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Q&A with Treaty 3 Elders PAGES B6 and B7

Celebrating youth achievement PAGES 10 to 11 Vol. 38 #06

Meet finance guru Gord Keesic PAGE B4

March 17, 2011

Northern Ontario’s First Nation Voice since 1974

www.wawataynews.ca

Governance could help drug issue James Thom Wawatay News

Provincial and federal laws are helping bring drugs into First Nations, says Webequie prescription drug abuse strategy coordinator Levi Sofea. “People use the Charter of Rights and Freedoms,” Sofea said. “We can’t do what we want to do like body searches to see if people are bringing drugs into our community. The collective rights of the First Nations are at odds with the rights of the individual. We need to do things for the collective good of the community.” Sofea was participating at the Matawa First Nations Community Governance and Economic Development Conference March 1-2 in Thunder Bay. He said if First Nations had their own governance, community leadership would be able to determine a compromise. “We’re trying to clean up our workplaces,” Sofea said. “But we have great difficulty because of labour laws and drug testing regulations. The health of our people is critical.” But just as importantly, employers have the right to know if their employees are addicts, he said. “If people are sick, abusing or misusing drugs, it won’t be a successful venture,” he said. Conference chairman Patrick Cheechoo said governance is the foundation of success for economic development in First Nations.

9,300 copies distributed $1.50

Not giving up hope

It also lays out responsibility in some cases. “With projects, it says directly who is responsible for making decisions. That leads to more successful ventures,” Cheechoo said. “First Nations need economic development to provide funds. And self-governing communities will desire to be self-reliant. It is very closely related.” Several youth also attended the conference. St. Ignatius High School student Cheyenne Baxter, from Marten Falls, was one of them. “I wanted to hear what was going on with the Ring of Fire,” she said. “It was good to hear about the future and what is being planned.” During the conference, both the Matawa and provincial Ring of Fire coordinators spoke, providing status updates. The Ring of Fire is home to a vast wealth of chromite, integral to the production of stainless steel. The Ring of Fire development is located in the traditional lands of Webequie and Marten Falls. Baxter said hearing the Ring of Fire coordinators speak about the need for youth to be trained and working in sectors supporting the mine or for the mine directly “made me feel needed.” “I’m very excited by the opportunities that exist,” she said. Baxter hopes to work as a business accountant.

ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐊᔭᑭᐸᐣ ᑎᐱᓇᐁᐧ ᐱᒧᓂᑎᓱᐃᐧᐣ ᑕᑲᐡᑭᒋᑲᑌ ᒋᑭᐱᑎᓂᑲᑌᐠ ᑲᐧᐣᑕ ᑲᐃᓇᐸᒋᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᒪᐡᑭᑭ ᒉᒥᐢ ᑕᐧᑦ ᐊᐧᐊᐧᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐃᐧᓇᐣ

ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᒥᓇ ᑲᓇᑕ ᐅᑭᒪᐅᐣ ᐅᓇᔓᐁᐧᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᐅᐃᐧᒋᑐᓇᐊᐧ ᒋᐱᐣᑎᑲᒋᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐣ ᑲᐧᐣᑕ ᑲᐃᓇᐸᒋᒋᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᑭᑎᐡᑯᓂᑲᓂᓇᐣ, ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐁᐧᐱᑫᐧ ᑲᐊᐧᓂᐊᐸᒋᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐣ ᑭᐱᑎᓂᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᓂᑲᓂᐊᓄᑲᑕᐠ ᓫᐃᐸᔾ ᓱᐱᔭ. ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐅᑕᐸᒋᑐᓇᐊᐧ ᑲᓇᑕ ᐊᐦᑭᐠ ᑲᐃᓇᔓᐊᐧᑌᑭᐣ ᐊᑭᓱᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᒥᓇ ᐅᓀᓂᒥᑎᓱᐃᐧᓇᐣ, ᐃᑭᑐ ᓱᐱᔭ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᐣᑭᑐᑕᓯᒥᐣ ᑲᐃᐧᑲᑫᐧᑐᑕᒪᐠ ᑐᑲᐣ ᒋᓇᓇᑐᒥᑲᐧᓇᔭᑭᑕᐧ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐱᑭᒧᒋ ᐱᐣᑎᑲᑐᐊᐧᑫᐧᐣ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐣ ᐣᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᓇᐠ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᐃᓇᑭᓱᐨ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂ ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᑭᒥᓄᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᐣᒋᑫᒪᑲᓯᓄᐣ ᑲᐃᓇᑭᓱᐨ ᐁᐧᒥᑎᑯᔑ. ᑭᓇᐃᐧᐟ ᐃᑯ ᐃᓯᓭᐸᐣ ᒋᑲᑫᐧᐅᓀᐣᑕᒪᐠ ᐊᓂᐣ ᑫᐃᔑᒥᓄᓭᐠ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᐣ. ᓱᐱᔭ ᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑭᐃᔕᐸᐣ ᒪᑕᐊᐧ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑎᐱᓇᐁᐧ ᐱᒧᓂᑎᓱᐃᐧᐣ ᒥᓇ ᔓᓂᔭᐃᐧ ᐱᒧᒋᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑐᐃᐧᐣ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᒥᑭᓯᐃᐧᐱᓯᑦ

1 ᒥᓇ 2 ᑲᐃᓇᑭᓱᐨ ᐁᐧᑎ ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ. ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐃᐡᑯᓂᑲᓇᐣ ᐊᔭᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᑎᐯᓂᒥᑎᓱᐃᐧᓇᐣ, ᑲᓂᑲᓂᑕᒪᑫᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧ ᐅᑕᑲᐡᑭᑐᓇᐊᐧ ᒋᑭᐅᓀᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᑫᐃᔑᒥᓇᐧᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᑫᑯᓂ ᑲᐊᓂᒥᓇᑲᐧᓂᐠ. ᓂᑲᑫᐧᐸᔦᑭᓂᑫᒥᐣ ᑲᑕᓇᓄᑭᔭᐠ, ᐃᑭᑐ ᓱᐱᔭ. ᔕᑯᐨ ᑕᐡ ᒥᑐᓂ ᐣᑕᓂᒥᐦᐃᑯᒥᐣ ᐅᓄᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧ ᐅᓇᔓᐁᐧᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᒥᓇ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐃᐧ ᓇᓇᑲᒋᐦᐃᑯᐃᐧ ᐅᓇᑯᓂᑫᐃᐧᓀᓴᐣ. ᒥᑐᓂ ᑲᔦ ᑭᒋᓀᐣᑕᑲᐧᓂ ᒋᒥᓄᔭᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᑭᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒥᓇᓂᐠ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᑲᔦ ᑭᒋᓀᐣᑕᑲᐧᓂ ᑲᐊᓄᑭᐦᐃᐁᐧᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᓯᓭᓂᐸᐣ ᒋᑭ ᑭᑫᐣᑕᒧᓂᑕᐧᐸᐣ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐅᑕᓄᑭᓇᑲᓂᒥᐊᐧ ᐊᐧᓂᐊᐸᒋᑐᓂᑫᐧᐣ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐣ, ᐃᑭᑐ. ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐊᑯᓯᐊᐧᐨ, ᐊᐧᓂᐊᐸᒋᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐣ, ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᓇᐣᑕ ᑕᑭᐃᔑ ᑲᐡᑭᒋᑲᑌᓯᐣ ᒋᑭᒪᒐᒪᑲᐠ ᑲᑲᑫᐧᐃᔑᒋᑲᓄᐊᐧᐠ, ᑭᐃᑭᑐ. ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑐᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᑭᓂᑲᓂᐱᒧᑐᐨ ᐸᐟᕑᐃᐠ ᒋᒍ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᑎᐱᓇᐁᐧ ᐱᒧᓂᑎᓱᐃᐧᐣ ᒥᐦᐅᒪ ᑫᑭᐅᒋ ᐅᑦᐱᑲᐸᐃᐧᒪᑲᑭᐸᐣ ᒋᑲᐡᑭᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᔓᓂᔭᐃᐧ ᐱᒧᒋᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᐃᒪ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐃᐧ ᐃᐡᑯᓂᑲᓇᐣ. ᐃᓇᐱᐣ ᐸᑭᑭᓂᑲᓂᐠ 6

Call

James Thom/Wawatay News

Jordan Wabasse’s great-grandmother is among the volunteers looking for the missing Webequie teen in Thunder Bay. Wabasse has been missing since early February. Between 50 to 100 volunteers have been searching the city in an effort to locate the teen. See page 13 for story.

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Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Wasaya will require photo ID

Quebec Crees offer advice

Rick Garrick Wawatay News

James Thom Wawatay News

About 35 years ago, the James Bay Cree communities in Quebec faced similar obstacles and challenges to those facing the Matawa Ring of Fire communities today. Anthony MacLeod, director of a Cree owned catering and janitorial services company, shared the story of how nine Cree communties banded together to find benefit when Hydro Quebec began damming rivers in their traditional lands to make hydro. “What they are experiencing now – interest in their land, development likely coming soon – we were experiencing that 30 to 35 years ago,” MacLeod said, speaking at the Matawa First Nations Community Governance & Economic Development Conference March 1-2. “We have been working with the Matawa communities for two years, showing them models we have as a nation, to show what we went through. It wasn’t all happy and successful. But we recognized we were much stronger as a united group than as individual nations.” In 1974, the nations came together against Hydro Quebec, he said. The James Bay And Northern Quebec Agreement was

James Thom/Wawatay News

Anthony MacLeod, director of Gestion ADC, a Cree owned catering and janitorial services company, speaks during the Matawa First Nations Community Governance & Economic Development Conference March 1-2. MacLeod said the Quebec Crees can relate to what the Matawa First Nations are going through with the Ring of Fire. created, detailing health, education and economic development and financial compensation. It was signed by governments of Canada, Quebec, publicly owned Hydro-Québec, the Grand Council of the Crees, headed by Billy Diamond, and the Northern Quebec Inuit Association. “The settlement was one thing,” MacLeod, from the Cree Nation of Mistissini, said. “With us, what was most important was coming together. The government had to recognize we were the occupants of the land … and they did.” What has happened since is

the First Nations have become major players in infrastructure and the air through the creation of joint venture companies, he said, like Air Creebec. The airline began as a 51 per cent First Nation-owned company in 1982. By 1988, partner Austin Airways was bought out leaving Air Creebec 100 per cent First Nation owned. MacLeod heads Gestion ADC, 100 per cent Aboriginal owned since an original partner was bought out, which was formed in 1993 based on a need to provide services during construction of more dams. “It should have been done

a lot sooner,” he said, adding it would have allowed more people to be trained and gotten them working. That’s something he is hopeful will be addressed with the Ring of Fire, which is home to a vast wealth of minerals, including the only known North American deposit of chromite. The Ring of Fire development is located in the traditional lands of Webequie and Marten Falls. “You have to get people ready (to work),” he said. “Day one starts tomorrow. Day doesn’t start when the project opens its doors. Training doesn’t start overnight. If you start training

now, you will be ready in a few years when the development is ready to proceed.” MacLeod can understand the fear people have with development, how life might change and the risks involved. “There was no all-season road access to our communities before Hydro Quebec,” he said. “Hydro brought the roads.” But, the roads brought drugs and alcohol, he said. “There was damage done to the community because of drugs and alcohol,” he said. “But we developed programs. We have our own AA (alcoholics anonymous) meetings.”

Wasaya Airways will be implementing an ID policy May 1 for all passengers 18 years or older on its scheduled flights. Passengers who appear to be 18 years of age or older will be asked to present identification before boarding Wasaya’s scheduled passenger services, according to a statement on the Wasaya website. Passengers will be required to present one of the following three options: one piece of valid government-issued identification that includes a photograph and the passenger’s name, date of birth and gender; two pieces of valid government-issued ID without photographs showing the passenger’s name, date of birth and gender; or a Restricted Area Identity Card (a smart card issued to airport workers). The name on the identification must match the name on the boarding pass. The following forms of identification are acceptable: status card, passport, citizenship card, permanent-resident card, driver’s licence, provincial health card, provincial or territorial government identification cards, birth certificate, record of landing form/confirmation of permanent residence (IMM 5292), immigration documents issued to foreign nationals (work permit, study permit and visitor record). For a complete list of approved identification visit www.wasaya.com

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Wawatay News MARCH 17, 2011

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ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Marten Falls Chief Eli Moonias (centre) speaks with local and national media March 3 about his communities concerns with development on the Ring of Fire as protesters hold up signs during the community’s second blockade on Koper Lake.

Koper Lake blockade resumes; Marten Falls feels left out Rick Garrick Wawatay News

Citing rapidly moving development and inadequate involvement for Marten Falls, the community launched its second blockade of the Ring of Fire. After taking part in a traditional ceremony March 3 at the community’s blockade site on Koper Lake in the James Bay lowlands, Marten Falls Chief Eli Moonias spoke with local and national media about his community’s concerns in the Ring of Fire mineral exploration area. Koper Lake is located about 128 kilometres north of Marten Falls in its traditional territory. “We feel that the issues here and the development is getting away from us, too far ahead, without our adequate and meaningful involvement,” Moonias said. The Ring of Fire contains chromite, a rare mineral used to make stainless steel. It falls in the traditional territory of Marten Falls and Webequie. “We never got to the first stage yet where we have meaningful exploration agreements,” Moonias said during the blockade, adding his community plans to hire a negotiator to work on their concerns. “What we’re saying here is slow down a little bit.” Moonias said the memorandums of understanding (MOUs) his community received from the mineral exploration companies since their January-March 2010 blockade with Webequie in the Ring of Fire have been “unsubstantial, superficial engagements.” “None of them touched on the transfer of properties,” Moonias said during a March 15 interview, noting that his community is looking for some financial involvement in the transfer of properties in the Ring of Fire. “That is the kind of in-depth, deep substantial agreement that I wanted – money.”

Moonias also expressed concerns about plans by the mineral companies to take samples out of the area for testing to determine the value of the ore. “One of them is Cliffs (National Resources Inc.) and they got the permission last Friday (March 11) – they got the letter from the MNR,” Moonias said. Joanne Ghiz, a Ministry of Northern Development, Mines and Forestry spokewoman said efforts were made to meet with the community to understand the potential impacts of the activity.

“This is the kind of indepth, deep substantial agreement that I wanted – money.” – Chief Eli Moonias

“Through various telephone discussions and meetings, no adverse impacts were identified that would suggest that this permit would have a negative impact on the community or development in the region,” Ghiz said. “One of the conditions of the permit is that Cliffs works closely with Marten Falls First Nation to ensure potential impacts are addressed and minimized accordingly.” Ghiz said the permit allows the company to further investigate the potential of the resource so the greater economic opportunities for the North and the province can be realized. Requests for responses were left with Cliff’s office in Cleveland, Ohio but they did not reply as of press time. Moonias is disappointed the community has seen little to no benefit to the exploration. “What we asked for last winter was that our winter road (to the Albany River) be opened so we could get into business to be

involved in the transportation of the material that is needed here so that our people can work too,” Moonias said. “There is nothing going up there – just my (snowmachine) trail to my cabin.” Moonias said his community is looking to build a winter road to the Albany River to supply the exploration companies. “Our winter road is idle; there are no items (exploration company supplies) coming through there. Everything is flown through,” he said. Moonias said two flights landed at Koper Lake early that morning and at one point this winter there were 36 flights by local airlines bringing in supplies for the exploration companies. “The underlying issue of what we are doing here is we want to get out of this trap that we are in – the welfare, the Indian Act, the Indian reserve system.” Moonias said his forefathers didn’t sign up for welfare when they signed the treaty in 1905. “I think that they signed that we all live together happy, all working for our bread and supporting our families.” Moonias wants to see a bright future for his people, so “they are not just labourers.” Moonias also brought up 10 concerns the community has about development in the Ring of Fire, including the Ring of Fire railway corridor study that was completed without the community’s input. “What I’m looking for is for my community to be involved in the decision of where the access will go,” Moonias said March 15. “We’re already building a road to the Albany River. We want that corridor used.” Moonias said his community has no resources to pay for their negotiators or legal advisors and is looking for assistance. “The government gave us enough money until April 1, but that won’t be enough,” Moonias said. Marten Falls is also request-

ing reimbursement of costs from last year’s blockade as well as the current blockade because it was not their fault they set up the blockade. “Our rights were stepped on – that’s why we went there,” Moonias said about the blockade. “Whoever stepped on our rights should pay.” Moonias said the blockade is staffed by a couple of monitors who are watching for activity by mineral exploration companies. If there is activity on the mining sites, the community could make it difficult for future progress in the Ring of Fire, Moonias said. “For one thing, we are not going to move that land-use plan (under the Far North Act),” Moonias said. “They need the land-use plan in order to develop the projects here.” Michael Gravelle, minister of Northern Development, Mines and Forestry, wouldn’t speak specifically to the concerns raised by Moonias, but said he is working with the community to “help resolve those concerns.” Gravelle and Ring of Fire coordinator Christine Kaszycki met with Moonias March 11 in

Toronto. Gravelle is also planning to take up an offer by Moonias to visit his community in a couple of weeks. “I certainly share Chief Moonias’ belief that there needs to be very significant benefits to all the communities that will be impacted by the potential development in the Ring of Fire,” Gravelle said during a March 9 interview. “It is important to say that it’s still very much at very early stages and I know there have been some First Nations members who have been hired as workers.” He added the Ontario government agrees for the Ring of Fire project to move forward First Nations need clear and significant benefits. Gravelle said the government’s Ring of Fire coordinator should not only work closely with Moonias but with all First Nation chiefs, companies and municipalities involved in the Ring of Fire. Nishnawbe Aski Nation Grand Chief Stan Beardy is looking for the people of NAN to benefit from the resources within NAN territory. He said

all the parties involved in the Ring of Fire need to discuss the issues. “If we fail to have co-operation between all parties, it will be just that much more difficult to do business,” Beardy said during the blockade. “I don’t think we want to see that because potentially if there is uncertainty here, it scares the potential (investors) away.” Beardy said everyone stands to benefit if the mineral resource developments in the Ring of Fire are done properly, collaboratively and in co-operation with all parties. “What the chief is saying here is very simple,” Beardy said. “They want a guarantee that 50 years from now there is bread and butter for the people, that there is something to look forward to by our young people with this activity.” Moonias announced protest plans in January due to concerns about a 40-man camp built on muskeg along Koper Lake. Mineral exploration companies working in the area were using the camp, but Moonias was concerned of the impact it would have on the environment.

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

The 40-man camp built by Webequie Logistics on muskeg along Koper Lake.


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MARCH 17, 2011

Wawatay News

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Winter bubbles 16-5th Avenue North P.O. Box 1180 Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1B7 Serving the First Nations in Northern Ontario since 1974. Wawatay News is a politically independent bi-weekly newspaper published by Wawatay Native Communications Society.

ᓂᐢᑕᑦ ᑲᑭᒪᑕᓄᑲᑌᐠ 1974 ᐁᐅᒋᐊᓄᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᑭᐧᐁᑎᓄᐠ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᑕᐃᑦᔑᑫᐧᐃᓇᐣ. ᑕᓱᓂᔓᐱᒥᑯᓇᑲ ᐅᔑᒋᑲᑌ ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐧᐃ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑲᐧᐃᐣ ᐅᓇᔓᐧᐁᐧᐃ ᑲᓇᐧᐊᐸᒋᑫᐧᐃᓂᐠ ᒋᐃᔑ ᐸᐸᒥᓯᒪᑲᐠ ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓂᑫᐧᐃᓇᐣ. MEDIA DIRECTOR Adrienne Fox MULTIMEDIA/NEWS COORDINATOR Brent Wesley

Commentary

Honouring the life givers Stories keep our culture alive in memory Brent Wesley WAWATAY NEWS

M

y grandparents had 16 children. Eleven of those kids were girls, one of which being my mother. So I grew up surrounded by women. And I think it’s pretty clear, who ruled the family. Those women. They were the ones who brought us together, who cooked, cleaned, organized. They did it all. They still do. At least once a year, my family gathers. It’s the women who make sure it happens. It’s evident in our society as Native people: women are the thread that binds us together. I still see it to this day. While we’ve lost much of our culture and we’re still railing from attempted assimilation, fragments of our culture remain. Women hold that key. Their power and determination have kept us going.

With no other options, Kokum took matters into her own hands. She delivered that baby on her own. My aunties have one woman to thank for their strength. My Kokum. I love the stories they tell of her. They stay with me, a glimpse into the past, the life of a Cree woman who stood proud to raise her family strong. She wouldn’t stand to see her children mistreated. My mom often tells the story of a time when she was in day school. The teachers often “disciplined” students by taking a ruler and striking students in the back of the hand with the short edge of a ruler. My mom, badly bruised and hurt one time from the lashing, tried to hide her wounds from my Kokum. She believed she was at fault for whatever it was she did as a young child. But once Kokum saw those marks and found out what happened, she made sure it never happened again. The way my mom tells it is the next school day, Kokum raced down to the school with my mom in tow. She stormed

into the school, grabbed a ruler, approached the teacher, snapped that ruler in half and stuck the jagged edge into the teacher’s face. She told that teacher to never harm her child again. My mom credits that story as an example to always stand up for one’s self. Don’t let the world push you around. Yes, Kokum wanted her kids to be self-reliant. To make their own way in the world. I often wonder if that’s the reason my grandparents never moved to a reserve, not wanting to fall into a trap of dependency. Kokum’s self-reliance and strength was made even clearer to me in a tale recalled by my aunt Annie. She wrote a story for a women’s book telling of the time Kokum went into labour during a snowstorm. My grandfather wasn’t around that time. The closest hospital was about 30 minutes away. With little time to spare and contractions settling in, Kokum had to make her way into town to find a taxi. They lived just outside of the small town of Longlac, northeast of Thunder Bay. The hospital was in Geraldton. So Kokum trekked her way into town to a taxi stand only to be turned away. She made her way back home. With no other options, Kokum took matters into her own hands. She delivered that baby on her own. Wow. I love these stories of Kokum, a woman who I can only seem to recall in her last days – frail and small. But these stories provide a glimpse into the life of a Cree woman I’m proud to have known. We all have our stories of our grandmothers, moms, aunts, and sisters. They are living, breathing whispers of our culture, our identity. They give us strength. We have much to be thankful for when it comes to the women in our families. Without women such as my Kokum, our families would not be. So, just recently, a very little known day passed us by – International Women’s Day. It’s an annual event, but given little fanfare. But, it’s a time to remember those women, the ones that brought us into this world. Our culture teaches us to respect the women, to honour and respect them. So I say Miigwetch Mom. Miigwetch Kokum. Thank you for life.

Paulette Jiles/Wawatay News archives

Robin Beardy blowing bubbles in Muskrat Dam, December 1981.

Grant me the serenity Xavier Kataquapit UNDER THE NORTHERN SKY

I

t has been very cold here in the Timmins area since the beginning of January. I prefer the clean, fresh nature of winter but I have to admit that this -30 C weather is not much fun anymore. I am not on the land much these days and I am at the computer working a lot so I am in the house most of the time. I guess I have gotten away from really enjoying what winter has to offer us up here in northern Ontario. When I was a teenager back home in Attawapiskat, I spent very little time in the house. I was out on the land all the time either making my way on a snowmobile with the family to far away places on James Bay or working 20 hours a day in the family contracting business. Life was not easy up the coast for many reasons. I was in a real fog at that point in

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my life as I had not sobered up yet. Most of the time I felt confused, lost and desperate. Winter offered me the ability to escape from the community and all my troubles. Often I would head out at 30 and 40 below on my snowmobile on my own. I would race along on the white snow under the glow of a warm sun in the biting cold wind. I pushed that snow machine to the limit as I skimmed along the surface of the river and out over the frozen muskeg wilderness. In the clean, white expanse I focused only on keeping myself alive while travelling at crazy speeds. My face was numb with the freezing cold, my hands stiff under the moose hide mitts and my heart raced as I pushed myself as far as I could out on to the limits in land, weather, machine and body. It was my way to meditate. Yes, it was dangerous but it worked. My mind had to focus so intently that I could not possibly be troubled with any worrying thoughts. There was simply no room in my brain for worry. Out on the bay I might run

MEDIA DIRECTOR Adrienne Fox adriennef@wawatay.on.ca MULTIMEDIA/NEWS COORDINATOR Brent Wesley brentw@wawatay.on.ca EDITOR James Thom jamest@wawatay.on.ca WRITER/PHOTOGRAPHER Rick Garrick rickg@wawatay.on.ca ART DIRECTOR Roxann Shapwaykeesic roxys@wawatay.on.ca GRAPHIC DESIGNER Matthew Bradley matthewb@wawatay.on.ca

into Wabusk or the polar bear if I travelled far enough. I did not venture close to Wabusk even though I had a powerful sled under me. The polar bear can run at speeds up to 40 kilometres an hour and I was not about to take any chance that I could have an accident or mishap with Wabusk in the area.

I pushed that snow machine to the limit as I skimmed along the surface of the river and out over the frozen muskeg wilderness. I would see the Kah-kah-koo or ravens when I was close to land. They seemed to be happily teasing me as they flew in singles or sometimes in pairs over me. When I tired myself out I would head back to town in the golden hue of a winter setting sun. On the far side of the bank facing Attawapiskat I would park my snowmobile and sit back to watch the last rays of light shimmer over town. It was so cold. It was also completely quiet. I bundled up in

ACTING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Meghan Kendall meghank@wawatay.on.ca ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Steve Elliott stevee@wawatay.on.ca CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Mark Kakekagumick markk@wawatay.on.ca TRANSLATORS Vicky Angees vickya@wawatay.on.ca Agnes Shakakeesic agness@wawatay.on.ca

my snowsuit and just lay there in a quiet that you can only feel at minus 30 or 40 in the frozen northern wilderness. There was nothing on my mind but the sound of silence. Every once in a while ravens would come close to check up on me. They hollered out strange sounds that brought a smile to my face. I stayed out on that bank as long as I could. As I lay back on the snowmobile seat I stared up at the northern sky as it turned from a pale blue to a very dark purple and then to black. Then out popped the stars like a million diamonds in the sky. If I was lucky a layer of magical lights of the Aurora Borealis or Wawatay would appear to dance for me. They flowed like a river of green, blue and red over town. Everything felt better. I was refreshed and rejuvenated and ready to face my life in my small, remote Cree community. I would return with hope and peace as my companions. Life would be better and when things got hard again I could always turn to the land and head out in search of serenity. underthenorthernsky.com

CONTRIBUTORS Joy Fox Xavier Kataquapit Russ Thom Richard Wagamese Guest editorials, columnists and letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the views of Wawatay News.


Wawatay News MARCH 17, 2011

OPINION Representation important in Ottawa To the Editor: This has been a critical year for Fort Severn Cree First Nation. We are making progress with our goal to co-manage the wildlife and natural resources on our traditional lands. We are developing strategies based on our traditional Cree knowledge to ensure that the children, grandchildren and those not yet born will live in a world where the polar bear lives, hunts and raises its cubs on our traditional territories. Fort Severn Cree is exploring ways to reduce our dependency on dirty power such as diesel generation with green sources of power such as wind and solar. We are making significant progress on balancing our books and paying down our deficit. We are working to improve educational opportunities for our youth with the Keewaytinook Internet High School. We are opening a new police detachment in our community this April. Earlier this year, I was invited to speak at an international polar conference in Paris, France to share Cree knowledge about the polar bear with delegates from around the world. All in all, this has been a significant year for the people of Fort Severn Cree First Nation. And, we have always been able to count on Greg Rickford, our MP, when we call on him for assistance. Few people know a lot about Fort Severn Cree First Nation. We are a small community located where the Severn River

flows into Hudson Bay. We are Ontario’s most northerly community that is connected with Canada by a winter road. Fort Severn Cree First Nation is also part of Kenora riding, one of the largest in Canada. It is not easy to represent Kenora riding in the House of Commons. Kenora riding has more than 40 First Nations communities. It also includes the urban centres of Kenora and Dryden as well as a string of small towns along the highway system. So I am happy to say that Greg Rickford has always been there for us when we need him. He has written letters of support for us and opened doors when we needed his assistance. He has supported our struggle to develop a polar bear strategy that will work. Greg has assisted us with improving housing and he pushed hard for us to get a new police detachment to serve this community. Greg raises our issues in the media and when he conducts speaking engagements. Greg told our story to other Canadians when he rose to speak in the House of Commons last month. Greg does not wait for me to call him. He calls us to find out what he can do to serve us better. If Greg works this hard to support us, a tiny remote community in the far north, I can only imagine how effective he is working for you in the rest of the riding. Chief Matthew Kakekaspan Fort Severn Cree First Nation

5

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www.bazaarandnovelty.ca INSPECTION Public Notice Approved 2011/2012 Annual Work Schedules Red Lake Forest and Trout Lake Forest Public Inspection of Annual Work Schedule

Your views from wawataynews.ca Re: Meet the neighbours

The Red Lake District of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has reviewed and approved Domtar Inc.’s April 1, 2011–March 31, 2012 Annual Work Schedule (AWS) for the Trout Lake Forest and Red Lake Forest Management Co.’s AWS for the Red Lake Forest. Availability

Speaking as another old white guy, DFC kids ROCK! I was involved with the youth survey last year and the DFC kids were great. They were interested, polite, helpful, and friendly. Speaking as the guy who did all the data input and read every single survey form, I’ll add, DFC kids have better spelling on average than the ‘general population’ in their age group. I firmly believe this school is vital and does outstanding work. Kudos to the good people who work on behalf of these kids. Bill Ferguson

These AWSs will be available for public inspection at the Domtar Inc. Dryden Office, by meeting with Red Lake Forest Management Co. General Manager Janet Lane (contact information below) and the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning March 15th 2011 and throughout the one year duration. The Ontario Government Information Center at the Red Lake District Office can provide access to the internet. Scheduled Forest Management Operations

If people take the time to get to know people and then treat people the same way that they would want to be treated, they will find out that all is well. Racism and its friends have no place in society anymore. Anonymous

The AWS describes forest management activities such as road construction, maintenance and decommissioning, forestry aggregate pits, harvesting, site preparation, tree planting and tending that are scheduled to occur during the year.

The only good thing about that meeting is that the racism some white people want to pretend doesn’t exist is coming right out into the open where it cannot be denied or excused or camouflaged as anything but the ignorance that it truly is. And once we have it out in the open, we can begin to deal with it as a community. I hope this Wawatay News article has been sent to every Thunder Bay city councillor and to the mayor. Anonymous

Domtar Inc. and Red Lake Forest Management Co. are responsible for tree planting on the TroutLake and Red Lake Forests. Please contact Janet Lane at 807-223-9156 or janet.lane@domtar.com for information regarding tree planting job opportunities.

Tree Planting and Fuelwood

For information on the locations of and licence requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, or commercial fuelwood please contact Laura Landry at the Red Lake District Office. More Information For more information on the Trout Lake Forest AWS or to arrange an appointment with MNR staff to discuss the AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact:

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Jason Suprovich, RPF A/Management Forester Ministry of Natural Resources Red Lake District Office P.O. Box 5003, 227 Howey Street Red Lake, ON P0V 2M0 tel: 807-727-1347 fax: 807-727-2861 Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Holly Aggas, Operations Forester Domtar Inc. Dryden Office 1 Duke Street, Postal Bag 4004 Dryden, ON P8N 3J7 tel: 807-223-9309 fax: 807-223-9401 Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

For more information on the Red Lake Forest AWS or to arrange an appointment with MNR staff to discuss the AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Robert Partridge, RPF Management Forester Ministry of Natural Resources Red Lake District Office P.O. Box 5003, 227 Howey Street Red Lake, ON P0V 2M0 tel: 807-727-1347 fax: 807-727-2861 Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Janet Lane, RPF Forester Red Lake Forest Management Co. Ltd. c/o Domtar Inc. Dryden Office 1 Duke Street, Postal Bag 4004 Dryden, ON P8N 3J7 tel: 807-223-9156 fax: 807-223-9401 Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


6

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

‘Power comes from spirit within’ To the Editor: I hope this finds everyone from the Canadian Tribes in the very best of health and spirit. I am writing to find spiritual people, Native brothers and sisters who walk the Red Road, and anyone who has knowledge period. I am a Native brother who is on the path. I have been locked up since I was 20, for the last seven years of my life. I’m thankful enough to be getting out soon. This time has shaped and polished me. I went from a wild youngster who dealt drugs, got shot, got stabbed multiple times (once in the heart), hit by a car, got in fights with everyone, overdosed, died legally twice; to a person who when I wiped out drugs and alcohol for six months was a completely different person. I went through a lot of trial and error of finding the things I love to do. I now write movie scripts, I am a mixed martial arts artist, I am an entrepreneur (from prison!), I am a singer, I am a writer and can write anything. I love to learn, love knowledge and love my Native culture. But if I can do this from here, you can surely do it out there. Whoever, wherever we are, in or out of prison, we are all doing hard time until we find the freedom inside of ourselves. We may seem an unlikely bunch, filled with doubts, fears and many forms of self-hatred. We also happen to be keepers of the precious flame of Truth, it survives solely because we keep it flickering in our hearts. We’re loaded with spiritual power. We just have to unblock access to it. And it takes a lot of

self-honesty and hard work, no matter where we live or how we spend our days or what we’ve done in the past. Everyone has a starring role in this movie of life. We’re all heroes, adventurers, who have a lot of ups and downs. We may stumble and fall a million times, but we can all become strong, wise, and free by the end. About the highest compliment in prison is, “He knows how to do his own time.” How many of us do? How many of us use every moment of our lives to get a little bit stronger, a little bit freer, no matter what’s going on around us, no matter how crazy or violent it all seems to be? This is a constant opportunity we all share. It takes us awhile to cop to it, but people with wisdom have known this forever. With kindness, humour, patience, courage and selfhonesty, we can find that inner peace deep within ourselves. We’re loaded with spiritual power, we may live, breathe, walk and talk, but most of the time we don’t use but a fraction of our spiritual power that would make life feel infinitely more natural and worth living. Wisdom and joy come only from learning how to see a wider more wondrous world, and power comes only from the spirit within. Bless all of your family hoops. Be well. Be safe. Be happy. Be yourself and take care. We are all related.

INSPECTION Public Notice Approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule Kenora Forest Public Inspection of Annual Work Schedule The Kenora District of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has approved the Miitigoog Limited Partnership (LP) April 2011–March 2012 annual work schedule (AWS) for the Kenora Forest. Availability The AWS will be available for public inspection at the Miisun Integrated Resources Management Inc. office and the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning March 2011 and throughout the one-year duration. Scheduled Forest Management Operations The AWS describes forest management activities such as road construction, maintenance, forestry aggregate pits, harvest, site preparation, tree planting and tending that are scheduled to occur during the year. Tree Planting and Fuelwood Miitigoog LP is responsible for tree planting on the Kenora Forest. Please contact Bob Boyce using the contact information below for information regarding tree planting job opportunities. For information on the locations of and licence requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact the Kenora District office of MNR. More Information For more information on the AWS or to discuss the AWS or to request the available AWS operations summary map, please contact: Ian Pyke, RPF Area Forester Ministry of Natural Resources Kenora District Office 808 Robertson Street P.O. Box 5080 Kenora, ON P9N 3X9 tel: 807-468-2559 e-mail: ian.pyke@ontario.ca

Bob Boyce, RPF Planning and Silviculture Forester Agent for Miitigoog LP 510 Ninth Street North Kenora, ON P9N 2S8 tel: 807-467-3351 e-mail: bob.boyce@weyerhaeuser.com

Gordon Night Washington State Penitentiary Walla Walla, Wash.

ᑭᒋᓀᐣᑕᑲᐧᐣ ᑲᐊᓂᐊᔭᒪᑲᑭᐣ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᐃᒪ ᐅᒋ ᐸᑭᑭᓂᑲᓂᐠ 1

ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᑕᐃᔑᐅᓇᑕᒪᑫᒪᑲᐣ ᒋᐸᐸᒥᓯᓇᓄᐊᐧᐠ ᐃᒪ ᐊᑎᐟ ᑫᑯᓇᐣ ᑫᐱᒪᓄᑲᑌᑭᐣ. ᐊᑎᑲ ᑐᑲᐣ ᑲᒪᑕᓄᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᑫᑯᓇᐣ, ᐃᑭᑐᒪᑲᐣ ᐊᐁᐧᓀᐣ ᑫᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᒥᑯᐨ ᐃᒪ ᐃᓀᑫ ᐅᓀᐣᑕᒧᐃᐧᓂᐠ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᐃᒪ ᐁᐅᒋᑲᐡᑭᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᒋᒥᓄᓭᐠ ᑲᐃᔑᐱᒪᓄᑲᒋᑲᑌᐠ, ᐃᑭᑐ ᒋᒍ. ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐃᐧ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᑲᐧᓄᐣ ᒋᐊᔭᒪᑲᑭᐣ ᔓᓂᔭᐃᐧ ᐱᒧᒋᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑫᑭᐅᒋᐅᔓᓂᔭᒥᐊᐧᐨ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᑲᑎᐱᓇᐁᐧ ᐱᒧᓂᑎᓱᒪᑲᑭᐣ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᑕᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᒧᒪᑲᓄᐣ ᒥᓯᐁᐧ ᒋᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᑎᓱᒪᑲᑭᐣ. ᒥᐱᑯ ᐯᔑᑲᐧᐣ ᑫᑲᐟ ᐁᔑᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᐣᒋᑫᒪᑲᑭᐣ. ᐊᑎᐟ ᐅᐡᑲᑎᓴᐠ ᑫᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧ ᑭᐃᔕᐊᐧᐠ ᐃᒪ ᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑐᐃᐧᓂᐠ. ᓭᐣᐟ ᐃᐠᓀᐟᔭᐢ ᐦᐊᔾ ᐢᑯᓫ ᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᐊᐧᑲᐣ ᔕᔭᐣ ᐸᐠᐢᑐᕑ , ᐊᑯᑭᐣᐠ ᐁᐅᐣᒋᐨ ᒥᐦᐊᐁᐧ ᐯᔑᐠ ᑲᑭᐃᔕᐨ, ᐣᑭᒥᓴᐁᐧᐣᑕᐣ ᒋᓄᑕᒪᐣ ᐊᓂᒧᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑫᐃᐧᐣ, ᐃᑭᑐ. ᐣᑭᒥᓀᐧᐣᑕᐣ ᑲᑭᓄᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᑫᔭᓂᑐᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᐊᓂᓂᑲᐣ ᒥᓇ ᐊᓂᐣ

ᐁᔭᓂᔑ ᐅᓇᒋᑲᓄᐊᐧᐠ. ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᑲᐱᒥ ᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑎᓇᓄᐊᐧᐠ, ᒪᒪᐤ ᒪᑕᐊᐧ ᒥᓇ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑲᐣ ᐅᑭᒪᐠ ᑭᑲᑭᑐᐊᐧᐠ, ᐅᑭᐸᑭᑎᓇᓇᐊᐧ ᐅᐡᑭᑎᐸᒋᒧᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᑲᐊᓂ ᐊᐱᑕᓄᑲᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᑕᓄᑭᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᐃᒪ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑲ ᑕ ᓇ ᓄ ᑲ ᑕ ᒧ ᐊ ᐧ ᐨ ᑲᐃᐧᒪᓇᓯᓂᐊᐧᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᒥᐢᑕᐦᐃ ᐃᒪ ᐊᓯᐣ ᐊᐱ ᐁᐃᔑᓂᑲᓱᐨ ᐠᕑᐅᒪᔾᐟ, ᒥᐦᐃᒪ ᑲᐅᐣᒋᐅᔑᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᑲᐊᐧᔐᔭᐱᑲᐠ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᐠ. ᐃᒪ ᑕᐡ ᑲᐃᐧᑕᔑ ᒪᓇᓯᓂᐊᐧᑌᐠ ᐯᔓᐨ ᐁᐧᐱᑫᐧᐠ ᒥᓇ ᐊᑯᑭᐣᐠ. ᐸᐠᐢᑐᕑ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᓄᐣᑕᐊᐧᐨ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑫᐃᐧᑭᒪᐣ ᑲᑭ ᑲᑭᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᒥᓇ ᑲᑭᐃᑭᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᑯᓯᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᐡᑲᑎᓴᐠ ᒋᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᐃᐧᑕᐧ ᒥᓇ ᒋᐊᓄᑭᐦᐃᑕᐧ ᐃᒪ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑲᓂᐠ, ᐊᒥ ᑲᑭᐃᓀᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᑫᓂᐣ ᐁᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᑯᓯᔭᐣ. ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᑕᐡ ᓂᑭᒋᓀᐣᑕᐣ ᐅᓄᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᑲᐊᓂᐊᔭᒪᑲᑭᐣ, ᐃᑭᑐ. ᐸᐠᐢᑐᕑ ᐸᑯᓭᐣᑕᑦ ᒋᐊᓂᐃᓇᓄᑭᐨ ᐃᒪ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᐱᒧᒋᑫᐃᐧ ᔓᓂᔭᐃᐧ ᓴᑲᑭᐱᐃᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ.

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INSPECTION Public Notice Approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule Ogoki Forest Public Inspection of Annual Work Schedule The Geraldton Area Office of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has reviewed and approved the Long Lake Forest Products Inc. April 1, 2011–March 31, 2012 Annual Work Schedule (AWS) for the Ogoki Forest. Availability The AWS will be available for public inspection at the GreenForest Management Inc. offices in Longlac and Thunder Bay and on the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning March 16, 2011 and continuing throughout the one-year duration. Ontario Government Information Centres at the Nipigon District Office and the Terrace Bay Area and Geraldton Area Offices provide access to the internet. Scheduled Forest Management Operations The AWS describes forest management activities such as road construction, maintenance and decommissioning, forestry aggregate pits, harvesting, site preparation, tree planting and tending that are scheduled to occur during the year. Tree Planting and Fuelwood GreenForest Management Inc. is responsible for tree planting activities on the Ogoki Forest. Please contact Steve Yeung, Silvicultural Forester with GreenForest Management Inc. at 807-629-8545 for information regarding tree planting job opportunities. For information on the locations and licence requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact the Ministry of Natural Resources Geraldton Area Office. For commercial fuelwood opportunities, please contact GreenForest Management Inc. at the address provided below. More Information For more information on the AWS or to arrange an appointment with MNR staff to discuss the AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Charlotte Bourdignon RPF, Area Forester Ministry of Natural Resources Geraldton Area Office P.O. Box 640, 208 Beamish Avenue West Geraldton, ON P0T 1M0 tel: 807-854-1824 fax: 807-854-0335 Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Renseignements en francais au : 807-854-1030

Leigh Anne Cecchetto RPF, Planning Forester GreenForest Management Inc. P.O. Box 22004 470 Hodder Avenue Thunder Bay, ON P7A 8A8 tel: 807-343-6444 fax: 807-343-8404 Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.


Wawatay News MARCH 17, 2011

7

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Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Growth Plan a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;starting pointâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for First Nations Lake Huron Region Grand Chief Isadore Day is pleased Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new 25-year Growth Plan acknowledges constitutionally protected Aboriginal and treaty rights. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We commend the Ontario government for making this visible in the plan. We intend to bring diversity and strength to our region and share in the benefits with our neighbours. It only makes business sense,â&#x20AC;? Day said. The plan will guide decision-

making and investment planning in the region, according to Northern Development, Mines and Forestry Minister Michael Gravelle. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This growth plan will guide our government and future governmentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; decision-making and investments across northern Ontario over the next 25 years,â&#x20AC;? he said â&#x20AC;&#x153;This plan builds upon substantial investments that our government has already made in northern Ontario which supports a skilled workforce,

world-class resources, leadingedge technology and modern infrastructure.â&#x20AC;? Day said the plan could help First Nations achieve economic sustainability and improve quality of life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Long gone are the days when consulting First Nations only resulted in discussions about jobs and the protection of sacred sites,â&#x20AC;? says Day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re quite clear, we support a plan that focuses on economic participation. As long as Ontario

makes investments in the North and they focus on including First Nations as partners, the North will be successful. This was the spirit and intent of treaties that our people made with the Crown.â&#x20AC;? Gravelle said the most significant consultation the province has ever undertaken went into the plan, including input from 75 First Nations. Dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community of Serpent River was one of them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Training, capital and invest-

ments in infrastructure are vital to the future of northern Ontario creating a strong workforce,â&#x20AC;? Day said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We support this approach because as First Nation governments we also recognize growing First Nation populations and the need to resolve labour pool shortages in the North.â&#x20AC;? Nishnawbe Aski Nation leaders were not available to comment about the plan but it is on the agenda for the chiefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meetings in Timmins March 22-24.

Video shows alternative interpretation of Treaty 9

INSPECTION Forest Management Plan Inspection Martel Forest 2011â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2021 Forest Management Plan

Rick Garrick Wawatay News

The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR), Tembec and the Martel Forest Local Citizen Committees (LCC) would like to advise you that the 2011â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2021 Forest Management Plan (FMP) for the Martel Forest has been approved by the MNR Regional Director and is available for inspection. The Planning Process The FMP takes approximately two years to complete. During this time, five formal opportunities for public and Aboriginal involvement are provided. The fourth opportunity (Stage 4) for this FMP occurred on November 9, 2010â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 7, 2011 when the public was invited to review and comment on the draft FMP. This Stage 5 notice is to advise you that the MNR-approved FMP will be available for inspection for 30 days. FMP Inspection â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Final Opportunity During the 30-day inspection period, you may make a written request to the Director of the Environmental Assessment Approvals Branch, Ministry of the Environment, for an individual environmental assessment of specific forest management activities in the FMP. A response to a request will normally be provided by the Director, Environmental Assessment and Approvals Branch, Ministry of the Environment, after the completion of the 30-day inspection period. The MNR-approved FMP and summary are available for inspection during normal office hours for 30 days from March 12, 2011â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 10, 2011 at the following locations: t 5FNCFDPGGJDF 1MBOFS3PBE $IBQMFBV 0/  4BSBI4VMMJWBO 31'  t ./3QVCMJDXFCTJUFBUIUUQTPOUBSJPDB GPSFTUQMBOT 5IF0OUBSJP(PWFSONFOU*OGPSNBUJPO $FOUSFJO5PSPOUPBOEUIFBQQSPQSJBUFDPNNVOJUJFTPGUIF./3SFHJPO EJTUSJDUBOEPSBSFBPGGJDFTQSPWJEF internet access) *OUFSFTUFEBOEBGGFDUFEQFSTPOTBOEPSHBOJ[BUJPOTDBOBSSBOHFBOBQQPJOUNFOUXJUI./3TUBGGBUUIFBQQSPQSJBUFEJTUSJDU or area office to discuss the FMP. For further information, please contact: Denis Ayotte, RPF MNR, Chapleau 705-864-3176

Sarah Sullivan, RPF Tembec, Chapleau 705-864-3021

Vic Wearn LCC Representative 705-946-0024

The approved FMP will be available for the 10-year period of the FMP at the same locations listed above. ./3JTDPMMFDUJOHZPVSQFSTPOBMJOGPSNBUJPOVOEFSUIFBVUIPSJUZPGUIF$SPXO'PSFTU4VTUBJOBCJMJUZ"DU"OZQFSTPOBM information you provide (address, name, telephone, etc.) will be protected in accordance with the Freedom of *OGPSNBUJPOBOE1SPUFDUJPOPG1SJWBDZ"DU:PVSQFSTPOBMJOGPSNBUJPONBZCFVTFECZUIF.JOJTUSZPG/BUVSBM3FTPVSDFTUP TFOEZPVGVSUIFSJOGPSNBUJPOSFMBUFEUPUIJTGPSFTUNBOBHFNFOUQMBOOJOHFYFSDJTF*GZPVIBWFRVFTUJPOTBCPVUUIFVTFPG ZPVSQFSTPOBMJOGPSNBUJPO QMFBTFDPOUBDU#JMM(VUISJFBU 3FOTFJHOFNFOUTFOGSBOĂ&#x17D;BJT

Oral Promises/Broken Promises, an alternative interpretation of Treaty 9 based on the diaries of a third treaty commissioner, is posted on the MiningWatch Canada website. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those diaries, which have been lost for a hundred years, were found and they tell a dramatically different story than everything the government has been saying for 100 years,â&#x20AC;? said Murray Klippenstein in the video, which is posted at www. miningwatch.ca. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The government negotiators and the bureaucrats in Ottawa wanted a written treaty that was signed by the First Nation representatives. The problem was the written version of the document was written in English and legalese, which the First Nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s people in northern Ontario certainly did not understand.â&#x20AC;? A Toronto-based lawyer who has been working with Mushkegowuk Council, Klippenstein said he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand what the government negotiators were thinking when they told First Nations representatives to sign a document they could not read or understand and then expected the document to mean something. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They knew (the First Nations representatives) couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t read it; they knew they couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand it,â&#x20AC;? Klippenstein said. The video features Klippenstein speaking at a November meeting of the Ontario Mining Action Network, hosted by MiningWatch Canada and the Canary Research Institute in Thunder Bay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The First Nations representatives were reluctant to sign the treaty document which they

Find online this week: NEWS: RING OF FIRE BLOCKADE MARTEN FALLS HAS ESTABLISHED THE SECOND BLOCKADE IN TWO YEARS

NEWS: MARTEN FALLS, THE SECOND BLOCKADE IN TWO YEARS WASAYA AIRWAYS WILL BE IMPLEMENTING AN ID POLICY MAY 1 FOR ALL PASSENGERS 18 YEARS OR OLDER ON ITS SCHEDULED FLIGHTS.

NEWS: FIRST NATIONS RECOGNIZE INTERNATIONAL WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY HE ANISHINABEK NATION IS CELEBRATING INTERNATIONAL WOMANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY MAR. 8 BY RECOGNIZING THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF TWO WOMEN, JOSEPHINE MANDAMIN AND JEANNETTE CORBIERE LAVELL.

READ STORIES WRITTEN IN SYLLABICS ONLINE! WWW.WAWATAYNEWS.CA/SYLLABICS-STORIES

The growth plan has seven sectors, including Aboriginal Peoples. An eighth includes implementation. The focus of the Aboriginal Peoplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; section is co-operation based on mutual understanding; capacity building for increased Aboriginal involvement in the Northâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic, social and cultural life; and working together to increase education, training and employment opportunities. - JT

To see what else is new go to

www.wawataynews.ca

could not read and asked questions as to whether their fishing and hunting privileges would be (protected),â&#x20AC;? Klippenstein said. Klippenstein said Chief Missabay was suspicious of the written treaty. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think Chief Missabay was smart â&#x20AC;&#x201C; his instincts were right,â&#x20AC;? Klippenstein said. Klippenstein said the diary of the third commissoner, Daniel (George) MacMartin, contained some â&#x20AC;&#x153;very good evidenceâ&#x20AC;? of the treaty negotiations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is what they were told,â&#x20AC;? Klippenstein said, quoting the dairy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were also allowed as of yore to hunt and fish where they pleased.â&#x20AC;? Klippenstein said he almost fell out of his chair when he read another comment in MacMartinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diary. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This says that â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Angus Weenusk of New Post replied that they accepted the terms as stated,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; not as written, as stated,â&#x20AC;? Klippenstein said. Ramsay Hart, MiningWatch Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Canada program coordinator, said the video shows how the oral traditions of many northern Ontario First Nations jive very closely in many ways with the written diaries of someone who was participating in the treaty process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And those two versions of the history vary considerably from what is in the written documentation of the physicallysigned treaty,â&#x20AC;? Hart said. Hart said MacMartinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diary changes the landscape in how traditional territories should be perceived in Treaty 9 territory. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It also then raises the question about how other treaties were communicated and understood,â&#x20AC;? Hart said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It should give First Nations a much stronger voice in resource development in their territories.â&#x20AC;?


8

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

á?§á?&#x160;á?§á?&#x160;á&#x2018;&#x152; á?&#x160;á&#x2019;&#x2039;á&#x2019;§á?§á?&#x192;á&#x201C;&#x2021;á?Ł

North Western Ontario Broadband Expansion Initiative benefits 26 NAN communities

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Project Overview The Province of Ontario, the Government of Canada and Bell Aliant are partnering to build a new $81.4 million fibre optic network, spanning 2,572 kilometres of Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Far North and benefiting some 26 First Nation communities. The fibre optic solution will provide more reliable voice and data service and broadband Internet with higher speeds and greater bandwidth. The project will also provide economic benefits for the communities during construction and beyond. Project Map Five Projects - Five Year Construction Plan Construction for Project One is slated to begin in April 2011, with Projects Two and Three set to start in May. The first three projects are expected to be completed in March 2012, with completion of Projects Four and Five anticipated by 2015.

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Project One Benefits Seven Communities Mishkeegogamang, Musselwhite Mine, New Osnaburg, Pickle Lake, Pikangikum, Ojibway Nation of Saugeen and Savant Lake are part of Project One construction plans, set to begin in April 2011. Projects Two and Three Include Seven Additional Communities With construction slated to start in May 2011, Projects Two and Three include the communities of Angling Lake (Wapekeka), Cat Lake, Kee-WayWin, Kingfisher Lake, Koochiching, Poplar Hill and Slate Falls. Remaining Communities Included in Projects Four and Five Although a firm construction start date has not been announced, the communities of Bearskin Lake, Big Trout Lake (Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug), Deer Lake, Long Dog (Wawakapewin), Kasabonika, Muskrat Dam, North Spirit Lake, Sachigo Lake, Sandy Lake, Summer Beaver (Nibinamik), Weagamow (North Caribou) Lake and Wunnummin Lake are part of Project Four and Fort Hope (Eabametoong), Lansdowne House (Neskantaga), Ogoki Post (Marten Falls) and Webequie are included in Project Five. Greater Bandwidth â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Higher Speeds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; More Reliable Network Fibre optic networks provide bandwidth greater than 1.5 Megabits per second (Mbps), making High Speed Internet available and the ability to download movies and music in record time, in fact, less than ten seconds to download a standard length song! The fibre optic solution will also provide more reliable service, with 90% of the fibre optic network being buried, and fibre being less sensitive to the elements, weather and forest fires no longer impose the threat that they did on pole lines or satellite and microwave installations. Employment Opportunities Local First Nations territory experts will work with Bell Aliant engineers to determine and plot the best path for the new network. Skills assessments and supplier inventories will be conducted in hopes that First Nations members will provide labour and supply materials for such things as guiding and engineering, surveying, line clearance, road building, construction and other logistics. There will also be post-installation opportunities for technical support and maintenance workers. Land Use Fees Bell Aliant will pay to Band Councils whose traditional land is being crossed for purposes of this project, an annual fee of $3,000 for the first five years, adjusting every five years according to the Consumer Price Index for the previous five years. The land use agreement will be reviewed with the respective Band Councils after ten years and then every five years for the duration of the twenty year agreement. Land Use Authorizations The Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has initiated its review of the project proposals for Projects 1, 2 and 3 and is considering issuance of authorizations for Crown land and, potentially, Crown resources such as timber and aggregates. If you have any comments regarding the potential issuance of authorizations for Crown land and, potentially, Crown resources to enable Project 1, 2 or 3 to be implemented, please contact:

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John Carnochan, District Planner, MNR Sioux Lookout District at (807) 737-5060;

Kelvin Davenport, Ignace Area Supervisor, MNR Dryden District at (807) 934-2244 by Friday, April 15, 2011.

Trevor Park, Planning & Information Management Supervisor, MNR Red Lake District at (807) 727-1344; OR

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Kelvin Davenport, Ignace Area Supervisor, MNR Dryden District at (807) 934-2244 by Friday, April 15, 2011. Comments and personal information regarding these proposals are collected by MNR under the authority of the Public Lands Act, Provincial Parks and Conservation Reserves Act, Crown Forest Sustainability Act and Aggregate Resources Act and will be used to assist MNR in making decisions. Comments not constituting personal information as defined by the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act will be shared among MNR and others as appropriate, and may be included in documentation available for public review. Personal information will remain confidential unless prior consent to disclose is obtained. Contact Glen Niznowski, Planning and Information Management Supervisor, MNR Sioux Lookout District at (807) 737-5037 for further information.

More information If you would like more detailed information about the project please contact: Chris Bell, Northern Ontario General Manager, Bell Aliant at (807) 475-6041 or visit http://nanbroadband.sims.sencia.ca/

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*This initiative is made possible by a contribution from Industry Canada.

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READ MORE ABOUT THE TECHNOLOGY, ECONOMIC BENEFITS AND EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN UPCOMING ISSUES OF WAWATAY NEWS

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Wawatay News MARCH 17, 2011

Lac Seul court move challenging Rick Garrick Wawatay News

Although nobody has missed their court appearance yet, Lac Seul Chief Clifford Bull is concerned about the recent move of the community’s court to Sioux Lookout. “It has been challenging for people who have no means of travel, especially people who are on welfare,” Bull said. “They don’t have money to pay for a taxi ride. It’s challenging.” The court had previously been held monthly in the Frenchman’s Head band office but it was moved to Sioux Lookout Feb. 26 and is scheduled to be held there until the June court date. Sioux Lookout is about a 30 to 40-minute drive from where the court had previously been held in Frenchman’s Head. “It became an issue there (at band office) because of the safety of band office employees,” said Lac Seul Police Sgt. David Tanner. “So they changed it to the complex.” But Tanner said it was difficult to hold hearings in the complex because it was a large room. He said Justice Peter Bishop couldn’t always hear what was going on or hear the court clerks. Tanner said notices were posted around the community notifying them of the change. “Everyone attended in Sioux Lookout at the new courthouse,” Tanner said. “There

9

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

INSPECTION Public Notice Approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule Big Pic and Black River Forest

have been no problems with it so far.” But Tanner did note it was more work for the Lac Seul Police to transport the people who were facing charges to the Sioux Lookout courthouse. “We have to get there a little bit early to ensure people have access to their lawyers,” Tanner said. “We take them in the (police) trucks and we have a prisoner van.”

Public Inspection of Annual Work Schedule The Manitouwadge Area Office of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has reviewed and approved GreenForest Management Inc.’s (GFMI) April 1, 2011–March 31, 2012 Annual Work Schedules (AWS) for the Big Pic and Black River Forests. Availability The AWS will be available for public inspection at the GreenForest Management Inc. office and the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning April 1, 2011 and throughout the one-year duration. The Ontario Government Information Centre in Manitouwadge provides access to the internet. Scheduled Forest Management Operations The AWS describes forest management activities such as road construction, maintenance and decommissioning, forestry aggregate pits, harvesting, site preparation, and tree planting and tending that are scheduled to occur during the year.

“It has been challenging for people who have no means of travel, especially people who are on welfare.”

Tree Planting and Fuelwood GreenForest Management Inc. is responsible for tree planting on the Big Pic and Black River Forests. Please contact Judy Hall at the GFMI office at 807-343-6524 for information regarding tree planting job opportunities.

– Clifford Bull

Tanner said it is advantageous for the people to have their court located in their own community. “When there is another location suitable for the court here, the judge is certainly willing to look at that,” Tanner said. Bull said the community is currently considering the construction of a new courthouse in Frenchman’s Head by this summer. “Although it has not been confirmed yet, chief and council are planning to build a courthouse adjacent to the existing Lac Seul Police station,” Bull said.

For information on the locations and license requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact Doris Zagar at the Wawa District Office at 705-856-4745. For commercial fuelwood opportunities, please contact Judy Hall at the GFMI office at 807-343-6524. More Information For more information on the AWS or to arrange an appointment with MNR staff to discuss the AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Derrick Tirschmann, RPF Ministry of Natural Resources Manitouwadge Area Forester 40 Manitou Road, Postal Bag Service Manitouwadge, ON P0T 2C0 tel: 807-826-3225 ext. 236 fax: 807-826-4631 e-mail: derrick.tirschmann@ontario.ca

Judy Hall, RPF GreenForest Management Inc. Planning Forester P.O. Box 22004, 470 Hodder Avenue Thunder Bay, ON P7A 8A8 tel: 807-343-6524 fax: 807-343-6424 e-mail: judyh@gfmiontario.ca

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10

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

ACHIEVEMENTS CELEBRATED

Shooniyaa honours its citizens Photos by Adrienne Fox

I

t’s an annual event that draws people from all corners Gary Smith provided emcee services at this of Treaty 3 territory. The Recognition Awards hon- year’s event, while British Columbia-born Inez ours the achievements of Treaty 3 members who par- Jasper entertained the nearly 100 people in ticipated in programs offered through Shooniyaa Wa- attendance. Jasper is a Sto:lo singer-songwriter Biitong. Each year, 20 bursaries are awarded to students in the areas of academics, attendance, community volunteer-service, sports and culture. Winners of a speech/essay poster contest are also announced. The awards recognize program participants who have overcome obstacles with some leaving their home communities to pursue their dreams. “The achievers represent the dreams and aspirations of all our clients,” states the Shooniyaa Wa-Biitong website.

and registered nurse. Drum group Lynx Soldier opened and closed th e celebration Shooniyaa Wa-Biitong Training and Employment Centre is based in Kenora, Ont. and serves

23 communities in Treaty 3. Shooniyaa has been in existence since 1991 and has gone from an annual budget of $500,000 to a $4.7-million corporation. This year’s event was hosted by Ojibways of Onigaming.

TOP LEFT: Tehya Handorgan was recognized for Best Overall Combined Academics and Attendance. BOTTOM LEFT: Riel Councillor was awarded for Excellence in Combined Academics & Cultural Preservation. CENTRE: Brent Joseph was also awarded for Best Overall Combined Academics and Attendance. TOP RIGHT: Jordan White won the Essay & Speech Competition in the Grade 11 and 12 category. MIDDLE RIGHT: Megan Cowley was honoured for Best Overall Combined Academics and Attendance. BOTTOM RIGHT: John Binguis also received an award for Best Overall Combined Academics and Attendance.


Wawatay News MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Other winners included Megan Bob and Estelle Simard. Each earned a Recognition Certificate. Michelle Botham, Kelly Major, Stephanie Perrault, Pat Yerxa, Roxanne Necanepenace, Maybelline Loon and Irene Skead all received Ozhiitaag “To Prepare” awards. Wade Johnson was honoured with a Youth Achiever Bursary Award. Damon Perrault got an Excellence in Combined Academics & Sports award. Elizabeth Morrisseau earned a High School Award for Excellence.

TOP: Megan Allan earned an Excellence in Combined Academics & Community Volunteer/Involvment award. TOP LEFT: Chelsea Capay-Kwandibens received a Best Overall Combined Academics and Attendance. TOP RIGHT: Keira Allan garnered an Excellence in Combined Academics & Cultural Preservation. CENTRE: Members of the Asubpeeschoseewagong Netum Anishinabek Ozhitaag (Grassy Narrows) Committee earned a Ozhiitaag “To Prepare” award. CENTRE LEFT: Cheyanne Pahpasay was awarded for Best Attendance. CENTRE RIGHT: Alina Skead earned an Excellence in Combined Academics & Sports award. BOTTOM LEFT: Keisha Seymour-Miller won the Essay & Speech Competition in the Grade 9 and 10 category. BOTTOM RIGHT: From left, Shooniyaa Wa-Biitong Executive Director Marie Seymour, singer-songwriter Inez Jasper and Shooniyaa Wa-Biitong youth representative Fawn Wapioke

11


12

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

The Public is Invited to come to a

Blessing and Naming Ceremony for the Healing Room at Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre

Bannock Elvis

Lac Seul First Nation

Monday, March 21, 2011 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM Lac Seul First Nation and Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre are having a Blessing and Naming Ceremony for the Healing Room in the new health centre. It has been named ‘Chief Sakatcheway Andaaw’iwewgamik Healing Room’. It is a special room for healing purposes and is open to all people. The ceremony will be lead by Lac Seul Drum and Christian representatives, speeches by elders and dignitaries, with the unveiling of a special plaque, followed by a feast and give away. We hope you will be able to attend this special occasion. ~ Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre & Lac Seul First Nation

INSPECTION Public Notice Approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule Whiskey Jack Forest Public Inspection of Annual Work Schedule The Kenora District of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has reviewed and approved the April 1, 2011–March 31, 2012 Annual Work Schedule (AWS) for the Whiskey Jack Forest. Availability The AWS will be available for public inspection at the Ministry of Natural Resources Office and the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning March 12, 2011 and throughout the one-year duration. Ontario Government Information Centres will provide access to the internet. Scheduled Forest Management Operations The AWS describes forest management activities such as road construction, maintenance and decommissioning, forestry aggregate pits, harvesting, site preparation, tree planting, and tending that are scheduled to occur during the year. Tree Planting and Fuelwood The Ministry of Natural Resources is responsible for tree planting on the Whiskey Jack Forest. Please contact Kurt Pochailo at the Kenora District Office of the MNR for information regarding tree planting job opportunities. For information on the locations of and licence requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact Kurt Pochailo at the Kenora District Office of the MNR. For commercial fuelwood opportunities, please contact Kurt Pochailo at the Kenora District Office of the MNR. More Information For more information on the AWS or to arrange an appointment with MNR staff to discuss the AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Kurt Pochailo, RPF Area Forester Ministry of Natural Resources Kenora District Office 808 Robertson Street P.O. Box 5080 Kenora, ON P9N 3X9 tel: 807-468-2597 e-mail: kurt.pochailo@ontario.ca

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Adrienne Fox/Wawatay News

Bannock Elvis made an appearance in Thunder Bay March 5 during an Urban Aboriginal Strategy event that honoured its frontline workers. The character was created by Stan Wesley, who emceed the event. The former WWT Television employee owns and operates the Wesley Group – which provides motivational and keynote speaking, facilitation and training services.

Province drops appeal in Meshake cabin case James Thom Wawatay News

An Aroland couple who built a cabin – for hunting, trapping, fishing and gathering – without a permit took on the province and won for a third time. Elsie Meshake and Howard Meshake (Cyrette) successfully argued their building and use of the cabin on Ogoki Lake was protected by their constitutional rights under Treaty 9. The province was set to launch an appeal through the Ontario Court of Appeals in Toronto March 1. Instead, the appeal was dropped, officially ending a five-year court battle. “As in all cases, decisions on how to proceed were made as the matter moved forward,” said MNR spokeswoman Kath-

ryn Lyzun. “The decision to abandon the appeal was based on a careful and thorough review of the specific facts of this case.” “We’re very happy,” Elsie said. “We weren’t going to give up.” The couple faced several charges by the Ministry of Natural Resources including failing to get a work permit for their cabin and failing to comply with a stop-work order. “We want to make sure this doesn’t happen to somebody else,” Howard said. He is hopeful the case will create a precedent so other First Nations people who choose to build cabins on their traditional territories don’t have to fight through the court system for vindication.

The Meshake’s case went through the Provincial Offences court and Ontario Court of Justice. In both cases, the judge sided with the couple. Aroland Chief Sonny Gagnon was pleased by the outcome of the cases. “Traditionally, we would go out all over our territory to hunt, trap and fish and we would build shelters for this purpose,” Gagnon said. “We still do this. It has taken a long struggle, but we are interpreting this move as a sign that Ontario is finally accepting our rights to build and use our cabins out on the land.” Lyzun said going forward MNR will assess each situation on a case by case basis, taking into account legal decisions that have been made.

First Nations recognize annual women’s day Justina Carpenter Wawatay News

The Anishinabek Nation celebrated International Woman’s Day Mar. 8 by recognizing the achievements of two women, Josephine Mandamin and Jeannette Corbiere Lavell. Josephine Mandamin, the Anishinabek Women’s Water Commissioner, has walked around all five Great Lakes to bring attention to the water supply. She is starting a new walk in April. Spanning five years, the walk will start from different directions – such as the Arctic, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans as well as the Gulf of Mexico – and end at a point in Minnesota.

Jeannette Corbiere Lavell is known for leading a Supreme Court Challenge of the federal government’s system of determining Indian Status. She is the first Anishinabek Nation Commissioner on Citizenship and also serves as president of the Native Women’s Association of Canada. “Josephine and Jeannette are examples of the many talented women in our communities who are caregivers, teachers, doctors, lawyers – and young girls can aspire to be like them. They are role models for our future generations,” said Glen Hare, Deputy Grand Council Chief of the Anishinabek Nation. Nishnawbe Aski Nation

(NAN) and the NAN Women’s Council are also bringing attention to the strengths and contributions made by First Nations women within NAN territory. “It is vital to our future that we all walk together equally to help restore the balance that has been lost in our communities,” NAN Deputy Grand Chief Mike Metatawabin said. “First Nations women are to be respected, honoured and valued because they are the heart and soul of our communities and the backbone of our families.” Started in 1911 by Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland, International Women’s Day is now recognized annually around the world.


Wawatay News MARCH 17, 2011

13

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

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A group of volunteer searchers for missing Webequie teen Jordan Wabasse stand outside their search headquarters in Thunder Bay. The group has not given up hope the 15-year-old, missing since early February, will be found safe.

Search coordinator hopeful Wabasse will be found safe James Thom Wawatay News

Fifty to 100 volunteers have kept up a daily search for missing teen Jordan Wabasse in Thunder Bay. Wabasse, 15, was last seen Feb. 7 and was reported missing by a guardian the next day. “We have a great team of volunteers … mostly friends and family from Webequie, who are searching along the Kaministiquia River and

Westfort areas,” said search coordinator Lillian Suganqueb. The search has focused on these areas based on evidence of his presence the night Wabasse went missing. Wabasse was Suganqueb seen on a city bus and got off at Mary Street near Holt Place in the evening. A cap, similar to one he was

wearing that night also turned up on the Kam River bank, which prompted the OPP to search the river with a dive team. The hat was sent for DNA testing. An aerial search was also conducted with an OPP helicopter. While few leads have come from the volunteer search, Suganaqueb is confident Wabasse will be found safe. “Everyone is fully motivated to find Jordan,” she said. “Every day, we feel like this

To all members of the Northern First Nations Communities who will be travelling so far by Ice Road to visit us, we encourage you to take part in all that Dryden has to offer in the way of shopping, dining and leisure. Enjoy your stay and come often! Sincerely, Mayor Nuttall and Council City of Dryden

is the day we’re going to find him.” Wabasse’s parents called on a medicine man to help with the search March 5-6. While hesitant to reveal what the medicine man was able to reveal to the family, Suganaqueb confirmed he “supported the family and helped with the search.” Anyone with information about Wabasse should contact the Thunder Bay Police at 807684-1200 or his parents at 807285-7282.

INSPECTION Public Notice Approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule Romeo Malette Forest Public Inspection of Annual Work Schedule The Timmins District Office of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has approved Tembec Inc.’s 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule (AWS) for the Romeo Malette Forest. The AWS will be available for public inspection at the Timmins District Office, the office of Tembec Inc., and the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning March 15, 2011. Scheduled Forest Management Operations The AWS describes forest management activities such as harvest, road construction and maintenance, site preparation, tree planting, and tending operations that are scheduled to occur on the Romeo Malette Forest between April 01, 2011 and March 31, 2012. In most cases, site preparation and tending operations involve the aerial application of herbicides to control competing vegetation. Ministry of Natural Resources has reviewed the AWS to ensure that activities are consistent with the approved Forest Management Plan. Tree Planting and Fuelwood Tembec Inc. is responsible for tree planting on the Romeo Malette Forest. Please contact Tembec Inc. for information regarding tree planting job opportunities. For information on the locations of and licence requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact the Timmins MNR District Office. For commercial fuelwood opportunities, please contact Tembec Inc.

BDC’S FIRST-HAND ABORIGINAL EXPERTISE HELPS YOU GROW YOUR BUSINESS.

More Information The approved AWS and any subsequent revisions will remain available for public inspection throughout the one-year duration of the AWS. For more information on the AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Mac Kilgour, RPF Ministry of Natural Resources Timmins District Office 5520 Hwy. 101 East South Porcupine, ON P0N 1H0 tel.: 705-235-1320 fax: 705-235-1377 Renseignements en français: 705-235-1300.

Lino Morandin, RPF Tembec Inc. PO Box 1100 Hwy 101 West Timmins, ON P4N 7H9 tel: 705-360-7544 fax: 705-360-1279

Cheryl K. Watson Aboriginal Banking Representative 204 983-3993 cheryl.watson@bdc.ca


14

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

The path to becoming healthier starts with a single step. What step will you take?

Step 1 Know your risk. Having a family history of diabetes or being a member of certain ethnic groups increases your risk for developing Type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. Find out more about what puts you at risk and what you can do about it. Visit www.nwohealthworks.org

It’s never too early to prevent Type 2 diabetes.

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

About 60-70 high school student peer leaders from schools across Thunder Bay took part in the Drug Buzz/Influence in Action conference March 3-4 at Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School.

Getting buzzed on information Rick Garrick Wawatay News

Race Relations Week 2011

Together We Have... Together We Will... March 21st – March 27th, 2011 Monday, March 21 Open House @ SLFNHA Tuberculosis Control Program: Join us for tea and cake to Equinox Sunrise Ceremony @ the Nishnawbe commemorate World TB Day. Tuberculosis has Gamik Friendship Centre 5:30am. A light impacted the lives of people throughout history. breakfast of bannock and jam will be provided. 55b Queen Street 1:30pm-3:30pm Blessing and Naming Ceremony for the Sioux Lookout Creative Arts Circle Healing Room @ the Meno-Ya-Win Health Film Screening @ Mayfair 7:30pm Centre. The room has been named ‘Chief (contact Laurel 737-2174) Sakatcheway Andaaw’iwewgamik Healing Room.’ The ceremony will include drumming, speeches, the unveiling of a special plaque followed by a Friday, March 25 feast. 10am-1pm Cleansing of the old Sioux Hotel in preparation Feast @ Friendship Centre 5pm for the new Cultural Centre for Youth and the Arts followed by a Walk Around Town. Meet National Book Launch for the Aboriginal Healing outside the Friendship Centre at 11:30am. Foundation’s publication of Cultivating Canada: Reconciliation through the Lens of Cultural Coffee House, come enjoy some talented local Diversity Sunset Suites Conference Room, 7pm musicians and story tellers. St. Andrew’s Hall, (contact Cathy Ann or Astrid 737-1501) 7:30pm-11:00pm (contact Astrid @ 737-2938). Tuesday, March 22 Youth Centre Open House, come check out the Saturday, March 26 Youth Centre from 3pm-8pm. Cedar Bay Fun Day - Cedar Bay Lakeshore (contact Dan 737-1501) bonfires, food, games and other outdoor activities, 12pm-4pm (contact Monika 737-3085) Wednesday, March 23 Film Screening Arts Circle presents Choke and Lunch and Learn Photovoice: exploring type 2 other short films. Followed by discussion with diabetes through photography, A-frame Gallery, fi lmmaker @ Friendship Centre, 7:30pm 12pm-1:30pm (contact Laurel 737-2174) (contact Cathy Ann 737-1501) Sunday, March 27, Thursday, March 24 Multicultural Feast and presentation of the Tea, Bannock & Bingo @ Sunset Women’s Mary Carpenter – People Making Changes Award, Aboriginal Circle 1:00pm-3:00pm Legion Hall, 5pm (contact Iris 737-7922) Ongoing Events: Laura’s Choice: An Invitational Quilt Show @ A-Frame Gallery, 88 ½ Front Street Wish Wall post your hopes, dreams and wishes for our community, country or world @ Johnny’s Fresh Market Mary Carpenter People Making Changes Award “Race Relations Week” Name Contest Submit your ideas for a new name for the week currently known as “Race Relations Week.” Submissions can be emailed to astridjohnston@slarc.ca, dropped off at the SLARC office @ 85 King St., 2nd Floor, or mailed to Box 1194, Sioux Lookout, ON, P8T 1B7 (submissions due March 27th)

Peer leader students from across Thunder Bay gathered March 3-4 at Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School for the Drug Buzz/Influence in Action conference. “It’s an opportunity for all races to communicate,” said Elijah Sugarhead, a Drug Buzz/ Influence in Action facilitator and role model from Nibinamik. “This conference is not about telling them don’t do this, don’t do that; it’s about providing them with information about the effects of (drugs and food additives).” The high school students learned about different additives in foods and drugs, and how those additives can affect them. “They enjoyed learning some facts, for example, a slice of

pizza contains 1,630 mlligrams of sodium,” said Cassandra Garrick, a conference co-facilitator. “That is way above and beyond the recommended daily intake of sodium, which is 1,500 milligrams.” How to make healthy choices was the main topic of discussion, Sugarhead said, estimating about 60-70 high school students took part in the conference from DFC, public and Catholic schools across Thunder Bay. “Drugs is an issue with all our schools – it knows no boundaries and no barriers,” said DFC principal Jonathan Kakegamic. “It’s an issue with us and with us taking a lead in partnership with (the Regional Multicultural Youth Council and the Student Commissions of Canada), DFC could play an important role for the City of Thunder Bay for youth.

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“We need to stop working in isolation.” Kakegamic said interacting with other students will make the DFC students stronger and give them a voice. “They enjoyed it,” Kakegamic said. “After several hours they are interacting now and feel a lot more comfortable.” Kakegamic said the students have a plan to implement some of the initiatives they developed during the conference. DFC students Jonathan Crane, from Weagamow Lake, and Davery Bottle, from Mishkeegogamang, have also been chosen to travel to Ottawa March 24-27 to represent DFC at the Students Commission’s National 2011 Unite and Ignite Conference where they will share experiences and learn best practices. “If you work hard, it’s worth it,” Crane said.

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Nishnawbe-Aski Legal Services Corporation (NALSC) office staff in Sioux Lookout held an open house Feb. 25 to showcase the organization’s services such as the Restorative Justice and Talking Together programs. From left, Vernon Morris, community youth justice worker, Ralph Taylor, Talking Together facilitator and Bobby Binguis, Restorative Justice worker, hold a cake displaying the NALSC logo.

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Aroland First Nation Band Office Atikokan Atikokan Native Friendship Centre Attawapiskat Northern Store Balmertown Diane’s Gas Bar 41 Dickenson Balmertown Keewaytinook Okimakanak 127 Mine Road Batchewana First Nation Band Office Bearskin Lake Co-op Store Bearskin Lake Northern Store Beaverhouse First Nation Band Office Big Grassy First Nation Band Office Big Island First Nation Band Office Big Trout Lake Education Authority Big Trout Lake Sam’s Store Big Trout Lake Tasona Store Brunswick House First Nation Band Office Calstock A & J General Store Calstock Band Office Cat Lake Band Office Cat Lake Northern Store Chapleau Cree First Nation Band Office Chapleau Value Mart Cochrane Ininew Friendship Centre Collins Namaygoosisagon Band office Collins Post Office Couchiching First Nation Band Office Couchiching First Nation Gas Bar Deer Lake Northern Store Dinorwic Naumans General Store Dryden A & W Dryden Beaver Lake Camp Dryden Greyhound Bus Depot Dryden McDonalds’ Restaurant Dryden Northwest Metis 34A King St. Dryden Robin’s Donuts Dryden Tim Hortons Ear Falls The Pit Stop Emo J & D Junction Flying Post First Nation Band Office Fort Albany Band Office Fort Albany Northern Store Fort Frances Gizhewaadiziwin Health Access Centre 1460 Idylwild Drive Fort Frances Sunset Country Metis Fort Frances United Native Friendship Centre Fort Hope Band Office Fort Hope Corny’s Variety Store Fort Hope John C. Yesno Education Centre Fort Severn Northern Store Geraldton Thunder Bird Friendship Centre Ginoogaming First Nation Band Office Grassy Narrows J.B. Store Gull Bay Band Office Hornepayne First Nation Band Office Hornepayne G & L Variety Store Hudson Grant’s Store Iskatewizaagegan 39 Independent First Nation Band Office Kapuskasing Indian Friendship Centre 41 Murdock St.

Kasabonika Chief Simeon McKay Education Centre Kasabonika First Nation Band Office Kashechewan Francine J. Wesley Secondary School Kashechewan First Nation Band Office Kashechewan Northern Store Keewaywin First Nation Band Office Keewaywin Northern Store Kenora Bimose Tribal Council 598 Lakeview Dr. Kenora Chefield Gourmet, Kenora Shoppers 534 Park St. - ON SALE Kenora Chiefs Advisory Kenora Migisi Treatment Centre Kenora Ne-Chee Friendship Centre Kenora Sunset Strip Husky - ON SALE Kingfisher Lake Omahamo Hotel Complex Kingfisher Lake Omahamo Store Kocheching First Nation Band Office Lac La Croix First Nation Band Office Lac Seul, Kejick Bay Lakeside Cash & Carry Lake Nipigon Ojibway First Nation Band Office Lansdowne House Co-op Store Lansdowne House Northern Store Long Lake #58 General Store Mattagammi Confectionary Michipicoten First Nation Band Office Migisi Sahgaigan First Nation Band Office Missanabie Cree First Nation Band Office Mobert Band Office Moose Factory Echo Lodge Restaurant Moose Factory GG’s Corner & Gift Store Moose Factory Northern Stores Moose Factory Weeneebayko General Hospital Moosonee Air Creebec Moosonee Airport Moosonee Native Friendship Centre Moosonee Northern Store Moosonee Ontario Northland Railway Moosonee Polar Bear Lodge Moosonee Tasha’s Variety Moosonee Tempo Variety Moosonee Two Bay Enterprises Muskrat Dam Lisa Beardy Muskrat Dam Muskrat Dam Community Store Musselwhite Mine Naicatchewenin First Nation Band Office Naotikamegwanning First Nation Band Office Nestor Falls C & C Motel Nestor Falls Onegaming Gas & Convenience Nicikousemenecaning First Nation Band Office North Spirit Lake Band Office North Spirit Lake Cameron Store Northwest Angle #33 Band Office Northwest Angle #37 Band Office Ochiichagwe’Babigo’ Ining First Nation Band Office Ogoki Trappers Store Ojibways of Pic River Nation Band Office Osnaburgh Band Office Osnaburgh Laureen’s Grocery & Gas

Pawitik Pawitik Store Pays Plat First Nation Band Office Peawanuck General Store Pickle Lake Frontier Foods Pickle Lake Winston Motor Hotel Pikangikum Band Office Band Office Pikangikum Education Authority Pikangikum Northern Store Poplar Hill Northern Store Poplar Hill Poplar Hill Band Office Rainy River First Nation Band Office Red Lake Couchenour Airport Red Lake Indian Friendship Centre Red Lake Regional Heritage Centre Red Lake Video Plus Red Rock First Nation Band Office Rocky Bay First Nation Lar’s Place Sachigo Lake Brian Barkman Sachigo Lake Sachigo Co-op Store Sandy Lake A-Dow-Gamick Sandy Lake David B. Fiddler, Band Office Sandy Lake Northern Store Sandy Lake Education Authority Sandy Lake Special Education Class Saugeen First Nation Sault Ste. Marie Indian Friendship Centre 122 East St. Savant Lake Ennis Grocery Store Seine River First Nation Band Office Shoal Lake #40 First Nation Band Office Sioux Narrows Anishinaabeg of Kabapikotawang Slate Falls Band Office Stanjikoming First Nation Band Office Stratton Kay-nah-chi-wah-nung Historica Summer Beaver Nibinamik Community Store Taykwa Tagamou Nation, New Post First Nation Band Office Timmins Air Creebec Timmins Timmins Indian Friendship Centre 316 Spruce St. S. Timmins Wawatay N.C.S 135 Pine St. S. Wabaskang First Nation Band Office Wabigoon First Nation Community Store Wabigoon Green Achers of Wabigoon 10695 Hwy 17 Wahgoshing First Nation Wapekeka Wapekeka Community Store Washaganish Band Office Wauzhusk Onigum First Nation Band Office Wawakapewin Band Office Weagamow Lake Northern Store Weagamow Lake Onatamakay Community Store Webequie Northern Store Whitedog Kent Store Whitesand First Nation Band Office Wunnimun Lake General Store Wunnimun Lake Ken-Na-Wach Radio Wunnimun Lake Northern Store

Wawatay News Sub Office 2nd floor Royal Bank Building, Suite 202 Victoriaville Centre, 620 Victoria Ave. East Wequedong Lodge Lodge 1. 228 S. Archibald St. Lodge 2. 189 N. Court St. Lodge 3. 750 MacDonnell St. Fort William First Nation: Bannon’s Gas Bar / R.R #4 City Rd. Fort William First Nation / Band Office K & A Variety THP Variety and Gas Bar/606 City Rd. Hulls Family Bookstore 127 Brodie Street South Quality Market 146 Cenntennial Square

Quality Market 1020 Dawson Rd. Mark Sault 409 George St. Metis Nation of Ontario 226 S. May St. John Howard Society Of Thunder Bay & District/132 N. Archibald St. The UPS Store/1020 Dawson Rd. Redwood Park /2609 Redwood Ave. Confederation College: 510 Victoria Ave. East 778 Grand Point Rd. 1500 S James St. 111 Frederica St.

Mascotto Marine Meno-ya-win Health Centre, Activity Centre Nishnawbe-Gamik Friendship Centre Northern Store Pelican Falls First Nation High School Rexall Drug Stores Queen Elizabeth D.H.S. Darren Lentz Queen Elizabeth D.H.S. Native Studies Robin’s Donuts Shibogama Tribal Council 81 King St. Sioux Lookout Meno-Ya-Win Health Centre, Nursing Flr. Sioux Lookout Public Library Sioux Lotto Sioux Pharmacy

Sioux Travel Slate Falls Airways Sunset Inn Sunset Suites Travel Information Centre Wasaya Airways Wellington Inn William A. Bill George Extended Care Unit 75 - 5th Ave N Wilson’s Business Solutions Windigo Tribal Council Sacred Heart School Sioux Mountain Public School

5IVOEFS#BZ0VUMFUT An Eagles Cry Ministry 100 Simpson St. Central News 626 Waterloo St. - ON SALE Dennis F. Cromarty High School 315 N. Edward St. Ka-Na-Chi-Hih Treatment Centre 1700 Dease Street Lakehead University Aboriginal Awareness Centre / 955 Oliver Road, Room SC0019 Native People of Thunder Bay Development Corp. / 230 Van Norman St. Negahneewin College of Indigenous Studies C 106. 1450 Nakina Drive Thunder Bay Indian Friendship Centre 401 N. Cumberland St.

4JPVY-PPLPVU0VUMFUT Sioux Lookout Airport Interpreter’s Desk Al’s Sports Excellence Best Western Chicken Chef D.J’s Gas Bar Drayton Cash & Carry Fifth Avenue Club First Step Women’s Shelter Forest Inn Fred & Dee’s IFNA 98 King St. Johnny’s Food Market L.A. Meats Linda DeRose Lamplighter Motel

If you run a business and would like to distribute Wawatay News, Please call 1-800-243-9059 and ask for Meghan.


16

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

Nitawin Community Development Corporation W9)& )A(A[&

P. O. Box 308, Sioux Lookout, Ontario P8T 1A5 Phone (807) 737-4574 Fax (807) 737-2076 Toll Free: 1-866-261-1101 Website: www.nitawin.ca

Employment Opportunity: Housing Manager Since 1986, Nitawin Community Development Corporation has been providing low to moderate rental housing to First Nation families and elders. Nitawin is governed by a Board of Directors that represents nine First Nation organizations operating in Sioux Lookout. Nitawin manages and maintains thirty-five houses and two 5-plexes for a total of forty-five housing units. We are presently recruiting for a Housing Manager. Responsibilities â&#x20AC;˘ Implement the policies and directives of the Board of Directors; â&#x20AC;˘ Effectively liaison with the Board of Directors, tenants, local First Nation organizations and funding agency; â&#x20AC;˘ Develop annual operational budget and complete financial reporting requirements; â&#x20AC;˘ Review tenant applications and provide tenant selection recommendations to the Board of Directors; â&#x20AC;˘ Monitor the preventative maintenance projects for the residential housing units; â&#x20AC;˘ Supervise staff and complete performance appraisals; Qualifications â&#x20AC;˘ Five years management or administration experience; â&#x20AC;˘ Knowledge of applicable Landlord and Tenant Act and legislation; â&#x20AC;˘ Effective management and communication skills; â&#x20AC;˘ An understanding of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles and Audit Standards; â&#x20AC;˘ Good organizational skills; â&#x20AC;˘ Ability to submit a cleared Criminal Reference Check; â&#x20AC;˘ Ability to speak a First Nation language (preference); If you feel your skills and qualifications meet the above requirements, please send your resume to: Cathy Kiepek, Board Secretary/Treasurer c/o PO Box 387, Sioux Lookout ON P8T 1A5 Phone: 807-737-2662 extension 2254 Fax: 807-737-4823 Email: cathyk@shibogama.on.ca The submission deadline for receiving applications will be Thursday, 2011 March 31 at 3 pm. We thank all applicants for their interest; however only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

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FIVE NATIONS ENERGY INC. Job Posting - Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

In Memorium

Five Nations Energy Inc. (FNEI) is seeking to hire a CEO, which will be located in Timmins. The CEO must relocate to Timmins if hired or when hired. The CEO will be responsible for the overall supervision, management and control, of the business and affairs of FNEI under the general direction of the Board of Directors. The CEO will be accountable for all on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;day to dayâ&#x20AC;? decisions regarding the Corporationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial, human resources, regulatory, resourcing, safety and environmental, obligations. The CEO will also be responsible for the establishment and achievement of current and longterm objectives of the FNEI organization including developing and implementing the strategic goals and objectives of the organization. With the President, will enable the Board to fulfill its governance function, and to provide direction and leadership toward the achievement of the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s philosophy, mission, strategy, and its annual goals and objectives. The CEO will oversee company operations to ensure internal efficiencies, outstanding quality of service to FNEIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s customers, and cost-effective management of resources. QUALIFICATIONS â&#x20AC;˘ The candidate must have grade 12/Post-Secondary education in Business Administration OR a minimum of 10 years of supervisory/managerial in progressively more responsible positions including a demonstrated ability to achieve goals and objectives and manage key customer/constituent relationships. â&#x20AC;˘ A clear demonstrated understanding of Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electricity sector including knowledge of the issues facing electricity transmission companies in Ontario. â&#x20AC;˘ Knowledge of the economic, social and political environment of the Western James Bay Region and/or experience with First Nations and/or knowledge of remote community realities. â&#x20AC;˘ Knowledge of financial management, business finance, contracts and partnership, including a history of for organization profit and loss. â&#x20AC;˘ Knowledge of public relations principle and practices, communication and public relation techniques, human resources principles, personnel policies & risk management. â&#x20AC;˘ The candidate must have proficient verbal and written English Communication skills. â&#x20AC;˘ Fluency in Cree language is an asset. â&#x20AC;˘ The candidate must be familiar with the Northern Communities and Cultural and lifestyle of Native People. â&#x20AC;˘ He/she must be willing to work and maintain positive working relationship with the leaders and people of the communities. If you are interested in this position, further information on FNEI can be found at www.fivenations.ca or by contacting FNEIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office at (705) 268-0056.

Sarah Melvin (April 1, 1952- March 25, 2001) It does not seem as if 10 years has passed. We miss your love, your smile, and most of all, your laughter. You were a mother, daughter, sister, wife, caregiver, healer and teacher. May you continue to soar with eagles. You are in our thoughts and in our hearts often. Also our daughters and sisters, Melba (September 18, 1968November 6, 1998) and Brenda (September 19, 1969 - May 26, 2005). Remembered always by Paul & Craig.

Closing Date: April 15, 2011 at 4:30 pm Eastern Time. Please forward your application/resume with a current CPIC, and you must submit at least three references to the attention of Mr. James A Wesley, Vice-President, Five Nations Energy Inc. You may send your application by any of the following modes: By Mail: By Fax: By E-Mail:

Five Nation Energy Inc., 70-C Mountjoy St. North., Suite 421, Timmins, Ontario P4N 4V7 (705) 268 0071 adminassistant@fivenations.ca

Place your classified ad here 1-800-243-9059

SIOUX LOOKOUT FIRST NATIONS HEALTH AUTHORITY Nodin Child & Family Intervention Services (NCFI) MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELLOR Internal/External Posting Permanent Full Time LOCATION: NESKANTAGA FIRST NATION

This full time position reports to the Clinical Supervisor. The Mental Health Counsellor will be responsible for providing direct Clinical Intervention and Prevention Services to referred clients in the Child and Family Intervention catchment area of Neskantaga. QUALIFICATIONS â&#x20AC;˘ Degree in Social Work/Psychology with relevant clinical/ counselling experience is preferred; â&#x20AC;˘ Minimum two years experience in the health services environment; â&#x20AC;˘ Specialized courses in specific areas of mental health; â&#x20AC;˘ Experience with video counselling technology an asset; â&#x20AC;˘ Travel is a requirement of the position. KNOWLEDGE & ABILITY â&#x20AC;˘ Ability to communicate in one of the First Nations dialects of the Sioux Lookout Zone is an asset; â&#x20AC;˘ Ability to manage a case load independently; â&#x20AC;˘ Familiarity with working in acute care situations; â&#x20AC;˘ Knowledge of community resources; â&#x20AC;˘ Knowledge of Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2007. Experience with a Client Database (e.g. CIMS), Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) & Brief Child and Family Phone Interview (BCFPI) an asset; â&#x20AC;˘ Excellent time management and organizational skills, as well as the ability to work independently; â&#x20AC;˘ Experience working with youth, a definite asset; â&#x20AC;˘ Education assistance and training available dependent upon applicantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s qualifications and in accordance with SLFNHA Policies and Procedures. Please send cover letter, resume, three most recent employment references and an up-to-date Criminal Reference Check with a Search of the Pardoned Sexual Offender Registry to: Charlene Samuel, Human Resources Manager Human Resource Department Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority P.O. Box 1300, 61 Queen Street Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1B8 Phone: (807) 737-1802 Fax: (807) 737-2969 Email: Human.Resources@slfnha.com Closing Date: March 25, 2011 The Health Authority wishes to thank all applicants in advance. However, only those granted an interview will be contacted. For additional information regarding the Health Authority, please visit our Web-site at www.slfnha.com

SALES REPRESENTATIVE Sioux Lookout Bureau Job Opportunity SUMMARY: Wawatay Native Communications Society serves the communications needs of the people and communities in Northern Ontario. The Society does this through the provision of a variety of multimedia services, including but not limited to: a biweekly newspaper, daily native language radio programs, weekly television programming, audio streaming and regularly updated website. These services help to preserve and enhance the languages and culture of the Aboriginal people in Northern Ontario. ACCOUNTABILITY: The Sales Representative is accountable to the Sales Administrator. RESPONSIBILITIES: â&#x20AC;˘ Sell advertising for Wawatay Media Services and special projects. Make regular sales calls to existing clients and actively search out new business by telephone and in person. Solicit and book ad agency sales; â&#x20AC;˘ Assist with the planning of annual sales and marketing strategies for Wawatay media services (print, radio, online, TV); â&#x20AC;˘ In consultation with the Sales Administrator, assist with the development and implementation of sales strategies that contribute to the profit and viability of Wawatay media services. â&#x20AC;˘ Work with Graphic Designer/Print Services to produce sales presentation kits. â&#x20AC;˘ Prepare ad sales contracts / insertion agreements. Proofread completed ads and obtain ad approval from clients. â&#x20AC;˘ Meet sales revenue and expense targets. â&#x20AC;˘ Assist with the development of new initiatives â&#x20AC;&#x201C; such as special Wawatay News sections, radio and online specials, and other special projects â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to help achieve budget targets. Write related funding and training proposals. â&#x20AC;˘ Make regular sales calls to existing clients and actively search out new business by telephone and in person. â&#x20AC;˘ Solicit and book ad agency sales. â&#x20AC;˘ Handle incoming sales calls.

â&#x20AC;˘ Produce run sheets and follow through with production in the absence of the Sales Administrator for newspaper, Sagatay & Seven. â&#x20AC;˘ Work with the Graphic Designer to draft ad layouts for presentation to clients. Arrange for or take photographs for advertisements as required. â&#x20AC;˘ Perform sales administration duties: maintain client files and provide complete sales billing information to the Sales Administrator. â&#x20AC;˘ Maintain daily log sheets detailing activities and submit on a weekly basis â&#x20AC;˘ Maintain a daily telephone log of incoming and outgoing calls. â&#x20AC;˘ Work with console operators and audio engineers to meet client/customer advertising and broadcasting bookings specifications. â&#x20AC;˘ Ensure commercials meet client needs and are approved for airing. â&#x20AC;˘ In co-operation with the WRNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Client Services Representative schedule sponsors, advertisements, live broadcasts to ensure that double-bookings do not occur. â&#x20AC;˘ Provide job price quotes for Wawatay media services. â&#x20AC;˘ Other related duties as required.

QUALIFICATIONS: â&#x20AC;˘ Education in business, administration or related fields and/ or previous experience in sales considered an asset. â&#x20AC;˘ Must have excellent verbal and written communications skills. â&#x20AC;˘ The ability to communicate in Ojibway, Oji-Cree or Cree considered an asset. â&#x20AC;˘ A high degree of initiative, motivation and the ability to observe strict confidentiality is essential.

â&#x20AC;˘ Excellent time management skills, including multi-tasking. â&#x20AC;˘ The candidate must be willing to work overtime and travel as required. â&#x20AC;˘ The candidate must provide a criminal records check. â&#x20AC;˘ A valid Ontario driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license and access to a vehicle is required.

Please forward your cover letter and resume to: Barney Turtle, Finance Manager Wawatay Native Communications Society 16-5th Avenue, Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1B7 Phone: 1-800-243-9059 or (807) 737-2951 Fax: (807)737-2263 Email: barneyt@wawatay.on.ca Closing date: April 22nd, 2011 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:00 PM CST


Obituary Paul Mckay Paul McKay was born in Sandy Lake, October 20, 1945, (age 65) died March 3, 2011, 2:27 PM at the Dryden Regional Health Centre from diabetes complications. He is survived by his wife Madeline (Rae) of 45 years, one daughter, Corrina McNickle (Jeff), and three sons, David McKay, Bruce McKay (Mary), Larry McKay (Rosa) from Dryden. Predeceased by one son, Derek, who died in the

Air Sandy crash. Ten grandchildren – Jeffery, Laz and Amanda McNickle, Alya Meekis, Corrina, Derek, Johnny, Samantha, Sarah and Christina McKay. One greatgrandson, Nathaniel McKay. He is survived by one sister, Ina Kakekamic (Silas), and three brothers, Eddie (late Clara), late Ennis (Bernie), and John (Geraldine). Paul was predeceased by his parents David and Susan (Kakegamic) McKay. Paul was an outdoorsman, building his own log homes, trapper and an artist. He was still painting a few weeks before his

hospital experience. He was a miner, worked at the Cochenour gold mines, he had a small business – Helping Hand Store in Keewaywin, assisting in different church groups in Red Lake and Keewaywin. Paul was involved in getting Keewaywin community band status. Paul and Madeline moved to Dryden in the mid 90’s. He and his close friend Steven Keeash were involved in sharing the gospel on Wawatay radio. Paul will be deeply missed by his family and many friends. He has gone to his eternal reward.

Looking to make a difference in your province? START HERE. Whatever your area of expertise, chances are we have the opportunity you seek to build a successful career and contribute to the health and wealth of your province.

RESEARCH ADVISORS t two temporary positions (up to 12 months) Bring your strong, analytical skills and expertise to the Negotiations and Reconciliation Division to conduct historical research and provide analytical support to the negotiation teams. In this role, you will conduct and oversee major research studies, analyse and evaluate land claim submissions, provide historical research advice to negotiation teams, and support the formulation of Ontario’s negotiating positions and strategies. Your ability to interpret and apply federal and provincial Aboriginal legislation, policies and program areas is supported by knowledge of the culture and history of Aboriginal peoples and a proven ability to apply historical research theories, principles, practices, methods and techniques to conduct research studies. Your verbal and written communication skills are complemented by the ability to synthesize historical, legal and policy research into concise written reports, analytical and evaluative skills to assess the historical merits of land claim submissions, and the interpersonal skills necessary to elicit the cooperation and participation of others. Able to plan and coordinate activities with internal/ external stakeholders, you have the ability to monitor the quality and timeliness of work performed by external researchers/other consultants, conduct historical research and provide litigation support.

www.debeerscanada.com Senior Maintenance Engineer Maintenance Department Closing Date: March 22, 2011 Posting #: 2011-024 Location: Victor Mine Rotation: 4 days in and 3 days out Reporting to the Maintenance Superintendent, this position will be responsible for establishing process, maintenance and engineering practices. The successful incumbent will ensure the safety, quality, efficiency and productivity of work sustained and contribute to the achievement of the company’s business objectives. Responsibilities include: x Manage and execute improvement projects by meeting project milestones (safety/cost/time/quality); x Supervise the technicians, technologists and engineers within the Process Plant Maintenance Engineering group; x Develop of accurate estimates and budgets, timelines with consistent monitoring, control and reporting on progress; x Maintain the document control and establish good engineering practices with regards to maintenance and projects; x Ensure compliance with all applicable legislative requirements and related company policy and procedures. Requirements: Post secondary education in Engineering and/or Project Management experience; x MS Office Suite applications- Microsoft Project is an asset; x Strong communications skills both verbal and written; x Five (5) years experience in a supervisory function; x Experience working in a cross cultural environment. x

Forward your resume in confidence to: Human Resources, Victor Mine Fax: 416-645-3902 Email: hr.victor@debeerscanada.com We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted. De Beers Canada is an equal opportunity employer. We are committed to protecting the privacy of your personal information. Information provided will be used for recruitment and employment purposes only.

www.debeerscanada.com

Please apply online, only, at www.ontario.ca/careers, quoting Job ID 34450, by March 25, 2011. Faxes are not being accepted at this time. If you need employment accommodation, please contact us at www.gojobs.gov.on.ca/ContactUs.aspx to provide your contact information. Recruitment Services staff will contact you within 48 hours. Only those applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.

The Ontario Public Service is an equal opportunity employer. Accommodation will be provided in accordance with the Ontario Human Rights Code.

ontario.ca/careers

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Wawatay News MARCH 17, 2011

Posting #: 2011-017 Rotation: 2 weeks in and 2 weeks out Location: Victor Mine

Mechanical Engineer Maintenance Department Closing date: March 22, 2011

As an integral member of the De Beers Canada, Victor team, you will be responsible to ensure the safe and proper installation, maintenance, and operation of all plant equipment, machinery and infrastructure to ensure departmental business objectives are met.

North East LHIN Health & Wellness for All Through an Innovative, Sustainable & Accountable System Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) are a key component of Ontario’s plan to make the health care system more patient-centred and responsive to local health care needs. LHINs respond to local population health needs by planning, coordinating, integrating and funding the delivery of health care. The North East Local Health Integration Network (NE LHIN) is one of 14 LHINs in Ontario and the second largest in the province, covering an area of 400,000 square kilometres. It is responsible for funding more than 200 health service providers, including community health centres, community mental health and addiction services, community support services, hospitals, long-term care homes, and the North East Community Care Access Centre.

Consultant – Aboriginal, First Nation and Métis Focused on high-quality health care and improved client outcomes for Aboriginal, First Nations and Métis populations, you will implement new strategies as you work to improve efficiencies. An exceptional communicator, you will engage with urban and rural Aboriginal, First Nation and Métis health service providers, organizations and communities within the North East LHIN catchment area. Your university-level education or equivalent in health administration, health planning, social services, native studies, or multicultural/diversity studies is teamed with an in-depth understanding of Aboriginal, First Nation and Métis culture, communities, and health resources. As well, your strong interpersonal and relationship management skills are supported by excellent written and oral communication skills. Fluency in an Aboriginal language (Cree, Anishinawbe, Oji-Cree) is a definite asset.

For further information on the NE LHIN, please visit www.nelhin.on.ca. Applicants interested in this position may e-mail or fax their resumes by March 28, 2011 to Ryan Jeffers, at Ryan.Jeffers@lhins.on.ca or by fax to 705-840-0142. We thank all applicants; however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Responsibilities include: x Develop appropriate engineering maintenance and project systems; x Review and set standards for existing and new project and maintenance systems; x Monitor and evaluate equipment performance; x Ensure all safety, health and environment and legal standards are met and maintained; x Review and approve engineered designs prepared by internal technicians or contracted engineering services. Requirements: x Engineering Degree or Engineering Diploma (Mechanical) with PEO professional licensed (or eligibility); x Maintenance experience an asset; x Design experience in low pressure piping, material conveying and various crushing processes is an asset; x Project management experience; x Strong communications skills, both, written and verbal; x Experience in cross-cultural (aboriginal) work environment is an asset.

Forward your resume in confidence to: Human Resources, Victor Mine Fax: 416-645-3902 Email: hr.victor@debeerscanada.com Indicate in the subject line: Mechanical Engineer 2011-017 We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted. De Beers Canada is an equal opportunity employer. We are committed to protecting the privacy of your personal information. Information provided will be used for recruitment and employment purposes only.

WWW.WAWATAYNEWS.CA/JOBS


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Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

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SPORTS A’bout’ time for wrestling James Thom Wawatay News

Having won one of three matches at the provincial high school wrestling championships, Keewaywin band member Jeremy Kakegamic knows what it will take to earn more success next year. Kakegamic, a Northwestern Ontario Superior Secondary Schools Athletic Association unlimited weight class representative, was ranked 31 out of 32 wrestlers at the provincial high school championships in Sudbury March 3-4. “It was a great experience to be there,” Kakegamic,18, said. “I learned a lot about wrestling technique. There are a lot of better wrestlers than me out there.” The tournament allowed Kakegamic, a senior at Hammarskjold High School in Thunder Bay, to recognize his technique needs to improve. “I tend to try and outmuscle people,” Kakegamic, who is 6’3”

and 295 pounds. “I can see now I need to train more and learn more technique and control.” To that end, Kakegamic is aiming to be a contender when the provincials are held next March. “I will train more,” he said. “I will learn more moves and be better technically.” One of the obstacles he had to overcome in even qualifying for the Sudbury meet was finding opponents his size to train against. “Usually I train against smaller opponents at school,” he said. But Kakegamic is interested in re-entering the Lakehead University wrestling school as part of his effort to improve. At the provincial champion-

ship, Kakegamic fell to the second ranked wrestler in his first match, defeated the 24th ranked fighter second and fell to the 14th ranked grappler in his final bout. He had a 7-3 record heading into the tournament, falling three times in local competition in Thunder Bay to the same wrestler, who also competed in Sudbury.

Russ Thom/Special to Wawatay News

Keewaywin band member Jeremy Kakegamic competed in the unlimited weight class at the high school provincial wrestling championship in Sudbury. Kakegamic won one of three matches, calling it a learning experience.

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Wawatay News MARCH 17, 2011

19

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Little NHL Russ Thom/Special to Wawatay News

Moose Factory novice goalie Ty Tyer relaxes during a break in action at this year’s Little NHL. The tournament began March 14 with finals taking place at the Sudbury Arena March 17. Look for complete coverage in the March 31 edition of Wawatay News.

INSPECTION

INSPECTION

Public Notice Approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule Pic River Ojibway Forest

Public Notice Approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule Caribou Forest

Public Inspection of Annual Work Schedule

Public Inspection of Annual Work Schedule

The Nipigon District of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) and GreenForest Management Inc., on behalf of Great West Timber Ltd., would like to advise you of the approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule (AWS) for the Pic River Ojibway Forest. The MNR has reviewed the AWS to ensure that activities are consistent with the currently approved Forest Management Plan (FMP). It should be noted that the 2006–2026 FMP has recently been extended for one year to provide an opportunity to further complete operations.

The Sioux Lookout District of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has reviewed and approved the AbiBow Canada Inc. April 1, 2011–March 31, 2012 Annual Work Schedule (AWS) for the Caribou Forest.

Availability The AWS will be available for public inspection at the GreenForest Management Inc. office during the hours listed below and the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning March 16, 2011 and throughout the one-year duration of the AWS. The Ontario Government Information Centre on 5 Wadsworth Drive in Nipigon, will provide access to the internet if required. Scheduled Forest Management Operations The AWS describes forest management activities such as harvesting, tree planting, tending, forestry aggregate pits, and road/water crossing construction and maintenance that are scheduled to occur on the Pic River Ojibway Forest between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012. Tree Planting and Fuelwood GreenForest Management Inc. is responsible for tree planting on the Pic River Ojibway Forest. Please contact Green Forest Management Inc. for information regarding tree planting job opportunities. For information on the locations and licence requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact the Nipigon District Office. For commercial fuelwood opportunities, please contact GreenForest Management Inc. More Information The approved AWS and any subsequent revisions will remain available for public inspection throughout the one-year duration of the AWS. For more information on the AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Raymond Weldon, RPF Management Forester Ministry of Natural Resources Nipigon District Office 5 Wadsworth Drive Nipigon, ON P0T 2J0 tel: 807-887-5058 fax: 807-887-2993 office hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Jeffrey Cameron, RPF Planning Forester GreenForest Management Inc. P.O. Box 22004 470 Hodder Avenue Thunder Bay, ON P7A 8A8 tel: 807-343-6418 fax: 807-343-6424 office hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Renseignements en Français : Nipigon au 807-887-5000

Availability The AWS will be available for public inspection at the AbiBow Canada Inc. Sioux Lookout office, MNR’s Sioux Lookout District Office, and the MNR public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning March 16, 2011 and throughout the one-year duration.The Ontario Government Information Centre at 62 Queen Street, Sioux Lookout provides access to the internet. Scheduled Forest Management Operations The AWS describes forest management activities such as road construction, maintenance and decommissioning, forestry aggregate pits, harvesting, site preparation, tree planting and tending that are scheduled to occur during the year. Tree Planting and Fuelwood AbiBow Canada Inc. is responsible for tree planting on the Caribou Forest. Please contact John Lawson at 807-475-2440 for information regarding tree planting job opportunities. For information on the locations and licence requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact the MNR’s Sioux Lookout District Office at 807-737-5038. For commercial fuelwood opportunities, please contact AbiBow Canada Inc. at 807737-7280. More Information For more information on the AWS or to arrange an appointment with MNR staff to discuss the AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Tara Pettit, RPF Area Forester Ministry of Natural Resources Sioux Lookout District Office 49 Prince Street, P.O. Box 309 Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1A6 tel: 807-737-5040 fax: 807-737-1813 Please call for an appointment.

John Bastone, RPF Operations Coordinator AbiBow Canada Inc. 34C Front Street, P.O. Box 568 Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1A8 tel: 807-737-7280 fax: 807-737-7281 Please call for an appointment.


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This Offer is subject to vehicle, accessory, and factory installed option availability. Dealer may sell for less. Only one (1) Offer may be applied toward the purchase or lease of each Eligible Vehicle. This Offer can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford of Canada at the time of factory order or delivery, but not both. This Offer is not combinable with CPA, GPC, Daily Rental Allowances or the Commercial Fleet Incentive Program (CFIP). Limited time offer. Offer may be cancelled at any time without notice. Some conditions apply. Offer available to residents of Canada only. See Dealer for details. ††Lease a new 2011 Ford Fiesta SE 5 Door Manual and get 3.99% APR for 48 months on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest APR payment. 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Offers include freight, air tax, PPSA, Stewardship Ontario Environmental Fee and $500 Ford Custom Car Event Incentive but exclude administration and registration fees of up to $799, fuel fill charge of up to $120 and all applicable taxes. *Receive 0% APR purchase financing on new 2011 Ford [Fiesta (excluding S) / Edge (excluding SE)]/[Flex (excluding SE)]/ [Escape (excluding I4 Manual)] models for a maximum of [36]/[60]/[72] months to qualified retail customers, on approved credit (OAC) from Ford Credit. Not all buyers will qualify for the lowest interest rate. Example: $30,000 purchase financed at 0% APR for [36] / [60] / [72] months, monthly payment is [$833.33] / [$500] / [$416.67], cost of borrowing is $0 or APR of 0% and total to be repaid is $30,000.Down payment on purchase financing offers may be required based on approved credit from Ford Credit. 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To qualify for a Ford Recycle Your Ride Program (“RYR”) rebate (“Rebate(s)”), customer must qualify for and take part in either the “Retire Your Ride Program” delivered by Summerhill Impact with financial support from the Government of Canada, or Summerhill Impact’s “Car Heaven Program”. To qualify for the “Retire Your Ride Program”, which offers $300 cash or rebate on the purchase of a 2004 or newer vehicle, customer must turn in a 1995 model year or older vehicle in running condition (able to start and move) which has been properly registered and insured for the last 6 months to an authorized recycler. To qualify for the “Car Heaven Program”, customer must turn in a 2003 model year or older vehicle in running condition which has been registered and insured for the last 6 months to an authorized recycler. If a customer qualifies for Car Heaven or Retire Your Ride, Ford of Canada (“Ford”) will provide an additional Rebate, with the purchase or lease of an eligible new 2010 F-150/2011 Ford or Lincoln vehicle (excluding all Fiesta, Ranger and Medium Truck models), in the amount of $1,000CDN [Focus (excluding 2011 S), Fusion (excluding 2011 S), Taurus (excluding 2011 SE), Mustang (excluding GT500, Boss 302, and 2011 Value Leader), Transit Connect (excluding EV), Escape (excluding 2011 XLT I4 Manual), Edge (excluding 2011 SE), Flex (excluding 2011 SE)] or $2,000CDN [Explorer (excluding 2011 Base models), Sport Trac, F-150 (excluding Raptor and 2011 Regular Cab XL 4X2), F-250 to F-550, E-Series, Expedition, MKZ, MKS, MKX, MKT, Navigator] (each an “Eligible Vehicle”). Taxes payable before Rebate amount is deducted. RYR Rebates are available to residents of Canada only excluding Northwest Territories, Yukon Territory, and Nunavut. Eligible Vehicle must be purchased, leased, or factory ordered during the Program Period to qualify for a Rebate. Rebates can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford at either the time of factory order or delivery, but not both. Rebates not available on any vehicle receiving CPA, GPC, Commercial Connection, Daily Rental Rebates, Commercial Upfit Program and Commercial Fleet Incentive Program (CFIP). Limited time offer, see dealer for details or call Ford Customer Relationship Centre at 1-800-565-3673. © 2011 Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited. All rights reserved. ‡‡Estimated fuel consumption ratings for the 2011 Ford Fiesta 1.6L I-4 Manual/Focus 2.0L -I4 5 speed manual/Fusion FWD 2.5L I-4 Manual. Fuel consumption ratings based on Transport Canada approved test methods. Actual fuel consumption may vary based on road conditions, vehicle loading and driving habits. Vehicle shown is Fusion Hybrid 2.5L-I4 CVT 4.6L/100km city and 5.4L/100km hwy. VBased on R.L. Polk Canada, Inc. vehicle registrations data, YTD December 2010. Class is intermediate sized cars.”

20 ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Chiefs take command

Joy Fox/Special to Wawatay News

The Sandy Lake Chiefs stomped the Wapaatawanga Oji Cree Tribe 6-3 in first day action of the 2011 First Nations Hockey Tournament. The annual tournament began March 14 at the Sioux Lookout Arena with finals wrapping up March 20. Look for full coverage in the March 31 edition of Wawatay News.

3/11/11 3:20 PM

Nothing fishy going on; just winning

He can’t drive yet but he owns a shiny new truck. A youth, Brett McKay, took top honours winning a 4x4 truck for his efforts in catching a 2.24 pound walleye at the annual Muskrat Dam ice fishing derby Feb. 12. Shaun Kakegamic was second with a 1.34 pound walleye and Charles Lawson placed third with the only other walleye, .53 pounds, of the derby. A 3.46 pound jackfish earned Phyllis Fiddler fourth place while Colleen Beardy was fifth with a 2.96 pound mariah. Other combatants in the top 10 were Lillian Duncan (1.56 pound mariah), Andrew Fox (1.28 pound jackfish), Charlie Beardy Sr. (1.28 pound jackfish), Danny Sanderson (1.26 pound mariah) and Maryanne Beardy (1.17 pound mariah). Sachigo Lake held its 8th annual ice fishing derby the following weekend, Feb. 19. Winners hailed from around the region. Sachigo Lake’s Tim Kaminawash placed first and won a 2011 GMC Sierra Crewcab 4x4. Sachigo Lake’s Steven Tait was second and took home a Polaris Ranger UTV 500. Frank Angeconeb, from Bearskin Lake, was third and won a 14 foot boat and motor package. Danielle Nothing, from Sioux Lookout, and Tommy Anderson, from Cat Lake, tied for fifth and won a livingroom suite and bedroom suite respectively. Sachigo Lake’s Mark Ostaffy was sixth, winning, then donating a kitchen suite to the Grade 8 class at the community’s school. Sioux Lookout’s Tony Hewlett won a 60-inch flat screen TV and home theatre system for finishing seventh. When Kingfsher Lake held its fishing ice fishing derby, Gordon Mckoop was the big winner. Mckoop and three others, each earned 2011 ATVs for their top-ranked finishes. Luke McKay, Maria Begg and Matthew Sainnawap were the other top winners. Crystal McKay won a sled in fifth place while Japeth Winter won a 47 inch LCD TV in sixth position. Bill Morris won an acoustic guitar for placing seventh. Rounding out the top 10 were John Mamakwa, Bellamie Bighead and Bradley McKay. - JT


SECTION B

March 17, 2011 Northern Ontario’s First Nation Voice since 1974

Battling the stigma of HIV Marianne Jones Special to Wawatay News

In 1992, Rene Boucher was a young business student with a dream of becoming a chartered accountant. He was also the proud father of a three-year-old son. He was excited about being a new father and ambitious about his future. Then he was diagnosed with HIV and his world turned upside down. “It was really devastating to find out. I had to start looking at life through a whole new lens. I thought I was dying.” With no support or counselling from the medical community and afraid to tell his family, he began to abuse alcohol for the first time in his life. “A young man I met at that time changed my path to a path of healing. We met in a bar and talked and talked about life. That’s what made me decide to pursue a path of education awareness.” His new friend Jerry was dying of AIDS. He told Boucher that when he was diagnosed, he wanted to go home and die. However, when he got home, the community had a band council resolution drawn up to banish him from the community. “When that happened, his family turned his back on him. So he had no support whatsoever. “I was really taken aback when I heard that. My reaction was one of anger and feeling that I needed to take action on this. I literally wasn’t

thinking of myself at the time. By hearing this story I became determined that this wouldn’t happen to other people if I could do something about it.” Boucher began to educate himself about the disease and attend support group meetings. Shortly afterward, Boucher heard that his friend Jerry was in hospital and asking for him. Boucher brought his son to meet Jerry, for the first and last time. “One of the things Jerry said to me was, ‘You were brought into my life for a purpose. I see in you a warrior spirit and I want you to go out and make a difference. I want you to not let this happen to anyone else. This needs to be addressed. Our reserves and our people need to be educated about this disease so that others don’t have to die alone in hospitals without family.” Armed with a new purpose, Boucher entered a treatment program to deal with his drinking. It was there that a counsellor told him, “I don’t think you have a problem with alcohol. I think you’re just freaked out about this HIV thing. You need to stop thinking in terms of dying of AIDS and change it to living with HIV.” Unlike Jerry’s experience, Boucher’s family was supportive and he began to feel hopeful about the future. He decided to move back to Sioux Lookout, where he had grown up, and where some of his family still lived. “I knew I would face rejection and stigma.” See EMPOWERED page B4

ᑲᑫᐧᓇᑲᓂᑲᑌ ᑲᒪᒉᐣᑕᑯᐦᐃᐣᑕᐧ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᑲᐃᓇᐱᓀᐊᐧᐨ ᒣᓂᐊᐣ ᒍᐣᐢ ᑭᐸᑭᑎᓂᑲᑌ ᐊᐧᐊᐧᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐃᐧᓂᐠ

submitted photo

Rene Boucher has been living with HIV since 1992. Since then the Thunder Bay resident has worked to educate First Nations people about HIV and AIDS in order to break the stigma attached to the disease.

ᒣᑲᐧᐨ 1992 ᐁᐊᔭᑭᐊᐧᓂᐠ, ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᕑᐃᓀ ᐳᔐ ᑭᐅᐡᑲᑎᓯ ᐃᐁᐧ ᐊᐱ ᐁᑭᐱᒥᐃᐡᑯᓄᐨ ᐁᐃᐧᔭᓂ ᑲᑫᐧᑌᐱᓇᐠ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓂ ᑕᐱᐡᑯᐨ ᐃᒪ ᔓᓂᔭᐃᐧ ᓴᑲᑭᐱᐦᐃᑫᐃᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓂᐠ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᑲᔦ ᐅᑭᐊᔭᐊᐧᐣ ᐁᓂᐦᓱᔭᐃᐧᓀᓂᐨ ᐅᑯᓯᓭᓴᐣ. ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᑯ ᐅᑭᑭᒋᓀᐣᑕᐣ ᐁᐅᐡᑭ ᐅᑕᑕᒥᒪᐃᐧᐨ ᒥᓇ ᐅᑭᒋᑫᐣᑕᐣ ᐁᐧᑎ ᓂᑲᐣ ᐅᐱᒪᑎᓯᐃᐧᓂᐠ. ᓇᑫ ᐊᐱ ᑭᒥᑲᒪᐊᐧᑲᓄ ᐁᑭᑭᐡᑲᑯᐨ ᑭᒋᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᓂ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᑲᐃᒋᑲᑌᓂᐠ ᐁᑲᐧ ᐊᐱᐣ ᑲᑭᓇᑭᐡᑲᐠ ᐊᓂᒥᓭᐃᐧᐣ. ᒥᑐᓂ ᓂᐣᑭᐊᓂᒥᐦᐃᑯᐣ ᐊᐱ ᑲᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᑯᔭᐣ. ᐸᑲᐣ ᐊᐱᐣ ᐣᑭᐃᔑᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᐣᑕᐣ ᓂᐱᒪᑎᓯᐃᐧᐣ. ᒥᐱᑯ ᐊᐱᐣ ᐁᐃᐡᑲᐧᐱᒪᑎᓯᔭᐣ ᐣᑭᐃᓀᐣᑕᐣ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᑫᑯᐣ ᐊᓱᐡᑲᑯᐃᐧᐣ ᓇᐣᑕ ᒪᒥᓄᒥᑯᐃᐧᐣ ᐃᒪ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᑯᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᒋᑭᐅᒋᐅᐣᑎᓇᐠ ᒥᓇ ᑭᑯᑕᒋ ᒋᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᐊᐧᑯᒪᑲᓇᐣ, ᒥᑕᐡ ᐊᐱᐣ ᐁᑫᐧᓇᐠ ᑲᑭᔭᓂ ᒪᐦᒋᒥᓂᑫᐧᐨ. ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᐃᐁᐧ ᐊᐱ ᐣᑭᒥᑲᐊᐧ ᐅᐡᑭᓂᑭ ᐁᑭᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᔑᐨ ᒋᑫᐧᑭᓭᐦᐃᑎᓱᔭᐣ ᑫᔭᓂᔑᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᑎᓱᔭᐣ.

ᓯᑭᓂᑫᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐠ ᓂᐢᑕᑦ ᐣᑭᐃᔑᐊᐧᐸᒪᐸᐣ ᐁᑲᐧ ᐣᑭᐊᔭᒥᐦᐃᑎᒥᐣ ᐁᑭᔭᓂᒧᑕᒪᐠ ᐱᒪᑎᓯᐃᐧᐣ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᐃᒪ ᑲᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᐅᓀᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᒋᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑫᔭᐣ ᑫᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᓂᓯᑕᐁᐧᐣᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᐣᑎᓯᓭᐃᐧᐣ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᐃᓂ ᐅᑐᐡᑭᐅᑐᑌᒪᐣ ᒉᕑᐃ ᐅᑭ ᑭᑭᐡᑲᑯᐣ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᑲᓂᓯᐁᐧᒪᑲᓂᐠ ᐃᓇᐱᓀᐃᐧᓂ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᐅᑭᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᐊᐧᐣ ᕑᐃᓀᐊᐧᐣ ᐊᓂᐣ ᐊᐱ ᑲᑭᒥᑲᒪᐊᐧᑲᓄᐨ ᐃᐁᐧᓂ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᓂ, ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᑭᐸᑯᓭᐣᑕᐠ ᒋᑭᐁᐧᐨ ᑲᐃᔑᑕᐨ ᒋᑕᔑᐃᐡᑲᐧᐱᒪᑎᓯᐨ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᑕᐡ ᐊᐱ ᐁᔭᓇᑭ ᑭᐁᐧᑯᐸᓀᐣ ᑲᐅᐣᒋᐨ, ᐃᒪ ᐅᑎᐡᑯᓂᑲᓂᐠ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑭᒪᐊᐧᐣᑐᐡᑲᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᑭᐅᓇᓯᓇᐦᐊᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᓂ ᐁᑭᓴᑭᒋᓂᔕᐊᐧᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᑲ ᒥᓇᐊᐧ ᒋᐱᑭᐁᐧᓂᐨ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᐃᐁᐧ ᑲᑭᑐᑕᐊᐧᑲᓄᐨ, ᐅᐊᐧᑯᒪᑲᓇᐣ ᑲᔦ ᐅᑭᐁᐧᐱᓂᑯᐣ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᑕᐡ ᑭᑭᓇᐊᐧᐨ ᑫᑯᐣ ᐊᓱᐡᑲᒪᑯᐃᐧᐣ ᒋᐅᒋᒥᓇᑲᓄᐨ. ᒥᑐᓂ ᐣᑭᑯᐡᑯᒥᐠ ᐅᐁᐧᓂ ᑲᑭᐃᓇᒋᒧᑕᐃᐧᔑᐨ. ᓇᐱᐨ ᑲᔦ ᐣᑭᔭᓄᒋᑭᔑᐊᐧᐢ ᒥᓇ ᐣᑭᐃᓀᐣᑕᐣ ᓇᐣᑕ ᒋᑲᑫᐧᑐᑕᒪᐣ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᐃᑯ ᓂᐣ ᐱᓇᒪ ᒋᐅᒋᒪᒥᑎᓀᓂᒥᑎᓱᔭᐣ ᐃᐁᐧ ᐊᐱ. ᐃᐁᐧ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᓄᐣᑕᐊᐧᐠ ᑲᑭᐃᓇᒋᒧᑕᐃᐧᔑᐨ ᐣᑭᐊᐃᑲᒣᐣᑕᐣ ᐁᑲ ᐃᐧᐣ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐠ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐅᐁᐧ ᒋᑭᑐᑕᐃᐧᐣᑕᐧᐸᐣ. ᐃᓇᐱᐣ ᐸᑭᑭᓂᑲᓂᐠ B11

Join fishing hosts Jerry Sawanas and Neil Michelin in...

on APTN (North)

Wawatay Kids TV

Shoomis’ Legends

Wednesday’s and Friday’s at 7:30 a.m.

Tuesday’s at 9:30 a.m.

Cry of the Loon: Fishing Adventures Monday’s at 2:00 p.m. & Saturday’s at 12:30 p.m.

All times central. Check local listings.


B2

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Design your own ad contest Prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place! EPIC WIN! Design your own ad around the topics of either: • • • • •

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All ads will be used throughout Wawatay Native Communication Society’s media outlets! Deadline: September 2011 Submit ads to: Chris Kornacki Misiwe Minoyawin Project Co-ordinator 807.344.3022 (office) 1.888.575.2349 (toll free) 807.344.3182 (fax) chrisk@wawatay.on.ca

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Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

B3

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Shebandowan Richard Wagamese ONE NATIVE LIFE

W

hen I was a younger man, my idea of Canada was different than it is now. In fact, as I grew the image of the country altered too, just as it has for generations of youth both First Nations and not. We have that in common. We mature and our sensibilities and what we learn to see become more focused and sharper. Or it doesn’t. As a small boy Canada was a muddle. I lived in a foster on Tenth St. North in the Rideout area of Kenora. There weren’t a lot of Ojibway kids in my school and I played with kids named Loranger, Zuleski, Waters, Campbell and Parks. I was left behind on family vacations, and shunted to the side at celebrations. Home had no real reference point for me and I thought Canada was where the white people lived. In the home I was adopted into at nine, Canada became a huge city on the skyline. It became endless, fast lines of automobiles. It became noise; of factories, manufacturing and construction at the same time that it became the hurry-scurry of people on sidewalks barely noticing each other or their varied colours. Home still had no real reference point and I thought Canada was where anybody other than the Indians lived. On the streets I drifted to at 16, Canada became a desperate venture into finding jobs, shelter and a sense of purpose. It became the place where labels were attached. Labels that I didn’t understand or felt that I deserved. I was a lazy, drunken, shiftless bum with unmotivated, unskilled, uneducated and untrained thrown in for good measure. I thought Canada was where the fortunate people lived. Then, when I hit the road as a hitch-hiker Canada became a stunning array of awe inspiring vistas, landscapes culled from the whimsy of an articulate God and the poignant heartache and yearning of peoples coaxed from their homelands to start again here. I identified greatly with that. In my late teens and early 20s I felt like an immigrant myself, searching for a new shore to start a better story. But there’s a place in north-

ern Ontario called Shebandowan. It’s a tiny little railroad town and in the mid-70s there wasn’t a lot going on. Just a small store that doubled as a post office, a hotel where the miners and the railroad workers drank and a few houses scattered about willy-nilly. The highway ran through it though I doubt if many travelers ever really saw it. Back then I was always on my way to somewhere else and I stopped to work in Shebandowan for a while. The CNR hired me out of Thunder Bay to be a line labourer responsible for leveling track, clearing switches and basically ensuring that trains could always make it through. I got to know the land pretty well because I’d take long walks for something to do when I wasn’t working. It was one of those places that’s really only a stopover. My only breaks came when we’d go to Thunder Bay every three weeks to load up on groceries. There I’d get my fill of movies and restaurant food, buy new books and music and then head back to work, set to earn enough money to get out of there. It was a funny little place. It had an Ojibway name but there weren’t any Ojibway around except for me. Sure, every weekend Indian kids would come in from Atikokan or Kaministiquia or Kakabeka Falls but they were there and gone again come Monday morning. I’d sit in the tavern and watch them interact with the miners and the other working men who filled the old hotel. The tavern was nothing more than a wooden bar, a dozen tables, a shuffleboard, a pool table and a big TV for the hockey games on Saturday nights. The miners would let the Ojibway kids win at pool so they could get them drunk and laugh. Every now and then a fight would break out and the place would be mayhem. For me it was difficult. I hadn’t really connected with my own people yet and to see this display of subtle racism over and over again made me feel strange and odd as though there were something I should do but I didn’t know what or how. It was the mid-70s and Canada was a different place. At 55, I’ve grown to be comfortable in my own skin and the pride I feel as an Ojibway man doesn’t allow me to condone racism whether it’s subtle or not. Shebandowan and the early years of my life taught me that were differences – age has taught me to celebrate them.

INSPECTION Approved 2011–2012 Contingency Plan and Approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule Kenogami Forest The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR), GreenForest Management Inc. (GFMI) and the Geraldton Area Natural Resources Advisory Committee (GANRAC) advises you that the 2011–2012 Contingency Plan (CP) for the Kenogami Forest has been approved by the MNR Regional Director. The associated April 1, 2011–March 31, 2012 Annual Work Schedule (AWS) for the Kenogami Forest has also been approved by the Nipigon District Office of the MNR. Both documents are now available for inspection. Availability The CP and AWS will be available for public inspection at the GFMI office during the hours listed below and on the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning March 16, 2011 and continuing throughout the period that they are in effect. Ontario Government Information Centres in the MNR Nipigon District and the Geraldton or Terrace Bay Area Offices provide access to the internet. Implementation of the CP and AWS will commence April 1, 2011. Why is a Contingency Plan Required? The preparation, submission, review and approval of the 2011– 2021 Forest Management Plan (FMP) will not be completed prior to the scheduled implementation date of April 1, 2011. As such, a one-year CP is required to ensure that forest operations can continue between April 1, 2011 and the approval date of the 2011–2021 FMP, anticipated in November 2011. Scheduled Forest Management Operations The AWS describes forest management activities such as harvesting, site preparation, tree planting and tending, road construction, maintenance and decommissioning that are scheduled to occur during the year. Tree Planting and Fuelwood GreenForest Management Inc. is responsible for tree planting on the Kenogami Forest. Please contact the GFMI Silviculture Forester for information regarding tree planting job opportunities. For information on the locations and licence requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact the Ministry of Natural Resources Geraldton Area Office. For commercial fuelwood opportunities, please contact Buchanan Woodland Inc.’s Longlac office. More Information For more information on the CP and AWS or to arrange an appointment with MNR staff to discuss the CP and AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Charlotte Bourdignon, RPF Area Forester Ministry of Natural Resources Geraldton Area Office P.O. Box 640, 208 Beamish Avenue West Geraldton, ON P0T 1M0 tel: 807-854-1826 fax: 807-854-0335 Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Deanna Hoffman, RPF Planning Forester GreenForest Management Inc. P.O. Box 188, Birchcrest Road Longlac, ON P0T 2A0 tel: 807-876-9554 fax: 807-876-9549 Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Steve Yeung, RPF Silviculture Forester (Aerial Herbicide) GreenForest Management Inc. P.O. Box 22004, 470 Hodder Avenue Thunder Bay, ON P7A 8A8 tel: 807-343-6407 fax: 807-343-6424 Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m

Steve Crawford Operations Forester Buchanan Woodlands Inc. P.O. Box 188, Birchcrest Road Longlac, ON P0T 2A0 tel: 807-876-9580 fax: 807-876-9549 Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

MNR is collecting your personal information under the authority of the Crown Forest Sustainability Act. Any personal information you provide (address, name, telephone, etc.) will be protected in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Your personal information may be used by the Ministry of Natural Resources to send you further information related to this forest management planning exercise. If you have questions about the use of your personal information, please contact Peggy Bluth at 807-854-1829. Renseignements en français : Doug Haldane au 807-854-1824

Booshoo 2 You! with Lewis Wesley Every Tuesday & Thursday at 3:00PM CST

On WRN 89.9 or Bell TV Channel 962

Check it out!


B4

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Aboriginal Artworks Group of Northern Ontario (AAGNO) Presents:

“SEQUIN”

The Aboriginal Fine Arts & Crafts Spring Gift Show & Sale “The largest gathering of Aboriginal Artisans of Northern Ontario” June 1st to June 4th at Victoriaville Center, Thunder Bay, Ontario Come one, come all, to see Authentic Aboriginal Fine Artworks of our Northern Ontario’s Aboriginal people’s creations. Great People, Great gift idea’s, Great prices, over 120 artisans participating

James Thom/Wawatay News

Lac Seul’s Gord Keesic was recently promoted to associate portfolio manager with RBC Global Asset Management making him one of four members of the Aboriginal Services Group.

Keesic climbs RBC ladder

ON SALE

Tamarack Birds Beadwork Original Native Paintings Wood Carvings Native Apparel Handmade Quilts Native Jewellery Home Ornaments/Decors Leather Works Birchbark Artwork

James Thom Wawatay News

Aboriginal Art workshops, demonstrations and Much, Much More!

TIMES

Wednesday, June 1 Thursday, June 2 Friday, June 3

10:00 a.m. – 5:30 P.M. 10:00 a.m. – 5:30 P.M. 10:00 a.m. – 5:30 P.M.

For more information please call John Ferris @ 939-7525 or email: jferus@hotmail.com Please Note: to all artisans, there will be a fee of $100.00 /4 days or $35.00 /1 day Artisans can double up to help share cost for table (limited to 2 artisans per table)

Wawatay TV will be webstreaming the Northern First Nations Hockey Tournament

wawataytv.ca Our broadcast schedule will be available on our website.

Sponsored by:

Sioux-Hudson Literacy Council

SPRINGHILL

LUMBER

Gord Keesic’s stock is rising. The Lac Seul band member was recently promoted to associate portfolio manager with RBC Global Asset Management; making him one of four members of the Aboriginal Services Group. “I’m now working with bigger clients,” Keesic said, speaking at his Fort William First Nation office. The Aboriginal Services Group deals predominately with trusts and land claim funds of First Nations with sums greater than five million dollars, he said. “We manage the settlement dollars on behalf of the entities,” Keesic said. Keesic became a member of the team Jan. 24 and officially began his new position March 9. Keesic said there are similarities between his former position – investment Advisor with RBC Dominion Securities – and his new role. “It is very much a client relationship role,” he said. “We talk to clients about their goals with

money … ask them what they want to accomplish and do risk analysis.” Keesic said one of the most important aspects of his position with Global Asset Management is communicating with his clients to ensure they understand risk versus reward. If a First Nation wants to invest in a higher risk project, it could earn a higher return on investment, he said. A safer investment would be government bonds with a guaranteed return. Something with more risk would be the stock market, he said. “But they need to make the decision that is right for them,” he said. “We look at the needs of the community. Based on that, we create an investment policy statement (which is used to manage the money).” What Keesic is most looking forward to is accessing more resources for his clients. “If a community wants to invest in global infrastructure, that is something I can help them with now,” Keesic said. That could be investing in toll roads like the 407 highway in southern Ontario or water puri-

fication in foreign countries. “Everything in the world is financed through something else,” Keesic said, explaining the premise of investment. By lending money into a project, the community would receive interest, dividends or equity. Keesic takes great pride in working with First Nations in the financial sector. Investing is something he has enjoyed for many years, even when he was a school teacher and investing his own funds in the stock market. “I did well on my own and had always been interested in investing,” Keesic said. “I became more interested in a career managing people’s money.” He began to take certification courses – necessary to become an accredited broker or investment advisor within Canada – through Canadian Securities Institute Global Education and answered an advertisement in the paper for RBC. “They offered me a job,” he said, conditionally on his completing the courses. He did so in 2005.

‘Empowered’ by sharing journey from page B1 But Boucher had decided not to let that be an obstacle for him. “It reinforced my belief in the need to educate people about the stigma surrounded HIV and AIDS.” Nonetheless, he says, “It was frustrating in Sioux Lookout trying to find support for the first six months. Some people really opened their arms to me. But some would see me and cross the street to avoid me.” As difficult as it was, Boucher continued to talk openly about his experiences. “By sharing my journey I felt I was being empowered.” It was while he was living in Sioux Lookout that Boucher attended the 1995 Opening Doors Counseling Conference in Thunder Bay for HIV/AIDS counselors. There he met an HIV/AIDS Educator for Nishnawbe Aski Nation. She asked Boucher if he would be willing to travel to northern communities and share his story. He jumped at the chance, seeing it as the fulfillment of his desire and his friend Jerry’s dream for him. Since that time he has visited 80 per cent of the First Nations communities in Ontario – “some three or four times” raising awareness about HIV prevention and emphasizing the need for empathy and understanding. “Often at my talks I ask the question, ‘Who in this room thinks that if a person has HIV,

everyone in the community should know about it?’ Usually every hand in the room goes up. Then I ask, ‘If it was a member of your family who had HIV/ AIDS, how many think that everyone in the community should know?’ Fewer hands are raised. Then I ask them, ‘If it was you who was diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, how many?” Nobody puts their hands up. That’s what we want people to think about: what if it was me?” During that period Boucher helped compile “In Our Own Words,” published by the Ontario First Nations HIV/AIDS Education Circle. The book is a collection of stories and poetry by Ontario First Nations people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS. Boucher hopes it will be the first of a series. In 2006 Boucher moved to Thunder Bay. After 10 years of travelling to raise awareness about HIV prevention, he says, “Since coming to Thunder Bay in the last five years my focus has evolved to providing support for my peers. When friends with HIV started dying I began to advocate for them. Now my work is more advocacy than education.” Part of that work included involvement with the AIDS Bereavement Project of Ontario, where long-term survivors of HIV/AIDS met to talk about dealing with their multiple losses. “We meet new people with HIV and lose them. Then we get anxiety about getting attached.

“I did a workshop with my peers in Thunder Bay five years ago and we made a quilt that we called Survive to Thrive. It sits in the AIDS committee boardroom in Thunder Bay.” At 44, Boucher has been living with HIV for 20 years and is full of energy and passion. He has had opportunities to work as an HIV advocate and educator at the national level, but prefers to do what he is doing. “My heart is with my people in northern Ontario. “There’s got to be a reason why all this is happening,” he says. He recalls a time when a woman told his mother that she had a vision of him standing in front of thousands of people sharing a powerful message from God. “People living with HIV would like people to have empathy. One of the challenges I see is that our First Nations people are not fully accepting of people with this disease. They’re still standoffish. If that was you or a member of your family, how would you like to be treated? “When I got cancer in 2000, I got so much help for me and so much help for my family. The contrast with HIV – I needed to see that. Between one and three Aboriginal people become infected with HIV every day in Canada. It’s not the end of the world. Every day I learn new lessons from it. “Empathy – that’s the lesson we’re being taught by this disease.”


Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

B5

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Thunder Bay community celebrates Aboriginal culture Rick Garrick Wawatay News

The culture and heritage of First Nations people was celebrated March 11 during the Spirit of Anishnabae Celebration at the CLE Coliseum in Thunder Bay. “It’s a living culture and a living heritage that people are seeing,” said Dave Simard, emcee for the Spirit of Anishnabae Celebration and a member of the Thunder Mountain Singers. “It’s something the kids can bring home – it’s something real for them rather than just being something in a book.” Organized by the Community Arts & Heritage Education Project (CAHEP) in partnership with the Thunder Bay Catholic District School Board and Thunder Bay Aboriginal Arts & Heritage Group, the Spirit of Anishnabae Celebration featured 15 dancers in full regalia and the award-winning Thunder Mountain Singers.

About 1,200 students from 15 Thunder Bay Catholic District School Board schools took part in the third annual event, which was split up into morning and afternoon sessions. Simard also shared some stories about the different styles of songs and dances presented during the event. “It’s a good way to start off the spring for many of the singers and dancers that are going on the powwow trail,” Simard said. Simard has seen a growing interest in First Nations culture since the first Spirit of Anishnabae Celebration was held. “The feedback that we’ve had has always been positive,” Simard said. “Many of the teachers at the end of this will be asking me a million questions about our culture, our heritage, our language, our songs and dances.” The students were divided into four groups, with each group of students chosen by

one of the different styles of dancers, including grass dancers, fancy shawl dancers, men’s traditional dancers and a hoop dancer, to dance with them after they had demonstrated their own style of dancing. “The kids love this event – it’s a chance to share cultures,” said Rita Zavagnin, a program manager with CAHEP. “A lot of the kids who are at schools who go to powwows with their families come with their own regalia. “It gives them a chance to share that with their fellow students.” CAHEP also delivers about 100 hands-on sessions with the schools over the school year. “Some are craft based where the students are making things like medicine pouches or rattles or drums,” said Pam Cain, CAHEP’s executive director. Students also learned Aboriginal legends and storytelling, regalia and song writing.

Roy Morris’ art-ona-canoe to be raffled Rick Garrick Wawatay News

Muskrat Dam’s Roy Morris has both the brush stroke and J-stroke down pat. Morris is painting images depicting the traditional uses of the canoe on a 12-foot canoe for the Thunder Bay Art Gallery Art on the Water raffle. In addition to the images of two water animals, the beaver and the muskrat, Morris has also painted an image of the loon on the canoe, which was donated by Thunder Bay-Superior North MP Bruce Hyer and Margaret Wanlin, operators of Wildwaters Kayaks & Canoes.

“Once they saw the loon come out, they would assemble all of their canoes, they would put their shooter at the bow, and they would paddle after it. The loon wouldn’t be able to fly because to take off it needs a good wind.” – Roy Morris

“The loon was hunted for two purposes,” Morris said. “One was for food and one was for entertainment – the two were mixed together.” Morris said people in his community used to gather on the shorelines in the evening when the lake had calmed down to watch for loons landing or swimming by. “Once they saw a loon come out, they would assemble all of their canoes, they would put their shooter at the bow, and they would paddle after it,” Morris said. “The loon wouldn’t be able to fly because to take off it needs a good wind, so the only way it could escape the paddlers was to dive.” Morris said the hunter at the bow of the lead canoe would quickly check which direction the loon had headed when div-

ing and would point all of the canoes in that direction. “When the loon came up he only poked his head (above the water) for a couple of seconds and it was during that time ... they would have a chance to shoot at it,” Morris said. “If they were a good marksman they were able to get it. That was the entertainment part of it – trying to get it.” Morris said the community would then cook the loon for a meal. “Nowadays we don’t do that anymore,” Morris said. “We haven’t done that for about 20-25 years because of the mercury pollution.” Morris said the image of the loon depicts it chasing fish, which is also one of the traditional uses for the canoe. “The loon eats the fish,” Morris said. “But at the same time, we use the canoe to set nets to catch fish. That was a traditional way of feeding the families.” Morris has also painted images of a man paddling a canoe, a moose and a sun on the canoe. “It provides light and heat,” Morris said of the sun. “They are essential for all life on the planet.” Morris used marine paints to paint the images so the canoe could be used for paddling on the water. “Marine paint is quite toxic: you need a well-vented place to work with it,” Morris said. “I am looking forward to seeing the finished project – what I have envisioned may not be what I see at the end.” Morris previously completed a similar project when he painted his own freighter canoe with some images while re-canvassing years ago when he was still living in Bearskin Lake. “If I won it, I would probably paddle it around for a little while,” Morris said. “But once you land, you’re going to be scraping on the rocks and the brush and paint scrapes off.” Tickets for the raffle will be sold beginning May 27 at the Thunder Bay Art Gallery’s Up the Creek Paddle Auction. Contact the gallery for tickets.

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Fancy shawl dancers demonstrate their dance style during the Spirit of Anishnabae Celebration held March 11 at the CLE Coliseum in Thunder Bay by the Community Arts & Heritage Education Project in partnership with the Thunder Bay Catholic District School Board and Thunder Bay Aboriginal Arts & Heritage Group.

Inspection PUBLIC NOTICE APPROVED 2011-2012 ANNUAL WORK SCHEDULE DRYDEN FOREST, ENGLISH RIVER FOREST, WABIGOON FOREST Public Inspection of Annual Work Schedule The Dryden District of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) has reviewed and approved the 2011-2012 annual work schedule (AWS) for the Management Units listed above. Availability The AWS will be available for public inspection at the respective Sustainable Forest Licence (SFL) holder offices and the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario. ca/forestplans beginning March 16th and throughout the one year duration. Service Ontario Centres at the Ministry’s Dryden District Office and the Ignace Area Office provide access to the Internet. Scheduled Forest Management Operations

516 105

Sioux Lookout

664

17

Dryden Forest

609 665 605

599 642

72 601

English River Forest

Dryden

594

811

17

Wabigoon Forest 502

71

622

Ignace

English River

17

The AWS describes forest management activities such as road construction, maintenance and decommissioning, forestry aggregate pits, harvest, site preparation, tree planting and tending that are scheduled to occur during the year. 71

Tree Planting and Fuelwood The SFL holders below are responsible for tree planting on the listed Forests. Please contact the SFL holder for information regarding tree planting job opportunities. For information on the locations of and license requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact the Ministry Offices below. For commercial fuelwood opportunities, please contact the respective SFL holder. More Information For more information on the AWS or to arrange an appointment with Ministry of Natural Resources staff to discuss the AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Ministry of Natural Resources Dryden District Office 479 Government Street, P.O. Box 730 DRYDEN, ON P8N 2Z4 Tel.: 807-223-3341 Fax: 807-223-2824

Ministry of Natural Resources Ignace Area Office Corner of Hwy. 17 & 599, P.O. Box 448 IGNACE, ON P0T 1T0 Tel.: 807-934-2233 Fax: 807-934-2304

For more information on each AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact (between 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.): Dryden Forest Don Armit Area Forester, MNR Tel.: 807-223-7526 E-mail: dj.armit@ontario.ca

English River Forest John Coady Area Forester, MNR Tel.: 807-934-2255 E-mail: john.coady@ontario.ca

Wabigoon Forest Derek Johnson Area Forester, MNR Tel.: 807-223-7556 E-mail: derek.johnson@ontario.ca

Jack Harrison Dryden Forest Management Co. 28A Earle Avenue DRYDEN, ON P8N 1X5 Tel.: 807-223-7216 Fax: 807-223-7229 E-mail: dfmc@shaw.ca

Dave Legg Planning Superintendent AbiBow Canada Inc. 427 Mowat Avenue FORT FRANCES, ON P9A 1Y8 Tel.: 807-274-5311, ext. 1215 Fax: 807-274-8202 E-mail: david.legg@abitibibowater.com

Gary Wearne Operations Forester Domtar Pulp & Paper Products Inc. Dryden Forest Lands Office within Dryden Mill Tel.: 807-223-9626 E-mail: Gary.wearne@domtar.com


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Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

ELDER Q&A

Bob Kabatay

Where were you born? “In Seine River, someplace close to here, on the trapline.” How many children and grandchildren? “Four sons, one daughter – maybe 100 grandchildren,. I don’t know, a lot.”

Age: 74

What jobs have you had? “Cutting pulp, guiding, working in the sawmill, river drive, commercial fisherman and trapper.”

Member of Seine River First Nation

What is the biggest change in the community? “I see a lot of alcohol and drugs now. There is more housing and at the time there was only log cabins. I used to see a lot of sweatlodge ceremonies, there was only one carrier at the time and now there are a lot of carriers.” What is the best advice you ever received? “My grandfather talked to me about the way of life, how to treat life and lots of do’s and don’ts.” What is your advice for the younger generation? “Stay away from alcohol and drugs. Get a job and provide for yourself and your family.”

Aanti ka-ishinitawikiyin? “Pesho omanake Seine River, niwani-ikewininank.” Aniin minik entashiwach kinichanisak shikwa kiyoshisak? “Niiwiwak niikwisisak, peshiko nintanis – niikotwachiwak kanapach nooshisak, Kaawin niikikentasin, patenoowak.” Aniin kapi-inanookiyin? “Ninki-shki-ka-aakwe, nikipimaa-oshiwe, tashkipoochikewinink ninki-anooki, ninkipima-otas, ninkipakita-owa shikwa ninkiwani-ike.” Wakonen mawach ka-aanchisek o-oma kitashikewinink? “Patenatinoon minikwewin shikwa mashkikinsan noonkom. Patenatinoon wakaikanan shikwa mitikowaka-ikanan eta ki-ayawan weshkach. Ninkiwapantanan ekipatenatinkin maatotiswanan, kipeshiko kakipimiwitoch shikwa noonkom patenoowak kapimiwitowach.” Aniin ka-ishi-ayakwamimikoyin? “Nimishoomis ninkiwawintamak ke-ishipimaatisiyan, ke-ishikanachitoyan pimaatisiwin shikwa kipatenatinoon kekoonan chitotansiwan shikwa kepiminisha-amaan.” Aniin ke-ishi-ayankwamisiwach ka-oshki-pimaatisiwach? “Kekoo pimentaken minikwewin shikwa mashkikinsan. Anookin chipami-itisoyin shikwa kanawenimikook kinichanisiwak.”

PAYUKOTAYNO CHILD CHILD AND AND FAMILY FAMILY SERVICES SERVICES PROUDLY PROUDLY ANNOUNCES ANNOUNCES PAYUKOTAYNO

Regional Child Welfare Conference ‘Empowering Families & Communities’ March 22 - 24, 2011 E.P.R. Building & Community Hall Moose Factory Keynote Speakers Cindy Blackstock Social Justice for Aboriginal Children Touchstones of Hope

Harry Snowboy Rites of Passage ~ Honouring our Children Youth Empowerment

Bill Constant Impacts of Colonialism

Workshops Promoting Positive Change Community Feast Evening Social Activities

Featuring “The Big Bear” Gerry Barrett, Lawrence Martin & Vern Cheechoo

For more information contact: Kathy Cheechoo @ 705-336-2229 kathy.cheechoo@gmail.com Hosted by Payukotayno James & Husdon Bay Family Services


Wawatay News

Where were you born? “In Seine River.” How many children and grandchildren? “Four kids, two girls, two boys and eight grandchildren.” What jobs have you had? “I worked in the tourist camp for 16 summers, brush-cutting, tree planting, trapping, pulp cutting, homemaker, mother and grandmother.”

B7

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

MARCH 17, 2011

Rita Potson Age: 68 Member of Seine River First Nation

What is the biggest change in the community? “Running water, electricity on the reserve, roads, telephones and cellphone, everything changed. Growing up we got water from the lake and had to handwash everything. We have everything now like the washer and dryer. There is no hard work anymore. I started working when I was seven or eight – gathering the wood and getting water. I would also get day-school during the day. My mother made our house; she was a pulp cutter. She used to get two cords a day with just a swede saw and an axe.” What is the best advice you ever received? “I was raised by Indian teachings – not supposed to steal, be kind to all living things – almost like the 10 commandments. That’s how I raised my kids and grandkids; the Indian way.”

Aanti ka-ishinitawikiyin? “Mi-oma Seine River.” Aniin minik entashiwach kinichanisak shikwa kiyoshisak? “niiwiwak nintapinoochishimak, niishiwak ekwesansak, niishiwak kwewisensak shikwa niishwachiwak niyoshisak.” Aniin kapi-inanookiyin? “mitaswa-shi-niikotwaso niipin ninki-anooki i-ima kwashkepichikewi-kamikoon, ninki-pashkoka-ike, mitikonsiwi-kitikewinink, ninki-wani-ike, ninkikishka-akwe, ninki-kanawentan niwaka-ikan, ninki-omamawi shikwa ninki-okoomimawi.” Wakonen mawach ka-aanchisek o-oma kitashikewinink? “0inapikesin nipi entayan, wasikan ayamakan o-oma ishkonikanink, mikanan, kikitowapikonsan, kakina kekoonan ki-aanchisewan. Weshkach kapi-onpikiyan nikinitananata-ipimin i-ima saka-ikanink shikwa kakina kekoon kimichikisipikinikatewan. Kakina kekoon kayanchise nookom kapimipitekin kisipikinikewinan shikwa kapimipitek chipatekin kisipikinikewinan. Kaawin awiya nita-anookisi nookom. ninshwaso kema nishwaso nikitasopiipoonwe kakimatanookiyan – nanatawiseyan shikwa ekinanata-ipiyan. Ekishikak nikikinwa-amako. Nimamanan oki-oshitoon niwakaikaninan, kinitakishka-akwe. Ninshominate minik okikishitonan peshikokishik ekimichi-apachitoch kamichiwepinikatekin kishkikipoochikan shikwa wakakwat.” Aniin ka-shi-ayakwamimikoyin? “ka-onpikiyan kipiminisha-ikate anishinaapewi-pimaatisiwin – chikimotisisiwan, chikitimakentamaan kakina kekoon kapimaatisimakakin – tapishkoka-ikitomakakin mitaso ayakwamisiwinan. Mi-i ka-ishikikinwa-amawakwa ninichanisak shikwa nooshisak; anishinaapewi-pimaatisiwin.”

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B8

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Wawatay Radio Network presents... Live play-by-play action of the

2011 Northern First Nations Hockey Tournament March 14 to 20

Support your favourite team or teams by sponsoring a game so we can bring the action to your home.

Listen Live!

WRN 89.9FM Sioux Lookout Bell ExpressVu Channel 962 Online streaming and updated scores at www.wawataynews.ca

WAWATAY Radio Network 89.9 FM

Sioux Lookout, Ontario

SPONSORSHIP FORM 2011 Northern First Nations Hockey Tournament The Northern First Nations Hockey Tournament is once again happening from March 14th to the 20th, 2011 in Sioux Lookout. Wawatay Radio Network will, once again, be broadcasting live play-by-play coverage of this Big Event. Only because of your generous sponsorships are we able to broadcast the Tournament. Please support your favorite team or teams from your area. WAWATAY Radio Network is pleased to hear of your potential sponsorships. In order to proceed will you please take a moment to fill out the form below and fax it to (807) 737-3224 or (807) 737-1403. Yes, I wish to sponsor live play-by-play action of the Northern First Nations Hockey Tournament for: ____________________________________________________ Game/Hour at $150.00 per team. For Community: _________________________________________________________________ Team Name: _________________________________________________________________ # of games: _________________________________________________________________ Name of Sponsor: _________________________________________________________________ Send the invoice to: _________________________________________________________________ (your address) _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Or payable to: Wawatay Radio Network (Sponsorships) Play by Play Hockey Live Coverage c/o Wawatay Native Communications Society P.O. Box 1180 Sioux Lookout, Ont. P8T 1B7 AUTHORIZED SIGNATURE: ____________________________________________________________ Purchase Order # (If applicable): ______________________________________________________

You can listen to the live play-by-play action on

89.9FM or across Canada on Bell TV channel 962 or online at www.wawataynews.ca, streaming it LIVE!


Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

B9

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Canadian Rangers key part of military exercise Peter Moon Special to Wawatay News

Sixteen Canadian Rangers from Constance Lake were an important part of a major military exercise to improve the ability of southern soldiers to operate in the North in the winter. The Rangers taught a range of winter survival skills to 115 soldiers from 32 Canadian Brigade Group, including members of the Grey and Simcoe Foresters. That group is part of the Canadian Forces Arctic Response Company Group, which is charged with responding to emergencies in the North. “They’ve taught everything from ice water rescue right down to ice fishing, food preparation, fire starting, improvised shelter building, snaring, and helping the soldiers stay out overnight in shelters the soldiers put together themselves,” said Master Warrant Officer Robert Patterson, Canadian Ranger sergeant major with 3rd Canadian Ranger Patrol Group. Rangers also accompanied the soldiers when they went

into the bush in two groups for the tactical phase of the weeklong exercise. “They went out to ensure the movement of the soldiers was safe,” Master Warrant Officer Patterson said. “They’ve done a fantastic job. This is the first time the Constance Lake patrol has ever hosted an exercise of this magnitiude and they’ve done an outstanding job under the leadership of their patrol leader, Sgt. Albert Sutherland. “Constance Lake is our most southerly patrol in northern Ontario but the Rangers haven’t lost any of the skills possessed by the more northerly Ranger patrols,” Sutherland said. Many of the southern soldiers were inexperienced in surviving on the land in the winter, Sutherland said. “Some of them had no idea what they were doing and they felt the cold,” he said. “It’s good being able to help them. It’s been a busy week. I think they appreciate what we teach them.” “The Canadian Rangers are very good instructors,” said Lt-

Junior Rangers, Army Cadets learn from each other Peter Moon Special to Wawatay News

A weekend spent on a joint training exercise by Junior Canadian Rangers from Constance Lake and army cadets from Hearst was rated a success in bringing youth from two cultures together in a positive learning experience for both of them. “It was a good experience,” said Capt. Kevin Grenon, commanding officer of 2826 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps in Hearst, a mostly French-speaking community about 40 kilometres east of Constance Lake. “There was a lot of exchanges of different skills.” “The Junior Rangers camp differently. They are so used to the cold and when it was time to light a fire they had it going in no time. They knew what to do outdoors.” Another feature of the weekend was the two groups learning to speak to each other in three languages. The Junior Rangers could speak both OjiCree and English while the cadets were mostly Frenchspeaking. “The Junior Rangers helped the French-speaking cadets with English and taught them some Oji-Cree,” said Master

Corp. Savannah Neotapin, who leads the Junior Ranger patrol at Constance Lake. “They had a lot of fun doing it.” The overnight camp was held in the bush near Hearst. The 16 Junior Rangers and 12 cadets were split up and slept together in military 10-person Arctic tents, a new experience for both groups. Many had never slept in a tent before. Temperatures dipped to –28 C and the Junior Rangers, more used to being outdoors in the cold, helped the cadets cope with the cold. Training included building improvised shelters and snowshoeing in the bush. “The Junior Rangers learned the cadets are more disciplined and structured than they are,” Neotapin said. “They had never seen drill done before. It was new to them but some of them were interested and want to learn how to do drill. It was a good learning experience for both sides because they learned different skills from each other.” A highlight of the weekend for the cadets was their first experience eating bannock. Neotapin’s mother, Charlotte, who is also a Canadian Ranger, made bannock for everyone. “It’s the first time we’ve done anything together,” Grenon said.

Sgt. Peter Moon, Canadian Rangers/Special to Wawatay News

Canadian Ranger Florrie Sutherland watches as Cpl. Riley Clarke of the Queen’s York Rangers tries his first piece of bannock during winter survival training. Col. Wayne Bruce, commanding officer of the Grey and Simcoe Foresters. “They use a different technique from what our soldiers get in garrison

in classrooms. It’s a hands-on technique and from watching them I think the soldiers learn better from the style of teaching the Rangers use. The Rangers

are very competent in their abilities. “Probably for 50 per cent of the soldiers this has been their first proper winter exercise,

their first extended stay outdoors in cold winter weather. So, with the help of the Rangers, this has been a great learning experience.”

INSPECTION Approved 2011–2012 Contingency Plan and Approved 2011–2012 Annual Work Schedule for the Lake Nipigon Forest The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR), Lake Nipigon Forest Management Inc. (LNFMI) and the Armstrong and Nipigon East Area Local Citizen Committees (LCC) would like to advise you that the 2011–2012 Contingency Plan (CP) for the Lake Nipigon Forest has been approved by the Ministry of Natural Resources Regional Director. The associated April 1, 2011–March 31, 2012 Annual Work Schedule (AWS) for the Lake Nipigon Forest has also been approved by the Thunder Bay and Nipigon District Offices of the Ministry of Natural Resources. Both documents are now available for inspection. Availability The CP and AWS will be available for public inspection at the LNFMI office during the office hours listed below and on the Ministry of Natural Resources public website at ontario.ca/forestplans beginning March 16, 2011 and throughout the period that they are in effect. Ontario Government Information Centres at 435 James Street South, Suite 114, Thunder Bay and 5 Wadsworth Drive, Nipigon provide access to the internet. Implementation of the CP and AWS will commence April 1, 2011. Why is a Contingency Plan Required? The CP is required to comply with the provisions of the Forest Management Planning Manual (2009). The proposed operations identified in the CP have been selected from the draft 2011–2021 Forest Management Plan (FMP) to enable the implementation of certain forest operations until the FMP is approved. Scheduled Forest Management Operations The AWS describes forest management activities such as harvesting, site preparation, tree planting, tending, road construction, maintenance and decommissioning that are scheduled to occur during the year. Tree Planting and Fuelwood Lake Nipigon Forest Management Inc. is responsible for tree planting on the Lake Nipigon Forest. Please contact LNFMI as listed below for information regarding tree planting job opportunities. For information on the locations and licence requirements for obtaining fuelwood for personal use, please contact the appropriate Ministry of Natural Resources office listed below. For commercial fuelwood opportunities, please contact LNFMI as listed below. More Information

Without a Home Phone? CALL:

HOME PHONE RECONNECT TOLL FREE

1-866-287-1348 Proudly serving Ontario and all of Canada Reasonable rates Friendly Service No Credit Information Required TOLL FREE

1-866-287-1348

For more information on the CP and AWS or to arrange an appointment with Ministry of Natural Resources staff to discuss the CP and AWS or to request an AWS operations summary map, please contact: Don Plumridge Armstrong Local Citizens Committee P.O. Box 96 Armstrong, ON P0T 1A0 tel: 807-583-2288 e-mail: plumridg@tbaytel.net

Dennis Lemon Nipigon East Area Local Citizens Committee P.O. Box 187 Beardmore, ON P0T 1G0 tel: 807-875-2174

Chris Leale, RPF Ministry of Natural Resources 5 Wadsworth Drive, P.O. Box 970 Nipigon, ON P0T 2J0 tel: 807-887-5042 fax: 807-887-2993 e-mail: chris.leale@ontario.ca Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Paul Poschmann, RPF, General Manager Lake Nipigon Forest Management Inc. 78 Salls Street, P.O. Box 449 Red Rock, ON P0T 2P0 tel: 807-886-3024, ext. 1 fax: 807-886-2641 e-mail: paul.poschmann@lnfmi.ca Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The Ministry of Natural Resources is collecting your personal information under the authority of the Crown Forest Sustainability Act. Any personal information you provide (address, name, telephone, etc.) will be protected in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Your personal information may be used by the Ministry of Natural Resources to send you further information related to this forest management planning exercise. If you have questions about the use of your personal information, please contact the Planning and Information Supervisor at 807-475-1452. Renseignements en français : Nipigon au 807-887-5000


B 10

Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

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Federal food subsidy program expands list of foods, delays program launch The federal government has listened to concerns about changing the Food Mail Program to the Nutrition North Canada program. Although the government had earlier announced certain foods would no longer be eligible for subsidies, Indian and Northern Affairs Minister John Duncan and Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq announced adjustments March 9 to ensure people living across Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s north would continue to have 2QWDULR(QHUJ\%RDUG

subsidies for those foods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have heard their concerns and we recognize northerners want more time to adjust to Nutrition North Canada,â&#x20AC;? Duncan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am pleased to announce that we have expanded the list of foods eligible for subsidy from the government of Canada to include all food, as well as most non food items until October 2012.â&#x20AC;? Scheduled to take effect April 1, the expanded list of food and non-food items is being imple-

mented to ensure a smooth transition to Nutrition North Canada and to allow for two more sea-lift cycles to bring goods to northern consumers. The federal government announced in May the Food Mail Program would be replaced with Nutrition North Canada on April 1 to make healthy food more accessible and affordable to Canadians living in isolated northern communities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will continue to work to

ensure northerners are heard and that this new program will help them by providing access to fresh, healthy and affordable food in the north,â&#x20AC;? Aglukkaq said. While Nutrition North Canada was developed following three years of extensive engagement with northerners, the federal government is continuing to explore additional options to assist retailers and suppliers in adjusting to the new program. When the Nutrition North

Canada program was first announced by previous INAC minister Chuck Strahl, plans called for the highest rate of subsidy to be placed on the most nutritious perishable foods, such as fruits, vegetables, bread, fresh meats, milk and eggs. A revised list of eligible items included a provision to improve access to commercially-produced traditional, northern foods. The Food Mail Program is

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Wawatay News

A record amount of funds went into mineral exploration in Ontario last year, according to the president of the Boreal Prospectors Association. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eight-hundred and twentyfive million dollars was spent in exploration in Ontario as a whole,â&#x20AC;? said Michael Fox, president of the Boreal Prospectors Association. The Boreal Prospectors Association hosted a prospectorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s symposium in Sioux Lookout March 1-3 to review and discuss new Ontario Mining Act regulations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We showcased communities that had been involved in mineral exploration,â&#x20AC;? Fox said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kasabonoka outlined the journey they have been on as a community ... to look at mineral potential in their traditional area.â&#x20AC;? The Ministry of Northern Development, Mines and Forestry also presented three sets of regulations associated with the new Ontario Mining Act for which they are looking for feedback from Aboriginal communities, including regulations on sites of Aboriginal significance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are now tools in that set of regulations that will help communities to protect before staking, which is what they call the withdrawal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the ability to withdraw areas from staking,â&#x20AC;? Fox said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even after staking, the community has the ability to go through the process around surface restrictions within sites of Aboriginal significance.â&#x20AC;? Fox said the second set of proposed regulations deals with plans and permits, where anyone involved in exploration, including prospectors, junior exploration companies and major companies, will now be required to submit plans to the government and the government will facilitate an education process on those plans to communities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Explorers will now require a permit to be approved,â&#x20AC;? Fox said. Fox said the new Ontario Mining Act calls for early notification, more early engagement and more formal consultation compared to the old Mining Act which didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t call for duty to consult until the advanced exploration stage. Fox said the third set of proposed regulations deals with Aboriginal consultation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was related to land permits,â&#x20AC;? Fox said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They went through the more detailed inhouse procedure on how they are going to facilitate information, engagement and consultation.â&#x20AC;?


Wawatay News

MARCH 17, 2011

B 11

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

ᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᑲᐧᐣ ᐁᑲ ᒋᔭᓇᐁᐧᐣᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᐃᒪ ᐅᒋ ᐸᑭᑭᓂᑲᓂᐠ B1

ᒥᑕᐡ ᑲᑭᔭᓂᑐᑕᐠ ᐁᑭᔭᓂ ᓇᓇᑕᐃᐧ ᑭᑫᐣᑕᐠ ᐅᑎᓇᐱᓀᐃᐧᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑭᔭᐃᔕ ᑲᐅᑯᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᐱᒥᐊᔭᓱᐡᑲᑎᐊᐧᐨ. ᓇᑫ ᐱᑯ ᐅᑭᓄᐣᑕᐣ ᒉᕑᐃᐊᐧᐣ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐠ ᐁᑭᐱᐣᑎᑲᓂᒥᐨ ᒥᓇ ᐅᑭᓇᑕᐁᐧᓂᒥᑯᐣ ᒋᓇᑕᐊᐧᐸᒪᐨ. ᕑᐃᓀ ᐅᑭᐃᔑᐃᐧᒋᐊᐧᐣ ᐅᑯᓯᓴᐣ ᐯᔑᑲᐧ ᒋᐊᐧᐸᒪᐨ ᒉᕑᐃᐊᐧᐣ. ᐯᔑᐠ ᑫᑯᐣ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᐃᐧᔑᐨ ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᒉᕑᐃ, ᐅᐣᒋᑕᐱ ᑭᑭᐱᒋᓂᔕᐦᐅᑯ ᓂᐱᒪᑎᓯᐃᐧᓂᐠ. ᐊᒥ ᐁᔑᐊᐧᐸᒥᓇᐣ ᐁᑲ ᐁᔕᑫᐧᓂᒧᔭᐣ ᐁᑲᐧ ᑕᐡ ᑭᓇᑕᐁᐧᓂᒥᐣ ᒋᐸᐸᒥᔭᔭᐣ ᒋᐊᐧᐃᐧᒋᑕᐧᔭᐣ. ᑭᓇᑕᐁᐧᓂᒥᐣ ᒋᑭᐱᑎᓇᒪᐣ ᐁᑲ ᒥᓇᐊᐧ ᒋᐃᐧᐃᔑᓇᑭᐡᑲᐠ ᐅᐁᐧᓂ. ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᑲᐧᐣ ᒋᔭᓂᒧᒋᑲᑌᐠ. ᑭᑎᐡᑯᓂᑲᓂᓇᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑭᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒥᓇᐣ ᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᑯᓯᐊᐧᐠ ᒋᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᐃᐧᐣᑕᐧ ᐅᐁᐧᓂ ᐃᓇᐱᓀᐃᐧᓂ ᐁᑲ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐠ ᒋᓂᔑᑫ ᐳᓂᐱᒪᑎᓯᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐠ ᐊᐱᐣ ᑲᐁᐧᓂᐱᑯᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᐊᐧᑯᒪᑲᓂᐊᐧ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᑕᐡ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᑲᐧᔭᐣᒋᐨ ᑫᔭᓂᔑᐅᐡᑭᒪᒋᑕᐨ, ᕑᐃᓀ ᑭᐱᐣᑎᑫ ᑲᐃᔑᐸᓱᐣᑕᐧ ᑲᒥᓂᑫᐧᐊᐧᐱᓀᐊᐧᐨ ᒋᔭᓄᑲᑕᐠ ᐅᒥᓂᑫᐧᐊᐧᐱᓀᐃᐧᐣ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᐃᒪ ᑲᐃᔑᐸᓱᐣᑕᐧ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᑯᐨ ᑲᒪᒥᓄᒥᐁᐧᓂᐨ, ᑲᐃᐧᓂᐣ ᒥᓂᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᑐᑕᑯᔭᐣ ᑭᑎᓀᓂᒥᐣ. ᐃᐁᐧ ᐱᑯ ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᑭᔭᓂᒥᐦᐃᑯᔭᐣ ᑭᑎᓇᐱᓀᐃᐧᐣ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᒋᑲᑫᐧ ᐳᓀᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᒋᓂᓯᑯᔭᐣ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᐡᑲᐧᐨ ᒋᐃᓀᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᐊᓂᐣ ᑫᐃᔑᓇᑯᑐᔭᐣ ᑭᐱᒪᑎᓯᐃᐧᐣ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᑲᑭᑭᐡᑲᑯᔭᐣ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᑕᐡ ᐃᐧᐣ ᒉᕑᐃ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᓇᑭᐡᑲᐠ. ᕑᐃᓀ ᐃᐧᐣ ᐅᐊᐧᑯᒪᑲᓇᐣ ᐅᑭᐃᐧᒋᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᑯᐣ ᐁᑲᐧ ᐊᒥᐦᐃᒪ ᑲᑭᔭᓄᒋᒪᐡᑲᐃᐧᑲᐸᐃᐧᐨ ᓂᑲᐣ ᒋᔭᓂᓇᐱᐨ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᐅᓀᐣᑕᐠ ᒋᑭᐁᐧᑯᓯᐨ ᐊᐧᓂᓇᐊᐧᑲᐠ, ᐃᒪ ᑲᑭᑕᔑᐅᑦᐱᑭᐨ, ᒥᓇ ᑭᔭᐱᐨ ᐊᑎᐟ ᐅᐊᐧᑯᒪᑲᓇᐣ ᑲᐃᔑᑲᐯᔑᓂᐨ. ᐣᑭᑫᐣᑕᐣ ᐃᐧᓂᑯ ᒋᓇᑭᐡᑲᒪᐣ ᐊᓀᐧᓂᒥᑯᐃᐧᐣ ᒥᓇ ᒪᒋᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᒥᑯᐃᐧᐣ. ᔕᑯᐨ ᒥᐱᑯ ᑲᐃᔑᐅᓀᐣᑕᐣᐠ ᐁᑲ ᐃᓂᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᐃᓀᓂᒥᑯᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᒋᑭᐱᐡᑲᑯᐨ. ᐊᐣᒋᑯ ᐱᑯ ᐣᑭᐅᒋᒪᐡᑲᐁᐧᐣᑕᐣ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᑌᐯᐧᑕᒪᐣ ᓇᐱᐨ ᐁᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᑲᐧᐠ ᒋᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᐃᐧᑕᐧ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᑲᒪᒋᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᒥᐣᑕᐧ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᒥᓇ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᐃᓇᐱᓀᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᑭᑭᐡᑲᑯᐊᐧᐨ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᓂᐢᑕᑦ ᐣᑭᐃᔑᓇᑭᐡᑲᐣ, ᐃᑭᑐ, ᒥᑐᓂ ᑭᐊᐧᐊᐧᓀᐣᑕᑲᐧᐣ ᓂᐢᑕᑦ ᑯᑕᐧᓱᐱᓯᑦ ᑲᐊᔭᔭᐣ ᐃᒪ ᐊᐧᓂᓇᐊᐧᑲᐠ ᒋᒥᑲᒪᐣ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᑯᐃᐧᐣ. ᐊᑎᐟ ᐃᐧᓂᑯ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐣᑭᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᑯᐠ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᔕᑯᐨ ᐊᑎᐟ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᑲᐊᐧᐸᒥᔑᐊᐧᐨ ᑭᐸᑫᐡᑲᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᑲ ᐁᐃᐧᐯᔕᐧᐸᒥᔑᐊᐧᐨ. ᒥᑐᓂ ᑭᔭᓂᒪᓂ, ᔕᑯᐨ ᐃᑯ ᒥᐱᑯ ᑲᐃᔑ ᐱᒥᑎᐸᒋᒧᐨ ᐅᑎᓯᓭᐃᐧᓇᐣ. ᑲᑎᐸᒋᒧᔭᐣ ᐣᑎᓯᓭᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᐊᒥᐦᐃᒪ ᑲᑭᔭᓄᒋ ᒪᐡᑲᐃᐧᓯᔭᐣ. ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᐊᐧᓂᓇᐊᐧᑲᐠ ᑲᑲᐯᔑᐸᐣ ᕑᐃᓀ ᑭᐃᔕᐸᐣ 1995 ᐅᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑯᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᐁᐧᑎ ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ ᐃᑭᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ

ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᒥᓇ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᐱᒥᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑫᐊᐧᐨ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᐃᒪ ᑲᑭ ᓇᑭᐡᑲᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᒥᓇ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᑕᔑ ᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑫᐨ ᐊᓂᔑᓇᐯ ᐊᐢᑭᐠ. ᐅᑭᑲᑫᐧᒋᒪᐣ ᕑᐃᓀᐊᐧᐣ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐃᓀᐣᑕᒧᑫᐧᐣ ᒋᑭᐸᐸᒥᔭᐸᐣ ᑭᐁᐧᑎᓄ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᒋᐸᐸᒥᑎᐸᒋᒧᐨ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᑲᐃᔑᑌᐯᐧᑕᐠ, ᐁᑭᐃᔑᐊᐧᐸᐣᑕᐠ ᐊᐱᐣ ᐁᑲᒋᑎᓇᐠ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᒥᓴᐁᐧᐣᑕᑭᐸᐣ ᒥᓇ ᐅᑐᑌᒥᐸᓂᐣ ᒉᕑᐃᐊᐧᐣ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᐸᑯᓭᓂᒥᑯᐸᐣ ᒋᑐᑕᐠ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᐃᐁᐧ ᐊᑯᓇᐠ ᑫᑲᐟ ᑲᑭᓇ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐃᐧ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᐅᒪ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᑲᐃᔑᐊᔭᐧᑭᐣ ᑭᐊᔭᑭᓀᐃᔕ - ᐊᑎᐟ ᓂᐦᓴᐧ ᒥᓇ ᓂᐊᐧ ᐁᑭᐊᐧᐃᐣᑕᒪᑫᐨ ᐊᓂᐣ ᑫᑐᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐁᑲ ᑫᑭᐅᐣᒋᑲᒋᑎᓂᑯᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᐅᑭ ᑭᒋᑲᓄᑕᐣ ᒋᑲᑫᐧᐊᐸᒋᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᑭᑎᒪᑫᓂᒥᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ ᒥᓇ ᓂᓯᑕᐁᐧᓂᒥᑐᐃᐧᐣ.

ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᐃᑯ ᓂᐣ ᐱᓇᒪ ᒋᐅᒋᒪᒥᑎᓀᓂᒥᑎᓱᔭᐣ ᐃᐁᐧ ᐊᐱ. ᐃᐁᐧ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᓄᐣᑕᐊᐧᐠ ᑲᑭᐃᓇᒋᒧᑕᐃᐧᔑᐨ ᐣᑭᐊᐃᑲᒣᐣᑕᐣ ᐁᑲ ᐃᐧᐣ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐠ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐅᐁᐧ ᒋᑭᑐᑕᐃᐧᐣᑕᐧᐸᐣ. – ᐁᐊᔭᑭᐊᐧᓂᐠ

ᐊᒥ ᒧᔕᐠ ᐁᑐᑕᒪᐣ ᑲᐸᐸᒥᑎᐸᒋᒧᔭᐣ ᐅᐁᐧ ᐣᑎᔑᑲᑫᐧᒋᒪᐠ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ, ᐊᐁᐧᓀᐣ ᐅᒪ ᑲᐊᔭᔦᐠ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐊᐃᐧᔭ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᑲᐃᓇᐱᓀᐨ, ᑲᑭᓇ ᐊᐃᐧᔭ ᑭᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᒋᑭ ᑭᑫᐣᑕᑭᐸᐣ. ᑲᑭᓇ ᐊᐃᐧᔭ ᐅᑦᐱᓂᑫᓂ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᐊᐱ ᒥᓇᐊᐧ ᐣᑎᔑᑲᑫᐧᒋᒪᐠ, ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᑕᐡ ᐃᐧᐣ ᑭᐊᐧᑯᒪᑲᐣ ᐃᒪ ᑭᑎᐯᐣᒋᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᐊᔭᐸᐣ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᓇᐣᑕ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ, ᐊᓂᐣ ᑕᓯᐣ ᑭᓇᐊᐧ ᐁᐃᓀᐣᑕᒣᐠ ᑲᑭᓇ ᐊᐃᐧᔭ ᑭᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᒋᑭ ᑭᑫᐣᑕᑭᐸᐣ. ᐸᐣᑭ ᐱᑯ ᐁᑕ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐃᐡᐱᓂᑫᑕᐊᐧᐠ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᐊᐱᐣ ᒥᓇᐊᐧ ᑯᑕᑭᓂ ᑫᑯᓂ ᐣᑎᔑᑲᑫᐧᒋᒪᐠ, ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᑭᐣ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᓇᐣᑕ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᐁᑭᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᑯᔭᐣ ᐁᐃᓇᐱᓀᔭᐣ, ᐊᓂᐣ ᑕᓯᐣ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᐊᐃᐧᔭ ᒋᐅᒋ ᐃᐡᐱᓂᑫᑕᐨ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᑲᐅᐣᒋᓇᑕᐁᐧᓂᒪᐣᑭᑕᐧ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᒋᓇᓇᑲᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ, ᐊᓂᐣ ᑕᐡ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᓂᐣ ᐃᓇᐱᓀᔭᐣ ᐃᐁᐧ. ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᐃᐁᐧ ᐊᐱ, ᕑᐃᓀ ᑭᐃᐧᒋᑕᐧ ᑲᑭᐅᔑᒋᑲᑌᐠ, ᑭᑎᐸᒋᒧᐃᐧᓂᓇᐣ, ᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᐣ ᐃᑭᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᒥᓇ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᑲᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑫᐊᐧᐨ. ᐅᐁᐧ ᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᐣ ᑭᒪᒪᐃᐧᐱᐦᐃᑲᑌᐊᐧᐣ ᐅᑎᐸᒋᒧᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᒥᓇ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐣ ᐅᑎᑭᑐᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑲᑭᑭᐡᑲᑯᐊᐧᐨ ᒥᓇ ᑲᐸᑭᑌᐡᑲᑯᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᒥᓇ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ. ᕑᐃᓀ ᐅᑎᔑᐸᑯᓭᐣᑕᐣ ᒥᐦᐅᐁᐧᓂ ᓂᐢᑕᑦ ᑫᐅᐣᒋᒪᐦᒋᓭᓂᐠ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐣ ᒋᐅᒋ ᐊᔭᓂᑫᐅᔑᒋᑲᑌᑭᐣ. ᒣᑲᐧ 2006 ᕑᐃᓀ ᑭᐃᔑᑯᓯ ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ. ᒥᑕᓱᔭᑭ ᑭᐸᐸᒥᔭ ᐁᑭᐸᐸᒥ ᐊᐧᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᑫᐨ ᐊᓂᐣ ᑫᐃᔑ ᐊᔭᐣᑲᐧᒥᓯᑲᐣᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ, ᐁᑲᐧ ᐃᑭᑐ, ᐊᑯᓇᐠ ᐊᐱᐣ ᐅᒪ ᑲᑭᐱᒋᑯᓯᔭᐣ

ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ ᓇᐣᑕ ᓂᔭᓄᔭᑭ ᐅᑕᓇᐠ ᐊᒥ ᐁᐱᒥᑐᑕᒪᐣ ᐁᐊᔭᓱᐡᑲᒪᐊᐧᑲᐧ ᑲᒥᓄᐃᐧᒋᐊᐧᑲᐧ. ᒥᓇ ᐣᑐᑌᒪᐠ ᑲᑭᑭᐡᑲᑯᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᑲᔭᓂᐯᔕᐧᐸᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᒋ ᔭ ᓂ ᐳ ᓂ ᐱ ᒪ ᑎ ᓯ ᐊ ᐧ ᐨ , ᐣᑲᓄᒋᑫᑕᒪᐊᐧᐠ. ᒥᐱᑯ ᐅᓴᑦ ᐁᐃᓇᓄᑭᔭᐣ ᐁᐅᒋ ᑲᓄᒋᑫᑕᒪᐊᐧᑲᐧ ᐁᑲᐧ ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᓇᐱᐨ ᒋᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑫᔭᐣ. ᐅᐁᐧ ᑐᑲᐣ ᐃᓇᓄᑭᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᔦ ᐃᔑᐸᐸᒥᓯᒪᑲᐣ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᒥᐣᒋᓇᐁᐧᓯᐃᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᑕᒪᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᐅᒪ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ, ᒥᐦᐃᒪ ᑭᓀᐧᐡ ᑲᐱᒥᐃᓇᐱᓀᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᒥᓇ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᐁᐅᒋ ᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᔭᓂᒧᑕᒪᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᒥᔑᓇᐧᔦᐠ ᑲᐃᔑᐊᐧᓂᒋᑫᓭᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᐱᒪᑎᓯᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ. ᓂᓇᑭᐡᑲᐊᐧᒥᐣ ᑲᔦ ᐅᐡᑭᔭᐦᐊᐠ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᑲᑭᑭᐡᑲᑯᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᑲᐧ ᐊᐱᐣ ᓇᑫ ᐁᐊᐧᓂᐦᐊᑭᑕᐧ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᐃᒪ ᑲᔦ ᐁᐅᒋ ᒥᑯᐡᑲᑌᐣᑕᒪᐠ ᐁᐧᓴ ᑲᔭᓂ ᓇᓇᒪᔦᓂᒪᑭᑕᐧ. ᐣᑭ ᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᐊᐧᐸᓂᐠ ᐣᑐᑌᒪᐠ ᐃᒪ ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ ᓂᔭᓄᔭᑭ ᐅᑕᓇᐠ ᐁᑲᐧ ᐣᑭᐅᔑᑐᒥᓇᐸᐣ ᓇᓇᑫᐧᑕᐦᐃᑲᐣ ᐁᑲᐧ ᐣᑭᐃᔑᓂᑲᑕᒥᐣ, ᐱᒪᒋᐦᐅᐣ ᒋᐱᒥᒪᐡᑲᐊᐧᑎᓯᔭᐣ. ᐃᒪ ᑕᐡ ᐃᔑᐊᑌ ᐁᔾᐟᐢ ᐅᑕᐱᑕᒪᑫᐠ ᐅᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑐᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐊᐧ ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ. ᐁᑲᐧ 44 ᑕᓱᔭᑭᐃᐧᓀ, ᕑᐃᓀ ᐊᔕ ᓂᔑᑕᓇ ᓂᔓᔕᐳᔭᑭ ᐅᑐᒋᑭᑭᐡᑲᑯᐣ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᓂ ᒥᓇ ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᓇᐣᑕ ᐃᔑᔭᓯᐣ ᒥᐱᑯ ᐁᔑᑭᔑᔕᐃᐧᔭᐨ ᒥᓇ ᐁᒐᒋᑲᑎᓯᐨ. ᑭᐃᓯᓭᓂ ᒋᔭᓄᑲᑕᐠ ᐃᐁᐧᓂ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᓂ ᒋᐅᒋ ᐱᒥᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑫᐨ ᒥᓇ ᑲᓄᒋᑫᑕᒪᑫᐨ ᒥᓯᐁᐧᑲᒥᐠ, ᔕᑯᐨ ᐅᒥᓀᐧᐣᑕᐣ ᐃᐁᐧᓂ ᑲᑐᑕᐠ. ᐁᐧᑎ ᐱᑯ ᑭᐁᐧᑎᓄᐠ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᐣᑎᔑᒥᓀᐧᐣᑕᐣ ᒋᑕᓇᓄᑭᔭᐣ ᑲᐃᔑᐊᔭᐊᐧᐨ ᐣᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒪᐠ. ᐅᐣᒋᑕ ᐃᐁᐧ ᑫᑯᓀᐣ ᑲᐅᒋᐃᓯᓭᐠ, ᑭᐃᑭᑐ. ᑭᑭᐁᐧᑲᓄᑫ ᐯᔑᐠ ᐃᑫᐧ ᐁᑭᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᐊᐧᑯᐸᓀᐣ ᕑᐃ��� ᐅᒪᒪᒪᐣ ᐁᑭᐸᐊᐧᓇᐨ ᕑᐃᓀᐊᐧᐣ ᐁᔭᓴᒥᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᐊᐧᐨ ᑭᒋᒥᔑᐣ ᒥᑕᓱᒥᑕᓇ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᐁᑎᐸᒋᒧᑕᐊᐧᐨ ᒪᐣᑐᑲᐠ ᐁᐅᒋᒪᑲᓂᐠ. ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ ᑲᑭᑭᐡᑲᑯᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᐸᑯᓭᓂᒪᐊᐧᐣ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐣ ᒋᐊᔭᐊᐧᐨ ᑭᑎᒪᑫᐣᒋᑫᐃᐧᐣ. ᒥᐦᐅᐁᐧ ᐯᔑᐠ ᑲᐊᐧᐸᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᑭᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒥᓇᓂᐠ ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᐅᐃᐧᐅᑕᐱᓇᓯᓇᐊᐧ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐣ ᐅᐁᐧ ᑲᐃᓇᐱᓀᓂᐨ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᒋᐃᐧᐱᓯᐢᑫᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ. ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᑭᐣ ᓇᐣᑕ ᑭᐊᐧᑯᒪᑲᐣ ᐃᓇᐱᓀᔦᑭᐸᐣ, ᐊᓂᐣ ᑭᓇᐊᐧ ᑫᑭᐃᔑ ᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᒣᑭᐸᐣ ᒋᐃᔑᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᒥᑯᔦᐠ. ᐊᑎᑲ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ 2000 ᐣᑭᐊᔭᐣ ᑲᐊᒧᐁᐧᒪᑲᐠ ᐊᑯᓯᐃᐧᐣ, ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᑯ ᒥᐢᑕᐃ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᑯᐃᐧᐣ ᐣᑭᐊᐧᐸᑕᐦᐃᑯ ᒥᓇ ᐱᑯ ᓂᐊᐧᑯᒪᑲᓇᐠ ᒥᐢᑕᐦᐃ ᑫᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧ ᑭᐃᐧᒋᐦᐊᐊᐧᐠ. ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᑕᐡ ᐃᐧᐣ ᑭᒋᐸᑲᐣ ᐃᓯᓭ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ, ᐣᑭᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᐣ ᒋᐊᐧᐸᐣᑕᒪᐣ ᐅᐁᐧ. ᐊᑎᑲ ᐯᔑᐠ ᒥᓇ ᓂᐦᓯᐣ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐅᑲᒋᑎᓂᑯᓇᐊᐧ ᐁᐨᐊᔾᐱ ᑕᓱᑭᔑᑲ ᐅᒪ ᑲᓇᑕ. ᑲᐃᐧᓂᐣ ᑕᐃᔑ ᐳᓂᔭᑭᐊᐧᓯᓄᐣ. ᑕᓱᑭᔑᑲ ᓂᐊᐧᐸᑕᐦᐃᑯ ᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑯᐃᐧᐣ. ᑭᑎᒪᑫᓂᒥᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ, ᒥᐦᐅᐁᐧ ᑲᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑯᔭᐠ ᒋᑲᑫᐧᐊᔭᔭᐠ ᐅᐁᐧ ᐃᓇᐱᓀᐃᐧᐣ.

SPRING EMPLOYMENT FISHERMEN and OUTDOOR ENTHUSIAST REQUIRE

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APRIL 25, 2011 IN

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12606_2B_R0_TiresAd_10.25x7.14.indd 1

Wawatay News

We will not be undersold on tires!±

as low as

$

per season. Only at participating locations.

15

PER CAR TIRE††

MARCH 17, 2011

Ford technicians are factory trained. They know what your Ford needs.

spring service event

PREMIUM TIRES

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FROM ONLY

$

20

THE

WORKS

15” tires on select 2000-2011 Ford Focus models.

8999

*

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per tire

PER TRUCK TIRE††

Spring refresher that can save you up to $350 a year^ on gas.

WE OFFER EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO GET READY FOR SPRING, INCLUDING TIRE CHANGEOVER, TIRES, RIMS, TIRE STORAGE AND MORE.

with this package and regular maintenance.

FOR ONLY

Switch into spring. Store your winter tires

Refresh your vehicle with these spring offers from Ford. You can trust the experts who know your Ford best: Genuine Ford Trained Technicians. For more details and offers, see your Service Advisor or visit us online.

$

PLUS: FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY, GET PREMIUM MOTORCRAFT® WIPER BLADES INSTALLED FOR ONLY $15.99 PER BLADE WHEN YOU PURCHASE THE WORKS.

59

99

ford.ca

All offers expire April 30, 2011. See Service Advisor for complete details. Applicable taxes and provincial levies not included. Dealer may sell for less. †Ford Protection Plan is only available for non-commercial cars and light trucks. If an eligible Ford, Motorcraft® or Ford-approved part fails due to a defect in material or workmanship, wear out or rust through, it will be replaced at no charge as long as the original purchaser of the part owns the vehicle on which the part was installed. Labour is covered for the first 12 months or 20,000 km (whichever occurs first) after the date of installation. Emergency brake pads are not eligible under this plan. See Service Advisor for complete details and limitations. ‡‡Excludes emergency brake pads and shoes. Machining or replacement of rotors and drums available at additional cost. ˆBased on a Ford Fusion V6 automatic that has a fuel consumption rating of 10L/100km in combined city/highway driving (properly tuned), a one-year driving distance of 24,000km and $1.02 per litre for gasoline. Improved fuel efficiency and emission reduction levels depend on model, year and condition of vehicle. ‡Applies to single rear wheel vehicles only. ±In order to receive a competitor’s advertised price: (i) tires must be purchased and installed at your participating Ford Dealer; (ii) customer must present the competitor’s advertisement (containing the lower price) which must have been printed within 30 days of the sale; and (iii) the tires being purchased must be the same brand, sidewall, speed and load ratings as shown in the competitive advertisement. Offer only available at participating Ford dealerships. This offer is valid on the cost of the tire only and does not include labour costs, valve stems, mounting, balancing, disposal and taxes. Offer does not apply to advertised prices in eBay advertisements, by tire wholesalers (including Costco) and online tire retailers, or closeout, special order, discontinued, and clearance/liquidation offers. Limited time offer. Offer may be cancelled or changed at any time without prior notice. See your service advisor. *Applies to Firestone P195/60R15/140582 (meets Focus and Fiesta OE fitment specs) tires. ††Storage term is at the Dealer’s sole discretion, up to a maximum of seven months. This offer may not be combined with any other offer. ¤Coupon value may only be applied towards the future purchase of any services. Coupon value may not be applied toward previous purchases. Coupon value is in Canadian funds. Taxes payable before $10 Coupon amount is deducted. Other limitations may apply; see Service Advisor for details.

B 12 ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Taking time for fans

Aboriginal country music singer Crystal Shawanda performed several songs during the Matawa First Nations Community Governance & Economic Development Conference March 2. Shawanda, above, poses for a photo with fans during a lunch break at the conference. James Thom/Wawatay News

3/10/11 6:35 PM


March 17, 2011