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HARBOUR LANDING


“By fusing the design of the new Ferry Terminal and Park into one special new place on the waterfront, Harbour Landing speaks to what it means to be inviting and public in a rapidly evolving, highly diverse, open society that is expanding and celebrating its common ground.” KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


This photo of the site in January anticipates a design theme for Harbour Landing: undulating topography that promotes a sense of discovery as one approaches the water’s edge. JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


Table of Contents 1

Harbour Landing Master Plan Concept

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Harbour Landing Schematic Plan

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Jack Layton Ferry Terminal Design Concept

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Operations

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Sustainability

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Implementation and Phasing

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The Park

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Integration into Central Waterfront Master Plan

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Project Team

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JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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Overview and Introduction Since 1833 ferries have plied the waters of Toronto harbour to the islands packed with Torontonians and visitors seeking refreshment and relief from the pressures of city life - from daytrippers to those seeking a unique place to live. Over time this critical point of embarkation has been squeezed and crammed into a corner even as its importance has grown for a dense and vibrant metropolitan region.

The experience starts from the moment you cross the threshold at Queens Quay and enter a welcoming ‘portal’ to the Toronto Islands. By fusing the revamped Ferry Terminal and Harbour Square Park into one special new place on the harbour, Harbour Landing speaks to what it means to be inviting and public in a rapidly evolving, highly diverse, open society that is expanding and celebrating its common ground.

‘Harbour Landing’ occupies a highly strategic yet currently almost invisible site at the foot of Yonge and Bay Streets. In addition to ennobling the experience of arrival from and departure to the ferries, providing for continuity along the water’s edge and solving significant functional challenges, there is also an opportunity here to create something special in the city that is more than the sum of its parts – a “jewel” with a human face.

It will re-appropriate 7 acres of precious waterfront territory that is currently underused with a confusing interface with the adjoining private development. The Landing will be an integral part of a continuous network of renewed public space that envelops the site, clarifying relationships to flow seamlessly from York Slip to Yonge slip with a variety of experiences and accommodations. The slip at the foot of Yonge Street will have a new wavedeck, and we imagine it functioning as the city’s ceremonial slip on the central waterfront. A movable bridge connects the east-west Water’s Edge Promenade, and can be

EXISTING PARK & FERRY TERMINAL

PROPOSED PARK & FERRY TERMINAL

floated to the side of the slip when visiting ships are in dock. Pedestrians also have the choice of walking around this slip. The market building on the east side can also be used for formal ceremonies and informal public events. Harbour Landing defies simple categorization – a ferry terminal, an urban park for active water-based activities, a retreat and an oasis for office workers and residents, the urban getaway for people living along the waterfront, in the city and an introduction to the waterfront for visitors to Toronto. Circulation to and through the Harbour Landing has to accommodate two major flows of varying intensity – north/ south to the ferry terminal and the east/west Water`s Edge Promenade. The imperative of accommodating the crossing of these movements has led to an integrated solution which allows for overlapping movements to share the space.

APPROACH THE FERRY TERMINAL

IMAGE OF FERRY TERMINAL 2

KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


Following the Water’s Edge east-west Promenade can be either at-grade by crossing the path to the terminal through an enlarged ‘piazza’ at the crossroads or by traversing the roof of the terminal itself to bridge the passenger flow to the terminal. The terminal’s green roof is universally accessible via gently sloping ramps. This ‘gained park space’ provides an irresistible public belvedere from which to survey the shoreline, the islands,and the lively ballet of boats in the harbour. The organic form of the park with rolling hillocks, whose gently sloping topography elevated from street level, presents visitors with dramatic harbour views and a panoramic backdrop featuring the Toronto Islands. This design approach is echoed in the Ferry Terminal whose undulating rooftop extends the park experience.

WATER’S EDGE PROMENADE

In its broader city context Harbour Landing will reflect both continuity and specialness at this critical junction, amplifying and connecting the transformation of Queens Quay, new wave decks at the Yonge and York slip heads and achieving the continuity of the Water’s Edge Promenade; but also creating a new central feature, a “landing” place where the city meets the lake. It works in 360 degrees, addressing both the landside and waterside, providing a new and potent image for the waterfront - iconic, not just as an object, but celebrating the life it supports, populated by the comings and goings of large numbers of people in the Central Waterfront. Nestled amongst public and cultural landmarks, together with its close proximity to a key public transport portal, suggests its poten-tial to be one of the most recognizable and prestigious public green spaces along the waterfront.

HABOUR SQUARE PARK

To make it more coherent and inviting as a park experience, a series of linked places – the expanded Water’s Edge Promenade, the roof-top promontory, the ‘piazza’ and the park hillocks greatly expand the range of the park for a multiplicity of users. Multifunctional in purpose, its generous shaded pathways provide ample places to sit and take in the scene, and opportunity for informal gatherings and performance spaces. To the west there is a water park for beginner canoers and kayakers which converts into a skating rink in the winter, and a children’s playground is located between the undulating landscape and Harbour Square condominiums. Striking flower beds evoke grand planting schemes reminiscent of traditional parks, adding to a rich ecology of plant materials that, together with wild flowers on the green roof of the Terminal, create an attractive habitat for migrating birds.

FLOWER BEDS

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Harbour Square Park

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15 park trees

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25 grass and flower beds

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4 undulating landscape

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continuous Water’s Edge Promenade

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3 connecting the neigborhood

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

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THE VIEW OF THE FERRY TERMINAL AND HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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1. Jack Layton Ferry Terminal

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2. Harbour Square Park 3. Finger Piers

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4. Water’s Edge Promenade 5. Water’s Edge Boardwalk

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6. York Wavedeck

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7. Yonge Wavedeck 8. Yonge Slip Bridge 9. Harbour Slip

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10. Sundial Folly Park

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11. Ferry Docks

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12. Maintenance building

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13. Pavilion

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14. Westin Garden & Terrace 15. York Plaza

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17. Queens Quay Boulevard

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16. Foot of Yonge Open Space 18. Harbour Slip Bridge

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19. Yonge Wharf 20. Ferry Terminal TTC platform 21. Trillium Ferry Slip

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22. 33 Harbour Square Condominium

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23. 55/66 Harbour Square Condominium and entrance parking

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24. 77/99 Harbour Square Condominium (One York Quay) 25. York Street Access Road

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26. Garage and Rooftop Park 27. Bay Street Access Road 28. Westin Harbour Castle Hotel

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29. Pier 27 Condominium

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30. Yonge Street 31. Bay Street 32. York Street 5


Ferry Terminal The experience starts from the moment you cross the threshold at Queens Quay and enter a welcoming ‘portal’ to the Toronto Islands. The distinctive undulating form of the Ferry Terminal roof with its wood structure provides a welcoming image of warmth from the water and the land side. Access to the ferries occurs under this dramatically billowing timber roof, providing shelter and a gracious sense of communality. Its cupping and undulating form captures the morning and afternoon light along the water’s edge. The last rays of west light in the summer fill the entrance. The Ferry Terminal is a major destination for hundreds of thousands of annual visitors. Clarity and ease of arrival and departure is critical, starting right from the links to emerging transit systems and stops, as well as all modes of approach including pedestrians and cyclists. Harbour Landing provides a welcoming interface for Ferry passengers carrying a great range of ‘stuff’ – bikes, strollers, picnic coolers, sports equipment and beach chairs etc. Our design also accommodates the specific daily needs of Island residents who have to transport all goods and provisions by way of the ferry to Wards Island.

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


AXONOMETRIC OF FERRY TERMINAL

UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE PEDESTRIAN PATHWAY

GREEN ROOF

PREFABRICATED WOOD STRUCTURE

ENCLOSED PAVILIONS

TERMINAL DECK

TERMINAL STRUCTURE

AQUATIC HABITAT

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


THE VIEW OF THE FERRY TERMINAL AND HARBOUR SQUARE PARK 1. Entry to Ferry Terminal 2. Automated Entry Turnstiles D-D’ 33

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3. Automated Accessible/Bike Entry Turnstiles & Gate 4. Staffed Ticket Booth 5. Automated Ticket Machines 6. Women’s Staff Washroom & Lockers

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7. Men’s Staff Washroom & Lockers

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8. Mechanical Room

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11. Vault

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10. General Office

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9. Superintendant

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12. Kitchenette

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13. Electrical Room

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14. First Aid Room

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15. Office Storage

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C-C’

16. Oil Storage 17. Blacksmith 18. Operations Storage

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19. Warm Waiting Area 22

20. Waiting Area 21. Gate 22. Aquatic Habitat

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23. Automated Accessible/Bike Exit Turnstiles & Gate 24. Custodial 22

25. Mechanical Room 26. Concession 27. Men’s Washroom 28. Women’s Washroom 29. Back of House 30. Roof Path 31. Green Roof 32. Roofed Gathering Area 33. Operations Yard Secure Entry 34. Operations Yard JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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WAITING FOR THE FERRY This is an environment that celebrates the human experience for all users – echoing some of the grandeur of the great early 20th century railway stations but in a new and fresh idiom. Under its enveloping roof, it addresses the basic human comforts with immediate access to washrooms, food and drink, and places to sit and rest. Queuing is well organized with smooth and easy interface with the ferries for embarking and disembarking. New ticketing technologies promote a stress-free flow of movement, while a minimum number of ticket booths still allow for interface with attendants. The new Terminal becomes the most significant place on the Central Waterfront where the city meets the lake. The fusion of functionality and aesthetics create a public meeting place under one roof, with a civic presence on the harbour in the tradition of great public piers of the last century. Two oval translucent glass pavilions are located on either side of the central waiting area under the dramatic rolling form of the roof. The eastern pavilion incorporates the ticket booths on the north side, offices and storage, washrooms and the winter waiting room. The translucent glass cladding is graduated to become clear vision glass in the waiting room to afford passengers extraordinary views of the frozen harbour. The embarkation gates are located between a series of oval openings in the deck that allow visitors to view down into the aquatic habitat below. Disembarking passengers exit the Terminal to the west crossing over the existing narrow slip of water that is being retained.

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


ARRIVING BY FERRY FROM THE ISLAND The Terminal is a welcoming image of warmth from the water – it will change the face of the city, its curvilinear roof form evocative of waves, rolling hills, and traditional dock sheds. Harbour Landing provides an active, inviting green base and foreground to the assemblage of existing buildings. The new Park and Terminal rescales Harbour Square and the Westin Harbour Castle Hotel forming a dynamic and animated public space for all seasons. The Terminal roof is covered in sedum, with wild flowers that will bloom in the spring. The green roof is not accessible to the public, but a universally accessible looping pathway provides safe access to the roof, and widens out to a promontory at the highest point that affords extraordinary views of the harbour. We imagine that this public viewing place will be a must-see destination for city dwellers and visitors to look out along the shoreline, to the coming and going of ferry boats, cruise ships, sailing boats and kayaks, and of course to the islands, sunsets on the horizon, the lake and the sky. This would undoubtedly be a popular spot to view regattas and the annual air show in August. The pedestrian pathway would be heat-traced for use in the winter months, when the ice formations on the lake enact a remarkable transformation of the harbour. The flowing fluid form of the green roof of the Terminal presents different readings and gestures at different scales from different vantage points. Each approach, from north, south, east or west, presents a distinctive, compelling view of the Terminal.

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


As one approaches the Ferry Terminal under the shade of the Promenade trees, the synergy between the


Operations FERRY OPERATIONS: Our Terminal is designed to operate with the existing ferries, and the even larger capacity ferries planned for the future. Another option for the future ferries is the European model where smaller ferries are employed. These are much faster to for passengers to embarking and disembarking, reducing long waiting times and congestion, and handling capacity by more frequent round trips. In Amsterdam, ferries are operated by one captain only, with ramps and gates designed to ensure both safety of passengers and smooth operation.

AMSTERDAM TICKETING: When this Terminal is built we imagine that the number of ticket booths will be minimized and most visitors will enter through turnstiles operated by the Presto card, or tickets pre-purchased on-line, or purchased at ticket machines at nearby transit stops and in close proximity to the Terminal. This method of ticketing will still offer the human interface as needed; special gates will be provided for strollers, bikes etc, while the turnstiles allow for smooth traffic flow through to the ferries.

ROTTERDAM CENTRAAL RAILWAY STATION

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


STAFFED TICKET BOOTH AUTOMATED TICKET MACHINES AUTOMATED TURNSTILES

ACCESSIBILITY & LARGE OBJECT ENTRANCE TURNSTILES & GATE

EXIT

EXISTING TICKETING ENTRANCE

TICKETING

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Sustainability In both the structures and the landscape, the design of Harbour Landing incorporates innovative means of achieving sustainability: Microclimate: Sun: Large roof overhang to the south blocks the summer sun, and allows the low winter sun in. In the summer, the late day west sun streams into the north entrance.

Passive Systems and Energy Conservation:

Aquatic and plant ecologies:

Radiant floors or ceilings in the enclosed pavilions provide active heating or cooling as required. Opening windows allow for natural ventilation in the summer and shoulder seasons, taking advantage of the breezes off the lake.

The aquatic habitat under the Terminal and proposed docks is an improvement to the existing lake. The support structure of the Terminal platform is open to the lake below and to the south. In addition, large oval voids are cut into the Terminal platform between the ferry gates, providing not only air and light for the aquatic habitat, but also raising public awareness around the issues of sustainable aquatic habitats in our lake system.

Decentralized ventilation units allow individual user control. Storm Water Management and Rainwater Reuse:

The precast concrete pavers of the Terminal provide thermal mass, which cools the microclimate in the summer. Shade: The pedestrian approach from Queens Quay is shaded by the large Promenade trees whose canopies will be trimmed up to 4.5m to allow good views to the Terminal and the water’s edge. The Terminal roof also provides shade for all passengers who have passed through the security turnstiles and are waiting for their ferry. Avoiding an Urban Heat Island: The combination of the green roof and a light coloured pathway contribute to a cooler microclimate. Wind: In summer, the breezes off the lake are welcome to cool the interior microclimate. Our approach is to channel the wind into the Terminal to provide relief from the summer heat. In winter, we intend to block the wind through the use of wind screens. We have diagrammed two options for wind screens.

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

The green roof controls storm water management on the site. Low-flush toilets have potential for rain water reuse. Materials: For the roof construction, we will employ innovative recycled wood technology. The timber roof structure and decking will be designed to be prefabricated off-site to facilitate speed of erection and construction. Precast concrete paving planks also minimize on-site construction time. As a heavily used public place, the materials selected for the terminal will be robust, durable and easily maintained.

These voids are a dynamic and educational design feature that also allows ferry users to look directly into the protected habitat below. The green roof is comprised of sedum combined with native wildflowers that bloom in the spring, attracting migrating birds and butterflies. A bee colony would be included on the green roof. The Park is designed to attract a diversity of wild life.


Textures and Materials

RECYCLED WOOD STRUCTURE

PRECAST CONCRETE DECKING

FRITTED GLASS

GREEN ROOF ‘WILD MEADOW”

GREEN ROOF PATH GRANITE PAVERS

EXPANDED METAL MESH

JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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GATE GUARD & SECURE CAGE

GUARD

DELIVERIES

SECURE PUBLIC ZONE FOR TICKET HOLDERS PARKING

EXIT GATES

SERVICE ACCESS

CAR FERRY

SERVICING

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

SECURITY

MARSEC SECURE ZONE OPERATIONS YARD


PIVOTING WIND SCREEN

WARM WAITING ROOM

WINTER WIND

WIND BARRIER OPTION 1 - PERMANENT PIVOTING WINDSCREEN

REMOVABLE WINDSCREEN

WARM WAITING ROOM

WINTER WIND

WIND BARRIER OPTION 2 - SEASONAL ,REMOVED DURING SUMMER WINDSCREEN

JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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Implementation and Phasing We have given a lot of thought to how the new Terminal would be constructed while keeping the ferry service in operation year-round. As only one ferry operates in the winter for access to Wards Island, this provides an opportunity for phasing the construction. Our strategy is to minimize the amount of on-site construction by prefabrication of the timber roof structure and steel columns. The pavilions could be prefabricated as well, or built in-situ. Precast concrete paving planks will facilitate timely installation of the Terminal platform. The following diagrams illustrate how we would imagine phasing the construction of the new Ferry Terminal while keeping the ferry service in operation.

Phase 1: Our team has considered several options for a Phase 1 implementation. • Buy/invest in 250 beautiful trees size 100mm • Build 400m2 of Water’s Edge Promenade or 45 Lm of promenade • Build the children’s playground and relocate it when Phase 2 is implemented

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


Existing

Step 1

EXISTING TICKETING

EXISTING TICKETING SECURITY GATE

TRILLIUM FERRY DOCK

EXISTING FERRY TERMINAL

EXISTING PASSENGER FERRY DOCKS

RED LINE INDICATES SECURE ZONE

SECURITY GATE

EXISTING FERRY TERMINAL

EXISTING CAR FERRY DOCK

TRILLIUM FERRY

RED LINE INDICATES SECURE ZONE

EXISTING CAR FERRY

TEMPORARY DOCK

RELOCATE PASSENGER FERRIES

Relocate Passenger Ferries JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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Step 2

Step 3 RELOCATE SECURITY GATE RELOCATE OPERATIONS BUILDING PROGRAMMING

EXISTING TICKETING

DEMOLITION OF OPERATIONS BUILDING

EXISTING TICKETING

EXISTING FERRY TERMINAL

BUILD AQUATIC HABITAT COMPLETE WITH PILES

EXISTING FERRY TERMINAL

TRILLIUM FERRY

EXISTING CAR FERRY

TEMPORARY DOCK LINE OF SECURE ZONE TO REMAIN WITH TEMPORARY FENCE

Build Aquatic Habitat 22

SECURITY GATE

KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

RELOCATED PASSENGER FERRIES TO REMAIN

LINE OF SECURE ZONE TO REMAIN WITH TEMPORARY FENCE

BUILD NEW CONCRETE DECK OVER AQUATIC HABITAT

TRILLIUM FERRY

EXISTING CAR FERRY

TEMPORARY DOCK

RELOCATED PASSENGER FERRIES TO REMAIN

Ferry Terminal Construction


Step 4

Step 5 DEMOLITION OF TEMPORARY OPERATIONS

LINE OF SECURITY FENCING AROUND DEMOLITION SITE

DEMOLITION OF EXISTING TICKETING, FIELD HOUSE & EXISTING FERRY TERMINAL

LINE OF NEW SECURE ZONE LINE OF SECURE ZONE TO REMAIN WITH TEMPORARY FENCE

RELOCATE NEW TICKETING AND FERRY TERMINAL PROGRAMMING IN NEW TERMINAL

EXISTING CAR FERRY

TRILLIUM FERRY

RELOCATED TEMPORARY DOCK

RELOCATE PASSENGER FERRIES

Ferry Terminal Operation

RELOCATE SECURITY GATE

LINE OF NEW SECURE ZONE

TRILLIUM FERRY

NEW DECK & AQUATIC HABITAT

RELOCATE CAR FERRY

Completed Construction JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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APPROACHING THE FERRY TERMINAL FROM QUEENS QUAY As one approaches the Ferry Terminal under the shade of the Promenade trees, the synergy between the rolling landscape of the park and the undulating green roof of the Ferry Terminal is revealed. The Jack Layton sculpture is proposed to be reinstalled close to where it is today on the west side of the access path.

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


FLYING INTO TORONTO CITY AIRPORT This image shows Harbour Landing as viewed on approach to the Island Airport for landing. The interweaving of the formal language of structure and landscape produce a new form of layered topography to create a unique identity for this portal into the city – a park transforming an almost invisible site at the foot of Yonge and Bay into an extraordinary new public place on the waterfront.

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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The Park OUR TEAM’S VISION FOR THE HARBOUR SQUARE PARK IMAGINES IT AS A BEAUTIFUL OASIS THAT PROVIDES BALANCE TO THE URBAN LIFE AT THE TORONTO WATERFRONT The park is framed by the Harbour Square and Harbour Castle condominiums and the shores of the Toronto inner harbour, nestled in a plane between lake and sky. The park is a promise of A real park - trees, flowers, water - as a counterpart to the frantic activity of the city. It will be a magnet for people, families and visitors to the waterfront, Toronto, Ontario, and Canada.

Toronto Waterfront nestled, amongst public and cultural landmarks, together with its close proximity to a key public transport portal, provide an opportunity to ensure that Harbour Square park will become one of the most recognizable and prestigious public green spaces along the waterfront.

Slightly elevated from street level, the gently sloping topography presents visitors with a truly spectacular view of the Toronto harbour. The undulating hills allow for dramatic harbour views with a panoramic backdrop featuring the Toronto Islands. Multifunctional in its purpose, the wide pathways create opportunity for informal gatherings as well as performance spaces. The paved paths meander through the trees. Striking flower beds evoke grand planting schemes reminiscent of traditional parks. The over-arching objective is to create a destination rather than a thoroughfare. Dwell time needs to be increased and the gardens are truly an open space used 24 hours a day. The park’s central position in the heart of the

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

The park is nestled in a plane between lake and sky.


A PARK FOR EVERYONE, FOR EVERYDAY A diverse mix of activities and spaces in which to do them allows the park to adapt to users needs and maintain flexibility and relevance.

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A PARK FOR EVERYBODY

THE DEMOCRATIC CANVAS THAT A PARK FOR THE PEOPLE OFFERS IS THE PERFECT BREEDING GROUND FOR THOUGHTFUL AND POWERFUL ARTISTIC EXPRESSION. By integrating performance spaces within the park and its infrastructure, the park will be able to provide energy to art and performance in the same way those elements lend activity and delight to the park. By combining themes of art, botany, ecology and performance, the park becomes a fusion of natural and artistic experience and expression. Its versatility allows for events that range from mass gatherings to small festivals.

(above) Richard Senna - Kroller Muller Otterlo - The Netherlands

(above) Music in the park - Music Garden Toronto (right) Cinema at the lake - Toronto (right) Toronto’s Frozen Waterfront (right) ”The Jack Layton Memorial”

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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A PARK FOR EVERYONE, FOR EVERYDAY Embracing the seasonality of the place. Capturing the identity of the place (site image of Harbour Square Park - January 2015 and June 2013) 32

KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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FRAMING VIEWS BY TOPOGRAPHY

CAREFULLY SELECTED VIEWS ARE FRAMED BY TOPOGRAPHY AND ARCHITECTURE CREATING SPECIALIZED PORTRAITS OF THE TORONTO WATERFRONT AND TORONTO ISLAND SKYLINES WITHIN THE PARK The perimeter of the waterfront park offers a unique 180-degree range of views from East to West: the remainders of the old harbour Port Lands, the natural skyline of the landfill Tommy Thompson Park, the Toronto Islands with its different landing points, marinas and buildings, and the activity of Billy Bishop Airport (Toronto City Airport) and closer the celebration of life, culture and creative spirit at Harbourfront Centre, the revitalized Queens Quay Terminal on the West side and the development of Pier 27, the Redpath Sugar factory with the sugar cargo ship and the development of Bayside.

PANORAMIC VIEWS ACROSS THE INNER HARBOUR UNFOLD FROM ALMOST EVERY DIRECTION FROM THE PARK. The design team’s vision for the Harbour Square Park is to frame the view lines and make them stronger, celebrating the horizon experience of the inner harbour of the Toronto waterfront.

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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TRANSFORMING THROUGH TOPOGRAPHY

BY CREATING AN UNDULATING TOPOGRAPHY ACROSS AN PARK THERE IS AN OPPORTUNITY TO SCULPT SPACES OF VARYING SIZE.

Earth that is carved out to create the belowgrade parking garage can be sculpted into adjacent rolling terrain.

The topography dramatizes the views from the park at the harbour Square park and cultivates unexpected beauty. By framing the horizon in various ways the landforms allow the Toronto Islands and inner harbour to be carefully presented in various, sometimes subtle ways. Where the lake meets the sky is occasionally punctuated by architecture in the foreground and at other times by a valley or a sloped hill.

In the centre of the park, a valley is created by building up 2 connecting hillocks, with a height of between 5 and 8m high. section A - A’ section B - B’

The gentle topography of hill and valley will create a unique microclimate that can be enjoyed through all seasons, for a wide variety of activities.

SCULPTING THE CANVAS Sculpting the flat, bare landscape of the waterfront creates a variety of places that people want to visit and explore while giving the park character, identity and scale. Spaces in a variety of scales, from open sloped hills to more romantic flower gardens and interesting meeting places on seating edges, accommodate the whole range of park users. Variations in height and changes in grade also provide places in the shade, out of the wind and with varying degrees of enclosure. This variety within the park provides the opportunity to transform the Harbour Square Park not only physically, but programmatically as well as the park will more logically accommodate a wider breadth of activities.

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS LTANTS

section C - C’


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section A - A’

section B - B’

section C - C’

Sculpting the Canvas 38

KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


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CONNECTING THE NEIGHBORHOOD

FLUID CONNECTIONS REINFORCE THE PARK’S ROLE AS A UNIFYING CONNECTIVE TISSUE FOR THE WATERFRONT. The park is a natural extension of main structures and connections originally laid out in the masterplan for the waterfront. Whether you arrive from Yonge, Bay or York, you will find the water’s edge via the Water’s Edge Promenade. This will guide you to the water, along the park and the ferry terminal. The Water’s Edge Promenade and boardwalk will be paved in and detailed out with the materials, colours and details as described in the Central Waterfront Masterplan.

Materials & Finishes Granite Types

Concrete unit paver

Wood

Paleo Tec light grey

Yellow Cedar - Structural Glulam Timbers

Royal Canadian Red

Ipe - Decking and Benches San Sebastian Grey

Caledonia Grey

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


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DISCOVER AND EXPERIENCE THE PARK - A FULLY ACCESSIBLE PATHSYSTEM CREATING A WALK THROUGH THE PARK. The pathway in the park is a continuous loop, which is fully accessible for all users. The loop allows users of the park to fully enjoy the scale of the park, the topography, it’s valley and the view over the inner harbour created by vista’s and view lines. The continuous loop is accessible from the Water’s Edge Promenade. The path is paved in 10x10cm San Sebastian Grey granite unit pavers. The path is framed in by a 50cm Stansed Grey granite curb on both sides. These curb stones grow into seating edges at interesting view locations or where a retaining wall is required. Where needed, additional path ways are combined with little entrance squares to create frontages to entrances and lobbies of the adjacent condominiums. As everything happens within the same design language a distance from the entrance is created, allowing privacy with a continuous identity. The path and the Water’s Edge Promenade will be illuminated, making the park accessible at all days.

(above) curb stone along the path system become seating edges.

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


CONNECTIVITY AND MOVEMENT A diverse flow of varying traffic is accommodated on and near the site with provisions for public transport, loading and delivery routes, pedestrian access, ferry access, maintenance areas, EMS & fire, and other infrastructure critical to the function of the park. The construction for the transformation of the new Queens Quay into the iconic waterfront boulevard between Spadina Ave. and Yonge Street is well on its way. Our design takes the alignment of the street as a base; the next step will be to develop Queens Quay East in a similar way.

Street and Yonge Street become the heart of the waterfront of Toronto connecting different communities together along this line. In this option the streetcar would drive on street level and no tunnels at Bay Street would be needed. At Bay Street a connection can be made with downtown Toronto and Union Station by re-using the exiting tunnel under Bay Street. The idea would be to install a moving walkway or run a people mover in the tunnel between Union Station and the waterfront. In this way Bay Street station becomes a hub where people change between different public transport modi.

The design team takes the new cross sections for Queens Quay East as a base. We would like to propose an alternative routing and alignment of the streetcar on Queens Quay. Currently the streetcar travels from Spadina Ave. or Exhibition Place across Queens Quay and goes at Bay Street into a tunnel, northbound towards Union Station. The current plans for transit to the East are discussing a new tunnel for the streetcar turning East at Bay Street, exiting at Freeland Street, just pas the Pier 27 development. The design team would like to propose an option where the streetcar is only traveling on a East-West line along the waterfront, connecting the Porlands with Exhibition Place and Spadina Ave. In this way the Central Waterfront and the block between Simcoe

(above) East - West transit on Queens Quay between Spadina and Ports Lands with a platform at Bay. The existing below-grade tunnel on Bay Street re-used by a people mover or moving walkway, with exists to the new streetcar platforms, creating a transit hub at Bay. JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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connection to public transport

SERVICING HARBOUR LANDING The access route to the ferry terminal is located on the east side of the Westin Harbour Castle Hotel. This route can be used for delivery of goods into the hotel as well to the ferry terminal. Adjacent to the Water’s Edge Promenade a space is reserved for delivery of goods to the pavilion and cafe as well for maintenance purpose. This route is fully accessible for EMS and fire, allowing access to the 55/66 Harbour Square Drop-off zone.

access routes for loading and delivery to terminal and hotel

55/66 Harbour Square Condominium drop-off zone

Scenario 1: parking space only leased out to visitors of the Harbour Square Condominium, drop-off for Toronto Island Public School students and car park space for island residents.

tunnel remain in place

operation area

The exiting tunnel is to remain in place and connect the internal roadway system of the Harbour Square Condominium with Queens Quay at Bay Street and York Street.

maintenance route

The existing parking place has been removed and a below-grade parking is proposed on the north-west side of the tunnel. This parking can be used in different ways - for residents only, or as a commercial garage. In the last scenario the tunnel becomes public.

TUNNEL T NN TU NNEL ELL AND AND D VISITORS VIS SIT ITO OR RS PARKING PARKIN PA RKING RK IN NG PUBLIC ACCESSIBLE PARKING PUBLIC ACCESSIBLE PARKING PUBLIC ACCESSIBLE PARKING

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

Scenario 2: first level leased out for visitors of the Harbour Square Condominium, drop-off for Toronto Island Public School students and car park space for island residents. Second, third and fourth floor publicly accessible parking garage.


ENTRANCE TO THE BELOW-GRADE PARKING The entrances to the tunnel are modified to allow for more public space and to create a greater entrance for the park. At Bay Street the entrance is reduced to a width of 6.60m and the slope is adjusted per code, In this way the entrance into the tunnel gets shorter, which results in more park. At the 55/66 Harbour Square Condominium dropoff zone, the tunnel has been extended. These adjustments can find place step by step.

integration revised tunnel entrance into park

integration existing tunnel entrance into park

integration revised tunnel entrance into park

integration existing tunnel entrance into park JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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CAPTURING THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE ‘PLACE-TO-GO-TO’

BY PROVIDING ECOLOGICAL HABITATS AND CONNECTIONS THAT SUPPORT THE LOCAL NATURAL HERITAGE ON LAND AND IN WATER, THE BIODIVERSITY OF THE CENTRAL WATERFRONT WILL BE GREATLY ENHANCED. Capturing the atmosphere of the ‘place to go’ to - the islands and bringing it to the park. In order to create the rich layer of green foliage that our team envisions, botanical biodiversity will be crucial. Variety in vegetation will allow the park to flourish year round, changing seasonally and responding to the climate. Fauna will be able to thrive in the dense, diverse landscape, lending further life and beauty to the park. While the park aspires to be green and lush we are also cognizant of the environmental considerations that must be taken into account. Careful adaptation and plant selection will yield great canopies and rolling stretches of green that will only improve with maturity while lending vital contributions to the ecosystem of the park.

(right) The park references the unique qualities of the Toronto Islands.

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JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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EVERGREEN Pitch-pine Pinus Rigida

BROWN-LEAF Pine Oak Quercus Palustris

Turkish Hazel Corylus Colurna

Sugar Maple Acer Saccharum

Platane Platanus

Red Oak Quercus Rubra

American Elm Ulmus Americana

American Tulip Tree Liriodendro Tulipifera

Oriental Sweet-gum Liquidambar

FLOWER Paulownia Paulownia Tormentosa

Eastern Redbud Cercis Canadensis

Magnolia Magnolia Saucer

Willow-leafed Magnolia Magnolia Salicifolia

A PARK FOR EVERYONE, FOR EVERYDAY (above) illustration showing the diversity of trees in the park with seasonal images (right) (right) reference images of flower beds with botanical biodiversity, flourish year-round and changing seasonality. Fauna will be able to thrive in this dense, diverse landscape. 48

KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


Paulownia

Paulownia Tormentosa

Red Oak

Quercus Rubra

Pine Oak Quercus Palustris

Turkish Hazel

Pitch-pine Pinus Rigida

Eastern Redbud

Corylus Colurna

Cercis Canadensis

Oriental Sweet-gum

American Elm

Magnolia

Liquidambar

Ulmus Americana

Magnolia Saucer

Sugar Maple Acer Saccharum

American Tulip Tree

Liriodendro Tulipifera

Willow-leafed Magnolia Magnolia Salicifolia

JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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PROGRAMMING HARBOUR LANDING

MAGNETS IN THE PARK, ATTRACTING VISITORS TO COME AND STAY IN THE PARK. In the vision of the design team there are 4 magnets in the park that attract visitors to come and stay. The main attraction is the ferry terminal itself, a well organized machine. The others are 3 more magnets: the Harbour Pavilion and cafe with Harbour Terrace, Sundial Folly Park and the foot of Yonge open space with Yonge One Wharf. The Water’s Edge Promenade is the chain that connects these 4 different places in program, function and atmosphere together. Foot of Yonge open space with Yonge One Wharf

Sundial Folly Park

Harbour Pavilion and cafe Jack Layton Ferry Terminal

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS


SUNDIAL FOLLY PARK A PLAYFULL PLACE In the vision of the design team the garden with “Sundial Folly” transforms into a playfull place with a playground for young and old. The art feature in an integral part of the playground, which makes this place from a nonplace into a heavily used place. Timber beams will create seating edges and prevent children from falling into the lake.

JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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A VARYING TOPOGRAPHY ALSO OFFERS THE OPPORTUNITY TO INTEGRATE THE BUILDING PROGRAM INTO THE LANDSCAPE Seamless integration of the Ferry Terminal, tunnel, below parking and pavilion within the topography of the park imbues a sense of mystery while maintaining accessibility and reasonable access to services and additional retail, dining and entertainment offerings. These spaces gain both a “found” quality to them as well as flexibility, with opportunites for events to spill out onto public walkways. The Harbour Pavilion and Cafe, located at the foot of the valley, is a public space with public washrooms for the users of the park and at the same time a place where during day time visitors can enjoy a simple snack and drink, in the evening the Pavilion transforms into a Jazz pub. The Harbour Pavilion has a big terrasse where visitors enjoy the possibility of sitting in the sun or shade, overlooking the activities in the inner harbour, the strolling people on the Water’s Edge Promenade, the colours of the flower beds, the activities and natural element that find place in the park.

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JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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1

A WELCOMING PORTAL TO THE TORONTO ISLANDS The Ferry Terminal is located at the cross point of different Water’s Edge Promenades and can be seen as the element that ties different directions together. At the cross point of the water’s edge the space is widened, creating Island Square (1), the meeting point for visitors and entrance into the Ferry Terminal. At this square, located under the double allee of trees, looking at the Ferry Terminal, with the park in the background, we find “The Jack Layton Memorial”. (2)

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2


JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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CELEBRATING THE FOOT OF YONGE The Foot of Yonge will be the celebration of the longest street, connecting the shores of Lake Ontario to Lake Simcoe, a gateway to the Upper Great Lakes.

1

The foot of Yonge is accessible via the Water’s Edge Promenade and across the Yonge Slip Bridge. At the foot of Yonge, an interpretation of the old sheds is being rebuilt, Yonge One Wharf (1). This space is a multifunctional space which can be used as a shelter, an outdoor market and an activity square. Behind the new Yonge One Wharf a pocket park references the “typical” Canadian lakefront painted by Tom Thomson in ‘The Jack Pine’. This pocket park is a green lawn planted with Jack Pines (2). In the team’s vision, the Yonge Slip will be the point of celebration at the lake for naval activities. This is the slip where large naval vessels should be welcomed when they arrive in the city. During these activities, the Yonge Slip Bridge can be removed.

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2


JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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PROGRAMMING HARBOUR LANDING The layout of the path system, the accessibility via the Water’s Edge Promenade and the topography gives the park a flexible use, for small and big gatherings and events, during every season.

STREET PERFORMANCE

Concrete slab

TAICHI

JOGGING YOGA FESTIVAL

SLEDDING

VIEWS

MUSIC

FLYING A KITE STUDYING FILM SPORT

BIRD WATCHING THEATRE LAYING PICNIC

BOTANY

STREET ART

ROLLING

Existing Sheet Pile SCULPTURES

SITTING

ART

Aquatic Habitat

COLOURSGIFT SHOP

PUBLIC WASHROOM PERFORMANCE

CAFE

MEETING

INFO KIOSK

MARKET FOOD FIREWORK

SAILING

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HAND CRAFT PARADE

FISHING

KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

Biodiversity - Aquatic


Sustainability SUSTAINABILITY VISION STATEMENT FOR HARBOUR LANDING TO BE A MODEL PARK THAT DEMONSTRATES THE BEST SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES TODAY SO THAT EVERYONE VISITING THE PARK CAN DISCOVER THE FULFILLMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND CULTURAL STEWARDSHIP HERITAGE: INSTILL A SENSE OF PLACE THAT REFERENCES THE HISTORY OF THE SITE, THE REGION AND INSPIRES PARK VISITORS; CONNECTIVITY: PROVIDE SAFE AND EFFICIENT TRANSIT CONNECTIONS FOR VISITORS WITHIN AND BEYOND THE PARK

POROUS PAVING AND USE OF RECYCLED AGGREGATE Porous paving material allows rain water to infiltrate directly through the granite paving stones and into the ground below. This will reduce the load on the stormwater drainage system. The water percolates into the ground water during rainy weather and then evaporates from the soil into the atmosphere during fine weather. The moisture evaporating from the ground can be taken up by the surrounding plants and trees, benefitting the entire ecosystem. The permeable paving material also has the ability to reduce the “urban-heat island” effect. Compared to asphalt or concrete pavement, porous pavement areas are approximately 3-8 degrees lower in temperature.

GROW HEALTHY, LIVING SOIL BIODIVERSITY: PROVIDE ECOLOGICAL HABITATS AND CONNECTIONS TO SUPPORT THE LOCAL NATURAL HERITAGE , ON LAND AND IN THE WATER, TO ENHANCE BIODIVERSITY IN THE WATERFRONT AREA. Introducing native plant species and removal of invasive species with proper invasive species management will reduce necessary maintenance, water consumption, and will result in recognizable habitat by native biota.

Soil cells or silva cells will be used for paved sites to provide adequate soil volumes for tree roots under the paved areas. These silva cells allow us to pave over good soil, without compacting it, leaving good quality, light soil to nourish the trees. The silva cells have a passive irrigation integrated into them. The rain water that falls on the pavement will be captured and drained into the soil cells providing the trees with needed moisture.

WATER: PROTECT AND CONSERVE BOTH NATURAL AND POTABLE WATER RESOUCES Storm water will be held and recycled for irrigation purposes with holding tanks using wind and solar power. Other stormwater will be able to irrigate freely into the soil cells or silva cells. Smart irrigation systems using an evapotranspiration monitoring will apply water based upon soil and plant needs, improving efficiency and avoiding overwatering. INCORPORATE INCLUSIVE DESIGN TO MAKE THE PARK ACCESSIBLE TO ALL AND CULTIVATE COMMUNITY ATMOSPHERE. PROTECT AND STIMULATE THE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING OF VISITORS.

Microhabitats will be created on land and in water ensuring a variety of niche habitat options for species that prefer specific habitat conditions. This will enhance biodiversity and allow park visitors to observe and learn about microhabitats.

JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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How does Harbour Landing Integrate into the Central Waterfront Master Plan? As the central waterfront fills in and becomes a still denser and more active neighbourhood with more people living and working in close proximity, Harbour Landing will develop as a year-round venue for local residents and office workers, as well as extending the season for visitors. It has the potential to support commercial opportunities like a café on the southern side of the Park on the Water’s Edge Promenade, or a new market pavilion on the east side of the Yonge Street slip – a pavilion that could also be used for special ceremonial events when the slip hosts visiting ships. Working with adjoining properties like the Westin Harbour Castle Hotel, there is an opportunity to add new life and a friendlier face to a revitalized Harbour Landing, a more welcoming public base to the existing condominium and hotel buildings.

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2006

2015 + Urban Design Vision for Lower Yonge Precinct URBAN DESIGN REPORT: PRINCIPLES AND RECOMMENDATIONS - WATERFRONToronto 2014

JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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JACK LAYTON FERRY TERMINAL & HARBOUR SQUARE PARK

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Project Team PREPARED FOR WATERFRONT TORONTO 20 Bay Street, Suite 1310 Toronto, Ontario M5J 2N8 phone +1 416 214 1344 Christopher Glaisek, Vice President, Planning and Design c/o Betty Leung, Procurement Manager

PREPARED BY DESIGN TEAM KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

WEST 8 urban design & landscape architecture b.v.

Shirley Blumberg Bruce Kuwabara Bruno Weber Sanaz Shirshekar Araz Akbarian Dawn Stremler Robert Faber Luke Van Tol Richard Mui

Schiehaven 13M 3024 EC Rotterdam phone +31 (0)10 485 58 01

WEST 8 urban design & landscape architecture b.v.

KPMB ARCHITECTS 322 King Street West, 3rd Floor Toronto, Ontario M5V 1J2 phone +1 416 977 5104

GREENBERG CONSULTANTS INC 20 Niagara Street, Unit 603 Toronto, Ontario M5V 3L8 phone 416 603 3777 IN COLLABORATION WITH Moffat & Nichol - Marine Engineers Schollen & Company - Aquatic Habitat TRANSSOLAR - Climate Engineer Entro Communications - Wayfinding Blackwell - Structural Engineers

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KPMB ARCHITECTS / WEST 8 / GREENBERG CONSULTANTS

KPMB ARCHITECTS

Adriaan Geuze Jelle Therry Daniel Vasini Alberto Gonzalez Ben Wegdam Ela Chojecka Giulia Frittoli Hernando Arrazola Harm te Velde Mary Protsyk William DiBernardo GREENBERG CONSULTANTS INC Ken Greenberg

Profile for Waterfront Toronto

KPMB Architects + West 8 + Greenberg Consultants  

Harbour Landing – a proposal prepared by KPMB Architects, West 8 and Greenberg Consultants. Part of Waterfront Toronto’s innovative design c...

KPMB Architects + West 8 + Greenberg Consultants  

Harbour Landing – a proposal prepared by KPMB Architects, West 8 and Greenberg Consultants. Part of Waterfront Toronto’s innovative design c...

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