s spotlight on Arthur Shilling is one of the first projects planned by the Thunder Bay Art Gallery’s newly appointed Aboriginal curator in residence. “His work was quite different than someone out of the Indian Group of Seven, who were practicing at the same time as him,” said Suzanne Morrissette, a Metis curator, artist and writer. “He often gets called an expressionist painter and I’m really trying to flesh that out and see what that means.” The Arthur Shilling spotlight will be exhibited Sept. 6 to Nov. 27 on the Thunder Bay Art Gallery’s front foyer wall. Morrissette plans to research the way Shilling’s art has been exhibited in the past and different ways of talking about his work now and in the future. Born in 1941 in Rama, Ont., Shilling developed a distinctive expressionist style using bold strokes of colour to set off the quiet questioning or proud defiance in the faces of his subjects. Shilling held his first solo exhibition in 1967 in Ottawa and his work is now in the permanent collections of the Thunder Bay Art Gallery, McMichael Canadian Collection, National Museum of Civilization, Royal Ontario Museum and Canadian Embassy Collection in Washington, D.C. He was also the subject of the National Film Board’s prizewinning documentary, The Beauty of My People: The Life, Work and Times of Arthur Shilling. Morrissette will also be presenting a paper on the Thunder Bay Art Gallery’s mandate study from 1994 at an upcoming Aboriginal Curatorial Collective meeting in Toronto. “That was at a time when a lot of galleries were re-evaluating the way Aboriginal artwork is collected and displayed,” Morrissette said. “So I’m looking back to see what the mandate study had accomplished, what has been done since and how that affects my position here at the gallery.” Morrissette grew up in Winnipeg; her grandparents are Cree from the Interlake and Metis from the Red River Valley. She studied at the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design University in Vancouver, B.C. and recently completed her Master in Fine Art at the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto, Ont. Morrisette previously was an intern at both the Urban Shaman Contemporary Aboriginal Art Gallery and aceartinc., an artist run centre in Winnipeg, Man. She is also working on an exhibition of drawings, including Norval Morrisseau pieces, for Sept. 1 to Nov. 27 at the Thunder Bay Art Gallery. “We have some very large drawings and some smaller drawings of his as well,” Morrissette said. “They’re quite reduced by comparison (with his paintings) so it’s a really interesting comparison to make, so I’m going to see what kind of narrative we can pull through with that.”

Constance Lake and Zenyatta Ventures Ltd. announced an exploration agreement July 18 regarding exploration and pre-feasibility activities on the Albany Project. “We are pleased to have reached an agreement with Zenyatta,” said Constance Lake Chief Roger Wesley. “It reflects the mutual respect that has developed between us and we look forward to building a strong relationship to realize the benefits and opportunities from the mineral exploration on the Albany Project in our traditional territory.” Constance Lake will participate in an implementation committee and receive, along with certain other First Nations, preferential opportunities for

employment and contracting. Zenyatta will also contribute to a social fund for the benefit of Constance Lake children, youth and Elders. “We recognize the Aboriginal treaty rights and the importance of the traditional lands to the First Nation people,” said Aubrey Eveleigh, president and CEO of Zenyatta. “We also realize that mineral exploration must contribute to the benefit of all parties involved.” Eveleigh said Zenyatta looks forward to working cooperatively with Constance Lake, other First Nations and local communities on the Albany Project. “We feel that active participation and a close relationship with First Nation communities creates sound business opportunities,” Eveleigh said. “The company is focused and committed

BRYAN V.

BARB T.

Service Plan Manager

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ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

to northern Ontario and has always accepted responsibility for strong community relations.” Constance Lake and Zenyatta had been involved in a mediation process, which a judge had been appointed to oversee. During Constance Lake’s initial April 29 court hearing seeking to stop Zenyatta from further exploration drilling in its traditional territory, Ontario Superior Court Justice Sidney N. Lederman ordered the three parties to attempt to resolve the issue. Zenyatta announced the start of a drill program in the Albany Project in February. Zenyatta is targeting nickel, copper and platinum group metals in its Albany Project claims, which cover 300,000 acres northwest of Hearst in Constance Lake’s traditional territory.

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Wawatay News

ATTENTION MEMBERS OF THE TAYKWA TAGAMOU NATION (TTN)

August 4, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Lac Seul focuses on young people WAWATAY NEWS

Date Completed:

June 30, 2011

Size:

2 COL x 110 AGATES

Information about the Nomination A bi election is being held to nominate a Youth Councillor (eligibility 18-29 years of age and a TTN member). Nomination packages will be mailed out June 30, 2011. The Electoral Officer must receive the completed TTN nomination form before July 14, 2011, 4:00 pm, in order for the nomination to be valid.

Information about the Bi Election The bi election will be held Saturday, August 13, 2011 at the band office on TTN, from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm. The ballot packages and voting information will be mailed to off reserve voters whose name and addresses are registered with the band office on July 18, 2011. If you are an eligible voter not residing on the reserve and wish to receive a ballot package, ensure your address is registered with the band office, or call the Electoral Officer to ensure she has your address for election packages. An elector residing on the reserve who is unable to attend the polling station may also vote by mail in ballot. To do so, please contact the Electoral Officer as soon as possible. If you require further information, please contact the Electoral Officer; Gail Brubacher at 705-676-6267.

Inspection NOTICE OF AERIAL HERBICIDE SPRAYING WABIGOON FOREST The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) invites you to inspect the MNR approved aerial herbicide spray project(s). As part of our ongoing efforts to regenerate and protect Ontario’s forests, selected stands on the Wabigoon Forest (see map) will be sprayed with herbicide to control competing vegetation, starting on or about: August 11, 2011. The herbicide Vision registration # 19899 will be used.

Completed by:

Tim Quequish Matthew Bradley Wawatay News

ID: 2011_07_07 Taykwa Tagamou Election

Youth from Lac Seul First To: ________________________ Nation gathered July 19-21 to ________________________ attend the annual youth conferFrom: _____________________ ence in Frenchman’s Head. Wawatay News Chris @Southwind, community activator, said youth Please proof yourthe ad and returnconit today started by fax, otherwise yourbut ad it ference off slow, will run as it is on this fax. really picked up July 20 with a Choose 1 of the following: talent show. He said there wasn’t a set Run as is agenda Run for ad the talent show so with changes he thought it was going (no additional proof required)to be a short event. was even worRequireHe new proof ried no DO oneNOT would show. HowRUN AD for quote only) ever, a (ingroup of eager youth came to showcase their talAd cost: ______________________ ent. A group of guitar players To run: _______________________ showed up and some youth presented a small 20-minute ______________________________ movie. Signature of Client’s Approval “We thought it was going toNote: be half an hour. It ended proofs two may not print thehours upAd being and a out half same size as they will appear in long,” Southwind said, adding the newspaper. he was happy with the results. After the talent show a dance was held. Southwind said he was happy to see community members smiling, laughing and having fun. He said he was “really satisfied” with all the participants and volunteers who helped make this annual gathering a reality. He is already looking forward to next year’s youth conference. Bea Shawanda, an OdawaPottowottomi from Manitoulin Island, Ont., attended the youth conference to teach the youth about respect, while enabling them to show their creativity through a design your own medicine wheel t-shirt workshop. She had each youth make their own medicine wheel. Each section contained a goal the child had, who their heroes WAWATAY NEWS were, what their culture meant Date Completed: to them and what their pet July was. 14, 2011 peeve Size: She shared the work of a 2 COLfemale x 110 participant AGATES young who drew Wileby: E. Coyote as one of Completed Matthew her heroes.Bradley The youth told Sha20110721 Domtar Wabigoon Notice wanda that she admired the ID: July 14, 2011 10:38 AM Coyote’s utter determination – the fact that he never stopped To: ________________________

Tim Quequish/Wawatay News

Niso Bradford from Manitoulin Island, held a game session with the youth from Lac Seul First Nation at a youth conference July 19-21. Youth participated in a communication game, where a team of youth held the opposite hand of their adjacent partner, resulting in the group getting tangled together. The objective of the game is to become untangled while still holding hands before another team does. chasing his goal, no matter the adversity. Shawanda said the majority of the youth chose gossip as their pet peeves, echoing Shawanda’s overall message about the harmful effects of hearsay. The second most common pet peeve they chose was bullying. She taught the lesson of Crazy Horse – know your enemy. Shawanda said that if the youth learn who or what their enemies are sooner, they would be more prepared to deal with it in the future. “What hurts Native people?” Shawanda asked. “Alcohol and drugs.” She said attending the youth conference was a good way to follow-up from her visit to Lac Seul during the community’s Day of Healing May 28. Shawanda also brought her son, Niso Bradford, a youth leadership trainer. He works at Uncovery, Recovery, Discovery, which is run by Shawanda.

They have worked together for about 17 years. Bradford played some games with the youth. One of the games they played was Lion’s and Tigers, where the youth got into two groups and lined up facing each other. Bradford assigned each line as a tiger or lion. When he yelled either group’s name, one would chase the other. Those who were caught would take the side of their captors. Bradford said it was a memoryretention game. “It does take a lot of effort and risk to come up to a group of people you may or may not know,” Bradford said. “At the same time, to be comfortable enough and to break out is such a powerful thing.” Shawanda said Bradford does games with important lessons that utilize the youth’s high energy. She focuses more on the “grandmother” stuff such as storytelling and art. “We build on the physical

________________________ From: _____________________ @ Wawatay News

City of Thunder Bay Public Art Program WAWATAY NEWS

Please proof your ad and return it today by fax, otherwise your ad will run as it is on this fax.

Date Completed:

Choose 1 of the following:

Size:

July 14, 2011

2 COL x 82.5 AGATES

Run as is Run ad with changes (no additional proof required)

Require new proof DO NOT RUN AD

Cochrane and Sudbury (Hanmer)

CALL TO WRITERS & Matthew Bradley STORYTELLERS 20110721 OAHS For Rent Cochrane

Ad cost: ______________________

Aboriginal Housing Opportunities

To run: _______________________

Interested and affected persons and organizations can arrange an appointment with MNR staff at the MNR District or Area office to discuss the aerial herbicide project. For More information or to arrange an appointment with MNR staff please contact: Penny Ratushniak R.P.F. 1 Duke Street PO Box 4004 Dryden, ON P8N 3J7 807-223-9852

Derek Johnston R.P.F. 479 Government Street PO Box 730 Dryden, ON P8N 2Z4 807-223-7556

or call toll free: 1-800-667-1940 and ask to be forwarded to one of the contacts above. Renseignements en français : Sylvie Gilbart (807-934-2262).

Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services (OAHS) is now accepting applicant names from self-identifying Aboriginal people who are Note: in renting Ad interested proofs may not print out the Affordable (below market) and same size as they will appear in Rent Geared-to-Income units: the newspaper. ______________________________ Signature of Client’s Approval

• Cochrane: 1 and 3 bedroom homes, and • Sudbury (Hanmer): 1 and 2 bedroom homes Interested applicants are encouraged to contact OAHS using our toll-free number to be placed on our waiting list. Alternatively, applicants may also visit our website for the preliminary application that can be printed out, completed and mailed or faxed. Interested persons should contact OAHS Please ask for the “Central Applicant Registry” line Toll free: 866-391-1061 www.OntarioAboriginalHousing.ca

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“Writings & Stories”

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The approved project description and project plan for the aerial herbicide project is available for public inspection at the Domtar Inc. and on the MNR public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning July 13, 2011 until March 31st, 2012 when the annual work schedule expires. Ontario Government Information Centre at 479 Government St, Dryden Ontario, provide access to the internet.

energy of the young people – a lot of the games we play are collective cooperation games, they’re not competitive,” said Shawanda. She said that cooperation games teach the youth to work together and solve problems together. Sara Kanutski of Lake Helen First Nation sang for the Lac Seul community on the first night of the youth conference. Sara said she was nervous, but she still loves to perform in front of audiences. She enjoys helping and encouraging others to try new things. Ron Kanutski, her father, is happy that his daughter has a goal in life, which is to be a singer and songwriter. He said he thought Sara was well received by Lac Seul. Aboriginal hip-hop artist Joey Stylez was also at the youth conference to talk about racism and how it affected his life. He told the youth to be strong in the face of racial discrimination.

To: ________________________ ________________________

Writers and storytellers From: _____________________

are invited to submit traditional @ Wawatay News works that will be integrated into stories or written sixproof locations in Marina Park at Prince Arthur’s Please your ad and return it today by fax, otherwise your ad Landing. This competition is open to Canadian writers will run as it is on this fax. and storytellers of any experience level. Previous Choose 1 of the following: experience is not required.

Matth

201108 July 29

To: ___

___ From:

Please p it today will run

Choose

Run as is

The submissions Run ad with changesshould reflect the experiences of those (no have additional lived proof required) who or spent time in Thunder Bay. Writers Require new proof are encouraged to consider a variety and storytellers DO NOT RUNviewpoints AD of themes, and stories that relate to (in for quote only) the City. The selected works will create opportunities Ad cost: ______________________ for moments of reflection along the shores of Lake Superior. To run: _______________________ Project Budget: ______________________________ Signature of Client’s Approval

$300 per selection

Submission Deadline: Note: Friday, August Ad proofs may not print out the 12, 2011 @ 4:00 p.m. local time same size as they will appear in the newspaper.

For more Information: Download PDF online: www.thunderbay.ca/calltoartists Pick up hard copies: Materials Management front desk Victoriaville Civic Centre 111 Syndicate Avenue South Thunder Bay Call 625-2252 to have a copy mailed to your address

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Wawatay News August 4, 2011

17

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Far from the comforts of home

Public Notices

Rental Housing

NOTICE OF RATIFICATION VOTE To: Members of Wahgoshig First Nation The Ratification Vote for the Impact & Benefit Agreement between Wahgoshig First Nation and Brigus Gold Mine will take place from 9:00 am to 11:00 am at the Wahgoshig First Nation Community Center Thursday August 25th, 2011 All Off Reserve members are encouraged to contact the IBA Information Coordinator, Tanya Babin at (705) 273-2055 to provide their address.

Sudbury Aboriginal Housing (Hanmer) 1 and 2 bedroom homes. Self-identifying Aboriginal people who are interested in applying are encouraged to contact Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services (OAHS). Please ask for the “Central Applicant Registry” line. Call toll-free 1-866-391-1061.

For Sale Falls V-Plow; snow plow; to be mounted on a grader or front end loader; good paint and cutting edges; stored inside 12 years. $1850. Steve 807-737-4390.

Services Cosco Technology Call Garett Cosco for all your tech needs including computer repair and satellite installation. 807-738-TECH (8324) www.coscotech.ca

_

Xavier Kataquapit/Special to Wawatay News

Forest fire evacuees from Cat Lake First Nation were assisted by Matachewan First Nation with accommodation and support services. The group was housed at the Ednysian Camp and Logistics, a new mining camp that was recently constructed in the community. The residents returned to Cat Lake First Nation on July 29.

Professional Quality Printing of Business Cards, Brochures, Posters, Banners, Signs and much more. Contact Roxy for more details or to recieve a custom quote. Call 1-888-575-2349.

Check out our complete list of job postings online WAWATAYNEWS.CA/JOBS SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY

SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY WAWATAY NEWS Nodin Child & Family Intervention Services (NCFI) Date Completed:

TRAVEL CLERK Full Time Position Location: Sioux Lookout, Ontario

This full time position of Travel Clerk is responsible for all related Physician travel to the First Nations communities in the Sioux Lookout area. The Travel Clerk should have a good understanding of accounting concepts and a working knowledge of ACCPAC. Education/Experience • Minimum Grade 12 and/or post secondary education in Finance or Business Program; • Previous experience in arranging travel; • Ability to speak in one of the First Nations dialects in the Sioux Lookout Zone a definite asset; • Experience in filing; • Working knowledge of AccPac accounting software and experience in data entry a definite asset; • Good working knowledge and experience in time management, excellent organizational skills, as well as ability to work independently. Knowledge/Ability • Excellent computer skills; • Excellent written and oral communication skills; • Ability to work under minimal supervision. Please send covering letter, resume, two most recent employment references and an up-to-date criminal reference check to: Charlene Samuel, Human Resource Manager Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority 61 Queen Street, P.O. Box 1300 Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1B8 Tel: 807-737-1802 Fax: 807-737-2969 Email: Human.Resources@slfnha.com Closing Date: August 12, 2011 The Health Authority wishes to thank applicants in advance for their interest in the Health Authority. Only those grated an interview will be contacted. For additional information regarding the Health Authority, please visit our Web-site at www.slfnha.com

July 25, 2011

MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELLOR Internal/External Posting 2 COL x 108 AGATES Permanent Full Time

Size:

Completed by:

Matthew Bradley

This full time position to the Clinical Supervisor. The 20110804 SLFNHA Travel Clerkreports Job Ad ID: Mental will be responsible for providing July 28,Health 2011 12:32Counsellor PM direct Clinical Intervention and Prevention Services to referred To: ________________________ clients in the Child and Family Intervention catchment area of Aroland, Fort Hope, Marten Falls, Nibinamik, Neskantaga, ________________________ Webequie, Mishkeegogamang, Sandy Lake, Saugeen and From: _____________________ Mcdowell Lake. The Mental Health Counsellor worker will be @ Wawatay News based out of the Sioux Lookout office, with considerable travel. Please proof your ad and return Qualifi it today cations by fax, otherwise your ad • Degree inonSocial Work/Psychology with relevant clinical/ will run as it is this fax. counselling experience is preferred; Choose 1 of the following: • Minimum two years experience in the health services environment; Run as is • Specialized Run ad withcourses changes in specific areas of mental health; • Experience video counselling technology an asset; (no additional with proof required) • Travel is a requirement of the position. Require new proof

Knowledge Ability DO NOT&RUN AD (in for quote only) • Ability to communicate in one of the First Nations dialects the______________________ Sioux Lookout Zone is an asset; Ad of cost: • Ability to manage a case load independently; To _______________________ • run: Familiarity with working in acute care situations; • Knowledge of community resources; • Knowledge of Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2007. ______________________________ Experience with a Client Database (e.g. CIMS), Child Signature of Client’s Approval and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) & Note: Brief Child and Family Phone Interview (BCFPI) an asset; Ad proofs may not print out the • Excellent time management and organizational skills, as same size as they will appear in as the ability to work independently; thewell newspaper. • Experience working with youth, a definite asset; • Education assistance and training available dependent upon applicant’s qualifications and in accordance with SLFNHA Policies and Procedures. • Must be willing to relocate.

Please send cover letter, resume, three most recent employment references and an up-to-date Criminal Reference Check with a Search of the Pardoned Sexual Offender Registry to: Human Resource Department Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority P.O. Box 1300, 61 Queen Street Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1B8 Phone: (807) 737-1802 Fax: (807) 737-1076 Email: Human.Resources@slfnha.com Closing Date: August 12, 2011 The Health Authority wishes to thank all applicants in advance. However, only those granted an interview will be contacted. For additional information regarding the Health Authority, please visit our Web-site at www.slfnha.com

_

Cochrane Aboriginal Housing 1 and 3 bedroom homes. Selfidentifying Aboriginal people who are interested in applying are encouraged to contact Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services (OAHS). Please ask for the “Central Applicant Registry” line. Call toll-free 1-866-391-1061.

_

Dryden Aboriginal Housing Single Room Occupancy (SRO), 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom and 3 bedroom homes. Self-identifying Aboriginal people who are interested in applying are encouraged to contact Ontario Aboriginal Housing Services (OAHS). Please ask for the “Central Applicant Registry” line. Call toll-free 1-866-391-1061 ext. 216 or 206.

To place a classified ad call

1-800-243-9059

W

WAWATAY NEWS Date Completed:

July 27, 2011

Date C

Aug Size:

Size:

2 COL x 108 AGATES Completed by:

Matthew Bradley

2 CO

Comp

Matt

DciVg^dCdgi]aVcY!VcV\ZcXnd[i]ZEgdk^cXZd[DciVg^d! 20110804 SLFNHA Mental Health East ID: July 27, 2011 3:01 PM lVhZhiVWa^h]ZY^c&.%'VcY^hVgZXd\c^oZYaZVYZg^c egdbdi^c\hjhiV^cVWaZZXdcdb^X\gdli]WnZhiVWa^h]^c\ To: ________________________ VcYdeZgVi^c\igVchedgiVi^dcVcYiZaZXdbbjc^XVi^dca^c`h ________________________ i]gdj\]djicdgi]ZgcDciVg^d#=ZVYfjVgiZgZY^cCdgi] From: _____________________ 7VnVcYdeZgVi^c\eg^bVg^an^ccdgi]ZVhiZgcDciVg^d!i]Z @ Wawatay News 8dbeVcnegdk^YZheVhhZc\ZgVcY[gZ^\]igV^ahZgk^XZh0 Please proof your ad and return gZ[jgW^h]bZcihZgk^XZh0bdidgXdVX]hZgk^XZh0VcYDciZgV! it today by fax, otherwise your ad iZaZXdbbjc^XVi^dchZgk^XZh# will run as it is on this fax.

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™ BjhiedhhZhhZmXZaaZciXjhidbZghZgk^XZh`^aahVcY]VkZ DO NOT RUN AD (in for quote only) ZmeZg^ZcXZ^cegdk^Y^c\XjhidbZghZgk^XZ^cVWjhn Zck^gdcbZci# Ad cost: ______________________

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______________________________

______ Signat

of Client’s Approval ™Signature EgZ[ZgZcXZl^aaWZ\^kZcidfjVa^ÒZYVeea^XVcihl]dVgZ ÓjZci^cWdi]d[ÒX^VaaVc\jV\Zh:c\a^h]VcY;gZcX]Vh Note: AdlZaaVh8gZZ# proofs may not print out the same size as they will appear in the newspaper.

;dgVXdbeaZiZedh^i^dcYZhXg^ei^dc! k^h^illl#dciVg^dcdgi]aVcY#XV FjVa^ÒZY^cY^k^YjVahbVnVeean^clg^i^c\l^i]VXjggZci gZhjbZWn'/%%e#b#!6j\jhi.i]!'%&&#LZi]Vc`Vaa Veea^XVcih[dgi]Z^g^ciZgZhi0]dlZkZg!dcani]dhZhZaZXiZY [dgVc^ciZgk^Zll^aaWZXdciVXiZY# DciVg^dCdgi]aVcY^hVcZfjVadeedgijc^inZbeadnZg# EdjgYZhgZchZ^\cZbZcihZc[gVcV^hXdbedhZoaZ &#-%%#(+(#,*&'edhiZ',+#

DciVg^dCdgi]aVcY 6iiZci^dc/=jbVcGZhdjgXZh<ZcZgVa^hi ***DV`HigZZi:Vhi!Cdgi]7Vn!DCE&7-A( ;Vm/,%*#),*#*%** :"bV^aid/_dWh5dciVg^dcdgi]aVcY#XV GZ[ZgZcXZ/8HH6"BddhdcZZ*%%"%()"%&&

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18

Wawatay News

August 4, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Bunker shot Chris Kornacki/Wawatay News

Raymond Beardy hits his ball out of a sand trap while Frank McKay watches at the fourth annual Darryl “Penasi” Fox Memorial Golf Tournament. The tournament was held July 28 at the Whitewater Golf and Country Club in Thunder Bay. The tournaments proceeds go towards cancer research.

WAWATAY NEWS Date Completed: Dec 5, 2009

Size: 2 COL x 28 AGATES Completed by: Javier

Espinoza

To: ________________________ ________________________

PRECISION AUTO BODY

From: _____________________

Phone: 807-737-2444

@ Wawatay News

INSURANCE CLAIMS - FREE ESTIMATES - COLLISION REPAIR - MECHANICAL REPAIR Please proof your ad and return it today by fax, otherwise your ad will run as it is on this fax.

JUST CALL, WE COME TO YOU!

CUSTOM EMBROIDERY CLOTHING TROPHIES ENGRAVING HOME COMING ITEMS HOCKEY JERSEYS DECALS SIGNS

Choose 1 of the following: Run as is Run ad with changes

Fax: 807-737-8049 38 Front Street, Sioux Lookout www.signaturesslkt.com info@signaturesslkt.com

(no additional proof required)

737-0666 HWY #516 SIOUX LOOKOUT, ON BOX 1266 P8T 1B8

97 Front Street Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1A3 Tel/Fax: Cell:

(807) 737-7507 (807) 738-1347 (807) 738-0321

DO NOT RUN AD

WAWATAY NEWS

2 COL x 28 AGATES Completed by:

Matthew Bradley

Native Owned!

Call us Today!

To: ________________________

Ju

Choose 1 of the follow

(807) 938-6370

________________________

Run as is

From: _____________________

Run ad with ch (no additional proof

@ Wawatay News

Please proof your ad and return it today by fax, otherwise your ad will run as it is on this fax.

YER LOAD Fax: (807) 938-6379

Choose 1 of the following:

Dinorwic, Ontario

Require new pr

DO NOT RUN A

2

in for quote only

Ad cost: ____________

To run: _____________

____________________ Signature of Client’s A VISA/MASTERCARD Ac

Com

2 COL x 28 AGATES

Ad cost: ______________________

Sept 15, 2009

To run: _______________________

______________________________ Signature of Client’s Approval VISA/MASTERCARD Accepted

2 COL x 110 AGATES

call sales at

________________________ ______________________________ From: _____________________ 1-800-243-9059 Signature of News Client’s Approval @ Wawatay Completed by: VISA/MASTERCARD Accepted Please proof your ad and return

Completed by: Javier Espinoza

Javier Espinoza

it today by fax, otherwise your ad will run as it is on this fax.

To: ________________________

Choose 1 of the following:

________________________ Run as is WAWATAY

• Business Cards • Brochures •

Date Completed:

(no additional proof required)

February 22, 20

@new Wawatay News Require proof

Size:

DO NOT RUN AD

Completed by:

2 COL x 56 AGA

Matthew Bradle

(in for quote only)

Please proof your ad and return it today by fax, otherwise your ad Towill run: run _______________________ as it is on this fax.

ID: 2011_03_03 Porcupine Canvas

To: ______________

______________

From: ___________

@ Wawatay N

Please proof your ad it today by fax, other will run as it is on thi

Thunder Bay: 1-807-344-3022 Choose 1 of the following: Toll Free: 1-888-575-2349 Note: Email: roxys@wawatay.on.ca Ad proofs may not print out the ______________________________ Signature of Client’s Approval

Choose 1 of the follo Run as is

Run ad with c

(no additional proo

same size as they will appear in the newspaper.

Run as is

Contact us for more details or to receive a custom quote Run ad with changes (no additional proof required)

Posters • Banners/Signs • and much more… Require new proof

WAWATAY NEWS Date Completed:

April 11, 2011 Size:

2 COL x 28 AGATES Completed by:

Matthew Bradley ID: 2011_04_14 H&M CARS

DO NOT RUN AD in for quote only

Thank You, Airlines!

For your fast, prompt delivery of Wawatay News to our northern communities.

Ad cost: ______________________

To: ________________________ ________________________ From: _____________________ @ Wawatay News

To run: _______________________

Please proof your ad and return it today by fax, otherwise your ad will run as it is on this fax. Choose 1 of the following: Run as is

______________________________ Signature of Client’s Approval VISA/MASTERCARD Accepted

Run ad with changes

(no additional proof required)

Require new proof DO NOT RUN AD

Auto Repair, Heavy Equipment Repair Welding & Fabricating, MTO Safety Inspections Praxair Distributor

_______________

From: ____________

Please proof your ad a it today by fax, otherw will run as it is on this

Ad cost: ______________________

737-4643 or 738-0047 Toll Free 1-877-337-4643 or Fax 1-866-891-2550

To: _______________

@ Wawatay New

ID: 2010_11_12_Precision_BussCard

Run ad with changes From: _____________________

Michael T. George

ID: 2011_03_17 Bernards Trucking B

in for quote only

2 COL x Completed: 28 AGATES Date

Let Rainbow be the calm to your storm

(New Location) 53 York Street, Box 3010 Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1J8

Matthew Bradley

DO NOT RUN AD

Ad cost:by: ______________________ Completed Jan 19, 2010 This could be your Matthew Bradley Business & Service Directory ad 20110804 Service BC To run:Rainbow _______________________ ID:Size: July 28, 2011 10:39 AM

E-mail: rainbowcarwash@hotmail.com

Completed by:

Require new proof

July 28, 2011

To: ________________________

2 COL x 28 AGAT

November 5, 2010 Size:

(no additional proof required)

WAWATAY NEWS

● Oil Burner: Sales, Service, Installation & Parts ● Propane: Sales, Service & Parts. ● Propane Appliances: Sales & Service. ● Propane Cylinders: Sales, Rentals & Re-Certification

March 10, 2011 Size:

Run ad with changes

Date Completed: in for quote only Size:

Date Completed:

Run as is

Require new proof

For all your Oil & Propane Service Needs.

WAWATAY N

WAWATAY NEWS Date Completed:

in for quote only

Ad cost: ______________________ To run: _______________________ ______________________________ Signature of Client’s Approval VISA/MASTERCARD Accepted

Require new DO NOT RUN in for quote only

Ad cost: ___________

To run: ____________

___________________ Signature of Client’s VISA/MASTERCARD A


Wawatay News AuGuST 4, 2011

19

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Peter Moon, Canadian Forces/Special to Wawatay News

TOP: A Canadian Ranger dances as a second Ranger leads Junior Canadian Rangers in drumming at the traditional skills training site at Camp Loon, an annual 10-day training camp. FAR LEFT: Grand Chief Stan Beardy of Nishnawbe Aski Nation, second from right, makes a hard turn in a large freighter canoe during a visit to Camp Loon. LEFT: A Junior Canadian Ranger crosses a river on a confidencebuilding zip line.

Camp attracts Junior Rangers from across the Far North Peter Moon

Special to Wawatay News

Camp Loon attracted 145 Junior Canadian Rangers from 18 First Nations from across the Far North of Ontario. The annual 10-day training camp for Junior Rangers is held on Springwater Lake, 50 kilometres north of Geraldton, Ont. “It was a good camp this year,” said Capt. Caryl Fletcher, the officer commanding the 700 Junior Rangers in northern Ontario. “We had Junior Rangers from every one of the 18 communities in which we have the program running. That’s because of the support of the Canadian Rangers in those communities and from the communities themselves. The word is out that Camp Loon is an experience not to be missed and it’s working, because there were no communities left out this year.” The Junior Canadian Rangers are a Canadian Forces youth program for boys and girls aged 12 to 18 in Canada’s remote and isolated communities. In addition to the 145 Junior Rangers, there were 14 staff at the camp from the headquarters of 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group at Canadian Forces Base Borden, 57 other military support staff, 47 Cana-

dian Rangers (who are parttime army reservists), and 18 Staff Junior Rangers (senior Junior Rangers who supported the training program), and four lifeguard-swimming instructors from the Municipality of Greenstone. The training emphasized safety on the land and water and in personal life styles. It included shooting and archery, power boating and paddle canoeing, mountain biking, traditional handicrafts and skills, a swim-to-survive program, and a confidence-building zip line that crossed a river. Most of the instruction was provided by Canadian Rangers with knowledge and experience in the various subject areas. Many of them attended a specialized training course in instructional techniques at CFB Borden in preparation for the camp. “There seems to be a real connect between the army, the Canadian Rangers and the Junior Rangers and I think that’s what makes it successful,” said Grand Chief Stan Beardy of Nishnawbe Aski Nation, who spent a day at the camp. “The impact of what they learn at this camp is something that will be with them for the rest of their lives. What they take from here in terms of their personal

development and leadership skills they can apply in all kinds of other settings. I think that when you look at the Junior Canadian Ranger program as a whole it has so much to offer, so many spin-offs that the kids can capitalize on.” Beardy took a 225-foot zip line ride over a river. The ride began from a 30-foot tower. “It was a bit frightening at first, when you step off the platform,” he said, “but after that it was fun. I’m glad I did it.” This year’s camp was the third for Junior Ranger Nigel Morris, 15, of Muskrat Dam. “I come because it’s fun and you learn about things, such as safety. “This year I’ve learned some traditional skills. I liked the traditional site. I liked the drumming and the singing, I learned about plants and how you can use them, and how to make a dwelling. I was pretty happy about the boating and canoeing. I loved the shooting and using a bow and arrow. It was great food and I thank the army cooks for it. And I liked the swimming, it kept me cool.” Sgt. Peter Moon is public affairs ranger for 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group at CFB Borden. See www.canadianrangers.ca.

3

The Dreamcatcher Charitable Foundation Presents with the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers

W

Date

July Size:

3C

Com

Mat ID:

2011 July

To: _

_

IT’S BACK! THE EVENT OF THE YEAR...

SIGN UP TO AUDITION NOW TO SHOWCASE YOUR GREAT IDEAS — and WIN BIG PRIZES in the Big !dea 3 Finals!

From

Pleas it tod will ru

Choo

Make your pitch to our panel of investors for possible financing for your innovation or great idea! Finals to be held at the CANDO Convention Centre, November 10, 2011

Ad co

To run

_____ Signa

Note: Ad pr same the ne

ut! iss OAY ! M t ’ TOD Don SIGN

Big !dea3 is supported by

THE ABORIGINAL GIFTING CO.

UP

BIG !DEA 3 AUDITION TOUR: • Whitehorse • Prince George • Vancouver • Calgary • Regina • Brandon • Thunder Bay • Toronto • Montreal • Moncton • Iqaluit Finals with celebrity panel to be held at CANDO Conference November 10, 2011 in Richmond, B.C. For details visit us at www.dcfund.ca or www.edo.ca


20

Wawatay News

T:10.25”

AuGuST 4, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

It’s never this obvious. T:15.71”

Breast cancer can be impossible to see or feel. Today more women survive the disease than ever before. Regular mammograms can lead to early detection and better treatment options, so make breast screening part of your health routine. Cancer screening sees what you can’t. That’s why Ontario has expanded breast cancer screening to more women. Find out when it’s the right time for you to start screening at ontario.ca/screenforlife

ontario.ca/screenforlife • 1-866-410-5853 • TTY 1-800-387-5559

Paid for by the Government of Ontario

August 4, 2011  

Volume 38 Number 16 of Wawatay News

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