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lifelonglearningopportunities09

openstudies part-timedegrees 2+2degrees foundationdegrees personalandprofessionaldevelopment


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Welcome

Lifelong Learning programmes at Warwick offer flexibility in terms of entry requirements and study modes


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Lifelong Learning at Warwick is about

Lifelong Learning at Warwick is about... // Opportunity // Warwick offers a world class education to everyone with the ability to benefit, regardless of their economic circumstances // Challenge // Warwick’s courses are challenging, you will be guided and inspired by our experienced staff // Support // At Warwick you will study in a caring and supportive community with staff who understand your needs and concerns // Flexibility // Lifelong Learning

programmes at Warwick offer flexibility in terms of entry requirements and study modes // Development // A Warwick education will develop your skills, knowledge and accomplishments to equip you for your future // Achievement // Lifelong Learning programmes at Warwick will open new doors and most importantly success will bring enormous pride and satisfaction.

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Contents

Contents 03 What makes Warwick different? 04 Different routes to a degree 05 Helping you to study 07 Support when you need it 10 Financing your studies 15 Other aspects of student life 16

openstudies

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personalandprofessionaldevelopment

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part-timedegrees

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2+2degrees

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foundationdegrees

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Full-time degrees

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Teacher Training (Learning and Skills Lifelong Learning Sector)

36 Finding out more

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What makes Warwick different

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Warwick has a range of facilities to provide help and support to ensure your learning experience is as enjoyable as possible

What is it that makes learning at Warwick so special? The University of Warwick is one of the UK’s leading universities. Applications from returners to study are welcomed and Warwick has many years’ experience of running programmes for such students. Warwick has a range of facilities to provide help and support to ensure your learning experience is as enjoyable as possible.

It’s a lively, cosmopolitan place, home to students and staff from over 120 different countries and from all backgrounds. All the essentials of 21st century life are close at hand. There are shops (including a supermarket), banks, laundrettes, a hairdressing salon, a travel agent, cafes, restaurants and bars. There is excellent entertainment seven nights a week in the Students’ Union. You can take in a play or a concert in the Arts Centre or enjoy one of the latest releases in its cinema. The Warwick campus has a real buzz: yet it remains green. There are lakes and woods, trees and landscaped gardens; at our last inventory of campus wildlife we counted 114 species of bird, 228 different kinds of plant, and 6 types of bat! This combination of town and country is also reflected in the University’s location on the edge of the busy city of Coventry, merging into Warwickshire farmland on the West side of campus.


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Different routes to a degree

For students who want to combine study with work commitments, we offer Foundation Degrees

Different routes to a degree Not everyone comes to university straight from school at the age of 18 or 19. Many of our undergraduate students return to education after raising families, during a career break, or in retirement. The University offers a range of programmes to help them fulfil their ambitions, with flexible entry requirements that recognise previous learning and experience. We welcome such students and find that they very quickly feel ‘at home’ with other undergraduates in classes and seminars. We do not necessarily insist that they meet the normal entry requirements for each degree course but consider each application individually, looking for motivation and work and other experience as much as formal qualifications. Many students however, prefer to study on a part-time basis and enrol on our Part-time Degree Programme. This allows them to study at their own pace for between 4 and 10 years, with classes during the day or in the evening. For adults without formal qualifications who are keen to get back into education and work for a university degree, we have set up our 2+2 Degree Programme in partnership with local colleges. Here, students study full-time for 4 years.

The first 2 years are spent at a local college, and after this students come to the University to work alongside other Warwick students for the last 2 years of the degree course. 2+2 students tell us that they gain immeasurably in confidence and knowledge during their 2 ‘college’ years, and arrive well equipped to make the best possible use of their final 2 years at Warwick. For students who want to combine study with work commitments, we offer Foundation Degrees. These are part-time programmes that include an element of work-based learning as well as academic study. Foundation Degrees can be used as a preparation for an Honours degree if you wish to continue your studies. Many people have found their way back into education via the University’s Open Studies courses, which are held at venues throughout the region and cover a whole range of topics. There are day schools, 10-week courses, and one-year certificates that can count towards a Part-time Degree at a later date.


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Helping you to study

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Helping you to study University is about working with others – and learning to work by and for yourself. You may be taught in lectures, seminars or small tutorial groups. In a seminar, a group of perhaps a dozen students meet with a member of staff to discuss and review a paper prepared by one of the group or there may be a presentation from a couple of students. In small tutorial groups, you have the opportunity for more individual contact with the tutor, so that you can discuss a piece of work in more detail and receive feedback on your progress. But formal academic teaching with your fellow students is only one aspect of learning at university. Underpinning all this collective learning will be your own independent study – essential if you really want to get to grips with your subject. Here you will be guided by your subject tutor, who will suggest what you should read, and discuss it with you. This kind of personal academic support is a particular feature of Warwick: it is especially important during the early stages when you are finding your feet. Each undergraduate also has a personal tutor with whom they can discuss both academic and personal matters. The Library The University Library is right at the heart of campus and whatever your subject, you’ll find it invaluable. It is open 7 days a week for most of the year, with very long opening hours. There are specialist subject librarians who liaise with academic departments to make sure all the right books for each course are stocked. There is a special short loan collection for books in heavy demand by undergraduates, so that everyone has an opportunity to use them for particular assignments.

The library is an excellent place to work. Individual study facilities can be found throughout the building. For group study or a more relaxed environment check out the newly modelled first floor with multimedia-assisted study areas and the Library's cafe. You can use the Library electronically, from on and off campus. Its web-based catalogue allows you to reserve books and renew your loans from almost anywhere at any time and many of its resources are also available electronically. There is also a wireless network in the Library. Students are sometimes a little anxious about using the Library but there is an introductory session at the beginning of the year with the option of training sessions in the first term too. The Learning Grid Individual Library-based study is an important part of working for your degree. However for group-based projects and presentations, you need a slightly different environment from the traditional library – a place where several of you can work together, that will allow you not only to prepare the project but also to practise presenting it. At Warwick you can do this in our student resource centre, The Learning Grid, situated in University House. The Learning Grid is open 24 hours a day; it has all the latest IT equipment and also the books and texts students are most likely to need. It’s a relaxed study environment that encourages group work with areas specifically designed for designing and practising group presentations. IT Support The University has excellent IT facilities supported by IT Services. IT Services offers a comprehensive range of IT courses which students are strongly encouraged to make use of. There are two levels of courses and also the possibility of one-to-one training for those who have no previous experience of using computers. Level 1 courses address baseline skills for effective study and Level 2 courses seek to improve and develop your skills. In addition there is an Open Learning Centre where users may study on-line material on an individual basis.


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Amanda Jones Early Years Sector Endorsed Foundation Degree “I never dreamt that I would be clever enough to go to university, let alone get a degree. My secondary school teachers basically told me that I would not cope with the ‘university workload’. I was eventually convinced by a work colleague to apply for this course. I was a bit daunted by all the work that was going to be involved, but made some fantastic friends who gave me such support and encouragement. I admit the work has been difficult at times, especially in the final year, but I have had tremendous support from my colleagues at work, who have picked me up when I was down and given me lots of helpful hints on where I need to focus my essays. I have also been able to share with them ideas that I have brought from lectures, to help them in new ventures across the school. I feel so proud to have finally graduated and have a new confidence in myself, which has spurred me on to study some more before becoming a teacher.”


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Support when you need it

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Student Support Services There is a comprehensive network of support and welfare services available to students to support them in times of difficulty. There is often more than one service which may be able to help, and services work together to ensure that any problems are dealt with swiftly and effectively.

• Disability Services work to help students with disabilities such as hearing and visual impairments, dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, AD(H)D, dysgraphia, mobility impairments, Autistic Spectrum Disorders, 'unseen' disabilities such as asthma, epilepsy and diabetes and any other conditions to address barriers to study.

More details of the services listed below, along with others available to students can be found at www.go.warwick.ac.uk/supportservices

• The Chaplaincy. The Chaplaincy provides the provision of pastoral and spiritual care to all members of the University community, of all faiths and none. They provide a space for worship and quiet reflection and the leadership of religious worship. The Chaplaincy is home to the Anglican, Roman Catholic, Free Church and Jewish chaplains, who are always glad to meet students socially and pastorally.

• The Director of Student Support and Residential Life, the University Senior Tutor and colleagues in Student Support work closely together to help students in times of need. If a student needs help during their time at Warwick, it is likely that one of them will be able to help. The Senior Tutor is able to help with serious academic issues, and the Director of Student Support and Residential Life can help with non-academic issues. The Senior Tutor is also responsible for developing the personal tutor system and for liaising with and co-ordinating student welfare functions. • The University Counselling Service provides an opportunity for all students at any level and at any time of study at the University of Warwick to access professional therapeutic counselling so that they may better develop and fulfil their personal, academic and professional potential. There are a wide variety of services, including individual counselling, group sessions, workshops and email counselling.

Disability Services can help make reasonable adjustments to facilitate study, provide advice and specialist services to students.

The University also has a dedicated Islamic Prayer Hall immediately adjacent to the Chaplaincy building. • The University Mental Health Co-ordinators are available to provide students with mental health difficulties with advice, information and support as needed to facilitate academic work and participation in University life. All communication is confidential and informal. Students are encouraged to disclose their mental health issues either at enrolment or at any time afterwards so that they can actively take part in how best to manage any difficulties that may arise. • The Students' Union Advice and Welfare Service offers a range of independent advice and guidance, in particular, housing law and finance/social security. It also offers advice in other areas including academic problems. www.warwicksu.com/advice/


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Support when you need it

We will give advice and information about the availability of funding from both the University and the UK Government including access funds

Undergraduate Skills Programme go.warwick.ac.uk/usp Students can use the Undergraduate Skills Programme (USP) to develop their study skills, get better marks, impress potential employers and network with other Warwick students. Students learn at their pace, where, when and how they want to, choosing which parts of the programme suit them best. The USP is free and available to all Undergraduates at Warwick, and includes Recipes for Success, Academic Coaching, a Study Skills Advice drop in service, and the Warwick Skills Certificate: an accredited certificate that helps students develop their skills to be better prepared for future careers. Modules are worth 5 or 10 CAT credits; achieve 30 and students receive the full certificate. The modules passed will appear on a student’s transcript as a permanent record of their achievement and modules can be taken in critical thinking, academic writing, time management, business writing, and many more. For more information and to sign up online, visit go.warwick.ac.uk/usp/wsc Student Guidance and Development Within the Centre for Lifelong Learning Pauline McManus, Senior Tutor in Lifelong Learning, offers students academic and personal support.

Topics covered include time management, speed reading, note taking skills, preparing and writing essays and reports, referencing, revision and examination techniques, seminar skills and oral presentation skills. Study skills sessions are advertised and offered throughout the academic year. Additionally, students are invited to contact Pauline for a one to one discussion on any issue which is related to or affects their studies. For more information, please contact Pauline on 024 7652 8459, or email: P.McManus@warwick.ac.uk The Nursery www.warwick.ac.uk/go/nursery The University Nursery moved to new premises in Autumn 2008 and now provides professional day care for around 78 children aged between 3 months and 5 years. Children are cared for by trained nursery nurses in a homely but structured environment where they are encouraged to socialize, explore and develop to their full potential. Students can concentrate on their studies knowing that their children are happy and safe and student parents may apply for help with nursery fees. Call 024 7652 3389 for more information.


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Harjit Johal BA Hons Social Studies Bakshish Johal BA Hons Health and Social Policy “ I arrived at Warwick University after a fairly traumatic experience, which for a while I thought would inhibit me from completing a degree. My confidence, motivation and self-belief were extremely low. Through the large amount of flexibility in degree structure and unprecedented support from the Part-time Degree team at Warwick, my confidence was soon restored and I was able to complete my degree and graduate with a BA in Social Studies. I was thrilled to achieve this as at one stage this seemed an impossible goal. The support and warmth of the part-time team at Warwick in particular is something which will stay with me forever, and my experience at Warwick has left me feeling equipped to face future challenges in life. I am proud to have followed in the footsteps of my mother (pictured above) who is also a Warwick University Part-time Degree graduate.�


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Financing your studies

Student Funding It is vital to consider the financial implications of returning to study, whether full-time or part-time, particularly if you have been working in the past. There will be new costs in addition to your normal outgoings, e.g. books, equipment, travel.

Financial arrangements for full-time students studying for a 2+2 degree

You should think about the sacrifices you may have to make and also the benefits and advantages that a Warwick degree is likely to give. Financial support is available to all full-time home students and to many part-time students. The information below gives an idea of the costs you are likely to incur and the help you may receive.

How much will I have to pay for my tuition fees? The maximum tuition fee contribution paid by 2+2 students in 2009-2010 will be £1,285. (This is expected to rise annually with inflation). You will not have to pay the tuition fee before you start your course or while you are studying. Students will be eligible for a student loan for fees to cover these costs. The loan will be paid directly to the University on your behalf and you will repay once you have finished (or left) your course and are earning over £15,000 a year.

The figures quoted in this section refer to the fees charged and support available in the 2009-2010 academic year. Detailed information on the rates of fees, grants and loans for 2009-2010 are given on the University website www.warwick.ac.uk/go/ugfunding If you have any concerns, please do not hesitate to contact the University’s Student Funding Adviser on 024 7657 2952 or email v.sykes@warwick.ac.uk or speak to an experienced welfare adviser at the Students’ Union Advice and Welfare service on 024 7657 2824.

As a full-time student there will be two main expenses that you will have to consider; tuition fees and living costs. You may get help with both of these from the government via Student Finance Direct www.studentfinancedirect.co.uk

2+2 students starting their courses at Warwick in 2009 will not be charged variable fees of £3,225 per annum.


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Financing your studies

What financial help is available towards living expenses? A Maintenance Grant will be paid to eligible new full-time students who are commencing their studies in 2009-2010. Most mature students will be eligible for a full or partial grant, unless they have a partner in well paid employment. The maximum amount available in 2009-2010 is £2,906 and a minimum grant of £50. How much help you will receive depends on your income and that of your household. As a rough guide, students from households with an annual of income of around £25,000 or less will receive the full £2,906 grant. Those from families with an income above £25,000 will receive a partial grant, the value of which decreases as income rises with a minimum grant of £50 being paid to students with family incomes of £60,032 a year. Students from families with incomes above £60,032 will receive no grant. The Maintenance Grant does not have to be paid back. Students who are eligible to receive means-tested benefits such as Income Support and Housing Benefit may receive a Special Support Grant rather than a Maintenance Grant. These students will generally be lone parents, other student parents if they have a partner who is also a student, and students with disabilities. The amount of support, the income assessment arrangements and the payment arrangements are the same as for the Maintenance Grant. Your entitlement to Department for Work and Pensions benefits will not be affected if you receive a Special Support Grant.

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What are Maintenance Loans and how do they work? Maintenance Loans are available to help with living costs. They attract a low rate of interest – at inflation levels. This ensures that the value of the loan repaid remains the same in real terms as the amount borrowed. All eligible students aged under 60, are entitled to be assessed for 75% of the maximum figure. Whether you can get any or all of the remaining 25% depends on your household income. If you have part of your maintenance needs met through a Maintenance Grant, your Maintenance Loan will be reduced by £1 for every £1 of Maintenance Grant you receive, up to a maximum reduction of £1,292. However, if you receive a Special Support Grant rather than a Maintenance Grant, your Maintenance Loan will not be reduced. In the 2009-2010 academic year the maximum Maintenance Loan for a student studying outside London is £4,745 and this is made up as follows: Loan (75%) non means-tested £3,559, additional means-tested loan (25%) £1,186. Maintenance Loan rates are usually increased in line with inflation each year. Repayments of Student Loans for Fees and Maintenance start in the April after you leave your course and once your earnings exceed £15,000 a year.


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Financing your studies

The table below illustrates how the levels of Maintenance Grant and Maintenance Loan for new students will change on family incomes of £25,000 or less and incomes of up to £72,057. New Maintenance Grant – Indicative Levels of Entitlement Income Maintenance Grant Maintenance Loan £25,000 or less £2,906 £3,453 £30,000 £2,053 £3,453 £40,000 £1,023 £3,722 £50,000 £538 £4,207 £60,032 £50 £4,695 £61,061 £0 £4,745 £65,000 £0 £4,321 £70,000 £0 £3,781 £72,057 £0 £3,559

Grant + Maintenance Loan £6,359 £5,506 £4,745 £4,745 £4,745 £4,745 £4,321 £3,781 £3,559

All figures above use the Maintenance Loan of £4,745 for students living away from home. Maintenance Loan entitlement is reduced by £1 for every £1 of Maintenance Grant payable up to a maximum reduction of £1,292. A minimum grant of £50 is payable at a household income point of £60,032 with no grant payable where household income is £60,033 or above. 25% of the Maintenance Loan is subject to means testing once household income reaches £61,061.

Supplementary Grants Some students may be able to receive supplementary grants in addition to their Maintenance or Special Support Grant and Maintenance Loan. • Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs). These help with the extra costs you may have as a direct result of a disability. Help is not dependent on household income. • The Parents’ Learning Allowance is non-repayable and will be worth up to £1,508 in 2009-2010 depending on household income. It is intended to help with course-related costs for students with dependent children. • Adult Dependants’ Grant. If a student has a husband, wife or partner or another adult family member who depends on them financially, they may be eligible for a grant of up to £2,642 a year in 2009-2010. This help is non-repayable. • Childcare Grant. This is a grant for full-time students with dependent children in registered or approved childcare. The amount payable depends on household income and actual childcare costs, up to a maximum of £148.75 a week (one child) or £255 a week (two or more children). This help is non-repayable.

How do I apply? You need to make only one application to Student Finance Direct (www.studentfinancedirect.co.uk) each year for help with tuition fee loans, maintenance loans and supplementary grants. You should apply as soon as possible after receiving an offer of a place.

Financial help available from the University What is the Warwick Undergraduate Aid Programme (WUAP) and who is eligible for additional funding? WUAP is intended to offer much needed financial support to students and their families who might experience the most difficulty in funding their university careers. In 2009-2010 first year full-time home (UK) undergraduates who are independent students, or who are from families with incomes of up to £36,000 a year, will be eligible for additional WUAP funding of £1,800 per annum. Students who are eligible for a £1,800 scholarship and who are assessed by Student Finance Direct as independent students, or who are in receipt of the following means-tested benefits, Income Support, Income Based Job Seeker’s Allowance, Income Based Employment and Support Allowance, Housing Benefit, Council Tax Benefit or Pension Credit are encouraged to apply for an Alumni and Friends’ Named Scholarship. If you are successful in your Alumni and Friends’ Named Scholarship application, you will receive a further award of up to £2,000 per annum in addition to your Warwick Scholarship.


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Financing your studies

• Scholarships at Warwick of £1,800 p.a. for those students with household incomes of up to £36,000 p.a. • Plus possible funding from the Alumni and Friends’ Named Scholarship of up to £2,000 p.a. Funding from WUAP is non-repayable and further details can be found on our website www.warwick.ac.uk/go/wuap The Access to Learning Fund If at any time during your course you find you have exceptional financial needs, you can apply to the University for additional support with your living expenses and course-related costs. Help may be available through the Access to Learning Fund. Access to Learning Funds are given to universities to provide selective help to students who have serious financial problems. Grants from the Access to Learning Fund are non-repayable and are intended to help with course-related or day-to-day living costs. Awards can be made towards the costs of accommodation, childcare, transport, disability needs and various other expenses. You will need to show genuine financial hardship and that you have explored other ways of supporting yourself and meeting any shortfall between your income and expenditure. Details of the application procedure for Access to Learning Fund grants are available on the website www.warwick.ac.uk/go/hardshipfunds. We try to make it as simple and student friendly as possible with an application form and just a short informal interview with a Student Funding Adviser. Warwick has adopted a policy of specifically targeting Access to Learning Funds at 2+2 and other returners to study.

Financial arrangements for part-time students Part-time students on courses that are 50% or more of an equivalent full-time course can apply for support towards their fees and course costs. The fee grant is linked to the intensity of your course and in 2009-2010 the maximum grant available will be £1,210, equivalent to the cost of three full modules. Part-time students can also apply for a course grant of up to £260 in 2009-10 towards travel, books and other course costs.

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Entitlement to the grants will depend on your income and that of your husband, wife or partner. If, for example, you are a single student with no dependants, you will qualify for full support if your income is less than £16,510 a year or if you are on income-assessed benefits. You may be able to get part of this support if you are earning between £16,510 and £27,505 p.a. Higher thresholds will apply to the combined incomes of students with partners and/or dependent children. Student Finance Direct will work out how much support you can get. There is no age limit for this support, but students who already have a degree cannot normally apply. Disabled Students’ Allowances Part-time students with disabilities who are studying at least 50% of a full-time course are eligible to apply for Disabled Students’ Allowances. Disabled Students’ Allowances are not income assessed and there is no upper age limit. The allowances are to help pay for any extra costs or expenses, during a course of study, which arise because of a disability. DSAs are assessed and paid by Student Finance Direct. Access to Learning Funds Part-time students studying the equivalent of at least 50% of a full-time course, who have applied for a course grant and who are still in financial hardship, can apply to the Access to Learning Fund for help with additional course-related costs. Students with dependent children who receive full fee and grant support will be eligible for a grant from the Access to Learning Fund to help with the costs of registered or accredited childcare. Help and Advice For further help and advice on all aspects of student financial support please contact: • Student Funding Office email: studentfunding@warwick.ac.uk 024 7615 0096 • University Disability Co-ordinator email disability@warwick.ac.uk 024 7615 0641 • Centre for Lifelong Learning (P/T students) email: lifelonglearning@warwick.ac.uk 024 7652 3683


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Louise Winter BA Hons Early Childhood Studies “I had always wanted to work with children but after leaving school I went to work for a large company where I stayed for twenty years. I probably would have been there forever if I had not been offered my redundancy. My third child started at primary school at the same time I left my job. I volunteered to help with school activities and this gave me a direct insight into primary school life. I knew then that I would love to teach. However, it was such a long time since I had studied I didn’t know how or where to begin. I was extremely lucky to meet someone who had just completed this degree and she thought the course was brilliant, and reassured me that I was the type of person who would be suitable. Looking back it was a big gamble to leave a secure, well-paid job but it has honestly been the best year of my life. I have no regrets. The other students and tutors are fantastic and I’m amazed at how much I have learnt in this short time. Having the flexibility to study around my family means we are all happy and I appreciate how lucky I am to have this opportunity.”


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Other aspects of student life

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Boosting your career prospects is just one reason for returning to learning, and the Careers Service is here to help all Warwick students achieve their career goals

Other aspects of student life Careers Centre Boosting your career prospects is just one reason for returning to learning, and the Careers Centre is here to help all Warwick students achieve their career goals. We provide a wide range of services to suit your needs whether you are seeking to enter an entirely new area or develop your current career. Our information library is based in the Learning Grid in University House, but a wealth of resources is also available at www.warwick.ac.uk/careers. We provide one-to-one appointments with Careers Consultants as well as workshops on job seeking skills, mock interviews and help with gaining experience in new areas of work. We also run events tailored specifically to the needs of returners to study, giving you the chance to work alongside others from similar backgrounds, and consider how you can effectively present yourself to employers given your previous experiences. Many employers are aware of the benefits of employing a diverse workforce and have a genuine interest in recruiting students returning to study after a period away. They recognise that maturity and life experience, at work and home, as well as the skills gained through your studies, can mean you have a lot to offer. However, just like traditional age students, a degree alone is not a passport to a graduate job. Finding out about different options, networking and gaining the experience you will need to take your career forward, all take time and are best done alongside your studies, not at the end. For this reason the help we offer is available from the very beginning of your time at Warwick – it’s never too early to start planning your next steps. The Cultural Scene At the heart of the University campus is Warwick Arts Centre – the largest arts centre in the Midlands. Two theatres, a concert hall holding 1500 people, a cinema and art gallery allow you to experience the best in UK and international drama, comedy and dance, hear all kinds of music from contemporary pop to classical, watch the recent box office

successes as well as arthouse movies, and see the latest contemporary art in the Mead Gallery. Around 250,000 people visit Warwick Arts Centre every year; there are special discounts for students – and it’s right on your doorstep! Warwick is an extremely ‘musical’ place. In the Music Centre you’ll find opportunities to exercise and develop your musical talents. There are opportunities for everybody, at all standards, from beginners to accomplished musicians. Some of our groups are auditioned but the majority are not. You can join over 500 other music-making students in a wide range of ensembles. The Sporting Scene The sporting life is great at Warwick. Whatever your preference – from ‘traditional’ outdoor sports to the challenge of our indoor climbing centre – you’ll find excellent facilities, enthusiasm and encouragement from our dedicated sports staff. The University Sports Centre, which includes a 25 metre 6 lane swimming pool, squash courts and two sports halls, is right in the middle of campus and a new indoor tennis centre is on our Westwood Campus. It has very recently been extended by the construction of a large health and fitness centre and an aerobics studio. The slogan at Warwick is ‘Sport for All’. Students’ Union The Union provides services for all students at the University and you will benefit from your involvement with it. It helps with personal development and gives you experience of extra-curricular activities which may be useful when applying for jobs. One of the strongest attractions of the Union is the huge range of societies on offer. The Union supports over 180 societies and 70 sports clubs. Because there are so many, the most diverse interests are covered – political campaigning, welfare, music, drama and much more. The Students’ Union represents students at all levels – from course representatives, through student-staff liaison committees to the University’s key decision making body, the Senate.


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Open Studies

Open Studies The Open Studies programme has been running for over 25 years and this year it has grown to offer a wider range of modules designed to appeal to everyone. Classes are held at the University and at centres in Solihull, Rugby, Leamington, Warwick, Kenilworth, Coventry, Nuneaton, Stratford and Evesham. Open Studies Modules Recognising that students returning to study often have work and family commitments, the programme offers daytime and evening study. Open Studies modules are genuinely ‘open’ in that anyone with the interest to study can enrol, irrespective of previous educational experience. The range of modules available is large and very diverse, offering something for everyone. People from all walks of life are currently taking modules for pleasure or progression. Most modules last for 10 weeks and are worth 10 credits. This year we have some new and exciting modules in, for example, History, Art History, Psychology and Personal and Professional Development. Open Studies Certificates Open Studies Certificates consist of 3 linked 10 week modules taken over 1 year. As their name suggests, there are no entry requirements other than enthusiasm and a willingness to engage in study over 3 terms. As with the 10 week modules certificates can be studied in the daytime or evening. They can be taken simply for interest and pleasure (although you will be expected to undertake some work) or as a first step towards a Part-time Degree – a Certificate is equivalent to one Part-time Degree module. Most modules are £70 but some have a different fee level. Concessions are available to those wholly dependent on state benefits (including full-time students). Certificates currently available: • Advice and Guidance • American Studies • Archaeology • Coaching and Mentoring • Creative Writing • Creative Writing - Advanced • Earth Science

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ecology and Conservation English Studies Historical Studies History of Art History of Music Journalism Local Historical Studies Local History Philosophical Studies Psychology Skills in Group Work Sociology Supporting Minority Ethnic Pupils Work Psychology

Day-schools In addition to all of the above, for people who don’t wish to commit to a 10 week course, non-accredited day-schools are held on Fridays and Saturdays throughout the year in various subject areas, including Art, Genealogy, History and Literature. For further information about the day-schools, modules and certificates contact the Open Studies team on 024 7657 3739 or email openstudies@warwick.ac.uk www.warwick.ac.uk/cll/openstudies

The Language Centre The Language Centre offers an extensive programme of foreign language courses for members of the University community and the general public. Courses are available at various levels, from absolute beginners to advanced conversation classes. Students on all courses can gain recognition for their efforts to learn a foreign language through the award of Open Studies Certificates. Languages currently taught are: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Turkish and Urdu. British Sign Language courses are also offered. If you would like further details and registration forms for these and other language courses, please contact The Language Centre on 024 7652 3462. Information and on-line registration are also available at www.warwick.ac.uk/LanguageCentre


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David McAteer Historical Studies Certificate “Having been out of education for several years, I still had a yearning to complete a degree. During one of my frequent trips to Warwick Arts Centre I picked up a leaflet for Part-time Degrees. Further enquiries and a chat with the tutor resulted in me choosing to start by studying the Open Studies Certificate in Historical Studies. I was previously unaware that completion of the course could count towards my degree. The 3 ten week modules flew by. The weekly lectures were interesting and I learnt many new things and I enjoyed the mix of students on each course. Initially I found it quite tiring as I have a full-time job but I soon adapted to the schedule. It was a good taster to see if I was fit to complete the degree and I now look forward to the challenges ahead when I return to Warwick in the autumn to start my Historical Studies degree.�


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Personal and Professional Development

Personal and Professional Development The Centre for Lifelong Learning has an excellent reputation for accredited courses for the general public and has developed a suite of personal and professional development courses in response to needs identified by local businesses and individuals. Three Open Studies Certificates are offered requiring 60 hours contact time. Open Studies Certificate in Advice and Guidance This will be of particular value if advice and guidance is an intrinsic part of the participant’s role. The first module focuses upon core interpersonal skills including techniques for handling difficult situations. The second module introduces a comprehensive range of information skills including online resources and how to market services to clients and staff within the organisation. The third module develops understanding and skills in dealing with different client groups. Open Studies Certificate in Coaching and Mentoring Coaching and mentoring are increasingly used to promote learning and development and improve performance and effectiveness in the workplace. The first module introduces a range of approaches from directive to non-directive, and enables participants to develop their skills and understanding. Further models and techniques are explored in the second and third modules to enable participants to articulate and critically evaluate their personal approach. Open Studies Certificate in Skills in Group Work Group work can be a very effective way of enabling individual clients to achieve diverse aims through mutual support and these can be greatly enhanced when the group facilitator has a deeper understanding of how groups work and has been trained in techniques to enable more effective processes. The first module develops understanding of group dynamic processes and provides experiential knowledge of group-based learning; the second module develops group facilitation and leadership skills; and the third module develops skills in session planning, design, and the facilitation of learning, development and assessment.

Contact Details If you would like further details about the course content or to discuss any other aspect please contact Catherine Zara on 024 7657 2987 or catherine.zara@warwick.ac.uk or visit www.warwick.ac.uk/go/professionaldevelopment If you wish to book a place on one of the above courses please contact the Open Studies Office on 024 7657 3739; openstudies@warwick.ac.uk

Counselling Courses The Centre also offers Counselling courses: • Introduction to Counselling (Open Studies module) • Certificate in Person-centred (Rogerian) Counselling • Diploma in Person-centred (Rogerian) Counselling and Psychotherapy • Advanced Diploma in Cognitive Behavioural Methods for Person-centred Counsellors • Advanced Diploma in the Supervision of Personcentred Counsellors and Psychotherapists • Advanced Diploma in the Supervision of Personcentred Counsellors and Psychotherapists with Research. From Autumn 2009 the Centre will also offer a Foundation Degree in Counselling (this is subject to approval), please contact the Centre for more information. Admission for many of these courses is by interview. For more information contact Tara Cosgrove on 024 7652 3831 or t.j.cosgrove@warwick.ac.uk


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Part-time Degree Programme

Part-time Degree Programme The Part-time Degree programme is a flexible programme particularly suited to the needs of mature students. Students are able to study at their own pace over 4 to 10 years. Admissions procedures allow sympathetic consideration of non-traditional qualifications, work and life experience and credit may also be given for recent prior learning and Open Studies work. Some courses are taught during the day-time only and some in both the day and the evening. Please contact the Centre for Lifelong Learning on 024 7652 3683 to discuss the timing of classes in a particular subject. Individual Degree Programmes • *Classics Students survey Greek and Roman Civilisation in a broad cultural context and are encouraged to understand the societies of the ancient world as unified and integrated wholes. The overall approach is wide ranging, covering language (including the opportunity to study Latin and/or Greek), literature, philosophy, history, material culture and contemporary theoretical approaches. • Early Childhood Studies This degree will be of particular interest to those who wish to gain knowledge and understanding of child development in early years settings. It can be a platform for students to take a PGCE for the 3-8 years age range or lead to career options in other early years settings such as hospital play as well as to social services opportunities. • English and Cultural Studies The Department of English teaches the two core modules for this degree, Modes of Reading - an introductory module - and Romantic and Victorian Poetry - an Honours level module. There are optional modules in English, North American and European literature. Students may also take modules in other humanities subjects such as classics, film studies and languages.

• European Studies This is a multi-disciplinary degree which allows students to focus on one language, (French, German, Italian or Spanish) and a non-language subject, with the option of taking a second language and other associated subjects. There is a core module at Level 1 in European History. • *French Studies This degree gives students the opportunity to explore the culture, society and language of France in a broad context. There is also the chance to study in-depth a selection of literature modules. For this degree students must have a high level of competence in French (e.g. Grade B at ‘A’ level or equivalent). There are also a number of ‘French with’ and ‘French and’ degree options offered through the Department of French Studies: French Studies with Italian, French Studies with German, French Studies with International Studies, French Studies with Film Studies, French Studies with Sociology, French and History, English and French. • Health and Social Policy This degree will be of particular interest to those who work in the health service, social services, or the voluntary sector. Some of our students are already professionally qualified: they are sometimes able to transfer credit towards their degrees. Modules cover policy analysis, historical, and comparative aspects of health and social policy.


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Part-time Degree Programme

• Historical Studies Students can choose from a wide range of modules taught by the Department of History, beginning with modules dealing with the period post-1750 but with the option to take modules in the period 1500-1750. The department’s specialisms include British, European and American history. Students may also take modules in subjects such as ancient history, archaeology, and history of art. There is a core module at Level 1, Making of the Modern World. • *History of Art The degree has a broad based range of modules at Level 1 designed to give students an academic grounding in History of Art. At Honours Level students choose from 1 of 2 streams – Italian/Renaissance and Modern Art. A particular feature of the degree is the term spent in Venice for the Italian Renaissance/Venice students.

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• *LLB Law This degree leads to a nationally recognised Law qualification. Introductory modules are Modern English Legal System, The Law of Tort, Methods and Functions of Criminal Law and Introduction to the Law of Property. Students must complete the degree in a maximum of 6 years to meet the requirements of the Law Society. • Social Studies This is a multi-disciplinary degree in which students focus on 1 subject area from business studies, economics, lifelong learning, health and social policy, philosophy, politics, sociology and gender studies. There are also core modules in study skills and research methods, and students write a dissertation in the final level of study. Flexibility of choice and the possibility of tailoring studies to a wide variety of personal interests and employment situations are attractive features of this degree. * These degrees can be studied in the day-time only More detailed information on each degree is available from the Centre for Lifelong Learning on 024 7652 3683.


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Part-time Degree Programme

What qualifications do I need? The University welcomes applications from people with a wide range of employment and study experience. Successful participation in Open Studies Certificate courses, A levels, HNC, NVQ or Access to Higher Education courses is highly valued. Application is made directly to the University (not to UCAS) on a simple application form.

What happens if my circumstances change? We realise that part-time students always have responsibilities other than those of a purely academic nature. We are sympathetic about making arrangements for our students to cope if problems arise, allowing them to suspend their registration temporarily or to withdraw during the year if confronted with difficult and unforeseen problems.

Credit Transfer We welcome candidates who have already completed or partially completed courses in higher education or professional qualifications. Such students may be awarded ‘Advanced Standing’ by transferring credit from qualifications completed in the last 5 years and be exempted from one or more modules. Advanced standing enables students to graduate more quickly and at less cost and is awarded for a range of professional and academic qualifications. Your application form should include a form headed Application for the Transfer of Credit to a University of Warwick Part-time Degree. Please complete this as fully as you can. Don’t worry if you do not know how much credit your qualification carries as you can discuss your claim for credit with Sally Blakeman on 024 7652 8100.

How much will it cost? Please see the ‘Student Funding’ section on page 10.

How long will it take to complete a degree? Typically, a part-time student studies 2 modules per year: on this basis, a degree programme can therefore be completed in 6 years. However, the system is flexible: some students may decide to do only 1 module in the first year, others may take 3. While studying 3 modules per year is possible if combined with a part-time job, we do not feel it is feasible for anyone with a full-time job, unless the employer is willing to offer time off to study during the day. Students with Advanced Standing, bringing exemption from previously completed qualifications, may graduate after 4 or even 3 years.

How do I apply? Application forms can be obtained from the Centre for Lifelong Learning. You are strongly advised to submit applications by the middle of July for Autumn 2009 entry to ensure that you can discuss fully your choice of Level 1 module(s). The final date for applications is 28 August 2009. (Applications for LLB Law and History of Art should be received by 30 June 2009). What happens after I apply? Each application is acknowledged. The Centre for Lifelong Learning will usually contact you to arrange a time and date for your interview as most applicants are interviewed by a member of academic staff. The interview enables the course selector to learn about an applicant’s interests and aptitude, and gives the applicant an opportunity to find out more about the degree, including how it is structured, approaches to assessment and issues such as time commitment and independent learning. If you are studying for a qualification you may receive a ‘conditional offer’. If your previous qualifications are suitable you will receive an unconditional offer of a place.


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Michele Archer BA Hons Historical Studies “Although I always did fairly well at school, I could not wait to leave, and started work at a bank only 2 weeks after my O level exams had finished. Whilst I may not have enjoyed school, I did enjoy learning and over the years have engaged with various forms of education from evening classes to distance learning courses. On taking a job here, at the University, I discovered that it was possible to study for a degree on a part-time basis thereby realising a long-held ambition. I started out taking a couple of Open Studies courses before taking the plunge and registering for a Part-time Degree in Historical Studies. It has taken me 5 years to complete and I won’t pretend that it hasn’t been hard work, combining study with a full-time job, but it has certainly been worthwhile. The modules that I have enjoyed the most have been those related to the history of medicine: in fact I have enjoyed these so much that I am starting an MA in Social History of Medicine.”


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Naomi Aslop BA Hons Social Studies “When I was growing up I assumed I’d go to university. When I was asked ‘what do you want to be when you grow up?’ my answer was usually a job which required a degree. However, in my teens I developed a chronic illness which badly impacted upon my education. My confidence in my academic abilities was rock bottom. I thought that all the jobs I’d wanted to do as a child were out of my reach. In my early 20s, back in good health, I started thinking about the future again and began to research what possibilities were open to me. I stumbled across the 2+2 degree at Warwick, plucked up the courage to go to an open day and received lots of encouragement from the CLL team. A lot of hard work and support later, I’ve just heard that I’ve achieved a first class honours degree and have been accepted onto a Masters course. I’ve gone from thinking I’d never make it to university to being a perpetual student!”


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2+2 Degree Programme

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2+2 Degree Programme This full-time programme is specifically designed for adults who lack formal qualifications and who wish to return to education. It offers an opportunity to study locally for a university degree and enhance career prospects. There is no access or foundation year: students on the 2+2 route have direct entry to a degree and are registered as Warwick students for all 4 years of the course. The first 2 years of the programme are taught at partner colleges, enabling students to gain confidence in coping with academic study, presentation skills and personal study skills in a local environment. This allows for a comfortable

transition into the final 2 years of the programme which are taught on the Warwick campus. The programme at college offers flexibility and a broad choice of subjects to explore, before committing students to a more specialised path at University which reflects interests which they have developed. Throughout their 4 years of study students are able to share all the benefits of student life at Warwick, including access to the University library, sports and social facilities. While students are based at their local college, study hours are usually between 9.30am and 3.30pm. Typically, up to 15 hours per week are scheduled as formal teaching time, backed by independent study. At University during the final 2 years, there will be 8 hours per week ‘contact time’ – 4 lectures and 4 accompanying seminars, each lasting one hour, although we always suggest that you should think in terms of 8-10 hours per week per subject for all aspects of studying.

Partner Colleges The partner colleges offering the 2+2 degree programme are detailed below: College

Degree Programme

Telephone

City College, Coventry

Social Studies Early Childhood Studies

024 7679 1500

North Warwickshire and Hinckley College

Social Studies Early Childhood Studies

024 7624 3154


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2+2 Degree Programme

Individual Degree Programmes • Early Childhood Studies This degree will be of particular interest to those who wish to gain knowledge and understanding of child development in early years settings. It can be a platform for students to take a PGCE for the 3-8 years age range or lead to career options in other early years settings such as hospital play as well as social services opportunities or a management role in the expanding world of early years. The core courses in this degree offer an educational perspective but students can take optional courses from other departments. • Social Studies This is a multi-disciplinary degree in which students initially cover several subjects and then choose to focus on one of particular interest such as business studies, gender studies, health and social policy, philosophy, politics, psychology and sociology. Flexibility of choice and the possibility of tailoring studies to a wide variety of personal interests and employment situations are attractive features of this degree.

Having successfully completed pre-requisite work at the college, it is possible to change your degree registration from Social Studies to Health and Social Policy at the end of Year 2. • Health and Social Policy This degree will be of particular interest to those who wish to work in the Health Service, Social Services, or the Voluntary Sector. Courses cover policy analysis, and historical and comparative aspects of Health and Social Policy. How to apply Applications should be made directly to the college at which you wish to study for the first 2 years of the degree course. Applications should be submitted by 1 September ready to commence on 28 September. Financial help The ‘Student Funding’ Section on page 10 has details of the financial support for full-time students.


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Sharon Goater Sector Endorsed Early Years Foundation Degree “Life dictated that I couldn’t follow my dream of going to university straight after school. It was only much later and after the birth of my son that I decided to have a complete career change and a friend recommended the Foundation Degree which was perfect for me. Throughout my 3 years of study, life has thrown a number of obstacles in my path, but through the wonderful support from the course co-ordinator and my link tutor I managed to keep going. I have gained so much confidence and self belief that I have now enrolled onto the honours level top-up to achieve my dream of gaining a BA Hons in Early Childhood Education Studies. Yes it’s been hard work and it demands a lot of sacrifice and commitment, but what a fabulous feeling, knowing that I have achieved my Foundation Degree and I am half way to achieving my dream.”


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Foundation Degree Programme

Foundation Degree Programme

Foundation degrees are vocational qualifications designed and supported by employers that allow you to learn and earn. They provide an opportunity to develop a range of vocational, academic and key skills which will be of value in the workplace. The Foundation Degrees offered at The University of Warwick are part-time with an element of work-based learning and involve workplace tasks, a project and mentoring. For those who wish to take their study further, the degrees also offer a preparation towards an Honours Degree. Entry requirements are flexible, and candidates should be able to demonstrate the potential to work at degree level.

Foundation Degree in Community Development Who is the degree for? • People working in the voluntary and community sector, either as paid staff or volunteers. • People in local government and public bodies involved in working alongside the voluntary and community sector. • People involved in regeneration initiatives.

How is it structured? This is a partnership degree designed jointly by representatives from the community and voluntary sectors, the local authorities, North Warwickshire and Hinckley College and The University of Warwick. The degree is taught at the college and awarded by The University of Warwick. It is delivered through a modular structure. Teaching methods include seminars, lectures, workshops, reflective practice, learning sets and work-based learning. Some of the course will be delivered through e-mail conferencing and mentoring in the workplace. What will the course cover? • Personal and Professional Development (Study Skills). • Accreditation of Prior Learning. • Introduction to Community Development. • Managing Organisations and Individual Capacity. • Research Methods. • Work-based Learning. • Current Issues in Community Development. • University of Warwick module. Further Information The Adult Centre North Warwickshire and Hinckley College 024 7624 3154 email adult.ed@nwarks-hinckley.ac.uk Applications for the Foundation Degree in Community Development should be made to North Warwickshire and Hinckley College.


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Foundation Degree Programme

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Early Years Sector Endorsed Foundation Degree (working with children from birth – 7 years)

Further Information This programme is offered at the University of Warwick, North Warwickshire and Hinckley College and Stratford-upon-Avon College.

Who is the degree for? • Teaching and learning support assistants, classroom assistants and nursery nurses working in LA schools/nurseries and early years settings.

For more information contact:

• Nursery nurses, nursery owners, managers and assistants working in private or voluntary sector nurseries, pre-school groups and independent schools. • Childminders and others employed in supporting children’s learning in early years settings. How is the course structured? This degree is delivered through a modular structure. Teaching methods include seminars, lectures, workshops, tutorials and workplace based learning. Some of the course is delivered through e-mail conferencing and mentoring in the workplace setting. Students will be asked to complete workplace tasks for the majority of the modules. Modules may be taught through weekend, evening or vacation teaching, workplace-based learning or independent directed study. What will the course cover? • Study skills. • Understanding of how children learn and develop. • Knowledge of education in the Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1. • Theoretical and practical implications of responding to Special Educational Needs. • Theoretical and practical implications of responding to child protection issues. • Issues relating to child health and welfare. • Classroom organisation and behaviour management. • Key communication skills.

Kay McEvoy 024 7652 4809 Centre for Lifelong Learning, The University of Warwick email: k.mcevoy@warwick.ac.uk Applications should be made to the Centre for Lifelong Learning at The University of Warwick The Adult Centre North Warwickshire and Hinckley College 024 7624 3154 email: he@nwhc.ac.uk Applications should be made to North Warwickshire and Hinckley College Stratford-upon-Avon College 01789 266245 email: angelajaquiss@stratford.ac.uk Applications should be made to Stratford-upon-Avon College The Warwick Graduates’ Association provides first year Early Years and Community Development Foundation Degree students with a book token at the end of their first term. These are provided from a fund established with donations from Warwick graduates who have expressed a wish that it is used specifically to help improve access to the University.

The University of Warwick also offers a Foundation Degree in Post Compulsory Education and Training – please see page 32 for further details.


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Full-time degrees

Full-time Degrees Warwick welcomes applications from adults wishing to return to full-time study. Course selectors must ensure that you have a suitable foundation of knowledge from which to develop your work at degree level, and you must have the ability and commitment to do well. In return for this, Warwick can offer a wide range of exciting programmes, excellent academic support, and many varied opportunities to meet new friends or experience new activities. Full-time study means that lectures, seminars or tutorials may be scheduled at any time between 9.00am and 6.00pm. The number of hours you will be required to attend lectures, seminars, tutorials or practicals will vary depending on your subject and department, but you should bear in mind that Arts and Social Studies degrees will involve between 8 and 12 contact hours and Science degrees around 20. You may not be sure at this stage which subject you would like to study. If you are undecided, browse through the University’s Undergraduate Prospectus to help clarify the direction you would like to take. You may feel that you want to continue with a subject you have been studying as part of an Access course; you may want to add an academic perspective to a personal interest such as archaeology; or you may want to try something completely new. Whatever your approach, you will need detailed information about the content and structure of the degree programmes on offer. This information is set out in the University’s Undergraduate Prospectus. A high level of ability is required for all our degree programmes. Returners to study do not need to have the formal entry qualifications set out in the Prospectus, but it does help if you can show evidence of recent academic work at an appropriate standard. Often students wanting to undertake fulltime study will have prepared via an Access to Higher Education course. The Undergraduate Prospectus gives details of typical offers for students on Access Courses validated by the Open College Network for Central England. Taking one or more

A-levels is also a good way to prepare. A minimum level of formal qualifications will be required for Teaching degrees, because the government sets out numeracy and literacy requirements. Make sure that you are aware of any compulsory requirements before you commit yourself to a particular subject. Don’t be put off by the grades listed in the Undergraduate Prospectus. Course selectors are looking for your ability to develop your academic capability over time. They understand that the circumstances of adults returning to study after a break may make it difficult for them to reach their true potential at the point of entry. It is important to remember, though, that for some subjects, especially the Sciences, a certain level of knowledge is required in order to start and continue the programme effectively. For example, the Course Selectors for Mathematics are positive about returning to study applicants, but they cannot consider applications from students who do not have A-level Mathematics (or equivalent) at grade A standard. For some courses such as Economics, applications from students returning to study are welcome but A-Level (or equivalent) Maths grade B is required. Further information about typical offers is available from the Undergraduate Admissions Team. How to Apply All applications to full-time programmes (other than 2+2) are made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). For further information please visit their website: http://www.ucas.com/ You can apply from 1 September of the previous year and the deadline is January 15 of the year you want to start. You are strongly advised to contact the department offering the degree of interest to you in good time before submitting your application to UCAS. Departments will advise on the suitability of your prior experience and suggest appropriate preparatory courses if required. For further application details phone the Undergraduate Admissions Team on 024 7652 3723 or refer to the Full-time Undergraduate Prospectus.


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Full-time degrees

How Decisions are Reached Warwick’s course selectors are committed to treating all applications fairly. The points below will give you some idea of what they are looking for and how their decisions are reached. • Your ability will be assessed through your application, especially the personal statement, the comments of your referee, any interview that takes place and any qualifications you have gained. • Selectors are very interested in diversity within the student population, so your breadth of experience will be a positive feature of your application. • You must be adaptable, since learning new skills is part of student life at any age. For example, you will need to use the library's online resources and word-process your essays.

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• Selectors will also be looking for staying power. If you have already been juggling work, home, and study commitments, you will certainly be able to demonstrate this. Selectors often comment on the strong commitment mature students bring to their degrees. • You will need to bear in mind that there are a limited number of places on all our full-time undergraduate degrees, and that entry is therefore competitive. Do try to complete your UCAS form as soon as is practically possible. If you wish to visit the University you are very welcome to come to one of our Open Days or Visit Days. Please visit www.warwick.ac.uk/go/study for further information.


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Teacher Training (Learning and Skills Lifelong Learning Sector)

Teacher Training

(Learning and Skills Lifelong Learning Sector)

The University offers a variety of teacher training and continuing professional development (CPD) courses for practitioners working in the Learning and Skills sector. The programme has been designed to address a number of important topical academic and vocational agendas in the sector and has been devised in conjunction with our partner institutions. It is fully endorsed by regional and national sector-specific training organisations. The programme also offers a coherent undergraduate and graduate pathway from the new Diploma in Teaching in the Lifelong Learning sector through to a PhD. Initial Teacher Training Qualifications for Lifelong Learning All new entrants to teaching in the Lifelong Learning sector are required to complete new teacher training qualifications. The following qualifications are role related and are designed to address the diverse needs of the Lifelong Learning sector. For further details please contact Dr Fergus Mckay on 024 7657 4180 fergus.mckay@warwick.ac.uk

The New Qualification Framework Open Studies Award in Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning sector (PTLLS) 10 credits NQF level 3 and level 4 On successful completion of the Preparing to Teach course candidates are required to undertake either the Certificate or Diploma qualification depending upon their teaching and training roles in the Lifelong Learning sector. The new qualifications are currently delivered by 8 partner colleges in the West Midlands region. Certificate in Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector (CTLLS) 30 Credits HE Level 1 This 60 hour programme of study has been designed specifically for individuals working in the Lifelong Learning sector who currently fulfil the requirements for the associate teaching role prescribed by LLUK. This course has been endorsed by LLUK. Diploma in Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector (DTLLS) 120 Credits (60 credits HE Level 1; 60 credits HE Level 2) This two year part-time programme of training has been designed specifically for individuals working in the Lifelong Learning sector who currently fulfil the requirements for the full teaching role prescribed by LLUK. We also offer Skills for Life integrated ITT Diplomas. All the Diploma courses have been endorsed by LLUK. The Foundation Degree in Post Compulsory Education and Training (PCET) This course is designed specifically for practitioners in PCET who wish to advance their knowledge and understanding of the sector. The course is offered on a part-time basis. Candidates must be in possession of a Diploma in Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector.


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Teacher Training (Learning and Skills Lifelong Learning Sector)

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BA Honours Degree The Honours level ‘top up’ from the Foundation Degree is designed specifically for practitioners in PCET who have completed the Foundation Degree in PCET (or equivalent HE Level 2 qualification). Candidates will be required to undertake 4 HE level 3 modules in PCET. On successful completion of the Honours level programme candidates will be awarded an Honours degree in Post Compulsory Education and Training.

Continuing Professional Development Programme In addition to the teacher training pathway the Centre offers a number of CPD courses designed for practitioners in the Lifelong Learning sector working in specific curriculum areas (or with specific groups of learners). These include a range of NQF level 5 diplomas designed to support the Skills for Life agenda: for further information on these contact Elaine Goodall or Sara Hattersley on 024 7657 4558.

MA/PhD in Educational Studies The MA course is designed for professionals and mangers in FE and training including those involved in youth and adult learning, 14-19 education, consultancy and work-based learning. The range of courses is suitable for new and experienced professionals who are seeking to gain new skills and understanding. The wide range of courses available provides opportunities for progression and professional development within a coherent programme offered by the University of Warwick.

In addition, the following CPD courses are offered:

PhDs offer an opportunity to undertake research in an aspect of PCET. All postgraduate courses are taught at the University’s Institute of Education.

• Key Skills Teaching and Learning • Personalised Learning for Practitioners • Citizenship Education for Post-16 Practitioners • Working with 14-19 Year Olds for PCET Practitioners • Challenging Behaviour • Mental Health Awareness • Diversity • E Learning • 14-19 • Observation Practise • Mentoring For more information about the CPD programme please contact Dr Fergus McKay on 024 7657 4180


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Manjit Bath, Jackie Thomas (course co-ordinator) Marina Kitchen and Kelly Johnston Foundation Degree Community Enterprise and Development

“This degree has given me the opportunity to study a very interesting subject that directly links in with my work. The support from NWHC and The University of Warwick has been brilliant, the tutors have been so supportive and have always believed in me even through my challenging times.” Manjit Bath “We can say lots about the “hard skills” we were taught, the things we were measured and assessed upon. But it also teaches you a great deal about yourself as a person - the softer skills. In terms of your motivation, drive, aspirations and how you support each other through the modules to ensure all succeed (and in the process forging lasting friendships). These are important skills that employees need in a competitive market which gives you an advantage over other candidates. I changed my job at the end of the second year to take on a role that I am absolutely passionate about. I am very pleased with my achievement. The staff at Warwick are wonderful and I am coming back next year!” Marina Kitchen “The FdA in Community Enterprise and Development has helped me to understand how the Community and Voluntary Sector functions and the effects of policy upon it. The range of information and opportunities for research are immense and the support provided is excellent. I would thoroughly recommend it to anyone working with Third Sector organisations. As a result of the programme I have a new job and much more confidence.” Kelly Johnston


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Finding out more

Finding out more

Lifelong Learning Enquiries Part-time, 2+2 and Foundation Degrees Kay McEvoy 024 7652 4809 Jane Peake 024 7652 3683 email lifelonglearning@warwick.ac.uk Open Studies Lynne Downs 024 7657 3739 email openstudies@warwick.ac.uk Counselling Tara Cosgrove 024 7652 3831 email t.j.cosgrove@warwick.ac.uk Teacher Training (Learning and Skills Sector) Fergus McKay 024 7657 4180 email fergus.mckay@warwick.ac.uk The Language Centre Philip Parker 024 7652 4147 email lcrac@warwick.ac.uk

Full-time Degrees For further details of all Full-time Degree programmes and a copy of the University’s undergraduate prospectus contact the Student Recruitment and Admissions Office on 024 7652 3648 email student.recruitment@warwick.ac.uk Postgraduate Programmes Warwick offers an exciting range of doctoral, research based and taught masters programmes, diplomas and certificates in Humanities, Sciences, Social Studies and Medicine. Our postgraduate prospectus will give you a detailed breakdown of courses and research interests. Please telephone 024 7652 4585 or visit www.go.warwick.ac.uk/contactpgadmissions Student Funding Student Funding Adviser 024 7657 2952 email v.sykes@warwick.ac.uk Students’ Union Advice and Welfare Service 024 7657 2824 email advice@sunion.warwick.ac.uk

www.warwick.ac.uk/cll


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Finding out more

How do I learn more about the University?

“We are very aware at Warwick that every student has individual needs and concerns when considering returning to study. It is therefore imperative that you get as much information about the courses, facilities and support available as possible. Hopefully most areas will have been covered but, if after reading this booklet, you are still unsure who to approach or which course would suit you best, then do not hesitate to contact me. I am happy to receive enquiries from prospective students interested in any of our Lifelong Learning programmes and will be able to discuss any issues you may have and guide you to the most appropriate person for further advice. Please contact me if you would like any further information or if I can help in any other way.” Kay McEvoy Centre for Lifelong Learning 024 7652 4809 email k.mcevoy@warwick.ac.uk www.warwick.ac.uk/cll

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Drop-in Sessions A series of informal Drop-in sessions are held from March until September each year. These sessions will enable you to talk through your plans informally with an adviser from the team. Family and friends are very welcome to join you at these events. Tuesday 3 March Tuesday 7 April Tuesday 9 June Tuesday 7 July Tuesday 2 September For further information about our drop-ins and other events for prospective students call the Centre for Lifelong Learning on 024 7657 3060 or visit our website. If you cannot make any of the advertised events, you are welcome to make an appointment to come in at any other time. Term dates 2009/2010 Autumn Term Mon 5 October 2009 – Sat 12 December 2009 Spring Term Mon 11 January 2010 – Sat 20 March 2010 Summer Term Mon 26 April 2010 – Sat 3 July 2010 Disclaimer For the benefit of applicants this brochure is produced at the earliest date possible. The University, however, reserves the right to modify or cancel any statement in this publication and accepts no responsibility for any consequences of such modification or cancellation.


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The University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK www.warwick.ac.uk/cll Tel: 024 7652 4617

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G7010 WARWICK UNI - LIFELONG LEARNING PROSPECTUS V5

Warwick University Life Long Learning Prospectus 08  

The University of Warwick Life Long Learning Prospectus for 2008.

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