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Top nurse comes north PAGE 3 May 17, 2012

Vol. 39 No. 12

9,300 copies distributed $1.50

Northern Ontario’s First Nation Voice since 1974

www.wawataynews.ca

Leaders threaten to pull support for Ring of Fire Cliffs announcement for Sudbury smelter disappointing: Waboose

Shawn Bell

Wawatay News

First Nation leaders are threatening to pull support for mining in the Ring of Fire, after Cliffs Resources’ announced it plans to locate its chromite processing plant in Sudbury. Cliffs announced on May 9 that the mining company will go ahead with the $3.3 billion Ring of Fire project, which includes the chromite mine east of Webequie, a transportation route running south from the mine site to connect to highway 17 near Aroland, and a ferrochrome processing plant in Sudbury. The decision goes against the wishes of First Nations and municipal leaders in northwestern Ontario, who wanted to see the processing plant located in Greenstone. “It’s obvious the province and Cliffs haven’t been listening to First Nations, and what their concerns and their aspirations are,” said Nishnawbe Aski Nation Deputy Grand Chief Terry Waboose. “Today is a classic example of development going ahead without adequate consultation, input and consent from our First Nations.” Waboose said he will advise the chiefs of the area to look at reevaluating their support for mining in the region. “Sure, you can have a smelter in Sudbury, but you still have to have a mine out there. And that’s something we all have to think about,” Waboose said. “I see (the announcement) as a step backwards. We need to get back and have some real discussions

Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News

NAN Deputy Chief Terry Waboose confronts Aboriginal Affairs Minister Kathleen Wynne (front left) and Minstry of Natural Resources Minister Michael Gravelle (front right) following the May 9 announcement that Cliffs Resources plans to locate its chromite processing plant in Sudbury. and real commitments from the province as well as from the company.”

“Cliffs does what Cliffs wants to do. They don’t want to accommodate anybody, unless it doesn’t cost them a penny.”

Chief Eli Moonias

Ontario’s minister of Aboriginal Affairs, Kathleen Wynne,

held a press conference in Thunder Bay on the day of Cliff’s announcement. Wynne took the opportunity to encourage First Nations to come to the table and work with the province on ensuring future benefits for Aboriginal people. “The decisions that have been made were the business decisions,” Wynne said. “The more formal conversations and consultations will now begin. Those engagements on the environmental issues, the engagements on the community supports,

those have not been finalized. “We need your best advice and your engagement on how do we make sure the training is in place, how do we make sure the upgrading is in place so people who want to participate can,” she added. Wynne said the next step is to start tri-partite discussions between First Nations, the provincial government and the federal government on training and education programs to get First Nations people ready to work in the Ring of Fire.

Following the announcement, Webequie First Nation issued a statement saying it agrees that all parties must work together on a cooperative framework. Webequie also stated that it will continue to pursue assurances from government and industry for a utility corridor to connect First Nations to southern infrastructure networks. But Marten Falls First Nation Chief Eli Moonias said Cliffs’ announcement confirmed what his community feared – that the road network proposed for the

mine will not connect to Marten Falls. “Cliffs wants to build this corridor through the proposed railway survey done by KWG Resources,” Moonias said. “That’s 50 miles upriver from us. The corridor is not going to provide access for us.” Moonias said his community believed that if they were able to get Greenstone and other First Nations on their side, it would help get their community connected to the road network. “Cliffs does what Cliffs wants to do,” Moonias said. “They don’t want to accommodate anybody, unless it doesn’t cost them a penny. Even Ontario does not dictate to them. They also do what the big company wants.” Moonias said he will hold community discussions to determine whether Marten Falls still supports the mining projects in the Ring of Fire. As for Waboose, he said First Nations leaders have to step back and evaluate what the Cliffs announcement means for future work between the province, industry and First Nations. He added the issues go deeper than the Cliffs project, and strike at some of the big problems with development in the North in general. “We need to talk about resource revenue sharing,” Waboose said. “ We need to talk about recognition of our jurisdiction up there. It is our land and we have a say in terms of what happens there, not just someone in Toronto giving permits and issuing licenses to developers without our permission and our consent.”

ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐅᑎᓀᑕᓇᐊᐧ ᐁᑲ ᒋᐃᐧᒋᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑫᐃᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓂ ᐊᓯᓂᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᐠᓫᐃᑊᐢ ᒋᔑᐦᐃᐁᐧᒪᑲᐣ ᑲᑭᐅᓀᐣᑕᐠ ᒋᑕᔑᐅᔑᐦᐃᑕᐧ ᐊᓯᓂᐠ ᐁᐧᑎ ᔕᐊᐧᓄᐠ ᓴᐟᐯᕑᐃ : ᐊᐧᐳᐢ ᔕᐧᐣ ᐯᓫ ᐊᐧᐊᐧᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐃᐧᓇᐣ

ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐃᐧ ᓂᑲᓂᑕᒪᑫᐠ ᑭᐃᑭᑐᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᑲ ᒋᐃᐧᒋᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᑫᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᒪ ᓇᓇᑕᐊᐧᓯᓂᐃᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓂᐠ, ᐊᐱ ᐊᓂᓯᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᐠᓫᐃᑊᐢ ᑲᑭᐃᐡᑲᐧ ᐃᐧᐣᑕᐠ ᐁᑭᐃᔑ ᐅᓀᐣᑕᐠ ᒋᐃᔑᐅᔑᑐᐨ ᑲᑕᔑᐅᔑᐦᐃᑕᐧ ᐊᓯᓂᐠ ᐁᐧᑎ ᓴᐟᐯᕑᐃ ᔕᐊᐧᓄᐠ. ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᐅᑭᐃᐧᐣᑕᐣ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᒪᑯᐱᓯᑦ 9 ᑲᐃᓇᑭᓱᓂᐨ ᒋᒪᑕᓄᑲᑕᐠ 3.3 ᐱᓫᐃᔭᐣ ᒋᐃᓇᑭᐣᑌᓂᐠ ᐃᐁᐧᓂ ᐅᒧᓇᐦᐊᓯᓂᑫᐃᐧᐣ, ᐁᑲᐧ ᐊᔑᐨ ᑲᐃᐧᒧᓇᐦᐃᑲᓱᐨ ᐊᓯᐣ ᑲᒪᐡᑲᐊᐧᐱᑭᓯᐨ ᐊᐧᐸᓄᐠ ᐃᔑ ᐁᐧᐱᑫᐧᐠ, ᑕᒥᑲᓇᑫ ᒋᐅᐣᒋ ᔕᐸᐧᒧᓂᐠ ᔕᐊᐧᓄᐠ ᐃᓀᑫ ᑲᑭᐃᔑ ᐅᔑᑐᐨ ᐅᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑲᐣ ᐁᑲᐧ ᐊᐱᐣ ᒋᐃᓇᒧᓂᐠ ᑭᒋᐅᑕᐸᓂᒥᑲᓇᐠ 17 ᐯᔓᐨ ᐃᒪ ᐁᕑᐅᓫᐊᐣᐟ, ᒋᐃᔑᑕᐸᓱᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᓯᓂᐠ

ᑲᑭᒧᓇᐦᐅᑕᐧ ᒋᑕᔑᐅᔑᐸᐃᑕᐧ ᐁᐧᑎ ᓴᐟᐯᕑᐃ. ᐅᐁᐧᓂ ᑕᐡ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᐅᓀᐣᑕᐠ ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᒋᓇᐦᐁᐧᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᒥᓇ ᐱᑯ ᐅᑌᓇᐃᐧᑭᒪᐠ ᑌᑎᐸᐦᐃ ᑭᐁᐧᑎᓄᐠ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᑲᔭᑭᐣ, ᐁᑭᐃᔑ ᒥᓴᐁᐧᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᒋᐃᔑᐅᔑᒋᑲᑌᓂᐠ ᐃᒪ ᐠᕑᐃᐣᐢᑐᐣ ᐅᑌᓇᐠ. ᑭᓂᓯᑕᐃᐧᓇᑲᐧᓂ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᐅᑭᒪᐅᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᐁᑲ ᑲᓇᑫ ᐁᑭᐱᐅᐣᒋ ᐅᑕᐱᓇᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᑲᐃᓀᐣᑕᒥᓂᐨ ᒥᓇ ᑲᐃᔑᐸᑯᓭᑕᒥᓂᐨ,” ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐊᓂᔑᓇᐯ ᐊᐢᑭ ᑭᒋᐅᑭᒪᑲᓀᐢ ᑌᕑᐃ ᐊᐧᐳᐢ. “ᓄᑯᑦ ᑲᑭᔑᑲᐠ ᑭᐊᐧᐸᑕᒥᐣ ᐯᔑᑲᐧᐣ ᐁᐃᔑᓇᑯᒋᑫᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧ ᐱᑯ ᐁᑕ ᑲᐃᓀᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᓂᔑᒪᑕᓄᑲᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᑲ ᑲᔦ ᐱᓇᒪ ᑲᐧᔭᐠ ᐁᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᑲᑫᐧᒋᒥᑕᐧ ᐊᓂᐣ ᐁᓀᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᑫᐧᐣ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ.”

ᐊᐧᐳᐢ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐁᐃᐧᑲᑫᐧᒋᒪᐨ ᐅᑭᒪᑲᓇᐠ ᐅᒪ ᑌᑎᐸᐦᐃ ᒋ ᓇ ᓇ ᑲ ᒋ ᑐ ᐊ ᐧ ᐨ ᒋᑭᐁᐧᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᑭᐃᑭᑐᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᐁᐃᐧᒋᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑫᐃᐧ ᐃᔑᒋᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᐅᒪ ᐊᐧᑲᐦᐃ. ᑕᑭᐃᔑᓇᑲᐧᐣ ᐃᐧᓂᑯ ᒋᑭᐊᔭᒪᑲᑭᐸᐣ ᐃᐁᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᑲᒥᐠ ᑲᑕᔑᐅᔑᐦᐃᑕᐧ ᐊᓯᓂᐠ ᐁᐧᑎ ᓴᐟᐯᕑᐃ, ᔕᑯᐨ ᐃᓯᓭᐸᐣ ᒋᐊᔭᒪᑲᑭᐸᐣ ᑲᔦ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑲᐣ. ᒥᑕᐡ ᐅᐁᐧ ᑫᑭᓇᓇᑲᒋᑐᔭᑭᐸᐣ,” ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐊᐧᐳᐢ. “ᒥᐦᐅᐁᐧ ᓂᐣ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᐊᐧᐸᑕᒪᐣ ᐅᑐᓀᐣᑕᒧᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᒥᓇᐊᐧ ᐊᐱᐣ ᐁᑭᐁᐧᐊᔐᓭᔭᐠ. ᐃᓯᓭᐸᐣ ᑕᐡ ᑭᑕᐧᑦ ᒋᑭ ᐊᔭᒥᐦᐃᑎᓇᓂᐊᐧᑭᐸᐣ ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᑫᒋᓇᐨ ᐃᑯ ᒋᐸᑭᑎᓂᑎᓱᐨ ᐅᑭᒪᐃᐧᐣ ᒥᓇ ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᑫᐃᔑᐃᐧᑕᓄᑭᒥᑯᔭᐠ.” ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᐅᑭᒪᐃᐧᐣ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑲᐅᒋᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᒥᑕᐧ, ᐅᑭᒪᑫᐧ ᑕᐟᓫᐃᐣ ᐃᐧᐣ, ᑭᓇᑭᐡᑲᑫ

Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Kathleen Wynne and Minstry of Natural Resources Minister Michael Gravelle talk to the media. ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ ᐃᐁᐧ ᐊᐱ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᐅᑭᐃᔑ ᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᑕᓇᐊᐧ,” ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐠᓫᐃᑊᐢ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᑲᑭᐸᑭᑎᓇᐠ ᐃᐧᐣ. ᐊᐊᐧᔑᒣ ᑕᐡ ᑕᔭᓂᐱᒥ ᐅᑎᐸᒋᒧᐃᐧᐣ. ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᐅᑭᒪᑫᐧ ᓇᓇᑭᐡᑲᑎᓇᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑕᔭᐱᒥ ᐅᑭᐅᒋ ᔕᔑᑭᒪᐣ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᑲᑫᐧᒋᒥᑎᓇᓂᐊᐧᐣ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᑕᐡ ᒋᐱᓇᑭᐡᑲᐊᐧᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᑫᔭᓂᒧᒋᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᐊᐦᑭᐃᐧ ᑫᑯᓇᐣ, ᐅᑭᒪᐣ ᒋᐅᒋ ᑲᑫᐧᑲᒋᑎᓇᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᑲᐃᔑᐸᐱᑭᓯᔭᑭᐣ ᑫᔭᓄᒋ ᒥᓄᓭᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᓂᓂᑲᐣ. ᒋ ᑲ ᑫ ᐧ ᒋ ᒥ ᑎ ᓇ ᓂ ᐊ ᐧ ᐠ ᐅᓄᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᐅᓀᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᐧᒋᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ, ᒥᐅᓄ ᐁᑲ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᐱᒧᒋᑫᐃᐧ ᐅᓀᐣᑕᒧᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᒪᔑ ᒥᑐᓂ ᑲᑭᔑᐅᓀᐣᑕᑲᐧᑭᐣ.

ᐣᑲᓇᑕᐁᐧᑕᒥᐣ ᑕᐡ ᑭᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᑫᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᒥᓇ ᒋᐱᓇᑭᐡᑲᑫᔦᐠ ᒋᐅᒋ ᑭᑫᐣᑕᒪᐣᐠ ᐊᓂᐣ ᑫᐃᔑᐅᓇᑐᔭᐣᐠ ᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑫᐃᐧ ᐃᔑᒋᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ, ᐊᓂᐣ ᑲᔦ ᑫᑐᑕᒪᐠ ᓇᐊᐧᐨ ᒋᐅᒋ ᐁᐧᐣᑕᐠ ᒋᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᑲᐡᑭᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᒋᐱᐃᐧᒋᑕᐧᐊᐧᐨ,” ᑭᔭᓂᑭᑐ. ᑭᔭᓂᑭᑐ ᒥᓇᐊᐧ ᑫᔭᓂᒪᒋᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᑕᓂᐦᓴᐧᔦᑭᓯᐊᐧᐠ ᑫᔭᓂᒪᐦᒋᐊᔭᒥᐦᐃᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ, ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᐅᑭᒪᐃᐧᐣ ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᑲᓇᑕ ᑭᒋᐅᑭᒪ ᒋᔭᓂᒧᒋᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧ ᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᑫᒥᓂᑕᐧ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᒋᔭᓄᑲᐧᔭᐣᒋᐦᐃᑕᐧ ᒋᔭᓄᑭᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᒪ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑫᐃᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓂᐠ. ᐊᐱ ᑲᑭᐃᐡᑲᐧ ᐸᑭᑎᓂᑲᑌᑭᐸᐣ ᑎᐸᒋᒧᐃᐧᐣ, ᐁᐧᐱᑫᐧ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᐅᑭᐸᑭᑎᓇᓇᐊᐧ ᐅᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᑫᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᐁᑭᑐᒪᑲᓂᐠ ᐁᑭᐃᔑ ᓇᑯᒧᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᐃᓇᐱᐣ ᐸᑭᑭᓂᑲᓂᐠ 3

First Nations Youth Aviation Camp 2012 Aviation Centre of Excellence - Thunder Bay, ON - July 23rd - 27th

For more information please contact Kerry Wabange at 807-474-2353 or email kwabange@wasaya.com

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1.877.492.7292 • www.wasaya.com


2

Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

Inside Wawatay News ᑎᐸᑯᓂᑫᐃᐧ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᐁᐧᐃᐧᐣ ᑭᓇᐣᑭᐸᑭᑎᓇ ᔓᓂᔭ

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

this issue...

ᑲᐅᒋᐱᒥᐃᐧᒋᑲᑌᐠ

ᐃᐧᓴᑯᑌᐃᐧᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐅᑕᔓᑕᒪᑯᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᑭᐊᓂᒧᒋᑲᑌᐊᐧᐣ ᑲᑭᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑎᓇᓂᐊᐧᐠ

ᔓᓂᔭ ᑲᐅᐣᒋ ᐸᑭᑎᓂᐨ ᐃᒪ ᐊᓂᔑᓇᐯ ᐊᐢᑭ ᑎᐸᑯᓂᑫ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᐁᐧᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᐊᓂᔑᓇᐯᐠ ᒪᒥᓄᐦᐃᑎᓱ ᐅᓇᑯᓂᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᐃᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᑭᓇᐣᑭᐸᑭᑎᓇ ᐯᔑᑯᔭᑭ ᒋᐱᒪᓄᑲᑌᐠ. ᑭᒐᑭᓭ ᔓᓂᔭ ᐯᔑᑯᐱᓯᑦ ᑲᒪᐧᔦ ᐃᐧᐣᑕᐠ ᑲᓇᑕ ᑭᒋᐅᑭᒪ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᓂᑭᑯᐱᓯᑦ 30 ᒋᐸᑭᑎᓇᐨ ᔓᓂᔭᐣ ᑭᔭᐱᐨ ᐯᔑᑯᔭᑭ. ᐅᐁᐧ ᐱᒧᒋᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑭᒪᒋᒋᑲᑌᐸᐣ ᒋᐅᒋ ᓂᓯᓂᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᐁᐧᓴ ᑲᒥᔑᓄᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᓇᓇᐱ ᒪᒪᓂᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᐃᐧᔭᐠ, ᐁᑭᐃᓀᐣᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᓇᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᑲ ᑲᐱᐨ ᒥᐢᑕᐦᐃ ᐁᒣᑎᓂᑫᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᑲᐅᒋ ᐊᓄᑲᓂᑕᐧ ᐁᑲ ᐃᐧᐣ ᑭᒋᒪᒪᓂᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᑐᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᐅᒋ ᑲᑫᐧᑲᐧᔭᑯᓭᐦᐃᑕᐧ, ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᐁᐅᐣᒋ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᐁᐧᓭᐠ ᓇᐊᐧᐨ ᒋᐊᔐᓂᑲᑌᐠ ᐁᐧᓴ ᑲᑭᒋᒥᔑᓄᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑲᓇᑕ ᑎᐸᑯᓂᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᑲᐃᔑᐱᐣᑎᑫᓭᐊᐧᐨ, ᑭᔭᑦ ᑲᑭᒪᒪᓂᑲᐣᑕᐃᐧᑕᐧ ᓇᐣᑕ ᒥᓇ ᑲᑭᒪᒪᓂᐊᐧᐨ. ᐅᑕᓄᑭᐠ ᐅᒪ ᐊᓂᔑᓇᐯ ᐊᐢᑭ ᑎᐸᑯᓂᑫᐃᐧ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐃᐁᐧᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐠ

ᐃᑭᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑲᑭᐃᔕᑕᒪᑫᐊᐧᐨ ᓄᑯᒥᑫ ᐃᐧᓴᑯᑌᐃᐧᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐅᑕᔓᑕᒪᑯᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᐊᓂᒧᒋᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑐᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᑭᐃᑭᑐᐊᐧᐠ ᐃᐁᐧᓂ ᑲᐃᔑᑲᓇᐊᐸᐧᑕᐠ ᐅᑎᐯᐣᒋᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᒥᐦᐃᒪ ᐁᐅᐣᒋᒪᑲᓂᐠ ᑲᐃᔑᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᑕᐠ ᑲᑭᓇ ᑫᑯᓇᐣ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᑲᑭᐃᔕᐊᐧᐨ ᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐃᑐᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᐅᑭᐊᓂᒧᑕᓇᐊᐧ ᐊᐣᑎ ᑲᑭᐱᐅᐣᒋ ᐊᔭᓂᑫᐅᐣᒋᐊᐧᐨ ᒥᓇ ᐯᑭᐡ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᒋᑫᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᐧᓴᑯᑌᐃᐧᓂᓂ ᓇᓇᑕᐃᐧᑭᑫᒋᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᐃᒪ ᓫᐁᐠᐦᐁᐟ ᔪᓂᐯᕑᓯᑎ ᑭᒋ ᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑫᐃᐧᑲᒥᑯᐠ ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ. ᐃᐁᐧᓂ ᐱᑯ ᐅᓴᑦ ᐅᑭᐊᓂᒧᑕᓇᐊᐧ ᐅᓇᑯᓂᑫᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᑲᐃᐧᐃᔑᐃᐧᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᒋᐅᒋ ᐅᓀᐣᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᐊᓂᐣ ᑫᐃᔑᑲᓇᐊᐧᐸᒥᑕᐧ ᐃᐧᓴᑯᑌᐃᐧᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ. ᑲᓂᑲᓂᓯᐨ ᐃᓴᑯᑌᐃᐧᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐅᒪ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ, ᑫᕑᐃ ᓫᐃᐱᐣᐢᑭ, ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐃᐧᓴᑯᑌᐃᐧᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᑲ ᐃᐧᐣ ᐃᒪ ᒋᑭᐅᒋ ᑎᐸᐸᒥᑕᐧᐸᐣ ᐃᒪ ᐅᑎᔑᓇᑯᓯᐃᐧᓂᐠ ᐯᔑᑲᐧᔦᐠ ᐁᐅᐣᑕᑲᓀᓯᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᒪ ᒥᓯᐁᐧᑲᒥᐠ ᒋᐅᒋ ᑲᑫᐧ ᐅᓀᐣᑕᑲᐧᓂᐠ ᐊᐣᑎ ᐁᔑ ᑎᐯᐣᑕᑯᓯᐨ ᐊᐦᑭᐠ. ᓫᐃᐱᐣᐢᑭ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐅᑯᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐃᐧᓴᑯᑌᐃᐧᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᐅᑭᐅᑕᐱᓇᓇᐊᐧ ᐅᒪ ᒥᓯᐁᐧ ᑲᓇᑕ ᐅᑭᑭᓇᐊᐧᒋᐦᐅᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ ᐁᑲᑫᐧᒋᒪᑲᓄᐨ ᐊᐃᐧᔭ ᑲᐱᒧᐡᑭᓀᐱᐦᐃᑫᐨ ᒋᓇᑲᐧᓂᐠ ᐁᐃᐧᓴᑯᑌᐃᐧᓂᓂᐃᐧᐨ.

Restorative justice program gets extension The funding for Nishnawbe-Aski Nation Legal’s restorative justice program has been extended for one year. Funding had run out for one month before the federal government announced on April 30 that it will extend the program another year. Restorative Justice has been linked to lower recidivism rates, is considered cost-effective in dealing with non-violent offenders, where circumstances warrant, and helps address the high rate of over-representation of Aboriginal people in the Canadian justice system, both as victims and offenders. Staff at NAN Legal are hoping the program will get long-term funding in the future. Page 6

ᑭᒋᒪᐡᑭᑭᐃᐧᑫᐧ ᑭᑭᐅᑫ ᐊᐧᓂᓇᐊᐧᑲᐠ ᑲᐅᑭᒪᐃᐧᐨ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐃᐧᑫᐧᐠ ᑲᐅᐣᒋ ᐃᐧᑕᓄᑭᒥᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᒪ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐃᓯᓭᓂᐸᐣ ᑫᐃᐧᓇᐊᐧ ᑲᒪᐡᑭᑭᐃᐧᑫᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᑕᒪᑫᐊᐧᐨ ᒋᑭᐸᑭᑎᓂᑕᐧᐸᐣ ᐊᐊᐧᔑᒣ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᒋᑐᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᐱᐨ ᐅᐁᐧ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᑲᐃᓇᓄᑭᐦᐃᑕᐧ. ᑕᐧᕑᐃᐢ ᐠᕑᐃᐣᐢᐸᐣ ᑭᐃᔕ ᑭᓇᐧᕑᐊ ᒥᓇ ᐊᐧᓂᓇᐊᐧᑲᐠ ᐅᑕᓇᐠ ᑲᐱᒥᑯᓇᑲᓂᐠ. ᐃᐁᐧᓂ ᒪᔭᑦ ᑲᑭᐊᐧᐃᐧᐣᑕᒪᑫᐨ ᑲᐸᑯᓭᐣᑕᐠ ᒋᓂᑲᑌᓂᑲᑌᓂᑭᐣ ᑲᒪᐡᑭᑭᐃᐧᑫᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᐊᐧ��� ᐁᑎᐱᒥᓂᑕᐧ ᐊᓂᐣ ᑫᐃᓇᓄᑭᐊᐧᐨ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓀᓴᐣ ᑲᑕᓇᓄᑭᐊᐧᐨ. ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐃᐧᑫᐧᐠ ᑭᐱᒥ ᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᐊᐧᑲᓄᐊᐧᐠ ᒋᑲᐡᑭᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᒥᔑᓇᐧᔦᐠ ᒋᐃᓇᓄᑭᐊᐧᐨ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐃᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓂᐠ, ᔕᑯᐨ ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᐸᑭᑎᓇᓯᐊᐧᐠ ᐊᑎᐟ ᑫᑯᓇᐣ ᒋᐃᓇᓄᑭᐊᐧᐨ. ᐅᐸᑯᓭᐣᑕᐣ ᑲᔦ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐃᐧ ᒪᐡᑭᑭᐃᐧᑫᐧᐃᐧ ᐊᓄᑭᓇᑲᓇᐠ ᒋᔭᓂ ᐊᔭᐊᐧᐨ ᐱᑯ ᐊᐣᑎ ᑕᔑᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᑲᐃᔑᐊᔭᑭᐣ.

Top nurse visits Sioux Lookout The CEO of the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario says that nurses should be allowed to do much more than they currently do. Dorris Grinspun toured Kenora and Sioux Lookout last week. Grinspun’s main message was about the removal of roadblocks to nursing in rural and remote communities. She said nurses are trained to do much more than they do now, but they are restricted by what they are allowed to do. She also wants to see more First Nations nurses working in communities. Page 3

Metis rights discussed at conference

The CEO of the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario says that nurses should be allowed to do much more than they currently do (top). Pic River First Nation’s Todd Genno was awarded the title of funniest amateur comic in Thunder Bay (middle right). The funding for Nishnawbe-Aski Nation Legal’s restorative justice program has been extended for one year (bottom right). Dennis Hunter of Shoal Lake said he was happy to just to be at the Canadian Masters Weightlifting Championship in Scarborough (left).

ᐃᐢᑲᑌᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ ᑲᑯᓯᑯᐅᐱᓂᑫᐨ ᑭᐸᑭᓇᑫ ᐅᓴᐃᐧᔓᓂᔭ ᑭᑭᓇᐊᐧᒋᐦᐅᐃᐧᐣ ᑌᓂᐢ ᐦᐊᐣᑐᕑ ᐃᐢᑲᑌᐃᐧᓴᑲᐃᑲᓂᐠ ᐁᐅᒋᐨ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐁᑭᒥᓀᐧᐣᑕᐠ ᑲᓇᑫ ᐱᑯ ᐁᑭᐃᑭᓯᓭᓂᐠ ᒋᐃᔕᐨ ᑲᓀᑎᔭᐣ ᒧᐢᑐᕑᐣ ᑲᑯᓯᑯᐅᐱᓂᑫᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᑲᑫᐧ ᐸᑭᓇᑎᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᐧᑎ ᐢᑲᐸᐧᕑᐅ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᐁᑕ ᒋᐅᒋ ᐃᔕᐨ, ᑭᐸᑭᓇᑫ ᐅᓴᐃᐧᔓᓂᔭ ᑭᑭᓇᐊᐧᒋᐦᐅᐃᐧᓂ. ᐦᐊᐣᑐᕑ ᐅᑭᑲᐡᑭᑐᐣ ᒋᐅᐱᓇᐠ 70 ᑭᓫᐅᐠᕑᐊᑦᐢ ᐯᔑᑲᐧᔦᐠ ᐃᒪ ᑲᐃᔑᒋᑲᓄᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᑯᑕᐠ 90 ᑭᓫᐅᐠᕑᐊᑦᐢ ᑲᑭᐃᔑᑯᒋᐦᐃᑎᐊᐧᐨ ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᐡᑲᐧᔭᐨ ᑭᒋᐸᑭᑎᓇᑫᐃᐧᓂ. ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᒥᓀᐧᐣᑕᐣ ᒣᑕᐁᐧᐃᔑᒋᑫᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᐁᑐᑕᐠ ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᐱᒥᐃᐡᑯᓄᐃᐧ ᐃᒪ ᑲᓇᑕᐧᕑ ᑲᐧᓫᐃᐨ ᑭᒋ ᐃᐡᑯᓄᑲᒥᑯᐠ ᓇᐧᕑᐟ ᐯ ᐁᑲᐧ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐁᐧᑎ ᐊᓂᓂᑲᐣ ᐅᐃᐧᑐᑕᐣ ᒋᐃᐧᒋᐦᐊᐨ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᒋᓇᑲᓇᒪᓱᐊᐧᐨ ᔓᑲᐊᐧᐱᓀᐃᐧᓂ ᐃᒪ ᐃᓀᑫ ᐊᐧᐊᐧᑲᐃᐧᐃᐧᓂᐠ.

Shoal Lake power lifter wins gold

Dennis Hunter of Shoal Lake said he was happy to just to be at the Canadian Masters Weightlifting Championship in Scarborough. But he not only attended, he won gold. Hunter lifted 70 kilograms in the snatch event and 90 kilograms in the clean and jerk event to win gold in his weight class. The sport-conditioning student at Canadore College in North Bay said his future goal is to help Anishinabe people overcome diabetes through physical activity.

Panelists at a recent Metis rights conference say that how a person views their family is often an indication of their world view. The panel discussion on family connections was part of a Metis Research Day held at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay. Much of the discussion centered on upcoming court cases that will help to define Metis rights. The president of the Metis Nation of Ontario, Gary Lipinski, said Metis people should not be defined by blood as no nation in the world uses blood to define its citizenry. Lipinski said the Metis Nation has adopted a national definition that asks the applicant to show Metis ancestry.

Page 9 ᐱᐠ ᓯᐱᐠ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂ ᑭᐸᑭᓇᑫ ᐅᐊᐧᐃᐧᔭᑌᐧᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᐱᐠ ᓯᐱᐠ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂ ᑕᐧᐟ ᒋᓄ ᑭᒥᓇᑲᓄ ᑭᑭᓇᐊᐧᒋᐦᐅᐃᐧᐣ ᐃᐧᐣ ᒪᐊᐧᐨ ᐁᑭᐸᐱᓂᑕᑲᐧᓂᐠ ᐅᐊᐧᐃᐧᔭᑌᐧᐃᐧᐣ ᐁᐧᑎ ᑕᐣᑐᕑ ᐯ. ᒋᓄ ᑭᐸᑭᓇᑫ ᐃᒪ ᐅᑌᓇᐠ ᐅᒪᒪᓇᑎᓯ ᑲᐸᐱᑕᒧᑭᐨ ᒣᑲᐧᐨ ᓂᑭᑯᐱᓯᑦ 27. ᐊᒥ ᑲᐃᑭᑐᐨ ᐁᑭ ᑭᑭᓄᐦᐊᒪᑯᐨ ᐊᓂᔑᓇᐯ ᑭᒋᔭᐦᐊᐠ ᐁᐡᑲᑦ ᐊᑯ ᐃᓯᓭ ᑲᐧᔭᐠ ᒋᒪᒥᑎᓀᒋᑲᑌᐠ, ᔕᑯᐨ ᑲᔦ ᑭᒋᓀᑕᑲᐧᐣ ᒋᒣᑕᐊᐧᓄᐊᐧᐠ ᒥᓇ ᒋᐸᐱᓇᓂᐊᐧᐠ. ᒋᓄ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᑭᒥᓇᑲᓄᐊᐧᐠ ᒋᐸᐱᐊᐧᐨ.

Pic River man wins Comic Idol Pic River First Nation’s Todd Genno was awarded the title of funniest amateur comic in Thunder Bay. Genno won the city’s Comic Idol event on April 27. He said he learned from his Anishinabe Elders that there are times when one must be serious, but it important to remember to have fun and laugh too. Genno said Native people are gifted with laughter. Page 10

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Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

3

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Top nurse wants changes to nursing system Grant Keesic

Wawatay News

Grant Keesic/Wawatay News

From left: Ann Cleland, nurse with SLFNHA; Kathleen Fitzgerald, Region 12 board representative with RNAO; Doris Grinspun, CEO with RNAO; and Paddy Dasno, nurse with SLFNHA.

BIWAASE’AA program funding cut Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

Thunder Bay’s BIWAASE’AA program for urban Aboriginal children and others in need is closing down at the end of June due to a lack of funding. “Our programming currently supports close to 500 children a day in seven local schools,” said Tammy Bobyk, executive director of Shkoday Abinojiiwak Obimiwedoon, which has operated BIWAASE’AA for the past eight years. “Without this funding, we are forced to discontinue the program and leave these children in a vulnerable position. We are deeply saddened that it has come to this and particularly because these children depend on us but we feel that we will have no other option.” Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada informed the organization at the end of March that it would no longer fund BIWAASE’AA. Although Shkoday Abinojiiwak Obimiwedoon established partnerships with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal organizations, businesses, local school boards and federal, provincial and municipal organizations to keep BIWAASE’AA operating since the end of March, they were not able to identify longterm, sustainable funding for the program. “The BIWAASE’AA program

has proven to be enormously successful over the years,” said Paul Francis, program manager. “We have the research to prove it, as well as testimonials from many local families who have been helped. This is a positive program that really makes a difference in people’s lives and positively impacts the entire community. By investing in our community’s children, we have been investing in our future. There is no reason why this program should not be funded moving forward.” BIWAASE’AA requires $700,000 to provide its services to the children and families in need, at a cost of $15 per child per day for the full program and $5 per child per day for the afterschool program. Shkoday Abinojiiwak Obimiwedoon has applied to potential funders for the program, including the province of Ontario, and unsolicited donations have been arriving on a regular basis. “It seems a heavy burden to put on the shoulders of the province to ask them to largely fund the program when the federal government has completely withdrawn its support,” Bobyk said. “The unsolicited donations from the community are both generous and encouraging, but without some significant funders coming forward, we have no other choice but to end the program.”

Doris Grinspun, CEO of the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO), visited Sioux Lookout May 9 and 10 as part of a tour of northwestern Ontario communities. Grinspun’s main message was about the removal of roadblocks to nursing in rural and remote communities. “Registered nurses are able to do way more than what they are unable to do now, including physical exams, working the clinics, counseling, et cetera,” said Grinspun. The funding structures currently in place in Ontario often do not allow for that full scope of practice in some situations in community health care, Grins-

Wawatay News

Neskantaga Chief Peter Moonias has informed the provincial government that his community will use every lawful means to oppose the Cliffs Natural Resources chromite mine project in the Ring of Fire. “We are going to police the (Attawapiskat) river system,” Moonias said. “They are going to have to cross the Attawapiskat River, but they’re not crossing — that’s what we’re saying. We’ll use every means, if we have any legal rights in the legal system that I can use, I will do that, at the First Nations cost.” Moonias sent a letter to Rick Bartolucci, minister of Northern Development and Mines, on May 11 stating his community was deeply disappointed to learn through a May 9 media announcement that the province had decided to support the Cliffs project and the proposed north-

south all-season road to the Ring of Fire. Moonias said the province made the decisions without adequate consultation with the community, noting the decisions will have significant adverse impacts on his community’s lands, environment and way of life. “There is no such thing as after the fact in consultation,” Moonias said. “Consultation happens before you go into somebody’s back yard. It wouldn’t be lawful for me to go and start digging in your back yard without letting you know first, and tell you, ‘I’ll talk to you after.’” Moonias said it is the government’s duty to consult. “The government is breaking the law, and all I’m saying is stop breaking the law,” Moonias said. “If they continue to break the law, I am going to be in the way and I am going to go as far as I can to stop that.” Moonias said he is willing to give up his life to defend his com-

the (healthcare) needs of all people.” The second issue Grinspun wants addressed is in terms of staff turnover. “The staff come and go. They leave for school and don’t come back,” Grinspun said. “There are many opportunities that I don’t think are always well known. For example we have in Ontario, the only jurisdiction in Canada that offers this program, what we call the one to one tuition reimbursement for nurses.” If a nurse leaves a community to study in school and returns to the same community, that nurse would be eligible to get up to four years of his or her tuition reimbursed, explained Grinspun. “That’s very big, and should be used as a magnet to attract

back the people to the area … and First Nation communities.” Grinspun also said she would like to encourage more men and women from First Nation communities to enter nursing as a way of bringing solutions to First Nations healthcare. “It always goes good from a health perspective. It helps to have people who understand the uniqueness better,” said Grinspun. “I would love to contribute to that in a significant way.” Grinspun visited the Health Canada-First Nations and Inuit Branch’s Sioux Lookout Zone Nursing Office, the William “Bill” George Extended Care and toured the Meno-YaWin Health Centre, which she described as one of the most beautiful hospitals she has seen.

Stan Beardy announces candidacy for Ontario regional chief

Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News

NAN Grand Chief Stan Beardy announced on May 13 he will be running for Ontario regional chief, becoming to the only challenger so far to incumbent Angus Toulouse. The election takes place June 26.

Lenny Carpenter Wawatay News

Grand Chief Stan Beardy has thrown his hat into the ring for the Ontario regional chief position, becoming the only challenger so far to incumbent Angus Toulouse. Beardy made the announcement on May 13, noting he had been thinking about it for some time after serving four terms as Nishnawbe Aski Nation grand

Neskantaga chief opposes Cliffs project Rick Garrick

pun added. “We are saying let the 4,800 nurses working in primary care work to their full capacity, (then) the people in this province, the people in Sioux Lookout will have immediate access to primary care as a result,” she said. Grinspun attended a dinner for Nurses Week at the MenoYa-Win Health Centre and made a presentation to local nurses that discussed nursing in remote communities. “From the point of view of nursing, there are several challenges,” Grinspun said. “(In Sioux Lookout) specifically … a nurse doesn’t specialize only in cancer care, only in cardiology, heart care… they need to know a lot about everything because the hospitals are smaller, they need to be able to respond to

munity’s interests on the land, both environmentally and for their livelihood. “That’s all I got left to do,” Moonias said. “I’m willing to lose my life over it. I’m going to defend it (the land) as far as I can.” Moonias said the Cliffs project will open up development in the north in a way that threatens his community’s culture and way of life, noting the proposed north-south road will cross the Attawapiskat River in the heart of the community’s territory and the airport and project site are within the community’s traditional lands. Bartolucci said the provincial government is committed to ensuring their duty to consult is met throughout the Ring of Fire development. “We have had several discussions with First Nations communities for some time now, and are committed to an ongoing dialogue.”

chief. “I’ve been very lucky, very blessed to have that kind of support from my chiefs,” Beardy said. “I just feel that it’s time to look for new opportunities.” Beardy said his 12 years as grand chief and more than 10 years as chief of Muskrat Dam First Nation gives him ample experience for the Ontario regional chief position. If elected, Beardy said his main priority would be ensur-

ing economic participation for First Nations in Ontario. He said when he reviewed the provincial and federal budgets this year, there was “very little” for First Nations people. “That tells me we have to have a different vision, different approach to maintain sustainability for my people in terms of our needs,” Beardy said. By being closer to Toronto and Ottawa should he be elected, Beardy said he wants to

raise the profile of First Nations people at the provincial and federal level. In a media release, Beardy noted his past achievements as grand chief, which included partnering with the lieutenantgovernor of Ontario to establish First Nation literacy programs; initiating Project Beyshick; creating the NAN youth, Elders and women’s councils; enhancing the Junior Rangers program; and reaching out to the Ontario, Canadian and international communities. Beardy said he will continue on as grand chief at least until the Chiefs of Ontario election, which is expected to take place on the first day of the threeday All Ontario Chiefs Conference June 26-28. The Ontario regional chief is elected through the traditional method of each community chief standing behind the candidate they support. The announcement came just as Beardy was about to head off to the NAN chiefs meeting in Cochrane, Ont., where Beardy said he would receive clarity in his role as grand chief before the election. Beardy would not comment on his plans should he not be elected, saying he is focusing on his campaign.

ᐊᓯᓂᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᐠᓫᐃᑊᐢ ᒋᔑᐦᐃᐁᐧᒪᑲᐣ ᑲᑭᐅᓀᐣᑕᐠ ᒋᑕᔑᐅᔑᐦᐃᑕᐧ ᐊᓯᓂᐠ ᐁᐧᑎ ᔕᐊᐧᓄᐠ ᓴᐟᐯᕑᐃ : ᐊᐧᐳᐢ ᐃᒪ ᐅᒋ ᐸᑭᑭᓂᑲᓂᐠ 1 ᑲᑭᓇ ᐃᒪ ᑲᐅᐣᒋ ᐸᐸᒥᓯᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᐧᔭᐠ ᒋᑲᑫᐧ ᐃᐧᒋᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᑎᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᐃᐧᔭᓄᔑ ᐱᒪᓄᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᑕᓄᑭᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ. ᑲᐧᔭᐠ ᒋᑲᑫᐧ ᐃᐧᒋᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᑎᐊᐧᐨ ᑲᐃᐧᔭᓄᔑ ᐱᒪᓄᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᑕᓄᑭᐃᐧᓂᐊᐧ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᒥᓇ ᑭᐃᑭᑐᐊᐧᐠ ᐁᐧᐱᑫᐧ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᒥᐱᑯ ᑫᐃᔑᐱᒥ ᐃᐧᒋᑕᐧᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᔕ ᑲᑭᐱᔑ ᐃᐧᑕᓄᑭᒥᑯᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᐅᑭᒪᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑲᑦᐸᓂᐣ ᑲᐃᐧᒥᑲᓇᑲᑌᐠ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ ᒋᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᑌᐱᓇᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᐁᐧᑎ ᔕᐊᐧᓄᐠ. ᔕᑯᐨ ᐊᑯᑭ ᐅᑭᒪᑲᐣ ᐃᓫᐊᔾ ᒧᓂᔭᐢ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᑲᑭᐃᔑ ᐅᓀᐣᑕᐠ ᐅᑭᐃᔑᐊᐧᐸᐣᑕᐣ ᑲᑭᑯᑕᒧᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᐅᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒪᐣ, ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᑲᐃᐧᐃᓇᒧᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑲᓂᐠ ᐁᑲ ᐃᐧᐣ ᐃᒪ ᐊᑯᑭᐠ ᒋᐅᑎᑕᒧᒋᑲᑌᐠ. “ᑲ ᑦ ᐸ ᓂ ᐅᐃᐧᑐᑕᐣ ᐁᐃᐧᐃᓇᒧᒋᑫᐨ ᐃᒪ ᒪᔭᑦ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐠ ᐸᑲᐣ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᑲᑭᓇᓇᑲᒋᑐᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᐁᐃᐧᐅᔑᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᐃᐡᑯᑌᐃᐧᑕᐸᓂ ᒥᑲᓇᓂ,” ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᒧᓂᔭᐢ. “ᓇᐣᑕ

ᐱᑯ ᓂᔭᓄᒥᑕᓇ ᑕᓱᑎᐸᐦᐊᑲᐣ ᓂᑲᑌ ᐣᑲᐊᐱᓴᐧᐸᑕᒥᐣ ᐃᒪ ᑫᐃᔑᐱᒪᒧᒋᑲᑌᐠ. ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᑕᐡ ᑲᓇᑫ ᓂᓇᐃᐧᐟ ᐣᑲᑭᔭᐸᒋᑐᒥᐣ.” ᒧᓂᔭᐢ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐊᒥ ᑲᑭᐃᓀᑕᒥᓂᐸᐣ ᐅᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒪᐣ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐅᑎᑕᒧᒋᑲᑌᓂᑭᐸᐣ ᐁᐧᑎ ᐠᕑᐃᐣᐢᑐᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐣ ᐃᐡᑯᓂᑲᓇᐣ, ᒥᐦᐃᒪ ᑫᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᐊᔭᔓᐡᑲᐊᐧᐸᐣ. “ᐃ ᐧ ᓀ ᑕ ᐱ ᑯ ᑲ ᐃ ᓀ ᐣ ᑕ ᐣ ᐅᑐᑕᐣ ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ,” ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᒧ ᓂ ᔭ ᐢ . “ᑲ ᐃ ᐧ ᐣ ᐊ ᐃ ᐧ ᔭ ᐣ ᐅ ᐃ ᐧ ᐃᐧᒋᐦᐊᐊᐧᓯᐣ, ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᐁᑲ ᐁᑲ ᓇᐣᑕ ᐃᔑᒣᑎᓂᑫᐦᐃᑯᐊᐧᐨ. ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᐅᑭᒪ ᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᐃᐧᐣ ᓇᐣᑕ ᐅᑎᓇᓯᐣ. ᐊᓂᐡ ᑫᐃᐧᐣ ᐅᑲᑫᐧᑌᐱᓇᐣ ᐊᐧᐁᐧ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᑲᑲᑫᐧ ᑲᐡᑭᑕᒪᓱᐨ.” ᒧᓂᔭᐢ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐅᑲᒪᐊᐧᒋᐦᐊᐣ ᐅᑕᓂᔑᓂᓂᒪᐣ ᐃᒪ ᐅᑎᐡᑯᓂᑲᓂᐠ ᒋᑲᑫᐧᒋᒪᐨ ᑭᐡᐱᐣ ᑭᔭᐱᐨ ᐃᓀᐣᑕᒧᐊᐧᑫᐧᐣ ᒋᐃᐧᒋᑲᐸᐃᐧᑕᒧᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᐁᐧᓂ ᐱᐊᐧᐱᑯᑫᐃᐧ ᐃᔑᒋᑫᐃᐧᓂ. ᐁᑲᐧ ᐃᐧᐣ ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐊᐧᐳᐢ, ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐃᐧ ᓂᑲᓂᑕᒪᑫᐠ ᐱᓇᒪ ᒋᑭᐊᔐᑲᐸᐃᐧᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᐁᑲᐧ ᒋᑭ ᓇᓇᑲᒋᑐᐊᐧᐸᐣ ᐃᐁᐧᓂ ᑲᑭᑐᑕᒥᓂᐨ ᑲᑦᐸᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᐊᓂᐣ ᐊᐱᐣ ᑫᐃᔑᓇᑲᐧᓄᑫᐧᐣ

ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᐣ ᐁᐧᑎ ᐊᓂᓂᑲᐣ ᑲ ᑭ ᐃ ᑭ ᑐ ᓇ ᓂ ᐊ ᐧ ᑭ ᐸ ᐣ ᒋᐃᐧᑕᓄᑭᒥᑐᐊᐧᐨ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᐅᑭᒪᐃᐧᐣ, ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᒥᓇ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐊᐧᐠ. ᑭᐃᑭᑐ ᐅᓄᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᑲᐱᒥᐊᓂᒧᒋᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᑫᑯᓇᐣ ᒥᐢᑕᐦᐃ ᐃᔑᓇᑲᐧᐣ ᐊᐱᐨ ᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᑦᐸᓂ ᐅᑕᓄᑭᐃᐧᐣ, ᒥᓇ ᐅᐣᒋ ᐸᑭᑌᐡᑲᑫᒪᑲᓄᐣ ᑲᐊᓂᒥᓇᑲᐧᑭᐣ ᐃᓯᓭᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᓇᐣ ᑲᐱᑲᑫᐧ ᒪᒋᒋᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᐅᐁᐧᑎ ᑭᐁᐧᑎᓄᐠ. “ᑭ ᒋ ᓀ ᐣ ᑕ ᑲ ᐧ ᐣ ᒋᑭᑲᑫᐧ ᓂᓯᑕᐃᐧᓇᒪᑭᐸᐣ ᑯᑕᑭᔭᐣ ᑭᒋᑫᑯᓇᐣ ᑐᑲᐣ ᐊᓂᐣ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧᐣ ᑲᐊᓂᔑ ᒪᒋᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᑭᐁᐧᑎᓄᐠ,” ᑭ ᐃ ᑭ ᑐ ᐊ ᐧ ᐳ ᐢ . “ᒋ ᐊ ᓂ ᒧ ᑕ ᒪ ᐠ ᒪᒪᐤ ᑫᐅᐣᒋ ᒥᓄᓭᐊᐧᑫᔭᐠ ᑲᒪᓂᔓᓂᔭᐊᐧᑌᐠ ᐊᐦᑭ. ᓇᑕᐁᐧᐣᑕᑲᐧᐣ ᒋᐊᓂᒧᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᑫᑭᐅᐣᒋᓂᓯᑕᐃᐧᓂᑲᑌᐠ ᑲᐃᑯᑎᐯᐣᒋᑫᔭᐠ ᑭᑕᑭᒥᓇᐣ. ᑭᓇᐃᐧᐟ ᐃᐁᐧ ᑭᑕᑭᒥᓇᐣ ᐁᑲᐧ ᑕᐡ ᑭᓇᐃᐧᐟ ᑭᑕᐅᓀᐣᑕᒥᐣ ᐊᓂᐣ ᑫᑐᒋᑲᑌᐠ ᑭᑕᑭᒥᓇᐣ, ᑲᐧᐃᐣ ᑕᐡ ᐃᓯᓭᐸᐣ ᐊᐧᐃᔭ ᐁᐧᑎ ᑐᕑᐊᐣᑐ ᑲᐅᐣᒋᐨ ᒋᒪᒥᓇᐨ ᐊᓄᑭᐃᐧ ᒪᓯᓇᐦᐃᑲᓀᓴᐣ ᐃᓂᐁᐧᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᑲᑦᐸᓂᐊᐧᐣ ᐁᑲ ᐱᓇᒪ ᑭᓇᐃᐧᐟ ᐁᑭᐅᐣᒋ ᑲᑫᐧᒋᒥᑯᔭᐠ ᒥᓇ ᐸᑭᑕᔓᐊᐧᑕᒪᐠ ᒋᐱᔭᓄᑭᐊᐧᐨ.”


4

Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

From the Wawatay archives 16-5th Avenue North P.O. Box 1180 Sioux Lookout, ON P8T 1B7 Serving the First Nations in Northern Ontario since 1974. Wawatay News is a politically independent weekly newspaper published by Wawatay Native Communications Society.

ᓂᐢᑕᑦ ᑲᑭᒪᑕᓄᑲᑌᐠ 1974 ᐁᐅᒋᐊᓄᑲᑌᑭᐣ ᑭᐧᐁᑎᓄᐠ ᐅᐣᑌᕑᐃᔪ ᑕᐃᑦᔑᑫᐧᐃᓇᐣ. ᑕᓱᓂᔓᐱᒥᑯᓇᑲ ᐅᔑᒋᑲᑌ ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᓂᔑᓂᓂᐧᐃ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ ᒥᓇ ᑲᐧᐃᐣ ᐅᓇᔓᐧᐁᐧᐃ ᑲᓇᐧᐊᐸᒋᑫᐧᐃᓂᐠ ᒋᐃᔑ ᐸᐸᒥᓯᒪᑲᐠ ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓂᑫᐧᐃᓇᐣ. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER David Neegan

Editorial

First impressions leave much to be desired in Ring of Fire Shawn Bell EDITOR

T

he Ontario government is good at using the right words when it comes to discussing First Nations involvement in the Ring of Fire. But as last week’s Cliff’s Resources smelter decision showed, it remains unwilling – or unable – to put those good words into play when it comes to making decisions. The announcement that Cliffs selected Sudbury to locate its Ring of Fire smelter was met with disappointment from across northwestern Ontario. The provincial government obviously anticipated that reaction. Two cabinet ministers, including Aboriginal Affairs Minister Kathleen Wynne, were sent to Thunder Bay to break the news. They repeatedly expressed their condolences to leaders of the region, while emphasizing that locating the smelter in Sudbury was a business decision made by Cliffs. Another sentiment came out between the lines. The ministers may have wanted the processing plant to go to Greenstone, but they were also afraid it would go to Quebec instead. Despite the government’s apparent preference for Greenstone, there was no chance it was going to do anything to jeopardize the smelter being located in Sudbury. After all, if you live in Toronto, Sudbury is northern Ontario too, and if you’re part of the Ontario government, anywhere within the province is better than anywhere outside it. That attitude may make sense from a provincial perspective, but it misses two very important points when it comes to First Nations involvement in the Ring of Fire. The first may seem minor to those in the south, but it is reflective of government’s attitudes towards the North for the province’s entire history. If you are from Marten Falls, or Aroland, or any one of the First Nations with traditional lands around the Ring of Fire, Sudbury is not in the North. It is far to the south, in another part of the country altogether. Putting the processing plant in Greenstone, as a consortium of First Nations and northwestern Ontario municipalities suggested, would have sent a clear message that the company and the government respect the territories that the minerals are being taken from. It would have signified an understanding of the importance of building relationships with the local people. And it would have set a clear precedent for other companies working the Ring of Fire that providing jobs, economic development and infrastructure

to communities of the region is essential in getting these mines off the ground. Instead, Ontario took the easy way out and allowed Cliffs to locate the processing plant in Sudbury. While the ministers were right in saying that the Cliffs project is just the first of many for the region, this was the precedent-setting case. And Ontario showed clearly how unable or unwilling it is to make sure companies are required to develop the actual region where the minerals are found. Which brings up the second point from last week’s announcement. First Nations around the Ring of Fire have been quite accommodating to the government and the companies. For the most part, the bands have refrained from playing hardball on mining. They have expressed interest in working with industry and government on getting this development right. They have been open to sharing their hopes, aspirations and suggestions for how the Ring of Fire can include and benefit First Nations people. They were doing all of that with the expectation that their ideas would be listened to. Cliffs may talk about how it is only one company of many that could potentially be working in the Ring of Fire. But there is no way to separate Cliffs from the big picture. Each project that goes forward sets precedents for those that come after; not only through the roads, rail lines and power systems developed, but also by how it moves through the process of getting the mine up and running. If Ontario really wanted the Ring of Fire to be different than other developments across the country that ignored First Nations, it has missed its first good chance. The province was dealing with willing First Nations who were widely in favour of mining. It had an opportunity to show it was serious about First Nations consultation and accommodation. And it could have done so with just a few changes to what the company was pushing for. In the end, communities most affected by the Cliffs decision really only wanted a few things. One, put the processing plant in Greenstone so local people could have a better chance of getting those jobs. Two, connect the transportation network to the communities along the route. Three, power the mine with hydro so the communities surrounding the development could tie into the electricity grid. Sure, the Cliffs decision is only the first step in a decadeslong development that will drastically change the region. But as everyone knows, first impressions are often lasting. Ontario had an opportunity to show it was serious about working with First Nations. Instead, it took the easy way out.

Wawatay News archives

Sachigo Lake, 1993.

It is time to put the care back in health care Xavier Kataquapit UNDER THE NORTHERN SKY

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his winter was the strangest one that I have ever seen when it comes to being sick. I was actually ill with some kind of lung infection for three months. Many of my family members and friends were also sick with this type of infection. It was terrible as I had a sore throat for awhile, then lost my voice and then coughed for a couple of months. It seemed like at one point just about everyone I was coming in contact with had this sickness. I believe that many elderly or health compromised people passed away this winter and spring with whatever this lung sickness was. When this type of serious illness begins to spread and finally ends up in remote First Nation communities it often ends up sending people to the hospital and in some cases this results in infections becoming deadly. Many people don’t know that in remote First Nations there are no doctors available at the local hospital and often nurs-

ing staff is limited. If people get really sick they have to be flown out of the community to a health facility where there are doctors and specialists. As a matter of fact, remote First Nation communities don’t even have dentists or optometrists. All of these professionals routinely visit the communities but they are not on site full time. So when a remote First Nation person gets critically ill, if he or she is lucky and everything falls into place properly they will be treated in the community by health professionals or flown out to a regional health facility. If things don’t fall into place then people often end up passing away. That happens to some extent in many non Native northern Canadian towns but more so in remote First Nations. The proper high level health care and medical equipment is just not available. So, you would think that if there was a very serious and seemingly highly infectious upper respiratory infection going around our health officials would be alarmed and letting people know. Well, we do have government agencies who report on the flu and watchdogs like the World Health Organization (WHO) that monitor and warn us about all kinds

of sickness but somehow this lung illness that hit so many this winter and spring went unnoticed. How can that be? It seems that it just did not fit into the criteria that these agencies understand. Actually, most of the reading I have done on the subject of flu, colds, viruses and bacteria mostly resulted in confusion. People I know this winter who ended up with this terrible sickness didn’t even know what to refer to it as. Was it a flu? Was it a cold? Perhaps it was human metapneumoviruses, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV for short), adenoviruses and rhinoviruses which can all cause flu like sickness. Flu Watch reported this year that there was a surge in RSV. As far as I can figure out this could be what I was ill with and what affected so many people. The virus attacks the lungs and breathing passages but most people tend to recover within a week or two. I don’t know anyone who did. RSV is the most common cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children and can create problems for anyone with compromised immune systems or those over 65 years of age. Secondary infections also seem

to be a problem for people and other organs in the body can be affected as a result of the initial illness. So, while all the experts claimed that this was such a wonderful low case year for the flu it seems that more people than ever were sick with something else that did not fit into that criteria. The problem is nobody including the experts seem to know what it was or is. That does not make me feel very secure about health monitoring and reporting. Finally, after seeing a couple of doctors and talking to others who were sick with the same symptoms I ended up on an antibiotic that worked so I guess I had a bacterial infection that was secondary. In a few days I was feeling much better after having been ill for three months. I still don’t have a good idea of what I was sick with and the sad part is there are no health professionals who can tell me. It seems to be a mystery. I believe we are in this situation because we feel it is more important to spend billions on wars and giving tax cuts to the very rich rather than in putting big dollars into our health care system. So, as a doctor I met once aptly pointed out to me ... just don’t get sick and if you do...good luck.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER David Neegan davidn@wawatay.on.ca

ART DIRECTOR Roxann Shapwaykeesic, RGD roxys@wawatay.on.ca

TRANSLATORS Vicky Angees vickya@wawatay.on.ca

CONTACT US Sioux Lookout

Office Hours: 8:30-5:00 CST Phone: .....................737-2951 Toll Free: ......1-800-243-9059 Fax: ................(807) 737-3224. ............... (807) 737-2263

Thunder Bay

Office Hours: 8:30-4:30 EST Phone: ....................344-3022 Toll Free: ...... 1-888-575-2349 Fax: ................(807) 344-3182

EDITOR Shawn Bell shawnb@wawatay.on.ca WRITER/PHOTOGRAPHER Rick Garrick rickg@wawatay.on.ca WRITER/PHOTOGRAPHER Lenny Carpenter lennyc@wawatay.on.ca

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Matthew Bradley matthewb@wawatay.on.ca SALES MANAGER James Brohm jamesb@wawatay.on.ca CIRCULATION Adelaide Anderson reception@wawatay.on.ca

Agnes Shakakeesic agness@wawatay.on.ca CONTRIBUTORS Xavier Kataquapit Stephanie Wesley Grant Keesic Adrienne Fox Joyce Atcheson

Guest editorials, columnists and letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the views of Wawatay News.


Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

Health: it’s ours, it’s not a pill Joyce Atcheson HEALTH

Substandard health services have been the hallmark of the federal government’s plan to meet its fiduciary responsibility for isolated First Peoples’ health. The government’s choice has been the delivery of daily health services by registered nurses (RNs) but the RNs usually do not have the extra nurse practitioner skills and education which is the standard required of nurses in the south. Now these inappropriate, inadequately staffed services and budget cuts could lead us to believe we are doomed; to make us lose hope if we believe we are worth less. News flash: in case governments and the general population haven’t noticed, we survive! The pain and suffering is immense, unjust, and overwhelming, but we are strong and resilient. One of our traditional teachings is that ‘enemies’ strongest and best warriors will help us become better as we outsmart them to win. When I felt overwhelmed and believed health care inequities for First Peoples would never change, late Elder Elsie Nanooch from Garden River, Alberta, told me, ‘If you quit, then they will win.’ She guided me, asking through a translator, ‘What do you do to help yourself?’

Letter

‘I walk or run every day, listen to the wind in the trees, the birds, the insects, dogs barking, and the sounds of early morning as I watch grasses move, the sun rise over the trees, and the world awaken. These give me drive to keep going,’ I said. ‘Tapwe,’ she said nodding. The truth is our healing comes from the land, from Creator’s gift to us, not from a pill.

We can do anything we really want to do. Let go of all doubt, believe it is possible, we can do it, and focus. It happens. Before the government intervened and before lies were told at treaty time, people lived largely disease free. ‘When I was a girl, we had fewer diseases,’ late Elder Jemima Morris of Wawakapewin and Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug told me in 2001 while talking about treaties. ‘We used land medicines, ate from the land, lived on the land, and rarely had illness.’ In the past months and years we’ve seen First Peoples standing up for Kanawayandan D’aaki -- for beemadziwin. We cannot let them win. We have future generations who need us to provide, protect, nurture, and teach survival ways. Health is part of that. When I moved from Ontario I came to Nova Scotia and helped Mi’kmaq Elder,

to the

Healer and Shake Tent man David Gehue write two books about his experiences. David’s strongest message: our minds create what we want to see and experience in our lives. If we focus on fear, we get it so we can face it and overcome it. If we focus on health with our heart and mind, the emotion we attach to our desire is what makes our bodies work toward the image we hold in our mind’s eye. We can do anything we really want to do. Let go of all doubt, believe it is possible, we can do it, and focus. It happens. Sure we’ll stumble and fall, we won’t meet success the first time and maybe not until the twelfth time, but we can do it if we never quit. We fail only when we give up. David’s words echoed my work as a nurse practitioner in northern Alberta. I told our people that we could heal ourselves. (We didn’t need pills but I would give them if the person wanted them.) I saw people successfully overcome illnesses. They began with the belief they could do it, added some land medicines and went to bed to rest. Try it, you’ll see. Share and help one another, go to the Elders, they will help. Joyce, a Métis woman of Plains Cree origin, is a freelance writer with a former career in health care. Her extensive examination of the isolated communities’ health care in Wawatay, Sept 1999, revealed the frank double standards of the system. Her column will be a regular contribution to Wawatay News.

Editor

Critical times facing Ojibwa and Cree nations; corporate interests and governments have to share benefits There have been critical times facing the Ojibwa and Cree Nations throughout their history and have been capable of adapting to changing circumstances. In the more recent history, the Ojibwa and Cree peoples foresaw a future of foreign settlement upon their lands. One such critical juncture was the signing of the 1905/06 James Bay Treaty Number Nine. It laid the political and fiscal foundation for future relationship with the Europeans encroaching on their homelands. Treaties resulted in the formation of Canada as we know it today. Another milestone is the creation of Grand Council Treaty Number Nine in 1973. This moment marked the collective will and unity of the Cree and Ojibwa Nations who wanted to assert their rightful place in society. They wanted to demonstrate the strength of their autonomy. This was a time of renewal and resurgence of warriors who would represent the people at all levels of government. The treaty based organization was to protect the treaty and ensure its benefits flow to the people and their communities. Another critical juncture was the Declaration of Independence in 1977. Canada was put on notice on the serious abdication of treaty promises and the ever rising exploitation of Treaty 9 lands and natural resources. In 1982, Treaty 9 was recognized in the new Canadian Constitution after the people joined forces with other Indigenous Nations to fight for the protection of their treaties and recognition of Aboriginal rights. Nishnawbe Aski Nation marked 100 years

of Treaty 9 in 2005/06 and declared the era of broken promises and marginalization would end. The next 100 years would be a time of fulfilling the political and fiscal promises, and the vision of the founding fathers of Treaty Number Nine of a prosperous future for their people, living in peaceful coexistence with the new settlers. In 2012, the peoples of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation are faced with another critical juncture in the form of resource development exploitation and dispossession in the Remote North of NAN. They are being marginalized in the extraction of their natural resources, with puny corporate compromises in exchange for unfettered access to the wealth of Treaty 9. Ontario is fast tracking processes and amending legislation to accommodate mining interests. Canada is beginning to dismantle environmental policies at the expense of the environment, Indigenous peoples , and Canadians. It is another critical time for the leaders, Elders and people of Treaty 9 to exert their alliance to ensure all signatory communities of Treaty Nine benefit from the extraction of their natural resources, including the preservation of their environment, and the cultural fabric of the people. Both corporate interests and governments have to share benefits being generated that will honour the spirit and intent of Treaty 9. Dean Cromarty Wunnumin Lake First Nation

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Aroland First Nation Band Office Atikokan Native Friendship Centre Attawapiskat Northern Store Balmertown Diane’s Gas Bar Balmertown Keewaytinook Okimakanak Batchewana First Nation Band Office Bearskin Lake Co-op Store Bearskin Lake Northern Store Beaverhouse First Nation Band Office Big Grassy First Nation Band Office Big Island First Nation Band Office Big Trout Lake Education Authority Big Trout Lake Sam’s Store Big Trout Lake Tasona Store Brunswick House First Nation Band Office Calstock A & J General Store Calstock Band Office Cat Lake First Nation Band Office Cat Lake Northern Store Chapleau Cree First Nation Band Office Chapleau Value Mart Cochrane Ininew Friendship Centre Collins Post Office Couchiching First Nation Band Office Couchiching First Nation Gas Bar Curve Lake Rosie’s Variety Deer Lake Northern Store Dinorwic Naumans General Store Dryden A & W Restaurant Dryden Beaver Lake Camp Dryden Greyhound Bus Depot Dryden McDonalds Restaurant Dryden Northwest Metis Nation of Ontario Dryden Robins Donut’s Ear Falls Kahooters Kabins & RV Park Emo J & D Junction Flying Post First Nation Band Office Fort Albany Band Office Fort Albany Northern Store Fort Frances Gizhewaadiziwin Health Access Centre Fort Frances Sunset Country Metis Fort Frances United Native Friendship Centre Fort Hope Corny’s Variety Store Fort Hope First Nation Band Office Fort Hope John C. Yesno Education Centre Fort Severn Northern Store Geraldton Thunder Bird Friendship Centre Ginoogaming First Nation Band Office Gogama Mattagammi Confectionary & Game Grassy Narrows J.B. Store Gull Bay Band Office Hornepayne First Nation Band Office Hornepayne G & L Variety Store Hudson East Side Convenience & Cafe Iskatewizaagegan Independent First Nation Band Office Kapuskasing Indian Friendship Centre

Kasabonika Chief Simeon McKay Education Centre Kasabonika First Nation Band Office Kashechewan First Nation Band Office Kashechewan Francine J. Wesley Secondary School Kashechewan Northern Store Keewaywin First Nation Band Office Keewaywin Northern Store Kenora Bimose Tribal Council Office Kenora Chiefs Advisory Office Kenora Migisi Treatment Centre Kenora Ne-Chee Friendship Centre Kenora Sunset Strip Enterprise Kingfisher Lake Omahamo Hotel Complex Kingfisher Lake Omahamo Store Kocheching First Nation Band Office Lac La Croix First Nation Band Office Lake Nipigon Ojibway First Nation Band Office Lansdowne House Co-op Store Lansdowne House Northern Store Long Lake First Nation Band Office Michipicoten First Nation Band Office Migisi Sahgaigan First Nation Band Office Mishkeegogamang First Nation Band Office Mishkeegogamang Laureen’s Grocery & Gas Missanabie Cree First Nation Band Office Moose Factory Echo Lodge Restaurant Moose Factory GG’s Corner & Gift Store Moose Factory Northern Store Moose Factory Weeneebayko General Hospital Moosonee Air Creebec Counter Moosonee Native Friendship Centre Moosonee Northern Store Moosonee Ontario Northland Railway Moosonee Polar Bear Lodge Moosonee Tempo Variety Moosonee Two Bay Enterprises Muskrat Dam Community Store Muskrat Dam First Nation Musselwhite Mine Naicatchewenin First Nation Band Office Namaygoosisagon Band Office Nestor Falls C & C Motel Nicikousemenecaning First Nation Band Office North Spirit Lake Cameron Store North Spirit Lake First Nation Band Office Northwest Angle First Nation Band Office Ochiichagwe’babigo’ining First Nation Band Office Ogoki Trappers Store Ojibways of Pic River Nation Band Office Onegaming Gas & Convenience Onegaming Public Library Pawitik Store

Pawitik Whitefish Bay Band Office Pays Plat First Nation Band Office Peawanuck First Nation Band Office Pic Mobert First Nation Band Office Pickle Lake Frontier Foods Pickle Lake Winston Motor Hotel Pikangikum Education Authority Pikangikum First Nation Band Office Pikangikum Northern Store Poplar Hill First Nation Band Office Poplar Hill Northern Store Rainy River First Nation Band Office Red Lake Indian Friendship Centre Red Lake Video Plus Red Lake Wasaya Airways Counter Red Rock First Nation Band Office Rocky Bay First Nation Band Office Sachigo Lake Co-op Store Sachigo Lake First Nation Sandy Lake A-Dow-Gamick Sandy Lake Education Authority Sandy Lake First Nation Band Office Sandy Lake Northern Store Saugeen First Nation Band Office Sault Ste. Marie Indian Friendship Centre Savant Lake Ennis Grocery Store Seine River First Nation Band Office Shoal Lake First Nation Band Office Sioux Narrows Anishinaabeg of Kabapikotawang Slate Falls Nation Band Office Stanjikoming First Nation Band Office Stratton Kay-Nah-Chi-Wah- Nung Historical Centre Summer Beaver Nibinamik Community Store Taykwa Tagamou Nation Band Office Timmins Air Creebec Counter Timmins Indian Friendship Centre Timmins Wawatay Native Communication Society Wabaskang First Nation Band Office Wabigoon First Nation Band Office Wabigoon Green Achers of Wabigoon Wabigoon Lake Community Store Wahgoshing First Nation Band Office Wapekeka Community Store Washaganish First Nation Band Office Wauzhusk Onigum First Nation Band Office Weagamow Lake Northern Store Weagamow Lake Onatamakay Community Store Webequie Northern Store Whitedog Kent Store Whitesand First Nation Band Office Wunnimun Lake General Store Wunnimun Lake Ken-Na-Wach Radio Wunnimun Lake Northern Store

Landmark Inn Metis Nation of Ontario Native People of Thunder Bay Development Corporation Negahneewin College of Indigenous Studies Quality Market, Centennial Square Redwood Park Opportunities Centre Seven Generations Education Institute Thunder Bay Indian Friendship Centre Wawatay Native Communications Society

Wequedong Lodge 1 Wequedong Lodge 3 Westfort Foods Fort William First Nation Band Office Fort William First Nation Bannon’s Gas Bar Fort William First Nation K & A Variety Fort William First Nation THP Variety and Gas Bar

Thunder Bay Outlets Central News Chapman’s Gas Bar Confederation College Satellite Office, 510 Victoria Ave. East Dennis F. Cromarty High School Hulls Family Bookstore John Howard Society of Thunder Bay & District Ka-Na-Chi-Hih Treatment Centre Lakehead University Aboriginal Awareness Centre

Sioux Lookout Outlets 5 Mile Corner Al’s Sports Excellence Best Western Chicken Chef DJ’s Gas Bar Drayton Cash & Carry Fifth Avenue Club First Step Women’s Shelter Forest Inn Independent First Nations Alliance Jeremiah McKay Kabayshewekamik Hostel Johnny’s Fresh Market

Lamplighter Motel Mascotto’s Marine Nishnawbe-Gamik Friendship Centre Northern Store Pelican Falls First Nation High School Pharmasave Queen Elizabeth District High School Robin’s Donuts Sacred Heart School Shibogama Tribal Council Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre Sioux Lookout Public Library

Sioux Lottery Sioux Mountain Public School Sioux Pharmacy Slate Falls Airways Sunset Inn & Suites Travel Information Centre Wasaya Airways Counter Wawatay Native Communications Society Wellington Inn William A. Bill George Extended Care Wilson’s Business Solutions Windigo Tribal Council

If you run a business and would like to distribute Wawatay News, Please call 1-800-243-9059.

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Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

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Multi-year restorative justice funding needed Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

Restorative justice worker Betty Achneepineskum recently faced a layoff due to late federal government funding for Nishnawbe-Aski Legal Services Corporation’s Restorative Justice program. Fortunately for the communities she serves, the program’s funding was extended for one year. “With the new criminal legislation (Safe Streets and Communities Act) that had been passed in March, it really made us apprehensive as to whether or not our program would continue,” said Achneepineskum, who serves the Matawa First Nation remote communities from the NAN Legal Thunder Bay office. “So we were quite happy — we do have a one-year extension so within that time we hope to gather evidence and documentation for us to continue lobbying to have our program continue.” NAN Legal executive director Celina Reitberger said five Restorative Justice staff faced layoffs due to lack of funding. The Restorative Justice pro-

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Betty Achneepineskum, restorative justice worker with Nishnawbe-Aski Legal Services Corporation, is one of five staff who faced layoffs due to late funding for the long-running Restorative Justice program. gram has been in operation since 2000. “It was a very difficult time for us all and the clients we serve because we couldn’t take any new referrals until we knew we had the funding to carry on,” Reitberger said.

Reitberger said the funding for the Restorative Justice program ran out a month before Rob Nicholson, minister of justice and attorney general of Canada, announced on April 30 that funding for the Aboriginal Justice Strategy would continue

at current levels. “Our government is committed to keeping our streets and communities safe,” Nicholson said. “This funding helps make the justice system more effective, fair, and accessible, and ensures value for taxpay-

NOTICE OF SUBMISSION OF CLASS ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT A Class Environmental Assessment for activities of the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines under the Mining Act The Ministry of Northern Development and Mines (MNDM) has completed the Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) for its activities under the Mining Act. As required under section 6.2 (1) of the Environmental Assessment Act, and according to the terms of reference approved by the Minister of the Environment on August 23, 2011, the MNDM has submitted its Class EA to the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) for review and approval. The Class EA comprises two classes of activities: discretionary tenure decisions and discretionary mine rehabilitation activities. As required under the Environmental Assessment Act, the Class EA will be available for public review and comment from May 11 to June 29, 2012.

ers’ dollars. Our government is continuing to support the provision of criminal legal aid for economically disadvantaged persons charged with serious criminal offences and to help Aboriginal communities develop community-based justice processes.” Nicholson’s announcement stated the one-year renewal of the Aboriginal Justice Strategy would provide $12.5 million to on and off-reserve, urban, rural and northern Aboriginal communities for community-based justice programs. The federally-led strategy has operated for 20 years to assist Aboriginal communities to develop and implement community-based justice processes that operate within the Canadian justice system. Provincial and territorial governments provide equivalent contributions. Community-based justice programs are linked to lower recidivism rates, are cost-effective in dealing with non-violent offenders, where circumstances warrant, and help address the high rate of over-representation of Aboriginal people in the Canadian justice system, both as victims and offenders. Achneepinskum first joined the Restorative Justice team in 2002, after working at NAN Legal since 1992. “The Restorative Justice program services the Nishnawbe Aski Nation communities and there isn’t any other program like it that exists, so it is a valuable program,” Achneepineskum said. “We have built the relationship in the communities and our credibility within the Euro-Canadian justice system.” Reitberger is requesting multi-year funding from the

Wood Products Ontario

A copy of the draft Class EA is available via www.ontario.ca/MDLB and at: Ministry of the Environment 2 St. Clair Avenue West, Floor 12A Toronto, ON M4V 1L5 tel: 416-314-8001 toll-free: 1-800-461-6290

2430 Don Reid Drive Ottawa, ON K1H 1K1 tel: 613-521-3450 toll-free: 1-800-860-2195

REQUEST FOR QUOTATIONS TO PROCESS AND DELIVER BIOMASS, WOOD CHIPS & ROUNDWOOD

Ministry of Northern Development and Mines 933 Ramsey Lake Road, 6th Floor Sudbury, ON P3E 6B5 tel: 705-670-5755 toll-free: 1-888-415-9875 ext. 5755

104-810 Robertson Street Kenora, ON P9N 4J2 tel: 807-468-2819

10 Government Road P.O. Box 100 Kirkland Lake, ON P2N 3M6 tel: 705-568-4517

203-447 McKeown Avenue North Bay, ON P3E 6B5 tel: 705-494-4045

6-875 Queen Street East Sault Ste. Marie, ON P6A 2B3 tel: 705-945-6931

B0002-435 James Street South Thunder Bay, ON P7E 6S7 tel: 807-475-1311

1270 Highway 101 East South Porcupine, ON P0N 1H0 tel: 705-235-1625

P.O. Bag Service 43 126 Old Troy Road Tweed, ON K0K 3J0 tel: 613-478-3161

federal Department of Justice, noting the program previously received a five-year funding commitment. “We would either like multiyear funding or better still, annualized funding, so we can carry on and expand what we are trying to do instead of always fighting this uncertainty and loss of momentum when the funding is in jeopardy.” Jim Beardy, vice-chair for NAN Legal, said the Restorative Justice program has been “very helpful” for community members who come in contact with the law. “Rather than spending time or going to court to deal with their issues, it’s more appropriate for them to deal with their issues at the community level with the community,” Beardy said. Beardy fears that community members would once again have to face a court system that does not understand how the communities operate if the Restorative Justice funding ended. “It would affect them in a very negative way where a lot of people would end up in court, in jail and the community would have no say in the matter,” Beardy said. Julie Di Mambro, press secretary for Nicholson, said the federal government is committed to enhancing the safety and security of Aboriginal communities. “Recently we announced that funding for this program will continue at current levels for another year,” Mambro said in an e-mail reply. “As with all our time-limited initiatives, we will review the results they have delivered for Canadians before deciding on next steps.”

Resolute Forest Products, in preparation for the start-up of its Condensing Turbine project to produce a sustainable supply of renewable green electricity, invites quotations for the processing and delivery of biomass, wood chips and roundwood from the following areas on the Black Spruce and Dog River-Matawin SFLs. ○ Current River Area (Black Spruce Forest), estimated annual volume of 60,000 GMT biomass

Anyone wishing to provide comments on the Class EA must submit their comments in writing and/or by fax to the MOE by June 29, 2012. All comments should be submitted to:

○ Boreal Road Area (Dog River-Matawin Forest), estimated annual volume of 60,000 GMT biomass

Cindy Batista, Project Officer Ministry of the Environment Environmental Approvals Branch 2 St. Clair Avenue West, Floor 12A Toronto, ON M4V 1L5 tel: 416-314-8214 toll-free: 1-800-461-6290 fax: 416-314-8452

○ Dog River Area (Dog River-Matawin Forest), estimated annual volume of 60,000 GMT biomass ○ Cameron Falls Area / Black Sturgeon Area (Black Spruce Forest), estimated annual volume of 60,000 GMT biomass, 69,000 m3 pulp chips, and 34,500 m3 roundwood.

A copy of all comments will be forwarded to the MNDM for consideration. If you have any questions or need further information about this project, please contact: Jenn Lillie-Paetz, Environmental Assessment Coordinator Strategic Support Unit, Mineral Development and Lands Branch Ministry of Northern Development and Mines 933 Ramsey Lake Road, 6th Floor, Sudbury, ON P3E 6B5 tel: 705-670-5918 / 1-888-415-9845 ext. 5918 fax: 705-670-5803 e-mail: Jennifer.Lillie-Paetz@ontario.ca

The successful contractor(s) will provide the processing and delivery of the biomass and pulp chips to the Resolute Forest Products Thunder Bay Pulp & Paper mill, and the roundwood to the Resolute Forest Products Thunder Bay Sawmill. Proposals must be received by 4 pm on Friday, June 8, 2012.

Please note that personal information provided in a submission (such as name, address, and telephone number) and your views and opinions are collected, unless otherwise stated in the submission, under the Environmental Assessment Act and Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. The submission will become part of the public record files for this matter and will be released, if requested, to any person.

BLEED

To receive a copy of the information package and the quotation requirements, contact Martin Kaiser, Thunder Bay Wood Products, at 807-475-2356 or martin.kaiser@resolutefp.com.

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Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

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Women encouraged to start businesses Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

“We know it is the Anishinabe way of life to work in clusters.” Those were the comments of Linda McGuire, Aboriginal mentoring coordinator with PARO Centre for Women’s Enterprise, as she spoke about creating clusters during the launch of a new series of online workshops aimed at connecting Aboriginal women from northern communities with northern business leaders. “Craft groups, cultural and traditional circles are great examples of clusters in a traditional setting,” McGuire said.

“Through this training, PARO will show participants how to apply traditional practices to achieve business success. Together, we will look forward at the path to self-sufficiency and teach women how dreams can come true.” PARO plans to deliver the series of six online learning workshops throughout the month of May for women who are looking to start, grow or build a business and new networks across the region. The workshops include: What is a Cluster by Jessica Hill from Women’s Economic Council on May 3, How a Cluster Works by Sandi Boucher from Centre for Change on May 10, My First Step – Path-

Kinew unsure of Aboriginal programming at CBC

way to Success by Linda McGuire, Cassie Riddle and Darlene Angeconeb on May 17, My Shooniah (Money) by Kim Bird from Nishnawbe Aski Development Fund on May 24 and Social Networking by Alice Sabourin on May 30. “I think it would be beneficial for the women to learn about starting their own businesses,” said Angeconeb, project coordinator with Equaywuk (Women’s Group). “My role within the workshops would be to help them start women’s groups, to help them develop their mission statements and their objectives.” Angeconeb emphasized some of the successes achieved by women across the north,

Wawatay News

Wab Kinew is unsure how funding cuts to CBC will affect Aboriginal programming. The host of the much lauded 8th Fire series said the series was a good first step in mainstream media telling Aboriginal stories and hopes to see more.

Adrienne Fox

Special to Wawatay News

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation is facing a $115-million cut to its annual budget over the next three years. And one of its rising stars is unsure about how those cuts will affect Aboriginal programming like the much lauded 8th Fire series. Wab Kinew is the face for the television series that aired over four installments earlier this year. The prime time show delved into Aboriginal history and current issues in a fast-paced style that brought Canada’s Aboriginal People to the forefront.

“I would like to see 8th Fire continue in some way but it’s not going to be a TV series again. That’s just not going to happen with the cuts and budget reality with CBC.”

-Wab Kinew

Kinew is proud of the series. “People thought it was a revelation,” he said. But “we

were just being honest about things.” He said the series reinforced his belief that there’s still a lot of work to be done when it comes to mainstream media telling Aboriginal stories. Kinew said The 8th Fire series was a good first step. “Now the challenge is how we take that momentum and move it forward?” he said. “I would like to see 8th Fire continue in some way but it’s not going to be a TV series again. That’s just not going to happen with the cuts and budget reality with CBC.” The 30-year-old is hoping 8th Fire will surge forward through community events like a youth conference held in Thompson, Man., March 14-16. He also wants to keep a presence online. “If not The 8th Fire show then at least some other sort of entertaining but substantive show that helps foster better understanding about Aboriginal people,” he said. Kinew is taking time off from his broadcasting role to spend time with family and attend speaking engagements. He will return to CBC this fall.

“I think it would be beneficial for the women to make their own money and to become empowered...”

-Darlene Angeconeb

Angeconeb said many women also do catering and cooking in their communities. “There is always a lot of demand for something like

pizza,” Angeconeb said. “One lady I see on Facebook is always advertising and saying she has so many pizzas and so many pies. And she serves breakfasts.” Angeconeb said the knowledge provided through the online workshops would help the women to continue developing their businesses, noting there are high unemployment rates in many northern communities. “I think it would be beneficial for the women to make their own money and to become empowered with some of the knowledge that we are going to be providing them,” Angeconeb said. “I think it will be very good for them, and for them to

teach other women.” Angeconeb said Equay-wuk also has a home-based business manual on its website for women who are interested in starting a business in their home. Rosalind Lockyer, executive director at PARO, said the clustering concept and benefits of clustering for business growth is common practice around the world. “By offering this training online, PARO Centre for Women’s Enterprise is really addressing an important need,” Lockyer said. “We are finding new ways to empower women within their communities, while promoting economic development in the north.”

Walking to prevent diabetes: Mocc Walk 2012 underway Rick Garrick

Wawatay file photo.

including a group of about 30-40 beaders in Sandy Lake. “They’re always a demand for their beadwork,” Angeconeb said. “They can bead and bead and bead. They’re always out — they sell everything.”

Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug’s (KI) Sandra Fox is participating in the Mocc Walk 2012 Challenge in memory of her late grandmother, who had diabetes. “She passed away at the age of 96,” said the receptionist at the Ontario Native Women’s Association office in Thunder Bay. “And my mother has diabetes and my aunt, she just had her leg amputated. And I’m diabetic too.” Fox started walking before the Mocc Walk 2012 Challenge began on May 1 during her coffee breaks. “It stabilizes my sugar and I guess I have to try and watch what I eat,” Fox said. “Now on both of my coffee breaks I go for my 10-minute walk.” Fox also goes for evening walks along a fitness path near John Street when she is not too busy. “It takes me about 40 minutes to an hour,” Fox said. “It’s beautiful. The river is there too, which is nice.” Fort William’s Jennifer Cornell said her husband and son already walk in the evening. “I think it’s a good way to get fit,” said the problem gambling awareness coordinator with ONWA. “I already walk so it’s a better way to keep track of it and promote a healthy lifestyle.” Cornell said the Mocc Walk 2012 Challenge is a good way to promote healthy choices

and be more active, considering the high rate of diabetes among Aboriginal people. Prizes are being handed out to the top three individuals and teams from each of the four regions across Ontario: northern, southern, eastern and western. Three grand prizes of a Wii Fitness game, an iPod and a child’s bicycle are also being awarded. ONWA is holding the Mocc Walk 2012 Challenge from May 1 to June 30 to increase diabetes awareness and promote physical activity among Aboriginal people across Ontario. “We haven’t got the count for this year yet, but last year we had 570 people walking across Ontario,” said Robert Fenton, Aboriginal diabetes worker with ONWA. “We’re hoping to break that record this year. Walking has been shown to be a good tool for managing your blood sugar level, so we’re trying to promote that with the Mocc Walk.” Fenton said walking is a simple exercise that just about everybody can do. “We have families joining, a lot of teams signed up,” Fenton said. “It’s a good tool for managing your diabetes.” Although Mocc Walk originally was a month-long challenge, Fenton said it was expanded to two months so walking would become a part of the participants’ everyday life. “People really enjoyed the

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

A group of Ontario Native Women’s Association staff, including KI’s Sandra Fox and Fort William’s Jennifer Cornell, go for a walk outside the Thunder Bay-based organization’s office as part of the Mocc Walk 2012 Challenge. two months and they continued even after that Mocc Walk was over with their walking.” Interested people or groups

can contact Fenton for information at 807-623-3442, toll free at 1-800-667-0816 or by e-mail at diabetes@onwatbay.ca.

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Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

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Youth art group ‘paint bombs’ Mac’s store Sandy Lake youth goes freestyle with spray paint Lenny Carpenter Wawatay News

A Thunder Bay youth art group took part in a large public painting project in partnership with Mac’s Convenience stores and the City of Thunder Bay’s Crime Prevention Council from May 1-5. The Paint Bomb the Mac’s project had the Definitely Superior Art Gallery’s youth art collective Die Active paint the back and side of the Mac’s Convenience store located on 346 May Street North in Thunder Bay. The large-scale contemporary wall art painting was designed and painted by eight Die Active youth following mentorship workshops and training at Definitely Superior

Art Gallery. Among the Die Active members is Jordan Meekis, a Sandy Lake First Nation member who attends Sir Winston Churchill Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Thunder Bay. Meekis became involved when his art teacher recommended he take part in the project. “He knew I was into that stuff so he recommended I take part,” said Meekis, who turns 18 in June. Meekis said he always liked drawing and carries a sketchbook. “I would draw in it when class got boring,” he said with a laugh. The Paint Bomb the Mac’s project was Meekis’ first time painting, which proved to have

its challenges. “I didn’t like using the stencils,” he said. “I thought it was too hard, so I just went freehand with the spray paint.” Meekis was given a section of the wall to paint with whatever he wanted, so he painted a woman figure atop an octopus with other figures in between. “It’s from a sketchbook so I thought it would be cool to put it up there,” he said. “We just try to mesh all of our art styles together to fill up the space.” Meekis said the project has inspired him to be involved in art. “Hopefully I can do more for the community and try to get art out there,” he said. After he graduates high school Meekis is thinking of going to college for WAWATAY NEWS

Lenny Carpenter/Wawatay News

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January 13, 2012 2:47 PM fine arts or graphic design. To: ________________________ The Paint Bomb the Mac’s ________________________ project culminated May 5 with From: _____________________ Wawatay News an @unveiling and back alley Please proofat your ad and return party the Mac’s Convenience it today by fax, otherwise your ad will run as it location. is on this fax. Store The party feaChoose 1 of the following: tured break dancing and perforRun as is mances by Aboriginal DJ Classic Run ad with changes Roots. Require new proof The Paint Bomb the Mac’s DO NOT RUN AD project is a pilot project develAd cost: ______________________ oped in celebration of youth, To run: _______________________ community and arts in Thunder Bay, coinciding with National ______________________________ (no additional proof required)

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Youth Arts Week (May 1-7). It also launches the Die Active collective into the start of their fourth season of free and indepth youth arts programming. Established to give youth an opportunity to express their artistic voices and engage the community of Thunder Bay, Die Active is a youth collective of more than 300 artists. The group mentors youth on the artist-run model of working as a collective by encouraging

them to bring a series of practical collective contemporary art projects into fruition, involving free art workshops. Past years have seen the creation of the city’s largest collaborative wall art/murals, including the creation of the multi-disciplinary Die Active Zine publication which is distributed nationally, an annual Y-Art Sale, art interventions at the Marina, Bike Lane Launch, Superior Youth Festival, and the Thunder Pride Festival.

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Several artists spray paint their own designs on the back wall of the Mac’s Convenience store located at 346 May Street North in Thunder Bay.

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Metis discuss rights and recognition

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Pic Mobert First Nation is seeking 1 FTE Grade 6/7/8 Teacher and 1 FTE Grade 1,2 Teacher commencing September 2012. QUALIFICATIONS: • Current Certificate of Qualification from the Ontario College of Teachers with Primary/Junior or Junior/Intermediate. • Reading and Special Education qualifications are an asset. • Experience with differentiated instruction and aboriginal education. • Ability to teach multiple grades.

Real Estate Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Brenda Macdougall, chair of Metis Records at the University of Ottawa, described a social networking model that provides a look at a Metis family world view during her April 17presentation a Metis Recognition and Rights panel discussion at Lakehead University.

Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

A social networking model describing a Metis family was one of the highlights during the April 17 Metis Recognition and Rights panel discussion at Lakehead University. “I’m fascinated by Brenda Macdougall’s social networking model for trying to figure out the historic connections,” said Jean Teillet, a lawyer with Pape Salter Teillet Barristers & Solicitors in Vancouver, great-grandniece of Louis Riel and one of three panelists in the panel discussion. “It’s a pretty interesting thing to see and quite an advance on the way we’ve been able to look at Aboriginal communities.” Macdougall, chair of Metis Records at the University of Ottawa, described the social networking model during her presentation.

“What I look at really is about world view. Family itself is a world view,” Macdougall said. “How people understand their relationships with each other represents how they understand the world in which they live. Who is a brother, who is a cousin and who is an uncle? These terms are actually very culturally specific. They don’t all mean the same thing to the same people.” Macdougall said the Metis world, in her opinion, centred around family and inter-familial relationships that lasted generations. The panel discussion was just part of a Metis Research Day held at Lakehead University for faculty, students and members of the Metis community. “It was very educational for the people present and even some of the Metis citizens,” said Metis Senator Bob McKay.

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The mandate of the Ontario First Nations Technical Services Corporation (OFNTSC) is to provide technical and enhanced advisory services to all First Nations in Ontario. The OFNTSC requires the services of an Environmental Technologist Intern to assist directly under the supervision of the OFNTSC Environmental Scientist with issues related to First Nation in all areas environmental and specifically landfills and other natural advisory services. The Environmental Intern will be located in either the Toronto Service Centre or the Thunder Bay Service Centre and will report directly to the Environmental Scientist. DUTIES: • To provide technical advice to clients as required. • To include the development of terms of reference for projects, assessing consultant proposals, meeting with clients, consultants and funding agencies, reviewing reports and other related duties. • Research and develop an understanding of the environmental issues that are common to many First Nations. • Work with clients to assess their capacity to deal with environmental issues. • Develop environmental training programs as needed; ie. First Nations landfill sites (dumps). • Maintain a good network of contacts amongst the diverse client base of the OFNTSC, and advocate for improvements to the health and environment of First Nation people. • Work with and assist the Environmental Scientist and other staff on environmental issues and policy as requested. STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS: • Post-Secondary degree in environmental science or engineering or experience as an Environmental Technologist or Scientist. • Experience in the Environmental/Engineering consulting field (writing/evaluating reports, environmental audits). • Must have an excellent understanding of environmental issues related to site assessment and remediation; solid waste management; environmental emergencies and spill response; hazardous wastes, environmental management systems; and environmental audits. • Must have good project management skills. • Ability to use computers for Word, Excel, and other programs. • Strong analytical, evaluation and assessment skills. • Must be self motivated with extremely good communication skills. • Possess a valid Ontario Drivers License and be willing to travel. • Preference given to First Nations persons. • 3 work related references will be required. CLOSING DATE: Friday June 1, 2012, 4:30 p.m. (EST) Please mark very clearly on the envelope “Environmental Technologist INTERN” and Email, Mail/Fax your resume/Curriculum Vitae to: Brian Staats, CRSP, Operations Manager Ontario First Nations Technical Services Corporation 111 Peter Street, Suite 606, Toronto, Ontario, M5V 2H1 bstaats@ofntsc.org

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RESPONSIBILITIES: • Developing an effective learning environment for students with a focus on their cultural and educational backgrounds. • Experience with different learning modalities; incorporate various methods of instruction, assessment and evaluation. • Maintain effective classroom routines as well as excellent classroom management skills. • Effective curriculum planning and daily lesson planning. • Excellent communication skills and enthusiasm.

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DUTIES: • To teach diligently the classes as assigned; to facilitate learning and encourage students to strive for success. Model and espouse the Seven Teachings: love, respect, wisdom, humility, bravery, honesty and truth. • Follow the policies and procedures of the Pic Mobert First Nation.

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Nations Technical Services Corporation (OFNTSC) is to provide technical and enhanced advisory services to all First Nations in Ontario. The OFNTSC requires the services of a Programmer To: ________________________ for a Maintenance Management System Intern to assist directly under the supervision of the OFNTSC Operation ________________________ & Maintenance Technologist with issues related to First Nation data reconciling, CAIS, ACRS and ICMS data “Program” a system that will record assets, track & assign maintenance and monitor maintenance activities From:and _____________________ @ Wawatay related to FirstNews Nation capital assets. The Programmer Intern will be located in either the Toronto Service Centre or the OFNSC Head Office located with the Mississaugas of the New Credit territory.

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Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Pic River comic takes Thunder Bay Idol Stephanie Wesley

Special to Wawatay News

Thunder Bay’s Comic Idol was an award Todd Genno didn’t expect to win. The 27-year-old Pic River First Nation member had not even planned on entering the contest until a few days before the show. Genno jokes that he was “too cheap to pay for a ticket,” so entering the contest allowed him to get into the show and watch his friend Ron Kanutski perform for free. By the end of the night on April 27, Todd’s frugal act of saving himself the $20 ticket fee earned him a cool $750. Thunder Bay Comic Idol is an annual event where amateur comedians compete with clever, often adult-orientated jokes to take home the top prize as well as the honor of being Thunder Bay’s Comic Idol. After watching a video of his performance on YouTube, Genno’s Comic Idol victory is no surprise. His six-minute act included awkward moments “like when your colour-blind friend thinks he finished a Rubix cube,” and how his wife hates the amount of time he spends on Facebook, to which he tells her that without Facebook they would never have met. He tells the crowd (who awaited the punch-line with audible giggles) that his marriage-proposal on his wife’s Facebook wall received “17 likes.” From the way Genno carries himself and how he interacts with other people, it is really no surprise that he

Stephanie Wesley/Special to Wawatay News

Todd Genno of Pic River First Nation won Thunder Bay’s Comic Idol on April 27. The 27-year-old said had not planned on entering the competition until a few days before the show, joking that he only entered because he was “too cheap to pay for a ticket.” would win a comedy competition. When questioned about how he is often making jokes in his everyday life, he explains that he has always enjoyed laughter and he likes

to make people laugh. Genno says that “Native people are gifted with laughter” and they “don’t just laugh from the belly, but they laugh from the heart.” Genno learned from

Anishinabe Elders that there are times when one must be serious but it is important to remember to have fun and laugh, too. He explains that he grew up in foster care and that in a few of the homes that he lived, laughter wasn’t allowed because the homes were too strict. He says that he and his siblings were often moved from place to place, but his Pic River reservation was still very accepting of them. “My reserve believes that it takes a whole community to raise a child,” Genno says, and he agrees with the belief because he has seen it firsthand. Genno has not let his sometimes negative experience in foster care affect him negatively – in fact it has helped him make decisions in his own life to be alcohol and drug free. He has not touched a drop of alcohol or used any illegal drug his whole life, a decision he made because he knew he was placed in foster care as a result of alcoholism. Genno has been living in Thunder Bay for the last five years with his wife April and their four children: Aiden, Serenity, and twins Ryan and Eryn. He has no current plans on moving back to his reservation because his children love living in Thunder Bay, but he says if the Creator guides him back home, he won’t have any problem with it. Todd feels that it is hard to find spirituality in the city, though. He maintains his own spirituality by being a drumkeeper. He says that a drum-

keeper “keeps the drum… treats the drum like it’s a grandfather.” He says that drum-keepers know all of the songs that go with the drum, and that drum-keepers are chosen by an Elder or through a vision or dream. Genno shares his songs at least once a week in Thunder Bay at Anishnawbe Mushkiki on Tuesdays or Aboriginal Headstart on Wednesdays. He was also asked by the Biwaase’aa program to MC their Shkoday Abinojiiwak Obimiwedoon powwow that was held this past April

to help the children. Genno credits an Elder named Lambert Nabigon, who recently passed away, for showing him just how delicate and easily lost the Anishinabe culture and language is. Todd explains that Lambert was a great man and was well-respected in Pic River. Genno’s desire to speak Ojibwa and keep the language and culture alive was strengthened after Lambert passed away. He aims to make a difference in young lives the same way many Elders made a difference in his. Now that he owns the title of Thunder Bay’s 2012 Comic Idol, Genno says that he has received some offers to do more stand-up performances and thinks that he will give it a shot, though he doesn’t expect to make a career out of comedy. Genno wants to keep making Anishinabe people laugh, and sees himself using his gift of humour at fundraisers and possibly open-mic comedy events. He says of his experience at Comic Idol that “you never know unless you try. Be confident in yourself… try new things.” Genno would like to thank the Fort City Kinsmen Club of Thunder Bay for hosting the competition, his wife April for listening to his jokes to let him know if they were funny enough first, Ron Kanutski for inspiration, and comedyveterans Chris Holland and Moccasin Joe for their advice. When asked what he spent his Comic Idol winnings on, Todd replied, “my kids.”

Genno learned from Anishinabe Elders that there are times when one must be serious but it is important to remember to have fun and laugh, too. Shkoday Abinojiiwak Obimiwedoon means “children fire keepers of the future” and the powwow was to honor the children, a subject that he keeps close to his heart. Genno is enrolled in Confederation College’s Native Child and Family Services program and feels that it is his calling to help the children who are in the same situation now that he once was in as a child himself. He hopes to use his experience growing up in foster care paired with his knowledge of his own Anishinabe culture

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Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Pelican Fall First Nation High School Graduates of 2012

Dennis Franklin Cromarty Graduates of 2012

11


12

Wawatay News MAY 17, 2012

ᐧᐊᐧᐊᑌ ᐊᒋᒧᐧᐃᓇᐣ

Team Ontario wins hockey bronze

Shoal Lake member lifts 90 kg for the gold

Rick Garrick/Wawatay News

Submitted photo.

Team Ontario’s female midget hockey team won bronze at the 2012 National Aboriginal Hockey Championship, held May 6-12 in Saskatoon, Sask. Grade 10 student Natasha Lyons of Thunder Bay was the goaltender and credited the cheering Ontario fans for getting “the team going.”

Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

Team Ontario’s female midget hockey team won bronze at the 2012 National Aboriginal Hockey Championship, held May 6-12 in Saskatoon, Sask. “The game was really close — it came down to the third period,” said Natasha Lyons, Team Ontario’s goalie and a Grade 10 student at École secondaire catholique de La Vérendrye in Thunder Bay. “We came back from 2-0 and we won 4-2. There were quite a few breakaways in that game, and I’d probably say those were the highlights, for my game anyway.” Lyons also credited support

from the crowd for the win. “We had some people from Ontario and they just kept cheering on,” Lyons said. “That’s probably what got the team going and that’s what got us to win the game.” Lyons said the win was “just an amazing experience,” noting the team had a discussion in the dressing room between periods. “Everyone wanted to go home with a medal,” Lyons said. “So we kind of had a speech, and it brought us to winning the game.” Lyons said most of the team had not played with each other before the tournament. “We had a few practices and we got to know each other and I think that’s probably the num-

ber one thing that helped us win — knowing the girls better and having more confidence,” Lyons said. Lyons said the team bonded quickly throughout the tournament. “We bonded great as a team and we were one of the teams that were closer,” Lyons said. “Just knowing each other the week before, it was really great having the chance to go on and actually get a medal.” Team Ontario played for the bronze medal after losing 5-2 against eventual silver-medal Team Saskatchewan during the semi-finals. Eastern Door and North, from Quebec, won the gold with a 3-2 win over Saskatchewan. “It was actually a really good

game — it was exciting,” Lyons said about the 5-2 loss. “We fought hard, but in the end we didn’t make it.” Lyon wants to keep pursuing hockey in the future, with a long-term goal of representing Canada in the Olympics. She began playing hockey as a skater when she was about four or five years old in southern Ontario, but soon developed an interest in goaltending. After her family moved back to Thunder Bay about a year ago, she joined an AAA midget team, the Marathon Ice Rats, and a senior women’s hockey team in Thunder Bay. “We actually have a tournament in a few days,” Lyons said about the Rink Rats.

Dennis Hunter of Shaol Lake won the gold medal at the Canadian Masters Weightlifting Championships in Scarborough.

Rick Garrick

Wawatay News

Shoal Lake’s Dennis Hunter recently won gold at the Canadian Masters Weightlifting Championships in Scarborough. “I was just happy to be there — it’s been a good experience with the program here,” said the second-year strength and sport conditioning student at Canadore College and member of the Canadore Panthers weightlifting club. “I was actually pretty nervous.” Hunter won gold in the 105 kg class, lifting 70 kg in the snatch event and 90 kg in the clean and jerk. “You get to do three lifts in the snatch and three lifts in the clean and jerk for a total of six lifts for the competition,”

Hunter said. “You set your specific weight that you are aiming to lift successfully and if you get that in your first lift, you can increase your lift. If you don’t get your first lift, you’ve got to repeat that over again to go up, but you are only allowed a maximum of three tries per weight.” Hunter said his coach at Canadore invited him to go to the championships, which is an open competition for people 35 years old and over. “I figured I better take the opportunity,” Hunter said, noting his coach won at the championships last year. “He is also a Pan American Games as well. When somebody like that extends a hand to you, I thought I’d better take the chance and go with him.” Hunter would like to see more Anishinabe people participating in Olympic-style weightlifting and powerlifting. “You get stronger and it’s better for your joints,” Hunter said. “It’s better for your posture and in the long run it will keep you healthy longer.” But for now, Hunter’s goal is to help Anishinabe people fight diabetes through exercise. “Most of the education on it is from the diet side,” Hunter said. “I don’t see too much information on physical activity.” In addition, Hunter stressed that people need to eat healthy foods while training. “You can’t be eating junk food, you can’t be running to the takeout,” Hunter said. “If you eat right, your body will respond better.”

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May 17, 2012 Volume 39 Number 12