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BISHOP WALSH CATHOLIC SIXTH FORM

Bishop Walsh Catholic Sixth Form Prospectus 2014 - 2016


BISHOP WALSH CATHOLIC SIXTH FORM

P.P.F. Stands for Patientia, Perseverantia, Fides. This is the motto of the sixth form Patience, Perseverance, Belief.

The sixth form provides a good curriculum with a wide range of options and enrichment activities. Students respond with enthusiasm. Their attendance is high and they take an active part in the life of the whole school, including mentoring younger students. Students are taught well and make good progress. There are excellent relationships between teachers and students and the pastoral care is outstanding. One student described the sixth form as ‘a friendly, welcoming, family community’. The newly appointed head of the sixth form is a determined leader supported by an enthusiastic team. Recent improvements include clear and consistent systems to track student progress and intervene where necessary to ensure that students remain on track to achieve their potential.

Ofsted


Bishop Walsh Sixth Form Prospectus 2014 - 2016

Contents Mission Statement

3

German AS/A Level

30

Introduction from The Headteacher

4-5

Government and Politics AS/A Level

31

Welcome from the Head of Sixth Form

6-7

Health and Social Care

32

Additional Opportunities

8-9

History AS/A Level

33

Dress Code - Uniform

10-11

Maths AS/A Level

34

Admission Criteria

12-13

Media Studies AS/A Level

35

Music AS/A Level

36

Courses and Curriculum Art and Design AS/A Level

14

P.E. AS/A Level

37

Biology AS/A Level

15

Physics AS/A Level

38

BTEC Level 3 - Applied Science

16

Psychology AS/A Level

39

Business Studies AS/A Level

17

Religious Studies AS/A level

40

BTEC Level 3 - Business

18

GCSE Re-Sit English

42

Chemistry AS/A Level

19

GCSE Re-Sit Maths

43

Computer Science A LEVEL

20

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme

44

Dance AS/A Level

21

Drama and Theatre Studies AS/A Level

22

Economics AS/A Level

23

English Language and Literature AS/A Level

24

English Literature AS/A Level

25

Fashion AS/A Level

26

French AS/A Level

27

Further Maths AS/A level

28

Geography AS/A Level

29

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Photography: Joseph Perrins and Abigail Stafford


Bishop Walsh Sixth Form Prospectus 2014 - 2016

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“ ” Mission Statement

Caring to Learn and Learning to Care

BISHOP WALSH aims to be a secure and happy Catholic school where we try to follow the example of Christ, enjoy learning and do our best. We believe in excellence and in developing our talents in a variety of ways. We respect and care for others and ourselves and are committed to justice in our school, parishes and world wide community.

This means that the aims of our school are:

• To know and live out the Mission Statement. • To have a positive self-image and value every member of our • • • • • • •

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school community. To respond to God the Father’s love expressed in the life of Christ and sustained by the Spirit. To provide a range of opportunities for spiritual, academic, social and physical development. To provide a broad, balanced, differentiated curriculum, inclusive of all abilities. To encourage excellent work, success for all and celebrate achievement. To provide stimulating and enjoyable teaching and learning experiences. To equip pupils with skills for a continually changing world. To re-commit ourselves to justice, care and service in the new millennium.


Introduction From The Headteacher

Dear Parents Thank you for your interest in Bishop Walsh Catholic School Sixth Form. Please find below information which I hope is helpful to you. History Bishop Walsh is a mixed Voluntary Aided 11 - 18 Catholic Comprehensive situated on a single open site in Sutton Coldfield on the north-east fringe of Birmingham Local Education Authority. The school was opened in 1966 and comprises excellent accommodation adjacent to its own extensive playing fields. Currently there are seven Science laboratories, networked ICT rooms, Sports Hall, Gymnasium, well equipped Learning Resource Centre and a host of specialist rooms for Music, Technology and Art. At the front of the building is the Chapel, the focal point of the school. In June 2001 the school was designated as a specialist Performing Arts College, only the second in the whole of Birmingham LEA to be awarded Performing Arts status. In January 2005 the school was granted second specialist status in Maths and Computing. In 2008 a fit for purpose series of buildings called The Cardinal Newman Centre was built to accommodate our growing Sixth Form. The annual intake to the school is 150 pupils. The present roll is 1000 with a considerable over-subscription. There is a large Sixth Form of 250 students. Since January 2014 Bishop Walsh Catholic School has been part of the John Paul II Multi-Academy Company.

Catholic Identity Bishop Walsh Catholic School is first of all a faith community. The great majority of pupils are baptised Catholics and over a half of the staff are Catholic. Openness to the ethos of the school is a standard

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question for all applicants at our post 16 interviews but it is not necessary to be a Catholic to apply. In September 2011, the section 48 OfSTED Team judged Bishop Walsh to be an Outstanding Catholic School.

Ethos of the School My vision for the school is about academic excellence, social awareness and spiritual development. We aim to develop the whole person - academically, morally and physically. A principal aim of the school is the spiritual growth of all pupils, not simply growth in their faith but in their awareness of the world as a place where their witness to the Gospel values of Love, Truth, Peace, Justice and Forgiveness is called for. The religious life of the school permeates all aspects of the curriculum and determines staff and pupils’ positive approach to school life. Our school chaplain is Fr. Van Tien, who is also parish priest at St. Nicholas in Boldmere. Every member of our school community is valued and we endeavour to fulfil the potential of all who attend here. The emphasis on the equal worth of each student stems from the belief that each has individual and unique God-given talents and opportunities must be provided for their growth and development. Emphasis is put on academic excellence and high standards of pupil behaviour. Certain traditional characteristics underpin our whole approach, principally the expectation of good behaviour, regular homework and compulsory school dress. Bishop Walsh continually seeks to enhance its reputation for the highest social and academic standards.


Introduction From The Headteacher Levels of Achievement

Extra Curricular Activities

The examination results in recent years have been excellent. Mindful of school policy of entering all pupils for GCSE, irrespective of ability, we experience excellent exam grades. In 2013, we achieved excellent A level results - 55% of A2 grades were at A*, A or B. In 2013 96% of Year 11 pupils achieved 5 or more grade A* - C at GCSE. 76% of pupils gained 5 A* - C’s including English and Maths and 97% of our Year 11 students gained at least 2 A* - C grades in Science. We prefer to measure our results by value added residuals. Our RAISE Online score for the whole school was 1017 in 2012. This was rated as significantly positive.

The school has a strong tradition of Performing Arts and Sport. Our last four school musicals (Jesus Christ Superstar!, Footloose, We Will Rock You and Guys and Dolls) came in the top three for the best school musical in Birmingham. We have continued this success with High School Musical in 2012. The main sports are swimming, soccer, hockey, cricket, netball, athletics, cross-country and tennis. Squash, badminton and golf are also played. There is a school band and orchestra and pupils are encouraged to learn a musical instrument. Tuition is provided in brass, woodwind, strings and guitar.

Organisation and Pastoral Care Pupils are placed in House Groups under the care of a House Tutor who, together with the Year Head, is responsible for monitoring the welfare and progress of each pupil. Regular meetings are held to allow parents and teachers to consult and parents are always welcome to visit the school. In the Sixth Form Year 12 and 13 are mixed in vertical House Groups each named after a saint. The school behaviour policy is based on the recognition of positive achievement. Emphasis is put on respect for oneself and others and on the links between school and home. There is a half-termly Newsletter.

Other activities include The Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme, Chess Club, Art Club, Gymnastics Club and a Drama Club. Community Service is undertaken by Sixth Form pupils and several train as Diocesan Youth workers each year. There are trips abroad including skiing visits, performing arts overseas trips and regular visits to the continent.

Parental Support Parental support is key to a student’s success. Our policy is to involve parents as much as possible in the progress of their children The Bishop Walsh Association provides opportunities for parents to meet socially and to support the school in practical ways.

Ofsted Inspection

The Catholic Partnership

The school had two excellent Ofsted Inspection Reports in September 2011. Ofsted praised the quality of relationships at Bishop Walsh and summed up the success of the school. The report states that ‘The school’s Catholic ethos underpins this harmonious community where pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is outstanding’.

Bishop Walsh is a member of the Birmingham Catholic Partnership in Birmingham and strongly supports all Partnership activities particularly relating to the professional development of staff. Similarly, it is firmly committed to working collaboratively with colleague schools in the Partnership and also neighbouring schools in Sutton Coldfield.

Sixth Form Courses Sixth Form courses to Advanced Level (Level 3) are available in many subjects. A small number are shared with neighbourhood schools.

Careers Guidance and Teaching The school employs its own Careers Officer to assist senior pupils with information and advice. There is a regular programme of careers films, talks and visits.

Homework Homework is seen as an essential part of every pupil’s study programme. A homework timetable and diary for the year provide the link between parents and school.

Religious and Moral Education

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The school is a voluntary aided school under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Birmingham. There is a School Chapel where Mass is celebrated weekly by the School Chaplain. There are special celebrations at other times in the Church’s year e.g. Gospel values form an integral part of the school ethos.

Every year for the last ten years students have gained entry to Oxbridge and the top universities. Thank you for considering Bishop Walsh Catholic School for your child’s post-16 education. Yours sincerely

Mr J B Farrell Headteacher


Welcome from The Head of Sixth Form

The Sixth Form at Bishop Walsh is a great place to be. The teaching and learning environment is organised so that students can maximise their potential and consequently improve their life chances. Sixth Form students provide role models to younger pupils who see them as a source of inspiration. The relationships between staff and students are friendly and supportive. The purpose built Cardinal Newman Centre ensures that we have a distinct identity, whilst making it easier for students new to the school to settle and mix. All staff recognise the holistic nature of education and our Catholic ethos helps to nurture and develop the spiritual as well as the academic, physical and social aspects of students in our care. These are some of the reasons why students join our Sixth Form: to be part of a caring, Christian community; to gain higher qualifications; to take time to decide on a career; to explore the different opportunities available to find out about life at university; to explore in greater depth a subject or subjects; to mature and develop as a person and to experience the privileges and responsibilities enjoyed by the Sixth Form.

Education (Noun) [ed-u-ca-tion] The word educate is directly derived from the Latin word educare, which was constructed by combining the two words, ex and ducere. The literal translation of educate is to draw out of, lead out of, etc. The Romans considered educating to be synonymous with drawing knowledge out of somebody or leading him/her out of regular thinking. The Romans developed the noun, education from the verb educare.

Which Courses Do I Choose?

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THINK... What job do I want in the future? Do I want to work with people, work in an office or work with computers? For how long do

I want to continue my education? How many GCSEs and at what grades will I need to do my chosen course? Do I want to go to university for three years? TALK... to your teachers, to your parents; to your friends, to careers officers, to local employers and to sixth formers LISTEN... to advice, to information, subject talks READ... this booklet; University prospectuses and websites, consult the UCAS website www.ucas.com, the Russell Group booklet Informed Choices www.russellgroup.ac.uk, Institute of Career Guidance www.icg-uk.org

Why Bishop Walsh Sixth Form? The unique thing that we have to offer our current Year 11 pupils is the continuity and personal knowledge that is provided by staff with whom you have already enjoyed success. We care about you, enough to cheer you up when things are not going too well. You will be able to continue and develop friendships formed over many years. You will have the chance to make a contribution to the ethos of your school a Catholic Community, with values and traditions that you will help to continue. However, if you are looking for a new school, Bishop Walsh is for you! It is a fairly small school with a friendly and caring atmosphere combined with a vigorous academic work ethic. It is a Catholic school and so we place a great emphasis on spiritual development as well as academic success. Students are expected to take part in activities which promote this spiritual development and to attend religious celebrations.


Welcome from The Head of Sixth Form Bishop Walsh Sixth Form offers a range of high quality academic qualifications. We also seek to provide a broad and balanced programme of study which will enable our students to succeed in the world beyond school.

Academic Life Most of our students will take four subjects in Year 12. An introduction to each of the subjects on offer is available in this booklet. Many students will choose subjects which they studied and enjoyed at GCSE. Some will take new subjects such as Government and Politics or Psychology. We want our students to emerge from the Sixth Form with the capacity for lifelong learning - the ability to respond exibly and successfully to a fast moving world. Most of our Year 12 students will take two or three modular exams in each of the subjects they study. If they pass them they will gain an AS qualification. This is a necessary first step if they wish to gain the full A level. If you gain at least 180 UCAS points from three AS Level qualifications, which is the equivalent of three D grades, you will go on to the second stage of your studies in the Sixth Form. This is called Year 13 or A2. If you begin with four subjects at AS level, you will continue with three of your subjects through to full A level. If you enrol on Pathway 2, namely Level 3 BTEC Business Studies, Level 3 BTEC Applied Science and one other AS Level course, subject to meeting the entry requirement, you will also be expected to achieve at least a pass in the BTEC courses and a grade D in your chosen AS course to continue onto Year 13. You will also attend an ASDAN Wider Skill Level 3 Religious Education course for an hour each week in both Year 12 and Year 13. It is important to us that you continue your Religious Education in the sixth form. The course helps you develop your presentation and debating skills. The course has the equivalency of 20 UCAS points and is recognized by many universities.

Sixth Form Life You will be encouraged to participate in activities outside of the classroom; building up the wider skills needed for later life. These not only enrich your education but allow you to add to your personal profile when applying for employment or Higher Education. The development of self-reliance skills is a key to success in the Sixth Form.

Leadership Opportunities and Christian Duty Every sixth former is obliged to carry out ten hours of Christian Duty throughout an academic year. This can be achieved by becoming a prefect or Head Girl or Boy in Year 13, volunteering to help the Fair Trade initiative, leading Sixth Form fund-raising initiatives, paired

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reading with younger pupils, all of which give you the chance to show your people skills. You might volunteer to accompany the annual Diocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Closer to home; you might become a lunchtime supervisor. Alternatively, some students get actively involved in our wider community by joining the Sixth Form Saint Vincent de Paul group. These positions are hugely rewarding and prepare you for a variety of positions of responsibility.

Tutor System and Pastoral Support Sixth Formers are divided into twelve small tutor groups of about 20 comprising of equal numbers of year 12 and 13 students. You see your tutor twice each day to register attendance and to follow our PSE programme. Your tutor takes special responsibility for you and will assist you on daily matters and ultimately your progress to the next stage of your education or employment. You will find that having year 13 students in your tutor group will help you settle down in the Sixth Form. They will pass on useful advice from their own experience on how to ensure you make good progress at AS level from their own experience and later in the year help you develop clearer insight in how to successfully apply for university. The Sixth Form Leadership Team has oversight of the whole year group and will provide assemblies on topical issues for you and assist you in your preparations for the future. The Sixth Form Leadership Team also keeps an eye on your attendance record, using information processed daily by our attendance officer. Your academic progress and attitude to learning will also be carefully monitored. You will be enrolled on the Positive Progress Programme if we feel you require additional help with your studies. This will help you make the most of your independent learning periods of which you will have approximately four hours each week. Support for you is also provided by our Sixth Form Mentor and by our Chaplain and his team.

Guidance for the Future This is an essential part of your progress through the Sixth Form. You will receive information from subject teachers, form tutors, the Careers Service and the Sixth Form pastoral team. There is a full programme of preparation for the University application system. Yours sincerely

Mr H Koryl Head of Sixth Form


Additional Opportunities

The Extended Project Qualification The Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) is a qualification that requires students to plan, research and write a dissertation on any topic they wish. It provides opportunities for the development of critical, reective, problem-solving and independent learning skills through the planning, research and evaluation of a selfselected project. It is a exible qualification which can be incorporated within many different programmes of study, including modules from the students AS subjects or an area of interest. Universities including Oxford, Cambridge, Birmingham, Manchester and many other Russell Group universities appreciate the hard work that goes into completing the project and encourage students to undertake the project. The qualification is worth up to 70 UCAS points (50% of an A-level) and even though it cannot be used against a grade offer (such as AAA), some universities may offer an alternative for candidates studying the Extended Project (such as ABB instead of AAB, provided that you get an A in your Extended Project qualification). Only the top 10% of the year group will be selected to complete the Extended Project Qualification as a result of their outstanding GCSE grades.

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Additional Opportunities

Envision

Bishop Walsh is one of just ten schools from across the city that has been selected to take part in The Community-Apprentice Birmingham; a high profile Cabinet Office funded social action programme. The programme will challenge 6th form students to make a positive difference in their local communities - in healthy competition with nine other schools from across the city - to win the title of Birmingham Community - Apprentice Team of the Year. With the support of specialist facilitators and corporate mentors, students will plan and deliver a project that benefits their community, with each individual also developing key transferable skills for employment. Every student that takes part will complete the programme with a Personal Competency Profile and an individual award which clearly expresses the skills that they have demonstrated through participation.

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The programme will launch in September 2014. YEar 12 students will have the opportunity to apply for a place on this initiative in September. There will only be 20 places available on the initiative. On completion of the programme, the students who participated will be able to mention the skills they used on future applications for apprenticeships and university places.


Sixth Form Dress Code 2014-16

Boys The official black Sixth Form jacket with Bishop Walsh Catholic School Sixth Form logo. Black trousers. A plain white shirt. This may be short or long sleeved. It must be buttoned at the front and have a collar. Black, smart leather shoes. No facial piercings or earrings allowed.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING Material - no denim, corduroy, leather, lycra, chinos or canvas. No trousers which in any way resemble jeans. The Sixth Form Leadership Team reserve the right to decide whether a pair of trousers look like jeans or not. NO TIGHT TROUSERS OR SHIRTS. Footwear - no trainers, no canvas shoes, no boots of a suede or snow variety such as UGG boots, no Doc Martin- style boots laced outside trousers, no flip flops, no van shoes, no wellington boots or sandals.

A smart hairstyle is compulsory. Male students are permitted to have long hair but this must be tied back. Only natural highlights are permitted. Red, purple, lilac, orange highlights are not permitted or any other colour that is not natural. The Sixth Form Leadership Team have the right to decide whether a highlight is natural and whether a hairstyle is smart.

Items of clothing - no sportswear, beachwear or shorts, no hoodies.

A tie.

THE SIXTH FORM LEADERSHIP TEAM RESERVE THE RIGHT TO SEND A STUDENT HOME IF THEY FEEL THAT HE IS WEARING CLOTHES WHICH CONTRAVENE THE CODE.

OPTIONAL The official black sixth form V neck jumper with sixth form logo. Note that male students are not obliged to wear a jumper but if they wish to do so it must be the official sixth form jumper.

Design - no large emblems/slogans or prints on clothing. Shoulders and stomach always covered, no extremes of fashion. Jewellery - No earrings or facial piercings. Other jewellery may be worn but this needs to be discrete.

A SMART, BUSINESS LIKE PRESENTATION MUST BE MAINTAINED AT ALL TIMES. JACKETS MAY BE TAKEN OFF IN THE CN CENTRE AND IN CLASS WITH THE PERMISSION OF THE TEACHER.

Girls The official black sixth form jacket with Bishop Walsh Catholic School Sixth Form logo.

neck jumper but if they wish to do so it must be the official sixth form cardigan.

Black trousers or plain, tailored, knee length or just below the knee length , black skirts. NEITHER SKIRTS NOR TROUSERS ARE TO BE TIGHT FITTING / FIGURE HUGGING.

Material - no denim, corduroy, lycra, leather, chinos or canvas. No trousers which in any way resemble jeans. The Sixth Form Leadership Team reserve the right to decide whether a pair of trousers look like jeans or not. No item of clothing is to be figure hugging.

A plain white blouse. This may be short or long sleeved. It must be buttoned at the front and have a collar. Blouses also are not to be figure hugging. Black, smart leather shoes. Tights may be worn under skirts, however leggings are not allowed. Tights must be plain black, grey or natural coloured. A smart hairstyle is compulsory. Only natural highlights are permitted. Red, purple, lilac, orange highlights are not permitted or any other colour that is not natural. If a female student does decide to dye her hair, just dying the tips of the hair is not permitted. No dreadlocks or weaves in hair. The Sixth Form Leadership Team have the right to decide whether a highlight is natural and whether a hairstyle is smart. If girls wish to wear make-up it must be kept to a minimum to maintain a natural, professional look. Girls are allowed to wear two pairs of earrings through the lobes of their ears. Earrings are not permitted through the helix or tragus of the ears. Other jewellery may be worn but this needs to be discrete. No facial piercings allowed.

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OPTIONAL The official sixth form cardigan or V neck jumper with sixth form logo. Note that female students are not obliged to wear a cardigan or V

Footwear - no trainers; no canvas shoes; no boots of a suede or snow variety such as UGG boots, no Doc Martin style boots laced outside trousers or over tights, no flip flops, no vann shoes, no wellington boots nor sandals. Items of clothing - no leggings or jeggings, no sportswear, beachwear or shorts, no hoodies. Shoulders and stomach always covered, no extremes of fashion. Design - no large emblems/slogans or prints on clothing. Shoulders and stomach always covered, no extremes of fashion. THE SIXTH FORM LEADERSHIP TEAM RESERVE THE RIGHT TO SEND A STUDENT HOME IF THEY FEEL THAT SHE IS WEARING CLOTHES WHICH CONTRAVENE THE CODE. A SMART, BUSINESS LIKE PRESENTATION MUST BE MAINTAINED AT ALL TIMES. JACKETS MAY BE TAKEN OFF IN THE CN CENTRE AND IN CLASS WITH THE PERMISSION OF THE TEACHER. NO FIGURE HUGGING ITEMS OF CLOTHING ARE PERMITTED.


Sixth Form Dress Code 2014-16

UNIFORM

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2013 Admission Criteria September 2014

There are two levels of entry into our Sixth Form Pathway 1 and Pathway 2 The admissions process is part of the Birmingham LA co-ordinated scheme. The Admission Policy of the Governors of Bishop Walsh Catholic School is as follows: The school was founded by the Catholic Church to provide education for children of Catholic families. The school is conducted by its Governing Body as part of the Catholic Church in accordance with its Trust Deed and Instrument of Government and seeks at all times to be a witness to Jesus. We ask all parents applying for a place here to respect this ethos and its importance to the school community. This does not affect the right of parents who are not of the faith of this school to apply for and be considered for a place here.

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Admission Criteria September 2014

Pathway 1

Entry requirements, for students who will study four AS Levels in Year 12. Level 3 entry: GCSE point score of 230 or above. To include GCSE grades at A* - C in five separate subjects. GCSE points score - A* - 58 points, A - 52 points, B - 46 points, C - 40 points, D - 34 points, E - 28 points, F - 22 points, G - 16 points, U - Below 16 points. Students who meet the entry requirements for Pathway 1 are welcome to opt for BTEC Level 3 Business Studies or BTEC Level 3 Science.

Students are required to note on the options form which four Level 3 qualifications they would like to study next year. They also need to note down a reserve choice. We will endeavour to ensure that every student gets his/her preferred choices. In the past over 98% of students have been able to study their first four choices on meeting the entry requirements. Timetable constraints and a course being cancelled due to a lack of interest have prevented a small number of students from being able to study the options of their choice.

Pathway 2

Entry requirements, for students who intend to study BTEC Level 3 Business, BTEC Level 3 Science and one other AS Level, subject to meeting the entry requirements of the course. GCSE point score of 200 or above. To include GCSE grades at A* - C in five separate subjects. GCSE points score - A* - 58 points, A - 52 points, B - 46 points, C - 40 points, D - 34 points, E - 28 points, F - 22 points, G - 16 points, U - Below 16 points.

External Applicants Where there are spare places the governors will consider external applicants. The minimum number of external candidates likely to be admitted for Year 12 in September 2014 will approximately be 20 students. External applicants are required to complete a Governors’ Application form for a sixth form place. In addition, if more applications are received than there are places available the Governors will allocate places in the following order: Baptised Catholic students who are in the care of a local authority (looked-after children) or provided with accommodation by them (e.g. children with foster parents) (Section 22 of the Children Act 1989).

• Baptised Catholic students with brothers or sisters already in the school

• Baptised Catholic students already attending 11 - 16 Catholic Secondary schools

• Baptised Catholic students already attending 11 - 18 Catholic

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Secondary schools

• Baptised Catholic students attending non - Catholic Secondary schools

Students applying for pathway 2 must fill in the appropriate options form, noting down the third qualification they would like to study subject to meeting the entry requirements. Note that every student is welcome to fill in both forms if they wish.

• Non - Catholic students with brothers or sisters already in the school • Non - Catholic students attending other Catholic schools • Non - Catholic students These priorities having been applied, in the event of over-subscription, applications will be admitted in an order of priority within the appropriate category, based upon the proximity of their domicile to the front door of Holy Trinity Catholic Church, Sutton Coldfield, measured in a straight line. The governors have adopted Birmingham LA’s definition of residency. The school aims to recruit no more than 130 students into the Sixth Form in September 2014. Application forms should be returned to the Head of Sixth Form c/o Mrs Stewart Headteacher’s P.A. at Bishop Walsh Catholic School.


Art and Design AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements You should have achieved at least a grade C or higher at GCSE, have a desire to do well in art and design and be creative and imaginative. You should also be an independent learner who is willing to work hard. AS UNITS - Coursework Portfolio - Candidates produce a portfolio of work from a range of starting points, topics or themes determined by the art staff and the candidates. The focus of the work should show exploration, research, acquisition of techniques and skills. 60% of total marks. Controlled Assignment – Candidates select one starting point from an early release question paper. There will be time for candidates to plan and prepare their work. The candidates will then be given five hours of controlled time to work on developing their ideas to realisation(s)/outcome(s). 40% of total marks.

The experience of working with a broad range of media, including traditional and new media and technologies.

A2 UNITS - Personal Investigation - Candidates submit one major project that has a personal significance. The Investigation includes a related, but presented separately, personal study that must contain between 1000 and 3000 words. 60% of total marks.

Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

9

1

1

2

3

2

0

0

2012

7

0

0

2

2

1

2

0

2011

11

1

2

1

4

1

2

0

2010

5

0

2

1

1

1

0

0

2009

4

N/A 1

2

0

1

0

0

2008

13

N/A 0

3

4

3

3

0

Controlled Assignment - Candidates select one starting point from an early release question paper. There will be time for candidates to plan and prepare their work. The candidates will then be given 15 hours of controlled time to realise their ideas into a final outcome or outcomes. 40% of total marks.

General Course Description The aims of the course are to encourage candidates to develop: Intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive powers. Investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills, aesthetic understanding and critical judgement.

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Knowledge, understanding and application of art, craft, design, media (traditional and new) and technologies in contemporary and past societies and cultures.

Previous Performance

Board: OCR Career Pathways The course is good preparation for a range of art and design degree and diploma courses; leading to a career in art and design, media, film and television, ICT, advertising or teaching.

Course Tutors Mr L Taylor


Biology AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Due to the demanding nature of the course, students should have obtained at least a grade B in GCSE Biology or at least BB in double award GCSE Science together with at least a grade B at GCSE in Maths. In order to be successful, students must have a genuine interest in the subject but this alone is not sufficient. Many students do not fully appreciate the more demanding nature of A level Biology compared to that of GCSE Biology. The ability to write good, clear English, to be competent at basic mathematics and a determination and willingness to work alone outside lesson time are essential.

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

22

0

2

6

8

5

1

0

2012

33

1

4

5

13

8

2

0

2011

22

3

4

4

4

4

3

0

General Course Description

2010

30

1

9

5

2

5

7

1

The AS course consists of three modules Module 1 is assessed externally by an hour long written paper in January and is worth 30% of the AS.

2009

15

N/A 3

6

1

4

1

0

2008

20

N/A 5

5

4

3

3

0

• Module 2 is assessed externally by a 1 hour 45 minute written

Board: OCR

• Module 3 is a practical skills unit that is assessed internally within

Career Pathways

paper in June and is worth 50% of the AS.

lesson time and is based on a series of assessed practicals which are conducted over the year. These are collectively worth 20% of the AS.

Other related or suitable subjects Biology goes well with a range of subjects such as Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and Geography. You may wish to take Biology as your only science and combine it with subjects such as History, English, Psychology or a foreign language. Whilst these subjects may not provide direct support to your study of Biology you may enjoy the diversity such combinations bring. A2 Biology Course description: The A2 course consists of three modules

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• Module 1 is assessed externally by an hour long written paper in January and is worth 15% of the A2.

• Module 2 is assessed externally by a 1 hour 45 minute written paper in June as is worth 25% of the A2.

• Module 3 is a practical skills unit that this assessed internally within

lesson time and is based on a series of assessed practicals which are conducted over the year. These are collectively worth 10% of the A2.

A biological background provides employment opportunities in the Food, Manufacturing and Pharmaceutical industries, Government services such as the Department of Environment and Scientific Civil Service and in Nursing and Teaching. Biology provides a suitable, and often preferred background for entry into Further Education to study Medicine, Veterinary Science, Dentistry, Biology and other science related degree courses.

Course Tutors Mrs Marston - Smith Mr Killworth Miss Twist


BTEC Level 3 - Applied Science

Course Entry Requirements Students will need to have a minimum of 5 GCSEs at level C or above (or equivalent) including Science, English and Maths. The mandatory units for this course are:

• • •

Fundamentals of Science Scientific Practical Techniques Working in the Science Industry

In the second year students will then have the opportunity to complete three modules from the following:

• Physiology of Human Body Systems • Physiology of Human Regulation and Reproduction • Biochemistry and Biochemical Techniques • Genetics and Genetic Engineering General Course Description This two year course, which is equivalent to one A-Level, is designed to give students who are particularly interested in Biology or Medical Science a qualification and range of vocational experience suitable as a stepping stone into scientific careers. For example roles such as:

• Medical and scientific technicians • Research scientists • Forensic scientists • Pharmacists • Nurses • Science journalists Students learn through project based coursework completed over the two years in school. As well as developing practical skills in laboratories, students will gain in-depth knowledge of the major systems working

16

within the human body including the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, urinary, nervous and endocrine systems. In addition students will develop an understanding of the building blocks of life e.g. DNA and biochemical reactions at a cellular level. The course will have structured teaching time of five hours a week over the two years, with a requirement for students to put in additional hours independently, in order to complete work to their best ability and submit it within clearly defined deadlines. Students will be continually assessed and so have the benefit of knowing exactly what level they are working at throughout the two year course. The BTEC course will be completed with a minimum of 30 credits, which will hold the equivalence of one AS-Level and a maximum of 60 credits, which will hold the equivalence of one A-Level. The level at which the student completes the course (Pass, Merit, Distinction or Distinction*) is based on their progress and work ethic during the two years.

Board: Edexcel Career Pathways The credits gained from this course are recognised by Higher Education Institutes and Universities. Students may like to embark on vocational based courses leading to becoming Science or Medical Technicians or indeed study subjects such as: Biomedical Science, Animal Biology, Forensic Science, Pharmaceutical Science, Nursing or Dental Technology.

Course Tutors Dr L Jones Mrs K Marston - Smith


Business Studies AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Grade B in GCSE Mathematics and a C grade in GCSE English Language or GCSE English. Alternatively a C grade in Mathematics and B grade in GCSE English Language or single award GCSE English. There is no requirement to have taken GCSE Business Studies. Board: AQA

AS UNIT 1 - Planning and Financing a Business AS UNIT 2 - Managing a Business

Career Pathways

A2 UNIT 3 - Strategies for Success A2 UNIT 4 - The Business Environment and Change

General Course Description This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the business world; how businesses are structured, how they work, marketing principles and financial analysis. The new design of the course means that students will experience a much more practical insight into the world of business, developing skills of managing a larger type of business as the course develops. All modules are tested under examination conditions.

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

18

0

0

1

5

9

3

0

2012

11

0

0

1

4

5

1

0

2011

4

0

0

2

1

1

0

0

2010

8

0

1

4

1

2

0

0

2009

13

N/A 1

8

2

2

0

0

19

N/A 3

4

6

6

0

0

2008

17

This is a valuable course that can lead towards further related degrees, such as Business, Accountancy, Marketing, Human Resource Management, Operations Management, etc. The course would also complement other written subjects or practical subjects. This is also a practical guide for people who wish to begin their own business one day.

Course Tutors Mr M O’Rourke Mr S Barlow


BTEC Level 3 - Business

Course Entry Requirements Students will need to have a minimum of 5 GCSEs at level C or above (or equivalent) to be accepted onto this course. The mandatory units for this course are: The business environment Business resources Introduction to marketing Business communication

• • • •

Students will then have the opportunity to complete up to eight more units comprised of the following:

• Internet marketing in business • The impact of communications technology on business • Website design strategy • Market research in business • Creative product promotion • Recruitment and selection in business • Managing a business event • Aspects of business and contract law General Course Description The purpose of the course is to equip pupils with a broad understanding of the business world that surrounds them in this modern day and age. It is a vocational course that should provide students with business skills to be used when leaving education. The students learn through project based coursework completed over the two years in school. This will include hands on experience of dealing with outside businesses, organising meetings and collecting in revenues from events that students will have to run.

18

The course will have structured teaching time of five hours a week

over the two years, with a required commitment to additional hours to run their business events. The BTEC course will be completed with a minimum of 60 credits, which will hold the equivalence of one A-Level and a maximum of 120 credits, which will hold the equivalence of two A-Levels. The level at which the student completes the course is based on his/her progress and work ethic during the two years.

Board: Edexcel Career Pathways This is a valuable course that can lead towards apprenticeships in fields such as Accountancy, Marketing, Human Resource Management, Operations Management, etc. This course could also be followed by further vocational courses at college or progression to University. The course would complement other practical subjects or vocational courses at Bishop Walsh. This is also a practical guide for people who wish to begin their own business one day.

Course Tutors Mr M O’Rourke Mr S Barlow To find out more about Business in the news or the department refer to our departmental blog: www.bwbusiness.org.uk


Chemistry AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Due to the demanding nature of AS Chemistry course, students should have obtained at least a grade B in GCSE Chemistry or at least BB in double award GCSE Science together with at least a grade B at GCSE in Maths. AS UNIT 1 - Foundation Chemistry Examined in June AS UNIT 2 - Chemistry in Action Examined in June AS UNIT 3 - Investigative and Practical Skills assessed throughout the course - this takes the form of practical work with a Controlled Assessment. A2 UNIT 4 - Kinetics, Equilibria and Organic Chemistry Examined in June A2 UNIT 5 - Energetics, Redox and Inorganic Chemistry Examined in June A2 UNIT 6 - Investigative and Practical Skills assessed throughout the course - this takes the form of practical work with a Controlled Assessment.

General Course Description This course builds upon the learning of atomic structure, isotopes, moles, calculating reacting masses, empirical formulae, ionic bonding, covalent bonding, types of structures, equilibria, extraction of metals, fractional distillation of crude oil, combustion and organic compounds. Therefore, as you enter this course from GCSE you already have a good foundation to build upon.

Previous Performance Year 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008

19 Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

20

0

6

9

2

2

1

0

13

0

3

2

6

2

0

0

15

2

6

5

0

2

0

0

21

0

12

3

3

1

2

0

20

N/A 6

6

4

1

3

0

14

N/A 4

4

4

2

0

0

Board: AQA Career Pathways Many degrees may be taken when you have an A level in Chemistry. Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Science require Chemistry as a compulsory A level. Other degrees that can be pursued are Biochemistry, Forensic Science, or many other unrelated degrees such as Law. Joint Honours could be undertaken with Mathematics or French for example. Many opportunities exist after university such as becoming a Doctor, Dentist or Veterinary Surgeon. There are also opportunities in pharmaceuticals, medical sales, teaching or further studies leading to a PhD or a graduate placement in a career of your choice.

Course Tutors Miss Nazir Miss Marshall


Computer Science AS/A2 LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Prior study is useful but not essential. At least a B in GCSE Mathematics.

AS UNITS Unit 1 - Computer Fundamentals (written exam)

Previous Performance

Unit 2 - Programming Techniques and Logical Methods (written exam)

Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

8

0

1

2

0

2

3

0

2012

7

N/A 1

0

5

0

1

0

2011

3

N/A 2

0

0

0

1

0

2009

5

N/A 0

0

0

2

3

0

2008

7

N/A 0

0

3

2

2

0

A2 UNITS Unit 3 - Advanced Computing Theory (written exam) Unit 4 - Computing Project - Programming (project work)

General Course Description This course is an excellent introduction for students interested in following a career in Computer Programming, Systems Analysis, Network Engineering or any other Computer Science related career path.

Board: OCR

The emphasis of this course is on computational thinking. You will learn not only the tools a computer professional uses, but will develop the ability to determine what can be computed and how to compute it. You will learn how computer systems work on both the hardware and software levels and you will apply these principles to the solution of problems, learning how to create your own computer systems that others can use.

Computing qualifies for UCAS points so it could allow you to study for a degree or BTEC higher diploma in related subjects such as Computer Science or Information Systems. You could also go on to work-based training.

Technology is still a growth sector that changes year-on-year. This course will enable you to stay ahead of this change and understand the role technology could play in many walks of life. You will not be limited to a Computer Science career, rather you will realise the advantages technology brings to any future career!

20

Career Pathways

Many Science, Engineering and Mathematics courses at University now include programming modules for which this course is an ideal preparation.

Course Tutors Mr S Davison Mrs H Clancy


Dance AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Grade B in GCSE Dance or merit in BTEC Dance and a C grade in English Language or single award GCSE English. PRACTICAL UNIT - (DANC2) Solo choreography (3.30mins) Marked on performance and choreography. Exam questions set by AQA Exam board, questions can be picture, text, prop, music, conceptual stimuli Performance in a group Dance (4.30mins) Marked on group interaction, projection, spatial awareness and understanding of devices

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

0

0

3

2

1

1

0

0

2012

8

0

4

4

0

0

0

0

2011

9

0

4

3

1

1

0

0

2010

5

1

1

1

2

0

0

0

2009

3

N/A

0

2

0

1

0

0

THEORY UNIT - (DANC1) Written Examination - 1 hour 30 min paper Variety of areas, anatomy, professional works, the theory of dance concepts, the dances in context, nutrition, analysis and the theory of conception. Part a) of the paper is shorter questions b) 2 essay questions based on any of the above areas.

General Course Description You must be a dedicated and enthusiastic student of Dance who is keen to improve both inside and outside of lesson time. You must be prepared to attend theatre trips and work with students of all year groups.

21

Board: AQA Career Pathways There are many career options for a dance student such as; Professional dancer Dance critic/teacher Dance Therapist Arts manager Professional Choreographer Pilates teacher Dance Science Physiotherapy Movement Therapy Media Work Arts Industry Promotion

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Course Tutors Miss Darby


Drama and Theatre Studies AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Minimum GCSE Drama grade B or the equivalent, and GCSE grade C in English Language or Single Award GCSE English and an Audition. If GCSE Drama is not offered, a grade B in both GCSE English Language and Literature or Single Award English is required in addition to an audition. AS UNITS Unit 1 - Live Theatre Productions and Prescribed Play (Written Exam). For unit 1 you will see a range of different live performances and learn to analyse the work of directors, performers and designers in creating a piece of live theatre. You will make notes on each play you see which you can take into the exam where you will be asked to answer a question based on the live theatre you have witnessed. You will also study the Greek play ‘Antigone’ by Sophocles. You will practically explore how you would perform the play for an audience as well as how you would direct, design, light and costume your own production. You will then be asked to answer one examination question on how you would stage a part of the play. You will be allowed to take your annotated text into the exam with you. (60% of AS)

General Course Description During the course you will be exploring plays and performance in the roles of actor, director, designer and critic. It will encourage you to develop your imagination, improve your interpersonal skills, encourage your independent learning and develop your ability to apply critical analysis to performance. You will study three scripts from different periods of theatre and perform extracts from a play to an examiner or design the set/lighting/costume for a performance. Course content: Text Study /Performing/Analysis of Live Theatre/Devising/Period Study of Theatre Styles/Theatre Design.

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

Unit 2 - Presentation of a play extract (Practical Exam) For this unit, you will be working in groups to present an extract from a play of your choice. You will be in groups of between 2 and 8 and asked to perform between 15 to 40 minutes of the play in the style of a theatre practitioner you will study. You may for this unit choose to be assessed on either your acting, directing, designing or technical skills. You will have to complete a piece of written coursework documenting the process of creating your piece. (40% of AS)

2013

5

0

0

2

2

1

0

0

2012

10

0

3

2

2

3

0

0

2011

7

0

0

2

5

0

0

0

2010

9

1

2

3

1

0

0

0

2009

7

N/A 2

3

2

0

0

0

2008

16

N/A 2

6

7

1

0

0

A2 UNITS Unit 3 - Prescribed Plays (Written Examination) This is an assessed written paper separated into two sections. You will study two set plays - one modern and one Victorian comedy. You will explore these practically in lessons before answering an examination question from either the viewpoint of an actor, director or designer. (30% of A Level)

Board: AQA

22

Unit 4 - Presentation of Devised Drama (Practical Examination) You will be working in groups to create and present a piece of devised drama in the style of your choice. You will be in groups of between 2 and 8 students and you will be assessed on either your work as actor, director, designer or technical skills. The piece will last between 15 and 40 minutes. You will base your performance on a stimulus and be expected to write supportive notes to accompany the performance and document the process. (20% of A Level)

Career Pathways This course is a good preparation for most careers where interpersonal skills are essential, but is particularly relevant to careers in theatre and the performance industry, journalism, the media industry and public relations.

Course Tutors Mrs J Priestnall Miss H Cox Mrs R O’Dowd


Economics AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Grade A or above in Maths GCSE. AS LEVEL Unit 1 - Markets in Action Unit 2 - The National and International Economy A2 LEVEL Unit 3 - Business Economics Unit 4 - The Global Economy

General Course Description Every day, newspapers, radio and TV bombard us with information about economic issues. The economy is constantly changing and impacting upon us. Economics studies the fact that there are an infinite number of people wanting items but only a limited number of resources. The choices we make in everyday life are decided by economic choices. In this course we will study the reasons for making these decisions. How are prices set? How do we decide how much to work or study? You will become better informed about the background to this information and gain a wider understanding of the economy which is essential to all UK citizens.

23

Board: AQA Career Pathways This is a valuable course that can lead towards further related degrees such as Economics, Business, Accountancy, Management, Marketing, Politics, etc.

Course Tutors Mr O’Rourke Mr Barlow


English Language and Literature AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Grade B in GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature or a grade B in English GCSE Single Award. AS English Language and Literature AS UNIT 1 - An exam based unit which focuses on introducing students to Language and Literature study. Students will study two texts such as The Kite Runner and A Streetcar Named Desire. The exam will require an analytical response to one text and an imaginative response to the other.

English as a language, while carrying forward the creative writing skills acquired during KS3 and KS4. Students will have the opportunity to explore ideas within Language study such as ‘The Spoken Word’ and the origin of words and communication yet still having the chance to engage with some challenging texts and issues.

AS UNIT 2 - An exam-based unit entitled Analysing Speech and its Representation. There will be two questions: one based on an extract from a prescribed play; one requiring comparison of unseen texts.

Previous Performance

A2 English Language and Literature A2 UNIT 3 - This is an exam based unit which requires the students to transform an element of a set text studied into another genre with a different audience. Students will then be expected to write a commentary on their own writing looking at how effective their approach has been in line with the brief given. A2 UNIT 4 - A coursework unit which will require the students to choose two texts from a prescribed list of authors and compare the linguistic devices used whilst considering the merit of such approaches.

General Course Description As well as offering our students more choice, the course will give the students the opportunity to develop skills already acquired in both GCSE English and GCSE English Literature. Whereas English Literature A Level course is focused on texts from the literary canon, the new course will allow students to analyse literary texts and examine

24

Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

18

1

1

8

6

2

0

0

2012

7

0

0

2

2

3

0

0

2011

7

1

0

1

3

2

0

0

Board: AQA Spec A Career Pathways This course is a good preparation for most careers, but is particularly relevant to journalism, publishing, the Media, teaching and the Civil Service.

Course Tutors Mr P Howes, Mrs V Kyriacou, Mrs L Adriano (Head of English), Mrs S Chilwan, Mrs A Tack and Mrs H Bissell


English Literature AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Grade B in both English Language and English Literature, or grade B in Single Award English GCSE. AS English Literature AS UNIT 1 - This examination-based unit will involve a detailed response to one set text and a response encompassing three other texts studied. The focus in this unit is on the narrative techniques used by authors. AS UNIT 2 - This unit assesses candidates through two pieces of coursework. Students will study and write a response to two drama texts within the comedy genre; one will be a Shakespeare text.

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

13

0

1

1

7

4

0

0

2012

27

5

5

6

5

6

0

0

2011

26

0

1

7

6

7

5

0

2010

34

8

5

7

7

7

0

0

A2 English Literature A2 UNIT 3 - This is a thematic examined unit where we look specifically at gothic texts. Pupils will study a range of texts across the ages. They will be expected to carry out wider reading.

2009

38

N/A 6

6

18

6

2

0

2008

34

N/A 3

13

11

3

4

0

A2 UNIT 4 - This is a coursework unit, based on the independent study of two texts. Students choose two texts of their own choice, formulate their own question and write their own response!

Board: AQA Spec B

General Course Description

This course is a good preparation for most careers, but is particularly relevant to legal careers, journalism, publishing, the Media, teaching and the Civil Service.

The English literature course encourages students to develop interest in and enjoyment of English literature through reading widely, critically and independently, across centuries, genre and gender, and through experience of an extensive range of views about texts and how to read them. The course is designed to build on existing skills developed at GCSE level. Students will be encouraged to develop their skills in analysis and make informed opinions about features of the texts studied.

25

The course, with its study of a wide range of texts from different periods, provides an excellent foundation for students who wish to study English literature to degree level. The skills developed by the course, the ability to read perceptively, to analyse, to evaluate, to express ideas cogently in oral and written form, are skills which are essential, however, in all careers and in all forms of Higher Education.

Career Pathways

Course Tutors Mrs J Killworth, Mr P Howes, Mrs V Kyriacou, Mrs L Adriano (Head of English), Mrs S Chilwan, Mrs A Tack and Mrs H Bissell.


Fashion AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements The course is open to all students who have GCSE Art or Design or Technology Textiles an Art related subject at grade C or above. Alternatively students who can demonstrate a personal interest in the subject. AS Coursework Portfolio - Candidates produce a portfolio of work from a range of starting points, topics or themes determined by the Textiles Staff and the candidate. The focus of the work should show exploration, research, acquisition of techniques and skills. Controlled Assignment - Candidates select one starting point from an early release question paper. There will be time for candidates to plan their work. The candidates will then be given five hours of controlled time to work on developing their ideas to realisation(s)/ outcome(s). A2 Personal Investigation - Candidates submit one major project that has a personal significance. The investigation includes a related personal study that must be between 1000 and 3000 words. Controlled Assignment - Candidates select one starting point from an early release question paper. There will be time for candidates to plan and prepare their work. The candidates will then be given 15 hours of controlled time to realise their ideas into a final outcome or outcomes.

General Course Description The course aims to encourage the enjoyment and appreciation of the diversity of Textile Design and Construction which incorporates a wide variety of disciplines, both traditional and modern.

26

• Surface Pattern Decoration - Visual and tactile surface decoration to include pattern and colour.

• Printing and Dying - Transferring images using traditional methods; block printing, batik, shibori, screen printing, stencilling or Hi Tec printing.

• Constructed - Knitting, weaving, felt, embroidery and appliqué. • Fashion - Garment construction, footwear design, fashion drawing, accessories, costume design.

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

6

1

5

0

0

0

0

0

2012

7

2

3

2

0

0

0

0

2011

6

3

1

0

1

1

0

0

2010

2

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

Board: OCR Career Pathways The Textile Course at Bishop Walsh is good preparation for a range of Textile and Design related degree or diploma courses, leading to a career in textiles, design, media, film and television, ICT, advertising or teaching. After completing A Levels, Foundation Degrees are designed as the principal gateway into a higher education in Art and Design. However, some Universities will accept students directly after A Levels, but we always recommend that students progress onto a Foundation Degree Course.

Course Tutors Mrs I Hornby - Walsh


French AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Grade B or above at GCSE French is desirable, although consideration may be given to potential candidates in some circumstances who may not have met this target. AS Leisure and Lifestyles - Travel and tourism, sport, hobbies, entertainment, customs, traditions, healthy living – health and nutrition, diet and exercise, unhealthy living – drugs, aids, smoking, alcohol etc.

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

7

0

1

3

0

1

2

0

The individual and society, relationships and responsibilities, gender issues, youth culture (values, peer groups, fashions, trends etc.), education, vocational training and future careers.

2012

2

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

2011

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

2010

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

A2 Environmental Issues - Technology, pollution, global warming, transport, energy, renewable energies, conservation, recycling, sustainability.

2009

6

N/A 4

2

0

0

0

0

Social and Political Issues - The role of the media, racism, immigration, social exclusion and integration, terrorism, world of work (employment, commerce, globalisation, etc.)

Course Description The course is designed to encourage students to develop an interest in, and enthusiasm for, language learning, increase their understanding of French in a variety of contexts and genres and communicate confidently, clearly and effectively in the language for a range of purposes. Students develop an awareness and understanding of the contemporary society, cultural background and heritage of countries or communities where the language is spoken. The course and content delivery will create an ideal basis for the further study of French at degree level or equivalent. Students acquire knowledge, skills and understanding of French for practical use, further study and/or employment. Students will benefit from regular lessons with a French Assistant and may opt to complete a work-experience placement in France.

27

Board: WJEC Career Pathways Current growth sectors for languages include finance, technology, public services and marketing as well as opportunities for travel and gaining new responsibility. An employer will pay on average, 8% - 20% more salary if languages are used. French may be studied as a Single Honours Degree at university. It is also very popular to combine languages with a vast range of work - related subjects such as engineering, media studies or criminology - making the graduate even more employable. One in 30 jobs has an explicit requirement for languages.

Course Tutors Mr J Bradbury, Mrs Bowker and Mr Early


Further Mathematics AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements This course is designed for the best mathematicians and so you will need an A or an A* at GCSE Mathematics to study Further Mathematics at A level. If you enjoy the challenges and rewards of mathematics and are expecting to achieve an A or A* at GCSE Mathematics then Further Mathematics A level is a potential choice for you. Discrete Mathematics - sorting algorithms, Chinese Postman algorithm, the Travelling Salesperson problem, linear programming, dynamic programming, game theory.

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

4

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

2012

4

1

1

1

0

1

0

0

Statistics - normal distribution, poisson distribution, sampling and the central limit theorem, hypothesis testing.

2011

3

1

1

0

0

0

1

0

2010

6

0

3

1

0

1

1

0

Mechanics - projectiles, equilibrium and moments, elasticity, momentum, uniform motion in a circle.

2009

7

N/A 3

3

0

1

0

0

2008

4

N/A 1

2

0

1

0

0

Further Pure Mathematics - Rational Functions and Graphs, Polar Coordinates, Hyperbolic Functions, Further Differentiation and Integration, Further Numerical Methods.

General Course Description Further Mathematics A level is designed to be studied alongside Mathematics A level. Students will therefore study the six modules for Mathematics A level (three in year 12 and three in year 13) with the other mathematics students and will then do a further six modules in Further Mathematics. The additional modules are Discrete 1, Discrete 2 and Further Pure 1 in year 12, and Statistics 2, Mechanics 2 and Further Pure 2 in year 13. This gives a total of twelve modules for Mathematics and Further Mathematics covering four different areas of mathematics, so giving both depth and diversity. These are allocated to Mathematics and Further Mathematics A levels in such a way as to maximise the grades achieved. There is no coursework in A level Further Mathematics.

28

Board: OCR Career Pathways Mathematics is one of the most highly regarded A level subjects. Further Mathematics goes one stage further – it puts you ahead of the rest. Universities and employers are particularly impressed by candidates who have studied Further Mathematics and if you are looking at a career which is quite competitive, then this could make the difference for you. If you are considering studying Mathematics at university, it will put you at a significant advantage. Many universities are now asking for Further Mathematics as a requirement for studying Mathematics at university.

Course Tutors Mrs N Prytherick Mr C Devine Mrs K Comyns Mr S Marshall


Geography AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements You should have achieved a grade C or above in GCSE Geography or a grade C in GCSE English Language or Single Award GCSE English and GCSE Maths if GCSE Geography not taken. AS UNITS Unit 1 - Physical and Human Geography Core physical unit: Rivers, floods and management. Core human unit: Population change. Optional physical topic: Coastal environments. Optional human topic: Energy issues.

Previous Performance

• • • •

Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

15

0

1

2

1

1

0

0

2012

11

0

2

2

6

0

1

0

Unit 2 - Geographical skills based on a field trip.

2011

Course not taught in 2011

A2 UNITS Unit 3 - Contemporary Geographical issues Plate tectonics and associated hazards; world cities; ecosystems.

2010

12

0

1

4

3

2

2

0

2009

4

N/A 1

0

2

0

1

0

2008

3

N/A 1

0

1

1

0

0

Unit 4A - Geographical Fieldwork Investigation based on a field trip.

General Course Description The course is divided into four units. Units 1 and 2 are assessed in Year 12 and units 3 and 4A in Year 13. The Year 12 course is split into core and optional physical and human units with geographical skills woven into the content. The Year 13 course is issues-based on contemporary physical and human geographical themes. Students also complete a geographical fieldwork investigation based on a field trip in Year 13 and are assessed on their ability to synthesise geographical information in an examination for Unit 4A. Day based fieldwork, an essential element of the course, to a river and a city in Years 12 and 13. A residential field trip to the Lake District is run with interest from the students.

29

Board: AQA Career Pathways Careers that involve using maps and data, knowing about the environment, making decisions about location, working with people in teams. Employment as an air traffic controller, archaeologist, architect, cartographer, civil engineer, conservationist, estate agent, environmentalist, farm worker, foreign correspondent, holiday rep, hydrologist, landscaper, meteorologist, outdoor pursuits advisor, peace keeper, town and country planner, surveyor, teacher, transport manager and travel agent all involve studying geography. Geography is a robust subject and educational institutions and employers recognise it as an academic qualification.

Course Tutor Mr Titcombe


German AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Grade B at GCSE is recommended.

AS Module 1 - Listening, Reading and Writing Module 2 - Speaking

Previous Performance

Topics include - Family, Friends and Relationships, Health, Holidays, Film, Music, Fashion, TV, Sport, Holidays, Media and New Technologies.

Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

A2 Module 3 - Listening, Reading and Writing

2013

4

0

0

0

1

3

1

0

2011

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

2010

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

2009

2

N/A 0

0

1

0

1

0

2008

2

N/A 1

1

0

0

0

0

Module 4 - Speaking Topics include - The Environment, Law and Order, Wealth and Poverty, Immigration, Racism, Future Technologies.

General Course Description

Board: AQA

The course aims to enrich and deepen your understanding of German language and culture, building on the broad base of topics studied to GCSE level.

Career Pathways

You will research topics independently and become adept at presenting and structuring an argument. The speaking skills you will develop are excellent preparation for giving presentations at university and in the workplace. In gaining a greater understanding of the structure of language, you will become practised at lateral thought and logical analysis and it is these skills, as much as your language knowledge, which will attract future employers. Work experience placements are available in a number of German cities.

30

All teaching takes place at school with students working in close conjunction with the German Assistant.

In addition to the more traditional language careers, German opens doors to a huge variety of careers in Media, Finance, Management, Marketing, Law, Government, Retail and IT. As well as opportunities such as travel and gaining new responsibility, an employer will pay on average 8% more salary if languages are used. It is possible to study German as a Single Honours degree or in combination with another subject, such as Engineering, Science or Business, which will make you even more employable!

Course Tutors Mrs C Bowker


Government and Politics AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements At least a B grade in GCSE History or English Language or Single Award English.

Board: Edexcel

AS UNITS Unit 1 - People and Politics Unit 2 - Governing the UK

Career Pathways

A2 UNITS Unit 3 - Governing the US Unit 4 - Representation in the US

General Course Description This subject has been designed to encourage an interest in and enthusiasm for the study of Politics. It will enable students to develop an insight into political beliefs, central to the understanding of the modern world.

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

12

1

1

1

5

3

0

1

2012

10

0

2

4

4

0

0

0

2011

13

0

1

4

6

2

0

0

2010

4

1

1

1

0

1

0

0

2009

11

N/A 4

1

3

2

1

0

2008

6

N/A 2

2

2

0

0

0

31

This course is a good preparation for most careers. Apart from a career in politics, it is particularly relevant to legal careers, journalism, publishing, the Media, the civil service, accountancy and financial services and teaching.

Course Tutors Mr Foley Mr Neilan


Health and Social Care AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Five B grades at GCSE including either GCSE English Language or Single Award English and Mathematics. This course is designed to provide a more vocational perspective and offers students the chance to obtain a qualification that meets both their individual aptitudes and interests. This course prepares students to enter a variety of courses in Health and Social Care and related subjects.

General Course Description The specification aims to encourage students to develop an interest and understanding in health, early-years care and education, social care and issues affecting the health and social care sector. Students will develop skills that will enable them to make an effective contribution to the care sector including skills of research, evaluation and problem-solving in a work related context. It also aims to prepare them for further study and training. The content at AS focuses on the needs of clients and the techniques and professional services aimed at meeting those needs. Students study rights, responsibilities and values, communication in care settings and health and well-being. The content at A2 develops the AS content through addressing the factors affecting, and issues involved in, service delivery. Students study service provision and practitioner roles, understanding human behaviour and development and their ability to draw together aspects of these areas in a variety of contexts. At AS level there are three mandatory units. One unit is externally assessed and the other two are internally assessed as portfolio work. At A2 level there is one mandatory unit which is internally assessed as portfolio work. The candidates then select two further optional units one of which must be externally assessed.

32

Board: TBC Career Pathways This course is an excellent preparation for students wishing to pursue careers in the health and social care sector e.g. nursing, midwifery, social work.

Course Tutors Mrs Nash


History AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements At least a B grade in GCSE History or 5A* - B GCSEs including a grade B in GCSE English Language or GCSE English Single Award. AS UNITS Unit 1 - Essay based exam on Black Civil Rights and the Korean and Vietnam conicts Unit 2 - Source analysis and extended questions on The Crimean, Boer and First World War A2 UNITS Unit 3 - From Kaiser to Fuhrer Unit 4 - Coursework at A2 on Britain and India 1847-1947

General Course Description This subject offers a wide and stimulating choice of content ranging from Black Civil Rights, the Korean and Vietnam War to the Crimean, Boer and First World War. The modules are designed around interesting, balanced and coherent teaching programmes. It features coursework at A2 on Britain and India 1847-1947 and acts as a natural progression from the GCSE in History and supports progression to further study.

33

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

22

1

3

11

5

2

0

0

2012

25

0

3

13

6

3

0

0

2011

15

0

1

6

6

2

0

0

2010

20

1

1

6

5

7

0

0

2009

23

N/A 8

4

6

4

1

0

2008

22

N/A 6

9

4

2

1

0

Board: Edexcel Career Pathways This course is a good preparation for most careers as the skills of formulating an argument, research and judgement based on evidence are transferable. History is particularly relevant to legal careers, journalism, teaching and the civil service.

Course Tutors Mr Foley Mr Neilan Mr Koryl Mrs Hamill


Mathematics AS/A LEVEL Course Entry Requirements A minimum of an A grade is recommended. Students who attain a strong grade B will be considered but will be interviewed by The Head of Mathematics - Mrs Prytherick to ensure they are suitable candidates for A level Mathematics. Students will also need a genuine enthusiasm for Mathematics if they are to be successful at A level. Course content Algebra - quadratics, expanding brackets, polynomials Differentiation and Integration Surds and Indices Radians Exponentials and Logarithms Vectors Statistics - probability, averages, representing data, correlation & regression Mechanics - distance, velocity & acceleration, linear momentum, forces & Newton’s laws

• • • • • • • •

General Course Description In year 12 the AS comprises three modules: Core 1, Core 2 and Statistics 1. Core Mathematics builds on GCSE work on algebra and graphs and introduces calculus. Statistics applies mathematics to situations involving probability and analysing data. All three modules contribute equally to the final AS grade. In year 13 three more modules are covered. The core topics are developed further in Core 3 and Core 4 and the student is introduced to the field of mechanics in Mechanics 1, where mathematics is applied to real life situations involving forces, pulleys and other particles. There is no coursework. The results of all 6 modules are aggregated to calculate a single final Mathematics A level grade.

Previous Performance Year 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008

34 Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

25

0

11

7

4

1

2

0

24

4

4

7

6

2

1

0

26

5

6

6

4

5

0

0

25

2

6

5

3

6

3

0

20

N/A 8

3

5

3

1

0

21

N/A 6

5

5

4

1

0

Board: OCR Career Pathways Mathematics is one of the most highly regarded A level subjects. Universities and employers view it very favourably, as it demonstrates important skills such as logical thought and problem solving. It also has applications to a wide variety of top careers. In addition to the more traditionally mathematical careers such as Banking, Finance or Accounting, the Mechanics part of the course is vital for Physics, Engineering, or any kind of technological career and the Statistics element is a sound basis for anyone considering a career in Geography, Biology, Medicine, Psychology or any aspect of Business, including Marketing, Advertising & Insurance. Most students find they enjoy mathematics much more at A level, understanding more as it all fits together and gaining confidence from the feeling of success it brings. So if you want to give yourself the best chance for your future, while enjoying a challenging and rewarding course, then Mathematics A level is for you.

Course Tutors Mrs N Prytherick, Mr C Devine, Mr A Hamill, Mr K Fung, Mrs C Lines, Mrs K Comyns and Mr S Marshall


Media Studies AS/A LEVEL Course Entry Requirements It is important to have obtained qualifications in Media at GCSE at grade B or above, but a grade of B or above in English Language GCSE or Single Award GCSE English will also be acceptable for entry. AS UNITS Foundation Portfolio - Students begin with a preliminary task, producing the front page and contents page for a school magazine. They have to take their own photographs and manipulate them in relevant programmes such as Adobe photoshop. They go on to plan, research and produce pages for a new music magazine of a specific genre and for a specific target audience. Their portfolio will show evidence of research, planning and the development of their magazine. They will also provide a detailed and exploratory evaluation. This will form 50% of their AS grade. In addition to their practical work, students will take an examination: Key Media Concepts (TV Drama). This involves the analysis of an extract of film footage with the application of their knowledge of the grammar of film and television – camera shots, sizes, angles and movement; sound; edits; mise- en-scéne. Candidates will be given a topic of representation and will have to explain how the micro techniques of film production create meaning. The second part of the exam will be a question on Institutions and Audiences. Candidates will prepare by studying a particular record label within the contemporary music industry. This will be accompanied by study of the strategies used by record labels to counter the practice of file sharing and their impact on music production, marketing and consumption. The exam is 50% of the AS grade.

preliminary and ancillary tasks and finally a reflective evaluation of their progress, in addition to the creation of the main media product. There is study of key media concepts, contemporary media issues and debates and cultural theories, allowing candidates to engage fully in highly relevant media discussion.

A2 UNITS Advanced Portfolio - Film and Print Again, the portfolio is 50% of the A2 grade. Here students are given a brief to create either a short film or a trailer. They have to run an on-line blog to record their research and developing ideas and skills throughout the unit. They will produce a promotional package, with ancillary tasks: their film featured on the front page of a film magazine; a review of their film within a magazine; a poster. There are opportunities to work in small groups or individually. The end product is then evaluated by candidates to conclude the portfolio. The exam in this final year involves Critical Perspectives in Media. There are questions that require candidates to undertake a theoretical evaluation of their production and a question on contemporary media issues. Candidates will study contemporary media regulation, looking at regulation and censorship of film and games. They will apply theories of audience and consider the effects debate and other relevant contemporary studies. Their research will include a number of case studies, for example controversy surrounding games such as ‘Call of Duty’ and films such as ‘This is England’.

Board: OCR

35

General Course Description This course comprises a mixture of practical work and theoretical study. Students create two portfolios – print and film. These units of production entail students undertaking detailed research; producing

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

11

0

0

8

0

3

0

0

2012

17

1

1

3

11

1

0

0

2011

17

0

1

8

5

3

0

0

2010

25

0

3

10

12

1

0

0

2009

16

N/A 3

7

4

2

0

0

2008

28

N/A 9

4

13

2

0

0

Career Pathways In the age of mass communication and fast growing technology industries, many career choices will be enhanced by the study of Media. Skills that students develop within the course, both in production tasks and critical understanding, will be viewed as highly desirable by future employers. All industries use IT and internet technologies and our media students will be familiar with a range of production techniques. Within Media industries – advertising, journalism, television and film, to name a few, there are exciting opportunities for careers at the cutting edge of the digital age. Media can also lead into education and rewarding teaching and lecturing careers.

Course Tutors Mr Khawaja (Head of Department) Mrs Killworth and Mrs Chilwan


Music AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Students who wish to take this course must be able to perform to grade 4 standard or equivalent on their instrument or voice. GCSE music is preferable but not essential. If you are unsure, come and ask! To continue to A2 pupils must be of grade 5 Music theory ability. (AS/A2) Performing 1 / Performing 2 These units are externally assessed by a visiting examiner. You will perform as a soloist and in a group (minimum grade 4 standard). You will also have a brief interview when you will discuss with the examiner your performance and the repertoire you have chosen. (AS/A2 Composing 1 Composing 2) This work is internally assessed. At AS a portfolio of harmony exercises and a composition for 4 – 10 instruments is produced. At A2 options include writing a song for a given text and composing a film sound track. (AS/A2) Introduction to Historical Study / Historical and Analytical Studies This is externally assessed in a written and listening examination. You will study a range of music and answer questions based on your knowledge of these pieces.

General Course Description A Level music develops a vast range of creative and analytical skills, from performance and presentation, to essay writing and mathematical skills in music theory. This makes music a subject that is highly regarded by universities and employers. The course is tailored to the individual’s strengths in composition and performance in particular.

Previous Performance Year 2013 2012 2011 2010

36 Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

7

0

1

3

3

0

0

0

9

0

0

0

3

4

2

0

5

0

0

4

1

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Board: OCR Career Pathways The most obvious reason for studying music is because you love it! Music is one of the most important and powerful means of human expression. Through performance, composition, technology, and critical and historical study we are able to express our creativity, intellect and emotions. We can engage with a range of societies and cultures, both contemporary and historical, and develop skills in working with and understanding others. The study and performance of music develops independent thinking and a range of analytical and communication skills that are highly valued in the professional world you will enter after university. Careers in music might include teachers, composers, performers, arts administrators, as well as in business, education, film and television, government, librarianship, media and the armed services. Where can I find out more information? Speak to Mr Baker to find out more! Alternatively documents are available on the OCR website.

Course Tutors Mr Baker Mrs Del Strother


P.E. AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Grade B or above at GCSE P.E. and GCSE Biology/ Additional Science. Or a Distinction* at BTEC Sport and a grade B at GCSE Biology/Additional Science. Or a Distinction* at BTEC Science and BTEC Sport. If you did not study GCSE P.E. a grade B at GCSE Biology and GCSE Maths. Or a Distinction* in BTEC Science and a grade B in Maths. AS UNIT 1 - Anatomy and Physiology (Section A) The Skeletal and Muscular Systems; Motion and Movement; The Cardiovascular and Respiratory systems in relation to the performance of physical activity.

General Course Description

Acquiring Movement Skills (Section B) Classification of motor skills and abilities; The development of motor skills; Information processing; Motor control of skills in physical activity; Learning skills in physical activity.

Previous Performance

Socio-Cultural Studies relating to participation in physical activity (Section C) Physical activity; Sport and culture; Contemporary sporting issues. Assessment: 1 x 2 hour written paper, Summer.

This subject examines participation and performance in physical activity as part of a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle.

Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

7

0

0

3

1

2

1

0

2012

9

0

0

2

3

4

0

0

2011

10

0

2

2

4

2

0

0

2010

12

0

1

0

3

3

5

0

AS UNIT 2 - Acquiring, developing and evaluating practical skills in Physical Education (PRACTICAL) Assessment - Performance (Either 2 sports, 1 sport and coaching or 1 sport and leadership); Evaluating and planning for the improvement of performance (verbal assessment).

2009

8

N/A 0

0

4

2

2

0

2008

8

N/A 0

2

4

1

1

0

A2 UNIT 1 - Principles and concepts across different areas of Physical Education This unit has two sections; Section A: Socio-Cultural options and Section B: Scientific options.

Career Pathways

Candidates must study three of the five possible options. At least one option must be Scientific. Options include: Historical Studies (Socio-Cultural), Comparative Studies (Socio-Cultural), Sports Psychology (Scientific), Biomechanics (Scientific), Exercise and Sport Physiology (Scientific).

37

A2 UNIT 2 - The improvement of effective performance and the critical evaluation of practical activities in Physical Education (PRACTICAL) Candidates will build upon the skills acquired and developed in AS in one of their chosen practical activities and work towards responding to a live performance in their own assessed sporting activity.

Board: OCR University/College courses including; Sport and Exercise Science, Sports Studies, Sport Management, Physiotherapy, Sports Coaching and Teaching, Leisure and Tourism. Teaching Qualifications in Physical Education. Armed Forces, Police Force, Fire Brigade. Employment in Leisure and Recreational Services.

Course Tutors Mrs W Clegg, Mr G Huddleston Miss N Mc Manus and Mr Khawaja


Physics AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements GCSE Physics grade B or above and GCSE Maths at grade A. Or grade BB or above in Core + Additional Science and a grade A at Maths. YEAR 12 AS-LEVEL Unit 1 - Particles, Quantum Phenomena and Electricity You will learn the fundamental properties of the structure of matter, electromagnetic radiation together with the study of current electricity. The exam (in June) counts 40% of the AS mark, 20% of A Level. Unit 2 - Mechanics, Materials and Waves You will develop your knowledge of forces and energy from GCSE, study the bulk properties of materials and conclude the unit by an in-depth study of waves, including refraction, diffraction and superposition. The exam (in June) counts 40% of the AS mark, 20% of A Level.

General Course Description At Bishop Walsh we study the AQA Physics A Syllabus. This is a fairly traditional route to the development of knowledge and understanding in Physics. It provides a smooth pathway from GCSE and a route to university courses in physics and other subjects in which physics is a key component. (It is not a requirement to study Mathematics at A-Level, but students who do not do so often find the course to be particularly difficult; especially at A2.)

Previous Performance

Unit 3 - Investigative and Practical Skills You will carry out experimental and investigative activities under controlled conditions, assessed in an Externally Marked Practical Assigment (EMPA) worth 20% of the AS mark, 10% of the A Level mark.

Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

14

2

2

1

6

2

1

0

2012

6

2

1

0

3

0

0

0

2011

7

0

1

2

3

1

0

0

YEAR 13 A2-LEVEL Unit 4 - Fields and Further Mechanics You will study circular and oscillatory motions, momentum, electrical, magnetic and gravitational fields, together with basic electromagnetic induction. Electric fields leads into capacitors and magnetic fields leads into the generation and transmission of alternating current. The exam counts 20% of the total A Level mark.

2010

7

N/A 0

1

1

2

2

1

2009

13

N/A 2

2

3

3

3

0

Unit 5 Nuclear and Thermal Physics and Optional Topic You will study the characteristics of the unstable nucleus, how energy is released and harnessed. The thermal properties of materials and the properties and nature of gases are studied in depth. The optional topics give the opportunity to study the following areas.

38

1) Astronomy and Cosmology, 2) Medical Physics, 3) Applied Physics, 4) Turning Points in Physics. The exam counts 20% of the total A Level mark. Unit 6 - Investigative and Practical Skills Just as in Year 12, you will carry out experimental and investigative activities under controlled conditions, assessed in an Externally Marked Practical Assigment (EMPA) worth 20% of the A2 mark, 10% of the A Level mark.

Board: AQA Career Pathways

A level Physics will open the door for many careers, for example: Civil Engineering, Aeronautics, Automotive Engineering and Design, Materials Science, Physics, Architecture, Medicine, and many others. A-Level Physics is often a requirement for many degree courses and highly valued as a facilitating qualification by the Russell Group Universities. Doing Physics A-Level will be challenging, but will also give you a sense of satisfaction as you take on the challenge. 80% of Physics is how you approach it. If you enjoy Physics at GCSE, you should seriously think of doing it at A level.

Course Tutors Mr Green, Mrs Gardner and Miss Mousley


Psychology AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements Apart from having a genuine interest and enthusiasm for human behaviour, during the course students will need to be able to communicate effectively and research information from a variety of sources and be willing to undertake independent study. Due to the wide range of skills Psychology involves it is necessary to have GCSE English Language or Single Award GCSE English and GCSE Mathematics at grade C or above. A grade B in GCSE Biology or Merit in BTEC is preferable. AS UNITS During the AS course, you be assessed by two module examinations, the first one of these to be taken in January (40% of the overall AS grade) and the other in the summer (60% of the overall AS grade) Unit 1 - Cognitive Approach - This unit focuses on the role of cognitive processes in human behaviour such as memory and forgetting. Social Approach - This unit focuses on aspects of human behaviour that involves the individual’s relationships to other persons, groups and society. Unit 2 Biological Approach - The unit focuses on showing the influence and impact of genes, hormones and brain lateralisation in gender development. Psychodynamic Approach - this unit looks at the work of Freud, the importance of early childhood experiences and the influences of unconscious processes on behaviour. Learning Approach - this unit looks at the effects of conditioning, reinforcement and social learning on behaviour. A2 UNITS During the A2 course you will put theory into practice. We will look at the following applications and apply key theories into explaining; Criminal Psychology - criminal behaviour and eyewitness testimony Health Psychology - substance misuse

Previous Performance Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

47

2

3

20

15

6

1

1

2012

55

2

7

15

24

4

2

1

2011

58

1

8

14

13

12

2

0

2010

38

1

5

9

12

7

4

0

2009

51

N/A 8

15

10

9

7

2

2008

41

N/A 7

15

9

7

3

0

Board: Edexcel Career Pathways Psychology is a science subject and knowledge of Psychology is valuable in all areas of life – at home, in relationships and at work. It will help give you a better understanding of why people think and act as they do. Psychology can be used to broaden your range of subjects and is relevant for many careers. Apart from following a degree programme in Psychology either as a single or joint programme with another subject, it is also useful for Teaching, Law, Police Force, Marketing, Public Relations, Counselling, Care sector, Nursing and Advertising.

Clinical Psychology - mental illness

39

General Course Description Psychology is the systematic and scientific study of human behaviour and investigates extremes of human behaviour such as mental disorders and transgender operations, as well as ordinary, everyday behaviour such as memory, development and treatment of phobias and gender development. There is no coursework. If you enjoy looking at the diversity and complexities of human behaviour and like hurly burly debate this course is for you!

Course Tutors Mrs L May Miss V Hounslow


Religious Studies AS/A LEVEL

Course Entry Requirements You should have achieved at least a grade B in GCSE RE and a grade C in English language or Single Award English. You will enjoy this course if you have opinions and enjoy debate about moral issues. You need interest in questions and views about the meaning and purpose of life. AS UNITS Philosophy - exploring issues relating to belief in God. ‘The Cosmological Argument’ and ‘Religious Experience’ are evaluated as to what extent they can prove the existence of God. ‘Psychology’ and ‘Atheism’ are analysed to decide how much of a threat they pose to religious belief.

Previous Performance

Ethics - debating life and death matters and trying to decide how they should be approached. The ethical theories of ‘Situation Ethics’ and ‘Utilitarianism’ are studied and applied to moral dilemmas. Issues arising from abortion and euthanasia are specifically studied along with views surrounding the value of human life. A2 UNITS A2 Philosophy - support and challenge for religious belief continue to be debated. ‘The Ontological Argument’ explores the logic of God’s existence and ‘Body, Soul and Identity’ evaluates the evidence and possibility of life after death. ‘Religious Language’ critiques the way religious belief is communicated and one of the biggest challenges to religious belief is analysed in ‘The Problem of Evil’. A2 Ethics - independent thought and deep evaluation is developed as many different approaches to making moral decisions are tested in their real use as they are applied to modern day medical moral decisions. By studying real issues arising from medical research and development, students must use and test ethical theories including Natural Law, Situation Ethics, Utilitarianism and Virtue Ethics.

40

General Course Description The subject is split into two separate parts – Philosophy and Ethics. Philosophy is a study of issues and questions relating to God, the existence of the world and the purpose of human life. Ethics is a study of moral issues and the approaches taken by different people to find out what is the right or wrong thing to do when making decisions about the issues.

Year

Total

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

2013

23

0

5

8

6

2

2

0

2012

24

0

2

7

9

4

2

0

2011

13

0

2

3

5

1

2

0

2010

12

0

3

4

4

1

0

0

2009

10

N/A 3

3

3

0

1

0

2008

14

N/A 5

6

3

0

0

0

Board: Edexcel Career Pathways This course gives excellent preparation for a huge variety of careers and degree options. The skills developed in thinking and evaluating are considered to be very desirable in many careers. It is particularly suitable for people considering careers in law, medicine, journalism, management and of course...RE teachers!

Course Tutors Mrs A Perfect, Miss K Meek, Mrs C Ellis and Mr C Wright


Bishop Walsh Sixth Form Prospectus 2014 - 2016

41


GCSE Re-Sit English

GCSE Re-Sit English Course Content • 40% of the course is through written controlled assessments: understanding literacy texts, producing creative texts.

• 60% is through one external exam, which tests responding to and creating non - fiction texts.

FROM 2014 Speaking and listening is assessed for the supplementary award, which is graded 1-5.

General Course Description This course offers students to explore the complexities of the English Language. It gives the opportunity to improve your written and verbal communication which is imperative in today’s job market. You are immersed into the study of a range of different cultures and identities and offered the language skills to enjoy these aspects of life fully. The course takes place in lessons after school.

42

Board: AQA Course Tutors Mrs Killworth, Mr P Howes, Mrs V Kyriacou, Mrs L Adriano (Head of English), Mrs S Chilwan, Mrs A Tack and Mrs Bissell


GCSE Re-Sit Mathematics

GCSE Re-Sit Mathematics Course Content • Number - worded problems, standard form, indices, percentages, ratio, fractions and decimals

Algebra - simplifying expressions, solving equations, expanding brackets, plotting graphs

• Shape and Space - Pythagoras, trigonometry, transformations, area and volume, constructions

• Data Handling - probability, mean from grouped data, representing data in diagrams

General Course Description This course will revise and reinforce the skills acquired during previous study in order to enable students to raise their achievement to grade C or above. Students must attend all lessons and do all homework if they are to be entered for the examination. Help will be given to improve your understanding, concentrating on mainly grade C topics and examination practice.

43

Board: Edexcel Course Tutors Mrs Prytherick Mr Hamill


Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme

Duke of Edinburgh’s Award

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award has been running at Bishop Walsh School since 2009. In the past few years we have run successful expeditions in Bromsgrove, camping at Blackwell Court, and in the Peak District, using the White Peak area. The DofE award is a very popular award in which to participate and since 2009, the award has increased from 14 pupils completing the award to 160 in 2013. In 2012, Bishop Walsh School facilitated the running of the Gold award, with 7 students participating and has now expanded to 20 students. This year the Gold Award will complete their expedition in 2014 to Snowdonia National Park. The DofE Award is an excellent opportunity for students to complete a prestigious award and have the opportunity to plan and complete two expeditions in rural areas - an activity that many of our pupils have not done before. As well as the personal achievements gained by completing the DofE, Businesses and Universities look very favourably on students who have completed one of the Awards. The table on the right is research taken from 100 of the largest companies in Britain that were asked to list the experiences/qualities that enhance an application. The DofE Award came out first! The DofE Award is advertised at the beginning of every academic year, with expeditions taking place between March - July, and Gold expeditions taking place in August.

For more information see Miss Twist

44

Average ratings in order of importance

Rank

1

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award (‘DofE’)

1.96

2

Work experience

2.00

3

Community activities

2.04

4

World Challenge

2.16

5

Young Enterprise

2.20

6

Team sporting activities

2.28

7

Youth awards

2.28

8

Public speaking/debating

2.32

9

County/National team sports

2.36

10

Interview skills

2.44

11

School Council

2.48

12

School Prefect

2.48

13

Individual sporting achievements

2.48

14

Financial awareness courses

2.52

15

Work shadowing

2.60

16

Industry days

2.60

17

School newspapers

2.64

18

Plays/drama

2.68

19

Investment clubs

2.68

20

Outside speakers

2.76

21

School radio

2.76

22

The house/prefect system

2.76

23

Solo musical ability

2.84

24

Orchestral participation

2.84

25

Artistic skills

2.88

26

British Schools Exploring Society

3.00

27

School trips

3.08

28

Take your daughter to work

3.28


Bishop Walsh Catholic School

BISHOP WALSH CATHOLIC SIXTH FORM

JOHN PAUL II Multi Academy Company

Bishop Walsh Catholic School and Sixth Form Wylde Green Road, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham B76 1QT Tel: 0121 351 3215 Fax: 0121 313 2142 enquiry@bishopwalsh.net www.bishopwalsh.net Designed and produced by WavePrint 0121 454 9441 info@waveprint.co.uk

Bishop Walsh Catholic School Sixth Form Prosepctus  

Prospectus and course guide for Bishop Walsh Catholic School in Walmley, West Midlands.

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