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Issue No. 23 September 2015


CONTENTS Branch Chairman’s Chat………………………………………..3 CRT for Kids……………………………………………………...5 Word Search……………………………………………………...6 Thorne Yacht Club Festival……………………………………..7 From the Archive……………………………...…...…………….8 Who finally put a Cuckoo into Keels and Cuckoos…...……..11 The Barnsley and Dearne and Dove…………..…………….14 Branch Officers………………………………………………….16 Keels and Cuckoos is published on behalf of the South Yorkshire and the Dukeries Branch of the Inland Waterways Association by M H Fielding, 1 Vicarage way, Arksey, Doncaster, DN5 0TG. Printed by Colour Image, Loudwater Views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of The Inland Waterways Association or of the South Yorkshire and the Dukeries Branch Committee The Inland Waterways Association: Registered Office Island House, Moor Road, Chesham, HP5 1WA Website www.waterways.org.uk Email iwa@waterways.org.uk Founded in 1946, incorporated in 1958 The Inland Waterways Association is a non-profit distribution company limited by guarantee (No. 62245) Registered as a Charity (No. 212342)

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BRANCH CHAIRMAN’S CHAT You may wonder why, in the later days of July 2015, I am concerning myself with the spring of 2016. The answer is that the IWA’s National Trail Boat Rally is coming to our branch area, and the date is less than nine months away. Certainly the bulk of the organisational work will fall on the shoulders of the Chesterfield Canal Trust, the local body tasked with organising the event at Staveley on the restored section of “our” Chesterfield Canal; but, as the local branch of the IWA we can not let the CCT carry all the load, monopolise the enjoyment and bask in all the glory. This is after all an IWA event, and we, the local branch, need to pull our weight. There are about four hundred of us, including you, in the branch area. For many of you IWA is a cause to quietly support fro which IWA is grateful, but for jus a few of you, a local rally of National significance will offer an opportunity to become involved, if only for a short while, in the great cause that is the IWA. Obviously the great and the good will be attending, and at similar events I found myself drinking tea with TV personalities, or opening doors for minor Royals. It all happens, as they say. So you may ask “what can I bring to the party? I am too old to dig, too shy to give talks, and I don’t know that much about canals. But the running of a waterway event opens many doors. Someone will need to ensure that access for people with mobility problems is as easy as possible, so someone might liaise with local organisations to ensure a supply of wheelchairs. The event will, hopefully, attract families with young children , should there be a crèche? If so who will staff it and ensure that safe activities are available should the weather prove unkind. Should the branch have a sales stand, if so what should be on sale, and who will organise stocks , preferably on a sale or return basis? Would a guide to local attractions prove popular.? If so it needs to be written. Should the branch commission a video record of the event and if so is there a member with equipment and skills to record and edit such a thing. Not one of the above tasks required a great knowledge of our canals, but through your work or other hobbies you may have skills that would enhance the enjoyment of the event for all. The days of simply turning up at a canal, dropping in your canoe , dinghy or

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plastic cabin cruiser are not “gone” because all are still eminently pleasurable things to do. But in 2016 the public, and that includes all of us, expect much more. The National Trail boat rally needs to have “event” status, it needs to offer “visitor experience” it must have a “WOW” factor. As the original grey-beard cross dinosaur, I find some of these words a little alien, but in truth I have simply used modern parlance to capture the very same sentiments that some of us recall from, for example, the Stratford in 1964 as we watched Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother cut the ribbon. Any waterway event that attracts “the public” is hugely important. For some our trail-boat rally may be their first encounter with an inland waterway. It could be our chance to create a great “first impression” not only on the adults, but also on the imagination of the children, for when we are all no more, it is they that will be the custodians of our waterways. So I ask again please think what you can bring to the event in the spring of next year that will cement good memories in those young minds, for, truly, it is there the future of our waterways lies. I look forward to hearing from you by telephone, letter or e-mail.

David Dawson SY&D Branch Chairman July 2015 Laughter Lines:

It pays to advertise

At a dry cleaner’s...We do not tear your clothing with machinery. We do it carefully by hand. On a road sign….When this sign is under water, this road is impassable. At a launderette...Automatic washing machines. Please remove all your clothes when the lights go out. In a church hall...Weight Watchers will meet at 7pm. Please use the large double doors at the side entrance.

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CRT FOR KIDS “WHAT SHALL WE DO TODAY PACK� This year Canal and River Trust have produced a very good activity guide for youngsters. It includes a whole host of fun and affordable ways to keep busy safely by your local canal or river with twenty different activities. Throughout there are places for activity stickers (provided) in different sections of the book and some puzzles and games. The activity pages tell you what you will need and what you can find. It also explains the different kinds of clouds and what they are made of . Also there is a page dedicated to what to feed and what not to feed to the birdlife found on the waterways. The guide is available by contacting the Canal and River Trust via their website.

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WORD SEARCH In the grid below are the names of sixteen derelict canals. They can be written forwards, backwards, vertically, horizontally or diagonally. The answers can be found at the foot of this page.

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ANSWERS Bentley, Ulveston, Bude, Andover, Carlisle Doctors, Torrington, Wem, Oakham, Nutbrook, Monkland Glastonbury, Kensington, Croydon, Tavistock, Leominster, 6


THORNE YACHT CLUB FESTIVAL The Branch were again invited to partake in the annual Regatta hosted by Thorne Yacht Club and held at Stanilands Marina, Thorne on the 15th and 16th of August. This year their nominated charity was “The Coppice School, Hatfield�, who support children with severe learning disabilities. Attractions included a display from Yorkshire Air Ambulance, vintage cars and motor cycles, a blacksmith, a demonstration using very old diving equipment with a hand operated air pump, a young dancing troupe and a street dance duo. TMCR (Thorne & Moorends Community Radio supplied music and the PA system. Also featured was a very light hearted dog show. We took the branch gazebo along with artefacts and photos belonging to the Branch Chairman David Dawson. He has collected many items over the years in his association with the IWA. At first visitors were few and far between but in the afternoon visitor numbers picked up. The weather held up for the majority of day although there was a rain scare in mid afternoon. Pat Davies made some cakes and brought some plants to sell which went down very well with several people asking us to keep putting them aside for collection later. All in all I feel we had quite a successful day, taking the opportunity to publicise the IWA and its objectives as often as possible. Many thanks to Thorne Yacht Club for their kind invitation to attend. Malcolm Fielding

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FROM THE ARCHIVE The following article is taken from material found in the former head office of the Sheffield and South Yorkshire navigation Company in Sheffield, after nationalisation it became the DAIWE (Docks and Inland Waterways Executive) North Eastern office. Log of the “Cressy” Hurleston to Ellesmere and return 1947 August 19th. Water coming down from upper level all night with the result that pound was up to weir level by morning and we were able to draw in to the quay wall. Getting under way in good time we travelled well through Povey’s lock to Willymoor, HERON leading. Just beyond the tail of Willymoor lock, Heron grounded, the pound being very low. We therefore waited in lock chamber, letting water through until the pound filled up. We then continued to Quoisley Lock where a stop was made for lunch. Weather fine and warm. Thence we travelled well through the good pound to Marbury. Here we drove two cygnets into the lock chamber ahead of us and these had to be hauled out struggling. We were much relieved to hear that the weeds in the pound through Wrenbury to Baddiley Top had been cut since we came up. We were therefore able to travel slowly but without much difficulty to Wrenbury drawbridge. On trying to lift the bridge we found that the winch had now quite come adrift and instead of lifting the bridge it merely wound itself in the air. Lashed it down with spare lines. Owing to removal of stores ’Cressy’ just failed to clear bridge platform this time and it removed a long shaving off the edge of our port side cant rail. Stopped for tea beyond the bridge, also to fit a temporary belt to replace broken one on HERON’S circulating pump. Then continued slowly but without difficulty to hear (rear, ed) of Baddiley Top Lock where we moored for the night. Hit submerged object (tree-trunk?) about 100 yds above lock but no damage done.

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August 20th Lock Keeper came up to see us through Baddiley Top Lock where we had had such trouble coming up. Going full ahead with a good flush from the top paddles we sailed out without any difficulty. Travelled easily through Baddiley middle and bottom locks, but found the weed bad and uncut between the bottom lock and Swanley top lock. We managed to drive through it, but HERON’S propeller fouled badly so we passed and took her in tow as far as the lock. When we came to Swanley lower lock we found the pound below (which extends to Hurleston top lock) was 1ft. below weir level. We therefore stopped in the lock chamber for lunch while we drew water down. When we judged that the pound had made up sufficiently we dropped paddles and proceeded. We dragged bottom at one point below the lock, so we had judged things pretty closely. Weed was bad in places, but we managed to drive through it without manual assistance and so reached Jurleston (Hurleston; ed) top lock. Locked down without incident, but when we reached the bottom lock we saw that the main line was at least 4” down and anticipated some trouble getting over the mud bar below. My wife, Livock and Christopher Grundy took a long line over the bridge to the main line tow path. Came out of the lock ‘full steam’ but nevertheless fetched up on the mud bar and it took considerable effort on the part of the bow-haulers to pull her over. HERON came over with little difficulty. We then proceeded down the main line to moor for the night in Nantwich Basin. CONCLUSIONS This trip showed that to restore the Welsh Canal section to reasonable navigable order would involve comparatively little work. If the pounds were kept at weir level there would be a reasonable draft except in certain short sections, where scouring has occurred. For the pleasure cruiser the canal is one of the most beautiful inland cruising grounds in Britain, but its present condition deters many local owners

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from attempting to navigate it. Even now however, a cruiser drawing not more than 2ft. And not exceeding 7ft. Beam should experience no difficulty in spring when water levels are higher and the weed not grown up. A 7ft beam cruiser should nor jam in the locks because this `maximum beam occurs only at one point on the hull. ‘Cressy’s’ trouble in this respect was due to the fact that with a narrow boat, maximum beam extends over a considerable length and depth of hull. ‘Cressy’s’ maximum beam is slightly under 7ft since she was built to work the Welsh Canal. It would not be possible for a narrow boat of Fellows Morton or Grand Union type to pass Grindley Brook locks in their present state as the maximum beam of these boats may be as much as 7ft 2ins. L.T.C.ROLT. A long but very interesting article showing the determination of the early waterway enthusiast’s to keep the waterways alive for future generations. I have reproduced this article as per Rolt’s log with editorial corrections indicated (…..ed), thus trying to keep to the authors original text.

Cressy with Tom Rolt on board. IWA co founder Tom Rolt.

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WHO FINALLY PUT A “CUCKOO” INTO KEELS AND CUCKOOS? The answer is our friends, The Chesterfield Canal Trust. Following several years of very low profile activity, a small team of Chesterfield Canal Trust members put the finishing touches to “Dawn Rose” the first true cuckoo (the colloquial name for the Chesterfield Canal working boats) and launched her into Shireoaks Basin. The boat has been built under the supervision of David Bownes, a Worksop resident and retired woodworking expert with a clear memory of the last original Cuckoos. Using only hand tools, appropriate to the era, the boat is truly handmade. All Chesterfield Canal boats were horse drawn no motorised boat ever traded on the waterway. Dawn Rose is therefore dependent upon either a horse, a motorised tug, or human muscle to get her from A to B. Thus it was on June 6th 2015 at the Worksop Water Day, organised by Canal & River Trust , that Dawn Rose visited Worksop for the very first time. She was the star attraction, moored to the towpath outside “The Lock Keeper” on the Shireoaks side of Worksop. As yet she was officially nameless. This was corrected when Sybil Fielding, chair of Nottinghamshire County Council and Shireoaks resident, performed the naming ceremony. This emulated those performed in “the old days”, during which, a celebratory pint of beer was split between the boat builder, the boat owner and the waterway itself. Ms Fielding had earlier spent some time discussing inland waterways with SY&D branch members and complimented them on the colourful and interesting display of waterway artefacts on the IWA stand in the main marquee. One feature, unique to Cuckoo narrowboats was their ability, on suitable waters for the crew to rig up a mast and sail. Mother Nature, obviously aware of this, did send quite strong winds on June 6th, but these were premature as the mast and sail were not quite ready for use, and the restricted channel just west of Worksop would have taxed even Sir Francis Chichester or Ellen MacArthur DBE! CCT plan in 2016 and onward to use the Trust owned, ex BW maintenance boat, Python, as the motive power to move Dawn Rose from event to event. It is hoped that at some stage Dawn Rose will follow in the wake of her predecessors and attempt the trip to Boston, using sail as and when appropri-

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ate. As I write this the mast is completed and the sail has been raised. A modern sailing rig is frequently made of stainless steel which, in this case, is totally inappropriate for Dawn Rose. With this in mind branch committee member, Helen Dawson, approached “Hunters Yard” in Ludham, Norfolk for help, and was, in return for a nominal donation to Hunters Trusts funds, presented with six (believed to have been made between the wars) well worn wooden pulley blocks, similar in appearance to those used on Cuckoos and to be used when Dawn Rose is rigged for display. If you would like to see this unique vessel for yourselves it is planned that she will be in Retford, for Heritage day, on September 12. She will be easy to find along the towpath between Carolgate Bridge and Retford Town Lock or in other words canal side just outside the ASDA supermarket. There are lots of easy access Council owned carparks, and on Heritage Day Retford is worth a visit to see the churches, museum, King’s Park vintage vehicles, model railways and much more. The operation and maintenance of Dawn Rose will be funded by the “Friends of Dawn Rose” and will not draw on the CCT’s central funds which still needed to continue the restoration of the western section between Staveley and Kiverton Park. Membership of The Friends is open to everyone at a minimum subscription of £10.00 per annum. The web address to join online dawnrose@chesterfield -canal-trust.org , or call me at home on 01777 704224 for an application form by post. David Dawson Chairman SY&D. IWA . July 23rd 2015 Laughter Lines In A Swansea department store….Bargain Basement upstairs, On a church notice board...Will those who have relatives buried in graves in the churchyard please keep them in order.

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The crowds gather for the naming ceremony. The crowd watching the naming ceremony.

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THE BARNSLEY, DEARNE AND DOVE We now we have the Ribble Link and plans are well underway for the Bedford, Milton Keynes Link. The link between the cathedrals of Lincoln, Peterborough and Ely is planned and a length is already completed. There Is talk of extending the Ashby to link with the Trent and Mersey, closer to home the Rother Link is on the drawing board. At a recent meeting of the Restoration Committee, in a letter from an IWA member the idea of linking the Ancholme to the Fossdyke was raised. That’s just a few of the novel ideas flourishing in this revival era. Many of theses links will be built, a few may be a “flight of fancy” with no real prospects of ever materialising. But what of a currently closed, but previously existing “link”. I refer, of course, to the two waterways in the in the title of this item. Will the B,D&D ever reopen? Certainly there is a restoration society with completed surveys but the capital cost of the restoration based on one completed survey was quarter of a billion pounds. That may be an eye watering amount of money, but in the national budget it is probably less that the cost of the paper used by HMRC—possibly. Having spent some time looking at what are in essence, two waterways, the picture is confused. Of the Barnsley Canal, quite a lot remains, of the Dearne and Dove Canal, very little remains. The Barnsley is very little worse to the untrained eye (mine) than the Huddersfield Narrow or the Rochdale was when restoration of these waterways was first mooted. Is there an argument to split the restoration campaign? If the seemingly easier restoration of the Barnsley were to be completed would that then precipitate a renewed campaign to open the Dearne and Dove? This could be seen as two campaigns, one short term , to relink the Barnsley with the national waterway system. This would

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be likely, in view of the density of the local population to be immediately busy, with scope for several marinas and given local engineering traditions the establishment of boat building and repair yards. The second, a long term project to build a “new” Dearne and Dove as lots of the original line seems to be beyond reclamation, using the River Dearne itself. Whilst this may fly in the face of local restorationists or preservationists, at least an alternative route ought to be considered , especially as the proposed HS2 may well be built before work on the Dearne and Dove begins thus making strict adherence to the original route totally impossible. I write this in the hope of sparking some interest, without which these two once great |waterways will fade further from the folk memory to be lost for ever, no longer even warranting “route of old canal” on future OS maps. It is my belief hat generations of Yorkshire folk, yet to born will think the better of us if we come together with new ideas for this water route. By leaving these local canals to moulder; by simply looking the other way, history will place us into the same category as those who demolished the Euston Arch, or sanctioned the infilling of the canal basins of Oxford and Banbury; to make car parks. Not a happy epitaph for today’s IWA members to contemplate. Please let me know what you think. Contact details can be found on the back page. David Dawson SY&D IWA Chairman July 2015 15


BRANCH OFFICERS CHAIRMAN David Dawson 21 Smeath Lane Clarborough Retford DN22 9JU VICE CHAIRMAN AND PLANNING OFFICER Colin Crofts Staddlestones South Bramwith Doncaster DN7 5SY TREASURER Pat Davies 55 Rockcliff Road Rawmarsh Rotherham S62 6LX

Tel 01777 704224 email dawsondavida@yahoo.com Mobile 07501 803918

Tel 01302 841619 email cjcrofts@btinternet.com

Tel 01709 206856 email patdav54@gmail.com

SECRETARY AND KEELS AND CUCKOOS EDITOR Malcolm Fielding Tel 01302 873127 1 Vicarage Way email roc3brn9ros1ark4@aim.com Arksey Doncaster DN5 0TG MEMBERSHIP OFFICER John Shaw 72 Norton Lees Crescent Sheffield S8 8SR PUBLICITY OFFICER Dave Scott 17 Bowshaw Road Batemoor Sheffield S8 8EY COMMITTEE MEMBERS Mavis Paul 116 Sandygate Road Sheffield S10 5RZ

Tel 0114 258 2535

Tel 0114 237 5327 email acp2004naburn@hotmail.com Mobile 07900 275327

Tel 0114 268 927 email mavis.brian_paul@btinternet.com Mobile 07725 464611

Helen Dawson as David Dawson Mary Crofts as Colin Crofts

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Keels and Cuckoos, Issue 23, September 2015  
Keels and Cuckoos, Issue 23, September 2015