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ISSUE 5 WINTER 05|06

National IPv6 Centre launched at WIT

Research Excellence

Research Support

Research Dissemination


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Editorial Welcome to the Winter issue of Research Matters for 2005/2006. 2005 was an important year in the academic development of the Institute with the granting of delegated authority to award its own postgraduate research degrees. This award recognises the quality of the research activity across all disciplines at WIT. The breadth and depth of this research is illustrated in the broad mix of topics presented in this issue of Research Matters.

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Internationally recognised research excellence is demonstrated in the establishment of the National IPv6 Centre and the Waterford Crystal Centre for Marketing Studies. A further example of the excellence of the Institute's research is the awarding of the prestigious European Language Label to a team of WIT researchers and their external research partners. The promotion of regional economic development is reflected in the success of the Enterprise Platform Programme and the creation of spin out companies from its research activity. We look forward to continued growth in research and innovation activity in 2006.

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Dr Willie Donnelly Head of Research

Contents IPv6 - the driving force behind the next generation of the internet ......

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PhD Graduates from the Chemical and Life Sciences Department ......

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Semiconductor Research Group (SRG) and Solid State Laboratory (SSL) ......

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Continuing professional development for Construction Management - the first Minerva Project to be co-ordinated at WIT ......

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Back to the country: the importance of rural tourism in Ireland ......

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The impact of movies on tourism ......

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Launch of Waterford Centre for Marketing Studies ......

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The cost of retirement: Ireland’s pension schemes and the price of administration......

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Privacy for patients in development of medical information systems ......

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Proposed new Centre for Scientific Computing......

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SecurIST - Driving ICT security and dependability research strategy beyond 2010 ......

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Accessing education: enabling adult learning ......

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German project wins European Language Award ......

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Visual research at the Institute ......

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Arts for Health research ......

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Equality Act 2004: Implications for Employers ......

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The impact of various types of exercise on mood states ......

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Award for Excellence in Research Supervision ......

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Profile of a Researcher: Dr Sergey Sergeyev ......

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South East Enterprise Platform Programme: turning research results into spin-out companies....

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Recent WIT publications ......

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IPv6 - the driving force behind the next generation of the internet The Telecommunications Software & Systems Group (TSSG) at Waterford Institute of Technology along with its consortium partners, HEAnet (Ireland's national research network), the Hamilton Institute (NUI Maynooth), and BT Ireland (with their links to the BT Exact research laboratories in Ipswich) has officially been launched as the Irish National IPv6 Centre. The vision of the Centre is to establish an open collaboration on IPv6, linked to an industrial base, working on research and development issues in Ireland. The centre was designated by the Irish DCMNR (Department of the Communications, the Marine, and Natural Resources) and opened by Mr. Martin Cullen TD, Minister of Transport in September last. Speaking at the event the Director of WIT, Professor Kieran R. Byrne, and the Chair of WIT's Governing Body, Mr. Redmond O’Donoghue welcomed the Minister. The Head of Research in WIT, Dr Willie Donnelly gave a short address on the importance of the TSSG within the context of WIT's research strategy. As part of the programme of talks for the launch event Mr. Mario Campolargo, Head of Unit DG-INFSO F3 Research Infrastructures in the European Commission, gave a presentation via video-link from Brussels, outlining the new business opportunities that IPv6 offers. Mr. Campolargo said that he was glad to see the expertise amongst these partners has been consolidated into a competence centre for IPv6 in Ireland. Each of the IPv6 consortium partners gave a presentation: Mícheál Ó Foghlú (Research Director at the TSSG, WIT), Dr David Malone (Hamilton Institute, NUI Maynooth), Mike Norris and David Wilson (HEAnet) and William McAuliffe (BT Ireland). In addition, presentations were given by a number of supporters of the initiative: Dr Mark Keane, Science Foundation Ireland; Nick Hilliard, INEX, and Latif Ladid, President of the global IPv6 Forum. For more information contact: Mícheál Ó Foghlú (mofoghlu@tssg.org) or Claire Fahy (cfahy@tssg.org)

Pictured with Minister Martin Cullen (centre) at the opening of the National IPv6 Centre are from left: Mr. Mícheál Ó Foghlú, Director of National IPv6 Centre; Dr Willie Donnelly, Head of Research at WIT; Mr. Latif Ladid, IPv6 Forum, Europe; Mr. Redmond O'Donoghue, Chairman of WIT's Governing Body; Professor Kieran R. Byrne, Director of WIT.

Every time you use the Internet you use an Internet Protocol (IP) - a set of rules for communication between computers. Internet Protocol Version 6, or IPv6 as it's more commonly known, is an upgrade to the most currently available Internet Protocol, IPv4. IPv4 was designed a long time ago in computer terms -about 1980, and since then, there have been many requests for enhanced capabilities. Currently IPv4 serves what could be called the computer market, the driving force behind the growth of the Internet. Each computer has an address called an IP address that allows other computers to communicate with it. However, there is a growing shortage of IPv4 addresses, which are needed by all new machines added to the Internet. The development of pervasive computing, where everyday machines such as fridges and cookers will contain computing devices connected wirelessly to the Internet compounds this need for more IP addresses. The main driving force for the deployment of IPv6, is its ability to expand the address space of the Internet. IPv6 will also bring many other improvements to IPv4 including routing and network auto-configuration. In his address at the launch event, the Director of Research at the TSSG, Mícheál Ó Foghlú described IPv6 as the driving force behind the next generation of the Internet. "It is vital to the economic development of Ireland", he said, "because it is at the heart of the next generation of the internet. Its scope and impact has not yet been fully understood". He also touched on the topic of the scope of IPv6 when he referred to the political and technical mission of the Centre. “Research into IPv6 spans from a technical level across to a political level where we need to ensure that it is developed in a way that is fair to all countries. At the moment it is even being used for inter-planetary communications”, he said. The Irish National IPv6 Centre is committed to continuing to research infrastructural and service-related issues linked to the use of the IPv6 protocol as the key element of the next generation Internet. In this, the centre will support the on-going mission of the Irish National IPv6 Task Force to encourage and lobby for the deployment of IPv6 in Ireland in the public and private sectors. Mícheál Ó Foghlú will act as Director of the Irish National IPv6 Centre, drawing on a range of expertise within the TSSG in WIT.

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G R A D U A T E S

PhD graduates from the Chemical and Life Sciences Department This year four students graduated with Doctorates from the Chemical and Life Sciences Department. A description and the results of their research are outlined below.

Michael Breen PhD Michael Breen's research was in the use of associated surfactant structures as reaction media. He completed his PhD studies under the supervision of Dr Sheila Donegan of the Department of Chemical and Life Sciences, WIT, Dr Evelyn Landers of the School of Science, WIT, and Professor Kieran Hodnett of the University of Limerick, with funding under the Higher Education Authority’s PRTLI scheme. A surfactant is a chemical which has two parts, part of the molecule likes water, while the other part does not. This gives surfactants unique properties in that they can get oil and water to mix, as one part of the molecule can dissolve in oil while the other can dissolve in the water. Soap is an example of a surfactant. At specific concentrations, surfactants can form organised structures, which stabilise

ferric perchlorate to give iron oxide particles. The particles produced by this method were in the micron range, were of uniform size and are of great interest to the electronics industry. These structures provide unique environments in which to carry out chemical reactions, as the reactants are kept in very close confines and the chance of collision between reacting specie is greatly enhanced relative to reaction in aqueous bulk media.

the entire system. Depending on the concentration of surfactant and other components present, a wide variety of structures can be formed, called micelles, liquid crystals and microemulsions. Michael's work focused on the use of lamellar liquid crystals in the hydrolysis of

During the course of his PhD studies Michael won first place in the Chemistry Research section of the Institute of Technologies’ colloquium. He is currently lecturing in the Department of Chemical and Life Sciences.

For more infomation contact: Dr Michael Breen (mbreen@wit.ie)

Margo Broderick PhD presentations at international conferences. Her work was the first reported use of water in oil microemulsions used in conjunction with CE, and has opened up a wide area of research.

Margo Broderick was recently conferred with her PhD, having completed her research under the supervision of Dr Sheila Donegan and Dr Joseph Power of the Department of Chemical and Life Sciences at WIT, and Dr Kevin Altria, Associate Director Glaxo Smithkline, Ware, UK. Margo's work focused on the use of microemulsions systems as separating media in capillary electrophoreis (CE) and HPLC. A microemulsion is a dispersion of oil, water and surfactant. They may be classified as water in oil or oil in water, depending on which is the major component. Due to the presence of water and oil in the system, they can simultaneously solubilise both water soluble and oil soluble materials. Combining microemulsions with conventional methods of analysis allows for new methods of analysis to be developed. Margo's work studied the

fundamental properties of microemulsions in relation to capillary electrophoresis (MEEKC) and HPLC, the development and evaluation of new microemulsion pseudo stationary phases and their application to pharmaceutical analysis. Margo's PhD research, which was funded by the TSR-Strand III programme, resulted in several peer reviewed top journal publications, as well as

In her PhD studies Margo successfully separated a range of pharmaceutical products without the need for any pretreatment steps that is normally required for analysis of pharmaceuticals in methods used by pharmaceutical companies today. This allows for more rapid analysis of pharmaceuticals and reduces the amounts of organic solvents used. Margo is currently working as Process Development Chemist in Bristol Meyers Squib, Dublin.

For more infomation contact: Dr Sheila Donegan (sdonegan@wit.ie)


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Aisling Olwill PhD Most people will have heard the stories of thalidomide - a pharmaceutical product that in the 1960s was administered as an anti-depressant. The drug is composed of two forms called enantiomers. Each of these enantiomers has very different physiological effects. One is successful in the treatment of depression whereas the other is implicated in the development of foetal abnormalities. Aisling Olwill's PhD research focused on the pharmaceutical compound, Lisinopril Dihydrate that is used in the treatment of hypertension. This important drug material is synthesised by Merck Sharpe and Dohme Ltd in Clonmel. The assistance received from the company throughout this research particularly from Ms. Eileen Counihan, Director of Quality, was greatly appreciated. By using the inherent chemical properties of the drug compound it was possible to prepare an extraction system (solid phase extraction), which could selectively retain

this compound when in the presence of related substances. The molecularly imprinted medium has the ability to remove the drug of interest while allowing the related substances to remain behind in solution. By carefully choosing the solvent (liquid) in which the drug compound is dissolved it is possible to

enhance the efficiency of this extraction process. The techniques developed during this research could potentially be used to complement and enhance the specificity of traditional analytical processes used by pharmaceutical companies. The concept of molecularly imprinting is a burgeoning area of research that has numerous long-term benefits to the pharmaceutical industry if exploited to its full potential. Aisling's research findings were presented at both national and international conferences and a poster presentation documenting results won first prize at a national research colloquium. Result data was also published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal, 'Biosensors and Bioelectronics'. Aisling is now working with Genzyme in Waterford. For more infomation contact: Dr Peter McLoughlin (pmcloughlin@wit.ie)

John Nolan PhD: Fulbright Scholar John Nolan, a recent PhD graduate of WIT, is the only student from the Institute to ever secure a Fulbright Scholarship. He is currently based in Augusta, Georgia, having been given the opportunity to work at the Institute of Georgia's Vision Science Laboratory. Here, he is building on his thesis work on age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of blindness in the Western world. Funded by Fighting Blindness Ireland, John's PhD project (a study on age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and macular pigment) was the first large-scale population-based study of its kind in the world, and was supervised by Dr Stephen Beatty, Consultant Opthalmic Surgeon in Waterford Regional Hospital, and Dr Orla O'Donovan of WIT. AMD involves degeneration of the central

retina in people over 55 years of age. People with age-related macular degeneration lose central vision and have difficulty with everyday activities such as

reading, writing, watching television and recognising familiar faces. What is truly fascinating is that macular pigment, which is entirely of dietary origin, is believed to protect against age-related macular degeneration. One of the most interesting findings to emanate from John's PhD was the discovery that healthy middle-aged offspring of patients with AMD had a relative lack of macular pigment. In other words, this finding suggests that the observed lack of pigment may predispose the sons and daughters of AMD sufferers to this disease, and that appropriate dietary modification may prevent, or even delay, the onset of the disease.

For more infomation contact: Dr Orla O’Donovan (oodonovan@wit.ie)

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Semiconductor Research Group (SRG) and Solid State Laboratory (SSL) The Semiconductor Research Group (SRG) and Solid State Research Laboratory (SSL) at Waterford Institute of Technology was founded in 2001 under the direction of Philip R. Walsh B.Sc. M.Eng.Sc. MIEEE. The group conducts research in the specialist disciplines, which surround the research, design and development of discrete and integrated microelectronic devices, incorporating all aspects of semiconductor device design, simulation, process development, fabrication, packaging and test.

P.R.Walsh, B.Sc. M.Eng.Sc. MIEEE, SRG Lead Researcher

Piotr Szczerba, Magister Ingneur SRG PG Researcher

At present, the group's main focus is on the research, design and development of advanced semiconductor switching devices for fast switching data communications, aerospace and automotive applications, with the core of the associated research activities (design, simulation and process development) being conducted at the Institute's main campus and with prototype fabrication being achieved through industrial collaboration at international level. The group's strategy calls for further growth and continued success to be ensured through: (i) the delivery of postgraduate specialist training, (ii) the continued monitoring of both the academic and industrial relevance of the research expertise being developed in-house and made available to industry, (iii) the continued development and demonstration of research capability through IP creation and peer review at international level. Since it was established, the group has gone from strength to strength and has

Liam Cahill, B.Tech. (Hons) SRG PG Researcher

significantly expanded its core of research expertise. At present it incorporates a total of seven research scientists (two staff lecturers, two associate industrial co-researchers and three postgraduate students), has a total of over twelve international publications and seven international patents in the aforementioned disciplines. Throughout the same period the group has also continued to develop its strong links with four of the five major industrial concerns currently operating in the microelectronics sector within Ireland, while significantly adding a sixth industrial partner through links established with a major international semiconductor manufacturer based in Taiwan (ROC). These developments have further consolidated the group's access to prototyping facilities and industrial leverage at both European and international level. At present, the group has a total of seven research projects actively underway in collaboration with General Semiconductor / Vishay Corporation (ROC), Ensign Bigford

Michael Flynn, B.Eng. (Hons) SRG PG Researcher

Automotive Electronics Division (USA), Xilinx Corporation (IRL) & Queens University Belfast (UK). On a worldwide basis, research and development in the solid state disciplines is recognised as being a key component in the on-going emergence of new ICT technologies, many of which form the basis of research activities within other groups at WIT. The Semiconductor Research Group is hence recognised as a key element in the School of Engineering's long term strategic objective of developing key and distinct areas of research and academic excellence, which can significantly aid and contribute to the undertaking of multi-disciplinary collaborations in new and emerging research fields. The group's activities are therefore unambiguously aligned with these objectives and those set out in the various programmes currently underway as part of the Government's National Development Plan. For more information contact: Philip Walsh (prwalsh@wit.ie)

Continuing professional development for Construction Management - the first Minerva project to be co-ordinated at WIT The fastest growing group in higher education is part-time participants seeking to advance their careers. This is particularly the case in the construction industry and construction professionals are increasingly seeking the delivery of e-learning content at home and at work. WIT has recently been successful in obtaining significant funding through the Minerva Action, which aims to promote European co-operation in the field of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Open and Distance Learning (ODL) in education. This is the first time that the Institute will be acting as project co-ordinator for a Minerva Action. The project titled, "Continuing

Professional Development for Construction Management" is designed with the training needs of managers in the construction industry in mind. The project's main objective is to establish a platform where different instructional strategies will be developed to accommodate different learning styles and cognitive processes. “We recognise that learning is a complex set of inter-related cognitive processes”, says John Wall, project coordinator. “The challenge for this project is to develop a framework to address the lifelong learning needs of construction professionals who remain in employment.” This full-time programme involves collaboration between WIT, Nottingham Trent University, U.K., and Fachhochschule

Karlsruhe, Germany. Participants on the programme spend one semester in each of the partner institutions. The Minerva project builds on these links as well as links established by Dr Ken Thomas with Istanbul Technical University, Turkey. External evaluators on the project include the University of Salford in the UK and Queensland University of Technology in Australia. The genesis for this research came from work John Wall is undertaking as part of his PhD. The involvement of Queensland University of Technology resulted from an International Travel Support Collaboration grant from Enterprise Ireland. For more information contact: John Wall (jwall@wit.ie)


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Back to the country: the importance of rural tourism in Ireland TWIGS Dissemination Activities There has been substantial research dissemination from the TWIGS project.

The Tourism Wales Ireland Green and Sustainable (TWIGS) initiative aims to address the increasing drift from rural to urban tourism. The objective is to enhance the development and marketing of rural tourism products in the relevant regions, resulting in the generation of higher spend and the even distribution of increased visits throughout the calendar year. TWIGS is an ERDF funded initiative, led by Anthony Foley and Anne-Marie Frampton of the WIT School of Business, with partners including the South East Regional Tourism Authority (SERTA) and the region's LEADER groups. TWIGS was launched by Mr. John O'Donoghue, Minister for Sports, Arts & Tourism in February 2005, at which time he commended the Institute, SERTA and the LEADER groups for their commitment to the initiative. The TWIGS team developed and delivered an innovative Business Development Programme to address their objectives. The unique process included a

http://www.twigs.ie comprehensive Training Needs Analysis of the South East Tourism Providers and the design of action orientated, case study based workshops and educational visits. The process also involved selfassessments and development of Action Plans, which the participants are currently implementing in their businesses. The team also developed innovative tools such as The TWIGS Green Directory a source of over 300 Green Suppliers, a Consumer Profiler Research Programme and a Descriptive Image Research Study. These facilitators further advance the creation of a value added network of TWIGS partners, participants and green suppliers, while simultaneously raising awareness of the need for product innovation. The network was further strengthened by the Cooperative Marketing element of the Business Development Programme where emphasis was put on rural tourism providers working cooperatively together to create a holiday package by enhancing their product with a range of activities, events, festivals and special interest products.

Research Assistants, John Power and David Haberlin, along with Anthony Foley of the Waterford Crystal Centre for Marketing Studies attended a conference on Tourism & Hospitality Research in Ireland: Exploring the Issues at the University of Ulster in June 2005 and presented a paper entitled “Developing the Positioning of the Irish Rural Tourism Product - the Role of Image and Market Focus”. They also presented papers at the Academy of Marketing Conference hosted by the School of Marketing, Dublin Institute of Technology in July, the Irish Academy of Management Conference hosted by GMIT in September, the Recent Developments in Tourism Research Conference hosted by University of Algarve, Portugal in October, and the 2nd International Symposium on Rural Tourism and Hospitality Cultures hosted by the University of Lapland, Finland in November 2005. The programme manager, Anne-Marie Frampton also presented at the National Tourism Conference, hosted by Carlow Tourism, in February 2005. For more information contact: Anne-Marie Frampton (amframpton@wit.ie)

The impact of movies on tourism The impact of Ballykissangel on the people of Avoca, Co. Wicklow has formed the basis of new research in WIT. To date, there has been little research on the effects of television and movies on general tourist perceptions of an area or region. Noelle O'Connor, Acting Head of Department of Languages, Tourism and Hospitality, is currently undertaking PhD research in this area and has been studying the impact on the Avoca region since 1999. Noelle's work on Ballykissangel revealed possible links between community

planning and movie induced tourism. For her PhD research, the study area includes the Yorkshire region in the North of England, which has been the subject of a number of popular English television series and is already the topic of much research in the tourism and destination marketing field. The research outlines some of the benefits of tourism branding that accrue to a destination based on an area's image, as moulded by a number of television series. The research aims to investigate how a brand based on an image derived from a television series may be a strong means of marketing the area and harnessing tourism.

A survey of visitors to Yorkshire over a seven day period in July 2003 was carried out in order to test this theory. The findings of this survey have a number of implications for the future branding of destinations based on television and film imagery.

For more information contact: Noëlle O'Connor (noconnor@wit.ie)


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Launch of Waterford Crystal Centre for Marketing Studies The Waterford Crystal Centre for Marketing Studies was launched in October, 2005 at WIT's School of Business by the Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment, Mr. Mícheál Martin. The purpose of the Centre is the creation of new marketing knowledge and was formed as a result of a partnership between Waterford Crystal and WIT School of Business, led by Dr Tom O'Toole. It aims to promote three main activities: teaching, research and interaction with industry. Research is carried out on a number of themes including branding, reputation, and the development of marketing strategy capabilities. Centre members have presented papers at major international conferences and have also published in many leading marketing journals. Students are at the core of the Centre, with two undergraduate marketing degrees (Bachelor of Arts in

Marketing and Bachelor of Business Studies with Marketing Specialism) and one postgraduate degree (Masters in Business Studies in Marketing) attracting large numbers. Students emerging from these programmes are the leading marketing graduates in Ireland, and many have moved into top positions in many Irish and international companies. In addition, research postgraduate students have made a significant contribution to furthering marketing knowledge and disseminating this knowledge at international conferences and in peerreviewed journals.

dissemination, such as the TWIGS rural tourism marketing capabilities initiative. The Centre also hosted a major International Reputation Management Research Conference in May 2005 at the WIT School of Business.

An emphasis is also placed on executive training and development ensuring that delegates benefit from the very latest thinking. The Centre currently delivers an Executive Programme in Brand Management on behalf of the Marketing Institute of Ireland. There is a focus in this programme on activities that facilitate business needs and research

Further details are available at www.waterfordcrystalcentreformarketing.com or from the email addresses below.

The Centre for Marketing Studies benefits greatly from its association with Waterford Crystal, with Gary Davies (Waterford Crystal Visiting Professor of Marketing), Brian McGee (Sales and Marketing Director of Waterford Crystal) and John Foley (CEO of Waterford Crystal) offering their expertise to staff and students alike.

For more information contact: Anthony Foley (afoley@wit.ie) or Dr Susan Whelan (swhelan@wit.ie)

Pictured at the official opening of the Waterford Crystal Centre for Marketing Studies are from left: Professor Kieran R. Byrne, Director of the Institute; Mr. Mícheál Martin, T.D. Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment; Mr. Martin Cullen, T.D. Minister for Transport; Professor Gary Davies, Waterford Crystal Visiting Professor of Marketing; Dr Susan Whelan, Waterford Crystal Centre for Marketing Studies; Mr. Brian McGee, Sales and Marketing Director, Waterford Crystal, and Dr Tom O'Toole, Head of WIT School of Business


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The cost of retirement: Ireland’s pension schemes and the price of administration An analysis of Irish occupational pension schemes and the costs involved in administering pension plans was the focus of Aidan Mahon's recent Masters Degree in Business. An important and timely project supervised by Dr Sheila O'Donohoe from the School of Business, the findings show that there has been no dramatic increase in pension provision over the past ten to fifteen years and that larger pension schemes enjoy significant economies of scale in their administration. Employers generally offer occupational pension schemes as part of a remuneration package. Concerns about pension fund returns and the adequacy of retirement income have been much talkedabout issues in the media in recent times. An additional topic highlighted by the study is that the significant administration costs of pension schemes have implications for member contributions and eventual retirement income. The Irish Association of Pension Funds (IAPF) is the main representative body for Irish occupational pensions and has approximately three hundred member organisations. Using its membership afforded a reliable sampling frame and offered diversity in industry size, as well as variation in the number, value and type of pension schemes provided. With a response rate of 38%, firms were represented from fourteen sectors across Ireland, with the key respondents in

financial services, electronics & chemicals, food and agricultural production, semistate, health and pharmaceuticals, and construction. More than half of the respondents were found to operate two pension schemes and the original schemes were found to be relatively mature. The average pension fund size was 230 million euro, with less than one quarter of respondents' schemes earning a positive return in 2003. Other findings of the study were that the average age of a pension scheme member is forty, female members are on average five years younger than male counterparts and employees contribute 5% on average of their gross salary to the scheme (with employers contributing 13% on average). In most cases, where increased contributions to the pension scheme had been sought in recent years, the employer made these contributions. The more generous employers (in terms of the percentage salary contributed) are those in education, electronics and engineering, and the food and agricultural sectors, while the least generous are those in the construction sector. Up to 62% of respondents indicated that they do provide access to Personal Retirement Savings Accounts (PRSAs) but over half of them stated that their employees opted not to take this coverage. Introduced in 2003 as a flexible and portable pension arrangement, employers

are required by law to provide access to PRSAs for all eligible employees not covered by the company pension plan. Over half of respondent schemes are managed externally and pension fund trustees are deemed to have a significant role in determining the investment policy of the fund. The mean cost of operating pension schemes proved on average to be 1.25% of assets, which is higher than our international counterparts. No clear consensus exists as to how these charges are levied, as they vary across member contributions and accumulated assets. Larger schemes enjoy significantly lower costs per retired member than smaller ones, consistent with Australian and US evidence. The charges borne by larger schemes represent only 0.32% of assets while smaller schemes bear 3.64% of assets. Increases in regulation were cited as having contributed to the costs of service providers. Fees are negotiable but again, are dependent upon the size of the pension scheme. From the evidence gathered through this research, the case is made for amalgamating smaller schemes together in order to benefit from the economies of scale with respect to administration charges. In conclusion, the study found that pensions are seen to be part of a complex framework and that the government target of reaching 70% pension coverage is unattainable in the near future.

For more information contact: Dr Sheila O’Donohoe (sodonohoe@wit.ie)

Privacy for patients in development of medical information systems In a recent paper presented at the 16th International Federation of Automation and Control (IFAC) World Congress in Prague this Summer, researchers from the Information Systems & Organisational Learning Research Group (ISOL) Peter Carew and Larry Stapleton examined a series of privacy challenges related to the increasing use of large-scale information systems in healthcare applications. This theoretical paper discussed a series of issues identified though the application of a privacy framework. This framework was developed as part of an ongoing research project in ISOL, which is looking at the role privacy plays in the development of information systems. The paper highlighted a variety of privacy concerns, including how highly sensitive medical data is treated in a similar fashion to non-personal data, such as bill of materials information as found in manufacturing and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. The privacy framework argues that information systems developers must go beyond simply identifying the data collected and consider the wider privacy ramifications for the physical, social and psychological spaces affected by technological change. Consider, for example, the blurring of the real world with the virtual world through ubiquitous technology and the changes such technologies make to the physical world, how we communicate

and socialise, and how we personally develop. Such technologies clearly impact on a myriad of human and information spaces and systems, and should therefore be carefully examined before the technologies are actually developed or deployed (though this is rarely the case in practice). There are wider privacy issues also, such as the different perspectives of various medical stakeholders and issues of patient safety due to data collection and access. Privacy, it seems, is not adequately considered in the development of large-scale medical information systems. This is a serious concern given recent developments such as global electronic patient record systems, and US FDA approval of a human microchip implant for medical identification purposes (yes, you can be "chipped" just like your dog!). Privacy is generally not considered in the development of information systems, with many seeing the development process as simply delivering a technical artefact (even though there is a clear impact on social and human systems). Ongoing work at ISOL seeks to redress this ethically precarious practice by investigating and providing methodological support for incorporating privacy values in information systems development. For more information contact: Peter Carew (pcarew@wit.ie) or Dr Larry Stapleton (lstapleton@wit.ie)

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Proposed new Centre for Scientific Computing Dr Mícheál Ó hÉigeartaigh joined WIT as Head of the Department of Computing, Mathematics and Physics early in 2005 and immediately set about the challenging task of building on the work of his predecessor Paul Barry who has moved on to the position of Head of School of Science. In a Department that embraces research in many facets including a number of research groups employing a joint total of over one hundred fulltime research staff; a significant number of faculty members who are conducting research on an individual basis and as members of international teams; sixty postgraduate researchers at Masters and Doctoral level, and an increasing number of postdoctoral positions, this task is not unlike trying to board a speeding train. Dr Ó hÉigeartaigh foresees some major challenges in the research area such as managing the emergence of strong doctoral and postdoctoral activity. In the short term his focus is on developing collaborative research relationships with colleagues within the Institute with international partners and with local industry. Over the past number of years Dr Ó hÉigeartaigh has undertaken extended research visits to a number of universities and research centres. These have provided

him with important models for managing research in his Department. For example: he visited the Centre for Operations Research & Econometrics (CORE) at the University of Louvain-laNeuve, outside Brussels. This is the largest centre in the world for research on combinatorial optimisation and is directed by Professor Lawrence Wolsey. CORE has pioneered the development of exact algorithms for supply chain management systems through the paradigm of Mixed Integer Programming (MIP). The list of successful implementations of the technology covers such areas as production scheduling, logistics, facility layout/location, very-large-scale Integration (VLSI) design and crew rostering. The strategy of Professor Wolsey has been to work closely with industry to identify problem areas of interest, to conduct theoretical research within CORE and to generate research income through the application of the technology in industry. The models developed by Professor Richard Karp at Berkeley and Professor George Nemhauser at Georgia Technical University are similar: funding for theoretical research is derived from a partnership model with industry, with research success being measured in terms of publications, patents and research income. The concept of internal universities within corporations is a strategy followed by many US universities: Rensselaer Polytechnic within Westinghouse, Ford etc., Emery Riddle

within aeronautics companies and Carnegie-Mellon. Dr Ó h'Éigeartaigh's philosophy for research by the Department is informed by these influences. "I propose to deepen the cooperation with local industry through a partnership model for research. One of my immediate goals is to work with industry to implement MIP technologies, with a view to establishing the South East Region as a centre of excellence in this area", he says. "I am proposing the establishment of a Centre for Scientific Computing as a vehicle for implementing these technologies. The proposed centre will draw on the research interests of faculty from a large number of Departments within WIT. It will address research problems in the areas of combinatorics, computational science (including BioInformatics), applied mathematics, statistics, computer science, high performance computing and embedded systems. On a personal level, I have had the good fortune to be the Director of a number of large EU projects in the area of Computer Education. I am also currently supervising research students in the area of combinatorial enumeration, metrics of performance and econometric modelling. I look forward to co-operating with staff at WIT in pursuing these interests". For more infomation contact: Dr Mícheál Ó hÉigeartaigh (moheigeartaigh@wit.ie)

SecurIST - Driving ICT security and dependability research strategy beyond 2010 The advances in ICT are driving the emergence of a new knowledge or information society capable of interlinking communities from across the world, revolutionizing concepts of community and national boundaries, linking ICT and Globalisation. Thus it is particularly important that Europe develops its own security research framework focused on European Citizen Empowerment. The challenges facing ICT Security include Ambient Technology, Mobile Connectivity and Ubiquitous Computing, whereas challenges facing European Citizens include Reliability of Infrastructure and services, Privacy concerns, Trustworthiness and Usability. The Telecommunications Software and Systems Group is leading a European Commission funded Pan Research project, called SecurIST, which is charged with

developing a European roadmap for ICT Security & Dependability beyond 2010. This roadmap will form an important contribution to the development of the ICT security workprogramme for the next European Research Framework (FP7). The project has developed a global "European Security Task Force" to capture the key security results and challenges from the present framework programme. 13 thematic working groups have been established by the Security Task Force and they have identified a number of challenges within these thematic areas which have been further validated and prioritised by the Advisory Board. It has also established an "Advisory board" composed of some of the worlds leading security experts. The advisory board provides guidance to the task force and helps to promote the projects roadmap to European industry and decision makers.

An initial ICT Security and Dependability Research Strategy has been developed and will be further refined by the Advisory Board before delivery in January/February 2006. Dr Willie Donnelly, the project manager of SecurIST made a key presentation to the Commission at a consultation workshop held on the 8th of December 2005 in Brussels in preparation for the Trust in the Net event being held on the 9th of February 2006 hosted by the Austrian Presidency. This workshop will bring together key decision-makers whose purpose is to validate the produced Security and Dependability Research Framework document, which will lead to the published Strategic Research Agenda for the next tranche of European research funding (FP7). For more infomation contact: Zeta Dooly (zdooly@tssg.org)


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Accessing education: enabling adult learning For adults, re-engaging with the future. Clarity of informaeducation is often a second tion is vital for adults who chance opportunity and need to know what educational guidance is direction to take and the seen as part of the step-byopening up of new options step process. However, has allowed many clients to adults are consistently explore areas they would facing barriers accessing never have considered before. education, in particular in In fact, quite a number of the the areas of childcare, clients who accessed guidance funding and eligibility to in REGSA are now registered take up courses. This can be on full-time and part-time a determining factor in courses in WIT. whether adults progress An important finding from the and achieve the goals they analysis has been the topic of Photo shows front row from left: Sandra Healy (REGSA); T; Peter Lucey (REGSA); Lucy Hearne set themselves. 'progression' for the client. (WIT). Back row from left: Tracey Hickey (REGSA); Michael O'Callaghan (WIT Graduate) In July 2005, a report was Responses have indicated that Roisin Shanahan (CHART) launched by the Regional progression is very much an Technology. It is evident from the findings Educational Guidance Service for Adults individual experience based on their own that clients have benefited enormously (REGSA) based in WIT’s College Street life experiences and expectations. Within from guidance provision, not only in terms the context of adult guidance provision in campus. This report was the result of of education and training experiences, but research carried out by Lucy Hearne, Ireland there has been a lack of research also career progression and personal Guidance Counsellor with the service in this area. fulfillment. The research has also highsince 2001, and its A key recommendation from the study has lighted the importance of lifelong learning purpose has been to evaluate the benefits been that appropriate tracking systems for adults and the barriers they face in of guidance for the adult clients accessing need to be implemented by the services accessing education and training the guidance service. The focus of the nationally to track clients on a opportunities. research has been on the clients' direct longitudinal basis in order to inform best Feedback has shown that the key benefits experiences of receiving information, practice for the future delivery of expressed by clients have been in the advice and guidance, and the tracking of guidance. This need is supported by the areas of personal development, access to his/her progression to determine Organisation for Economic Co-Operation professional expertise, information outcomes. and Development (OECD). This is now the provision, sign-posting of options and REGSA is the longest established adult subject of Lucy Hearne's Masters research appropriate referral. Clients see guidance guidance service operating within the in WIT. as an empowering process allowing them Adult Educational Guidance Initiative and For more infomation contact: to develop self-awareness and plan for the only one located in an Institute of Lucy Hearne (lhearne@wit.ie)

German project wins European Language Award A project providing teacher support, materials and facilities to non-traditional language learners has won the prestigious Léargas European Language Label Award for 2004. The prize was presented to the team of researchers from WIT, National University of Ireland, Maynooth and University of Limerick in September last by Minister for Education and Science, Ms. Mary Hanafin T.D. The aims of the three-year project called Opening the Door to Language Learning were to explore, support and disseminate good practice in the provision of access to language learning resources for non-traditional learners. The research involved partners in nine European countries.

The Irish partners provided opportunities for guided, selfdirected language learning on their campuses. At WIT School of Humanities, researchers Mary O'Connell and Carol O'Byrne welcomed 14 participants who were keen to learn German. Over a term, these learners made full use of the language materials and computerbased facilities available on campus on a weekly basis, and were mentored by a native speaker. All involved deemed it an enjoyable and profitable language-learning experience. Pictured at the presentation of the European Language Award are from left: Minister for Education and Science, Ms. Mary Hanafin T.D.; Ms. Mary O’Connell, Lecturer; and Ms. Carol O’Byrne, Lecturer.

Support materials, which were developed as a result of this project, are available from the local researchers. For more information contact: Mary O’Connell (moconnell@wit.ie) or Carol O’Byrne (cobyrne@wit.ie)

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Visual research at the Institute Practice-based or practice-led research in the Visual Arts, as well as in other artistic areas, has become well established at universities in the U.K. and Australia over the past twenty years. Cordula Hansen's thesis investigates the interdisciplinary nature of Umha Aois, a Wicklowbased, artist-led project, investigating Bronze Age casting technologies. A particular focus is placed on the contribution artists can make to archaeologists' understanding of ancient techniques due to their practical experience of working with traditional materials such as clay and bronze. Art practice by its very nature relies on the artist's personal experience. The founders of Umha Aois, sculptors Niall O Neill and Cliodna Cussen, have stressed repeatedly that they are fine artists and not archaeologists. This means that the low-tech casting methods refined during the annual symposia are not viewed solely from an archaeological perspective, but as a means of making bronze casting more accessible to individual artists.

Bronze Age pit furnace with clay crucible. Niall O Neill, 2005

Cordula is currently in the process of transferring to a practice-led PhD in Fine Art/Sculpture, to be completed in 2007.

For more information contact: Cordula Hansen (cordula_h@gmx.net)

Arts for Health research The concept of utilising the healing potential of the arts in a purposeful way is a fairly recent one. Art lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University, Peter Senior, is credited with the concept of using the visual arts to create a stimulating healing ambience within a healthcare context. This was approximately three decades ago, and the idea has escalated from there. Now there is a steadily growing demand for artist facilitators in diverse healthcare contexts. In 2003, the Arts Council, arising from its development work with various regional health boards, published an Arts and Health Handbook. Prominent amongst the case studies cited in the Handbook is that of the Waterford Healing Arts Trust. This project, now over ten years old, is generally regarded as exemplary of the way the arts can be used effectively to enhance the healing process in a busy short-stay hospital. In 2004 the Irish Arts Council recognized the growing significance of arts for health by hosting a major international conference on the subject. More recently, the UK based Nuffield Trust for Research and Policy Studies in Health Services has published a strategic paper strongly advocating the use of the creative arts and humanities in healthcare. The growth of the Arts for Health movement has been paralleled in medical and nursing education by the inclusion of medical humanities as a component discipline of university courses in many countries. Both developments taken together suggest a significant rise in recognition of the value of the arts as lifeenhancing and health-promoting vehicles, with a key role to play in the field of healthcare.

Speaking as a founder member of Waterford Healing Arts Trust, Dr Peter Jordan says “I have seen the project develop from its small beginnings, when the aim was to relieve the bleak emptiness of the corridors and waiting areas by introducing appropriate paintings and sculptures. Now there is a comprehensive programme of activities devised by the Trustees, embracing all the creative and performing arts, and a full-time arts administrator to implement it.” Postgraduate researcher Edel Nolan has successfully completed her M.A. by research on the subject of Arts for health. This research investigated the role and efficacy of the arts in the specific healing environment of Waterford Regional Hospital, and in the words of her external assessor, Peter Senior MBE, ‘its scope is prodigious and should certainly provide future students and academics with a multitude of useful reference points.’ The academic infrastructure is already in place for a taught M.A. in Arts for Health at WIT, as are the appropriate undergraduate feeder programmes in the visual arts, design, music, architecture, social care and nursing. A flexible learning schedule is envisaged, that would be tailored to the specific needs of individual applicants. According to Dr Jordan, “In terms of research, there are also existing interests in relevant areas of the arts, social and healthcare. The already strong relationship with and proximity to Waterford Regional Hospital, also provides WIT with the requisite physical infrastructure to make this subject ideally located at the Institute.” For more information contact Dr Peter Jordan (pjordan@wit.ie)


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Equality Act 2004: Implications for Employers It is now over a year since the Equality Act (the "2004 Act") was introduced. This piece of legislation revised the ground-breaking Employment Equality Act 1998 (the "1998 Act") and was required to meet Ireland's European obligations in that the State had to provide for three equality based EU Directives. The changes brought about by the 2004 Act will have a significant impact on Irish employers and set out below is a basic guide to some of the key changes introduced by the 2004 Act. Arguably the most important amendment introduced by the 2004 Equality Act has been the requirement on an employer to provide reasonable accommodation for persons with disabilities, subject to it not imposing a disproportionate burden on the employer rather than a nominal cost as had previously been provided in the 1998 Act. The previous position enabled employers to effectively bypass their obligations to current or prospective workers with disabilities, if the cost of the necessary adjustments to the workplace exceeded a "nominal cost". This was a test that was all too easy to satisfy. However, the above change brought about by the 2004 Act imposes a far greater burden on employers to ensure that the workplace is "disability friendly". Further, employers should note that any attempt to avoid this obligation would be heavily scrutinised by the Equality Authority and various Disability groups including The National Disability Authority. The definition of harassment has been broadened under the 2004 Act to include any form of unwanted conduct, which in either case has a purpose or effect of violating a person's dignity in creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading,

humiliating or offensive environment for the person. The practical impact of this change for employers is that the test of "reasonableness" which had previously been contained in the 1998 Act has now been removed. What constitutes harassment is determined solely by the effect that the act or conduct has on the employee. Therefore, the definition is now open to a much wider interpretation, as each individual will have a different level of tolerance to behaviour that may (or may not) constitute harassment. Consequently it is expected that more harassment claims will be brought. A similar extension to the definition of sexual harassment has been introduced and a similar increase in the number of claims is expected.

note that this subtle change provides a more flexible definition than that previously covered and will lead to an increase in the instances of behaviour and/or practices that could be considered discriminatory.

The 2004 Act extended the protection available to include persons between the ages of 16 and 65. Previously the 1998 Act had provided protection for those aged 18 and above. However, an employer can still set a minimum age requirement, not exceeding 18 years, for potential applicants for a job. The 2004 Act also removed the upper age limit (65 years) for retirement. The practical impact of this extension on employers is expected to be limited, as it is still possible for employers to set compulsory retirement ages and if an employer decides to offer a fixed-term contract to a worker over the compulsory retirement age this does not constitute discrimination.

Employers should note that the 2004 Act extends the definition of "employee" and "contract of employment" in order that employment protection is afforded to selfemployed persons. Furthermore, the Act also extends the provisions of the Act to apply to partners and partnerships. Although well established through case law, the 2004 Act now expressly states that the burden of proof is placed on the respondent. Therefore, if a claimant establishes facts from which it may be presumed that discrimination occurred, it would then be up to the respondent employer to prove that discrimination did not occur. Previously, this was only expressed in relation to claims of discrimination on the grounds of gender under the 1998 Act. This guide has been produced by Elliott Payne who is a law lecturer in the Humanities Department at the Waterford Institute of Technology. It is intended for information purposes only and is not a legal document.

The definition of discrimination has been broadened by the 2004 Act to mirror the more effective definition of discrimination as contained in the Equal Status Act 2000. Discrimination shall now be taken to have occurred when a person is treated less favourably than another person is, has been or would be treated in a comparable situation on any of the discrimination grounds. Once again, employers should

The ability to positively discriminate under the 1998 Act was confined to four grounds: gender, disability, age (in excess of 50) and membership of the travelling community. Employers should be aware that the 2004 Act has significantly improved this position by enabling employers to implement positive action schemes to all nine discriminatory grounds. It should be noted that employers are not obliged but continue to have a discretion as to whether they want to introduce such positive action procedures.

For more infomation contact: Elliott Payne (epayne@wit.ie)

The impact of various types of exercise on mood states Psychological research indicates that exercise helps produce positive mood states by reducing the levels of confusion, depression, fatigue and tension that constitute a negative mood state and increasing the levels of vigour. This is borne out in a recent study carried out by Donna Dunne, a researcher in the Health, Sport and Exercise Science Department. The purpose of this study was to analyse the impacts of three very different forms of exercise that placed aerobic demands, breathing requirements, movement patterns and resistance work on the

individual. The three exercises under investigation were Pilates, Aerobic Dance and Weight training. Each subject was asked to complete a questionnaire based on how they were feeling. They then participated in the class. Immediately following the class, each subject was asked to once again complete a questionnaire, recording how they felt at that moment. This procedure was repeated once a week for three consecutive weeks. This study, although not without

limitations, showed that participation in both exercise and attending a healthy living class improved mood, although the greatest improvement in mood was displayed by those participating in exercise. It revealed that an exercise involving heavy resistance demands on the body in the form of weight training elicited the greatest response in mood states in a positive direction.

For more infomation contact: Donna Dunne (ddunne@wit.ie)

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Award for Excellence in Research Supervision Last year WIT introduced a new annual award for excellence in postgraduate research supervision to recognise the growing importance of research and postgraduate studies for the Institute. Nominations were sought from postgraduate research students and the onerous task of selection was carried out by a panel of senior staff, students and an external expert. The selection process looked at a broad spectrum of areas such as current supervision activities, ability to select appropriate supervision strategies and implement them effectively, participation in professional development activities, enthusiasm for, and commitment to, mentorship and pastoral care of students and assistance given in furthering students' careers.

available, even during holidays. His friendly demeanour makes him a pleasure to work with on a daily basis. They asked that he be awarded because of his complete professionalism and personal drive to succeed as an academic and a researcher.

This year's worthy winner was Dr Peter McLoughlin, Lecturer in Chemistry. The award was presented at a ceremony in WIT and the citation for Peter was read by Dr Willie Donnelly, Head of Research and Innovation. Since he came to WIT twelve years ago, Dr Peter McLoughlin has worked tirelessly with colleagues in Chemistry & Biology to identify research themes, which are of interest to his colleagues in the laboratory sciences and indeed in other departments. He has actively translated these themes into two successful research groups - The Separation Science Research Group and The Estuarine Research Group. Both of these attracted significant Strand 3 funds, thanks to Peter and his colleagues in the Department of Chemical and Life Sciences. Peter's students have described him as approachable, understanding, always positive and creative, enthusiastic, helpful and always

Pictured receiving the award for Excellence in Research Supervision are from left: Dr Venie Martin, Head of Development; Award Winner Dr Peter McLoughlin with his wife, Dr Helen Hughes, and their children; Professor Kieran R. Byrne, Director of the Institute.

Profile of a Researcher: Dr Sergey Sergeyev One of the dynamically growing branches of optical engineering, Fibre Sensor Technology is investigated in WIT by the Optics Research Group (ORG) with research income in excess of seven hundred and fifty thousand euros since 1995. A critical mass of funding from the Enterprise-Ireland Commercialisation Fund, Technology Development and Proof of Concept, Applied Research, Strategic Research and International Collaboration programmes, Royal Society and British Council has given ORG the opportunity to undertake a wide spectrum of research activity from basic research to applied research and to the eventual development and commercialisation of the results. This broad spectrum of activity attracts internationally recognized scientists, such as Senior Research Scientist Dr Sergey Sergeyev. Dr Sergeyev completed research for his Masters and PhD degrees in the area of nonlinear spectroscopy and laser physics at the Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus, during the period 1985 to

Dr Sergey Sergeyev, Senior Research Scientist at the Optics Research Group

1991. In the nineties, he worked in various positions from Research Assistant to Senior Researcher at the Department of Physics in Belarusian State University. He became recognised internationally through his publication record in the field of stochastic processes, and polarization phenomena in lasers and spectroscopy, and was invited to join several program committees and editorial boards of leading conferences and journals in these areas of expertise. In search of new challenges, Dr Sergeyev moved to Sweden at the end of the Nineties where he worked as a Guest

Researcher, Project Manager, and Senior Scientist at the Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Sweden; Acreo AB, Stockholm, Sweden; and Ericsson AB, Stockholm, Sweden. Dr Sergeyev actively engaged in the research areas of optical telecoms including operation and maintenance of optical networks; polarization phenomena in fibre optics; optical amplifiers-design, assembly, and testing. In his current position as a Senior Research Scientist at the Optics Research Group in WIT, he leads the research in fibre optics, namely fibre optical telecom and fibre sensor technology. According to Dr Sergeyev, success in research is similar to sporting success. "The main feature of success is to have a good team. Each player has to be professional in sense of technique, and have the ability to communicate with other players quickly and effectively. For me the Optics Research Group is such a team." For more information contact Dr Sergey Sergeyev (ssergeyev@wit.ie)


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South East Enterprise Platform Programme: turning research results into spin-out companies One of the key requirements to promoting enterprise in the South East is a strong third level education system that encourages and supports an enterprise culture. The South East Enterprise Platform Programme (SEEPP), managed by WIT's School of Business, provides an invaluable channel for commercialising intellectual property that has been developed by research groups and campus companies within the Institute. During the summer months, a number of entrepreneurs were interviewed for participation, and in September 2005, twenty fledgling companies joined the programme. Two of these (Hélène Haughney and Dr Kevin Quinn, profiled below) have come directly from the Telecommunications Software & Systems Groups (TSSG), a research group based in WIT focusing on research in telecommunications software services management and internet technologies.

Commenting on the participation of these spin-out companies, SEEPP Programme Manager, Eugene Crehan says that "the inclusion of these high-level campus projects on the SEEPP Programme shows the need that exists for a commercialisation platform among research projects. These projects have already received funding from various European sources, and their core concept has been validated by detailed research. The SEEPP Programme will assist the project leaders in developing the concept through to a commercial reality". Barry Downes, Commercialisation Director at the TSSG, acknowledges the support that SEEPP is providing in this regard, describing the Business Management Training that the SEEPP Programme offers as an invaluable component of the commercialisation process for these and hopefully many other future TSSG-led projects. For more information about SEEPP contact: Eugene Crehan (ecrehan@wit..ie) or info@SEEPP.ie

M-Mag The M-Mag project has been developed to enable individuals and Small to Mediumsized Enterprises (SMEs) to publish information and content for mobile devices, gain access to mobile operators' networks and integrate value added mobile services such as location-based services, multimedia messaging and text messaging into their published content, using M-Mag's Catalyst service. Led by Hélène Haughney, who has over fifteen years' experience in the IT and Telecommunications industry, Catalyst builds on extensive research by the TSSG into advancing the state of the art in mobile services. The research and development of the M-Mag service was undertaken through Irish Government and European Commission projects such as RBS, Opium and Albatross. The validation of the service will be supported by a European Commission eTEN programme, which will include trials in Ireland, the U.K., Spain, Germany, and Greece. They will also conduct a trial in China. The core M-Mag platform is nearing completion with a launch of the Catalyst product expected before the end of the year. The China Academy of Telecommunications Research (CATR) will support the project by conducting a trial in China and providing input to the market analysis and business plan preparation for China. Hélène Haughney, M-Mag Manager

For more information contact Hélène Haughney (hhaughney@tssg.org)

Billing4Rent Billing4Rent aims to do for the Billing industry what Salesforce.com has done for the Customer Relationship Management (CRM) industry - completely turn the usual upfront license models on their heads and offer a service to the end user that can be rented per seat per month! According to Dr Kevin Quinn, Manager, Billing4Rent, software-as-a-service is here to stay, and Billing4Rent.com will be the first "Billing Software-As-A-Service" provider in the industry. Traditionally, the larger billing vendors have concentrated on providing solutions to large organisations, requiring quite a heavy investment on the client's part in additional hardware/software. Requiring no additional hardware or software purchase, Billing4Rent.com targets the tier 3, 4 or 5 ISP, content provider, utility provider, telecom carrier, as well as any organisation looking to do billing on a periodic basis. The premise is that regardless of the size of a company, they will at some stage need to take in revenue from their customers, and to do this, they will need to bill customers. Billing4Rent subscribers will be able to access state-of-the-art billing functionality on a subscription/rental model developed to fit their needs and budget.

Dr Kevin Quinn Billing4Rent Manager

For more information contact Dr Kevin Quinn (kquinn@tssg.org)

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Altria, K., Broderick, M., Donegan, S. & Power, J. (2005)Preliminary study on the Use of Water in oil microemulsion Eluents in HPLC Chromatographia 2005 62 7/8 341- 348 Balasubramaniam, S. & Pfeifer, T. (2005) "Active Node support for Autonomic Communications supporting Pervasive Systems", in Information Technology & Telecommunications annual Conference Cork, IT&T 2005, pp. 227-229. Barry, M. & Pitt, I. (2005) "Designing Educational Software to Suit the Strengths of the Autistic Learner". Paper presented at ISEC, Inclusive and Supportive Education Congress. ISEC (2005) Conference Proceedings. University of Strathclyde, Glasgow. Barry, P. (2005) A catalan transform and related transformations on integer sequences, J. Integer Sequences, 8 (2005), Article 05.4.5 (Published electronically) Barry, R., Doyle, L. & Stapleton, L. (2004) 'An Empirical Study of Inter-Organisational Systems (IOS) Adoption with Relation to Power-Dependence and Ties with Commitment in Buyer-Seller Relationships', Proceedings of the Irish Academy of Management. Boschi, E., Schmoll, C., Malone, P. & D'antonio, S. (2005) "INTERMON: an Architecture for Inter-domain Monitoring, Modelling and Simulation", in 4th International IFIP-TC6 Networking Conference, pp. 1397-1400. Carew, P. & Stapleton, L. (2005) 'Towards a Privacy Framework for Information Systems Development', in O. Vaselicas, W. Wojtowski & G. Wojtowski (eds.), Information Systems Development: Advances in Theory, Practice and Education, Kluwer Academic Press/ Plenum, Carew, P. & Stapleton, L. (2005) "Privacy guidelines for telemedicine developers", Proceedings of the International Conference International Conference for eHealth, Telemedicine and Health ICT (Med-e-Tel 2005), Luxemburg. Carew, P. & Stapleton, L. (2005) "Privacy, patients and healthcare workers: a critical analysis of large scale, integrated manufacturing information systems reapplied in health", Proceedings of the 16th IFAC World Congress, Prague (Elsevier). Cormier Fewer, S. (2005) Relating to self. IN: 3rd European Reality Therapy Convention, Dublin, Ireland, 6-9 July 2005. Cass, M. (2005) "Student nurses lived experience of caring for the dying", The Fifth Annual Nursing and Midwifery Research Conference at UCC Cork on 17th September. Clarke, J. & Fitzgerald, W. (2005) "SECURIST: Co-ordinating

the development of a Strategic Research Agenda for Security and Dependability R&D", in 39TH Annual IEEE International Carnahan Conference. Collins, A. (2005) Fedora Conference, "Knowledge and Transitions: Challenges for Guidance and Counseling within the Context of Globalization and the Enlarged European Union" University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus July 2005 Collins, A. (2005) AGCAS Biennial Conference Warwick University UK "Expansion Excellence Enterprise" Conlon, P. & Carew, P. (2005) "A risk driven framework for open source information systems development", Proceedings of the First International Conference on Open Source Systems, Genova, (Scotto, M. and Succi, G. (Eds.)), pp. 200-203 Cormier Fewer, S. (2005) Using total behaviour to work with anger. 3rd European Reality Therapy Convention, Dublin, Ireland, 6-9 July 2005. Davy, A. & Jennings, B. (2005) "Coordinating Adaptation of Composite Services", in Second International Workshop on Coordination and Adaptation Techniques for Software Entities (WCAT'05), S. Becker et al., eds. Davy, A., Mahon, F., Doolin, K., Jennings, B., & Ó Foghlú, M. (2005) "Personalised, Context-aware Composition of Pervasive Mobile Services", in 1st Euro Conf. on Mobile Government (Euro mGov 2005), I. Kushchu & M. Halid Kuscu, eds.. Davy, S., Barrett, K., Jennings, B., & van der Meer, S. (2005) "On the use of Policy Based Management for Pervasive mGovernment Services", in 1st Euro Conf. on Mobile Government (Euro mGov 2005), I. Kushchu & M. Halid Kuscu, eds.. Davy, S., Barrett, K., Balasubramaniam, S., van der Meer, S., Jennings, B., & Strassner, J. (2005) "Policy-Based Architectures to Enable Autonomic Communications", in Information Technology & Telecommunications annual Conference Cork, IT&T 2005, pp. 275-276. Denieffe, S., Reid, T., Denny, M. & McKenna J. (2005) Using Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for a Client following CABG and presenting with Panic Disorder Downes, B., Pfeifer, T., & Ryan, C. (2005), "Mobile Operator Publishing and Entertainment Platform", in The Fourth International IEEE Conference on Mobile Business, ICMB 2005, IEEE Computer Society Press, pp. 180-186. Duffy, D., Lyng, M., Stapleton, L., Jordanova, M. & Lakov, D. (2004) 'From Assistive Technologies to Assistive Systems: Human Centred Support for the Learning Disabled', Proceedings of International Multitrack Conference of Advances in Control Systems, University of Vienna (TUWien), Elsevier.


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Duffy, D. & Lyng, M. (2005) 'Implementation of a hybrid assistive systems for the learning disabled within the Irish third level education system' Proceedings of MedETel 2005, Luxemburg. Fitzgerald, W., Mahon, F., Doolin, K., Hauser, C., GOMEZSKARMETA, A. F., Butler, S., Schlosser, P., & Weyl, B. (2005) "Daidalos Security Framework for Mobile Services", in Innovation and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies (Proc.eChallenges 2005), P.Cunningham & M.Cunningham, eds., IOS Press, pp. 10771084. Foley, A. & Fahy, J., (2005) Towards Resolving Difficulties With The Conceptualisation Of Market Orientation: A Framework Based On The Market-Sensing Capability, Presented At The Academy Of Marketing Science World Congress, Muenster, Germany, July, 2005 Foley, C., Downes, B., de Leastar, E., & van der Meer, S. (2005) "Instant Messaging as a Platform for the Realisation of at True Ubiquitous Comuting Environment", in Innovation and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies (Proc.eChallenges 2005), P.Cunningham & M.Cunningham, eds., IOS Press, pp. 1051-1060. Gaughan, G. & Jennings, B. (2005) "An Aglorithm for Two Phase Rating of Dynamically Composed Services", in 9th Institutes of Technology Science & Computing Research Colloquium (ITSCRC 2005), p. 41. Gaughan, G. & Jennings, B. (2005) "Two Phase Rating of Dynamically Composed Services", in Information Technology & Telecommunications annual Conference Cork, IT&T 2005, pp. 301-303. Heffernan, C., Buckley, D. N. & O'Raifeartaigh, C. (2005) Photoelectrochemical Etching of n-GaN in H3PO4 and KOH Electrolytes. Proceedings of the 39th State-of-the-Art Program on Compound Semiconductors, PV 2002-3, The Electrochemical Society Proceedings Series, Pennington, NJ. Jennings, B., Malone, P., & van der Meer, S. (2005) "A Two Phase Rating Process for Dynamically Composed Services", in 12th Workshop of the HP OpenView University Association (HPOVUA2005), B. F. Marques, T. Nebe, & B. F. Oliveira, eds., pp. 155-171. Jennings, B., Malone, P., & Gaughan, G. (2005), "Charging for Dynamically Composed Services in the Digital Business Ecosystem", in Innovation and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies (Proc. eChallenges 2005), P.Cunningham & M.Cunningham, eds., IOS Press, pp. 15671574. Kelliher, F. (2005) In search of legitimisation - designing an interpretive case study, In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Business Research Methods, Paris, France, April 20th - 22nd, 2005.

Kelliher, F. (2005) Implementing Information Systems in a micro firm -The case of the Community Pharmacist,In: Proceedings of the UCC/IAM Doctoral Colloquium, UCC, Cork, April 25th, 2005 - Best Paper Award. Lehtihet, E., Ghamri-Doudane, Y., Agoulmine, N., & Derbel, H. (2005) "Autonomic Computing: A Goal-Based Management Architecture", in 12th Workshop of the HP OpenView University Association (HP-OVUA 2005), Oliveira et al., eds., pp. 247-259. Lehtihet, E., Derbel, H., Agoulmine, N., Ghamri-Doudane, Y., & van der Meer, S. (2005) "Initial Approach Toward Self-configuration and Self-optimization in IP networks", in 8th International Conference on Management of Multimedia Networks and Services (MMNS 2005), J. Dalmau Royo & G. Hasegawa, eds., pp. 371-382. Mahon, F., Pfeifer, T., & Crotty, M. (2005), "Scenario Based Methodologies in Identifying Ubicomp Application Sets", in Information Technology & Telecommunications annual Conference Cork, IT&T 2005, pp. 281-283. McGibney, J., Ponce de Leon, M., & Ronan, J. (2005), "SEINIT Security for Heterogeneous Mobile Network Services", in Innovation and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies (Proc.eChallenges 2005), P.Cunningham & M.Cunningham, eds., IOS Press, pp. 10851094. Mc Kenzie, S., O'Dowd-Smyth, C. & Thackray, M. (Eds), (2006) Proceedings of the first WIT School of Humanities Ireland/Newfoundland/Francophone World Conference: Living at the Edge: Living at the Centre, April 2003, Waterford, WIT School of Humanities Publications . Mullally, B. & Stapleton, L. (2006) 'The Socialisation of Virtual Teams: Implications for Information Systems Development (ISD)', Proceedings of the International Conference in Information Systems Development, Sweden. Murphy, F., Stapleton, L. & Smith, D. (2004) 'Tacit Knowledge And Human Centred Systems: The Key To Managing The Social Impact Of Technology', Proceedings of International Multitrack Conference of Advances in Control Systems, University of Vienna (TUWien), Elsevier. Murphy, F. & Stapleton, L. (2005) "Managing Tacit Knowledge in ISD Methodologies", in O. Vaselicas, W. Wojtowski & G. Wojtowski (eds.), Information Systems Development: Advances in Theory, Practice and Education, Kluwer Academic Press/ Plenum. O'Byrne, C. (2005) 'Higher Education in Ireland - should it, can it and does it promote active citizenship?' Presented at the International Conference on Civic Engagement and Service Learning, NUI Galway, 23 - 24th June 2005.

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O'Byrne, C. (2005) 'New capabilities for old: an alternative view of the purpose and nature of higher education based on the capabilities approaches of Sen and Nussbaum'. Presented at the European Educational Research Association ECER Preconference, UCD, 5-6th September 2005. O'Dowd-Smyth, C. (2005) "Algerian Women Writers", in Phelan, R & Hayes, A, (Eds), Women Emerging (2005), Galway: NUIG Womens Studies Centre, 171-173. O'Dowd-Smyth, C. (2004) "Development in Diasporic North African Literature of French Expression : the 'Indeterminacy of Diasporic Identity' of the Second generation of Immigration" in Royall, F, & Imbert J.P, (Eds), Contemporary Cultures & Societies of the French-Speaking World : An Interdisciplinary Assessment (2004) London: Peter Lang O'Dowd-Smyth, C. (2004) 'Assia Djebar: writing transnational identity in La disparition de la langue française' Conference paper for the RIA conference The Cause of Cosmopolitanism in Europe & Beyond, UCC, 11th November 2004 O'Dowd-Smyth, C. (2004) "The Indeterminacy of Francophone Diasporic Identity in the Literature of the Second Generation of North African Immigration to France", Keynote address at the conference Fluid European Identities , 10th September 2004, London, French Institute of the UK & German Institute of the UK O'Neil, D. (2005) 'Teaching legal French' Summer University programme organised by the Paris Chamber of Commerce Osmani, V., Barrett, K., Carroll, R., Jennings, B., & van der Meer, S. (2005) "An architecture for User-centric Management of Intelligent Environments", in 28th Int'l Convention MIPRO Conf. on Intelligent Systems (CIS05), L. Budin & S. Ribaric, eds., pp. 112-116. Osmani, V. & van der Meer, S. (2005) "Context? Yes, but to whom?", in International Workshop on Context in Mobile HCI. Pfeifer, T., Downes, B., & Elgar, P. (2005) "A 3G Mobile Services Eco-system: Catalyst", in Information Technology & Telecommunications annual Conference Cork, IT&T 2005, pp. 205-211. Pfeifer, T. & Downes, B. (2005) "Handbook of Research on Mobile Multimedia," in Mobile Magazines, Idea Group Publishing. Pfeifer, T. (2005) "Redundant Positioning Architecture", Computer Communications, vol. 28, no. 13, pp. 1575-1585. Pfeifer, T. (2005) "Secure Cross-Domain Positioning Architecture for Autonomic Systems", in 30th Annual IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks, LCN 2005. Pfeifer, T. & Downes, B. (2005) "The Mobile Magazine

Services Platform", in The Second IEEE International Workshop on Mobile Commerce and Services, IEEE Computer Society Press, pp. 122-129. Pfeifer, T., Olariu, S. & Filipe, J. (2005) "Wireless Sensor Networks and Applications", Guest Editorial: Special Issue of Computer Communication, vol. 28, no. 13, pp. 1481-1602. Philippopoulos, P., Menexis, S., Farshchian, B., Mahon, F., & Rogue, R. (2005) "Pervasiveness in Converged Telecommunications: A Business Opportunity for the Operators", in Innovation and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies (Proc.eChallenges 2005), P.Cunningham & M.Cunningham, eds., IOS Press, pp. 10611068. Reid, T., Denieffe, S., Denny, M. & McKenna J. (2005) Psychosocial Interventions for Panic Disorder After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft: A Case Study Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing 24(4) 165-170 Stapleton, L., Smith, D. & Murphy, F. (2005) 'A HumanCentred Systems approach to the Management of Tacit Knowledge,' Artificial Intelligence and Society, Summer, 2005. Stapleton, L. & Hersh, M. (2004) 'Technology Development and Ethical Decision Making: Identity Factors and Social Construction', Proceedings of International Multitrack Conference of Advances in Control Systems, University of Vienna (TUWien), Elsevier). Stapleton, L., Hersh, M., & Duffy, D. (2005) 'Applications of Narrative Ethics to Engineering', Proceedings of the International Federation of Automation and Control (IFAC) World Congress Prague. Sullivan, K. (2005) "Privacy vs. High Granualarity in Locationaware Services: Mutually Exclusive Entities?", in 9th Institutes of Technology Science & Computing Research Colloquium (ITSCRC05), Carlow, Ireland, p. 42. Sullivan, K. & Pfeifer, T. (2005) "Privacy vs. High Granularity in Location-Aware Services: Mutually exclusive entities?", in Information Technology & Telecommunications annual Conference Cork, IT&T 2005, pp. 223-225. van der Meer, S., Jennings, B., O'Sullivan, D., Lewis, D., & Agoulmine, N. (2005) "Ontology Based Policy Mobility for Pervasive Computing", B. F. Marques, T. Nebe, & B. F. Oliveira, eds., pp. 211-225. Wells, J.S.G., Walls, N. & Heffernan, D. (2005) Employer perspectives on employing people with mental health disabilities National Disability Authority 4th Annual Disability Research Conference Disability and Employment: What the Research Tells Us Great Southern Hotel Dublin Oct 11th 2005 Whelan, S. & Wohlfeil, M. (2005) "Communicating Brands as "Lived" Experiences", in Proceedings of the 1st Annual Colloquium on Critical Issues in Brand Management, University of Birmingham, Birmingham: Academy of Marketing-Brand SIG.


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White, M., Jennings, B., Osmani, V., & van der Meer, S. (2005) "Context-Driven, User-Centric Access Control for Smart Spaces", in IEE Int'l Workshop on Intelligent Environments (IE05), IEE, pp. 13-20. White, M., Jennings, B., & van der Meer, S. (2005) "UserCentric Adaptive Access Control and Resource Configuration for Ubiquitous Computing Environments", in 7th Int'l Conf. on Enterprise Information Systems (ICEIS05), C. Chen et al., eds., INSTICC, pp. 349-354. Wohlfeil, M. & Whelan, S. (2005) "Event-Marketing: When Brands Become "Real-Lived" Experiences", in Proceedings of the Irish Academy of Management 2005, Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, on CD-Rom. Wohlfeil, M. & Whelan, S. (2005) "Consumer Motivations to Participate in Marketing-Events: The Role of Predispositional Involvement", European Advances in Consumer Research, Vol. 7, University of Göteborg: Association for Consumer Research.

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JOURNALS

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Barklie R.C. & O`Raifeartaigh C. (2005) Electron paramagnetic resonance characterization of defects produced by ion implantation into silicon. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter vol.17 pp2351 Chesser-Smyth, P. (2005) The lived experiences of general student nurses on their first clinical placement: a phenomenological study, Nurse Education in Practice, Vol. 5 (6) pp. 320-327. Cormier Fewer, S., ed. (2005) Reality Therapy/Choice Theory: Irish Perspectives [William Glasser Institute of Ireland Journal, vol. 2]. Ref type: Journal (full) Cormier Fewer, S. (2005) Freedom: a basic need. Reality Therapy/Choice Theory: Irish Perspectives [William Glasser Institute of Ireland Journal, vol. 2], pp. 1-5. Stapleton, L. (2005) "A Survey of Engineering Ethics", Invited Contribution, IEEE Monitor. Wohlfeil, M. & Whelan, S. (2005) "Event-Marketing as Innovative Marketing Communications: Reviewing the German Experience", Journal of Customer Behaviour, Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 181-207.

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BOOKS

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Archer, D. & Delahunty, B. 2005, The Outlook Answer Book, Addison Wesley, Boston.

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OTHER

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Barry, M. & Pitt, I. (2005) "Redesigning the Interface for Cognitive Styles of Learners who are Autistic". Poster presented, (oral presentation), at IT&T, Information Technology and Telecommunications conference. IT&T (2005) Conference Proceedings, Maritime College, CIT, Cork. Barry, P. (2005) Research into integer sequences at WIT, The Irish Scientist 2005 Year Book, pp 62-63. Denieffe, S., Reid, T., Denny, M. & McKenna, J. (2005) Poster Presentation: 5th Annual Nursing and Midwifery Research Conference Nursing & Midwifery Research sharing visions and strategies for the future 17th September 2005. O'Raifeartaigh C. (2005) 1905: The Year of Enlightenment. SPIN Science Magazine Issue 12 p16 Power, P. (2005) 'Preceptors Perception of Benefits, Rewards and Support and their Commitment to the Preceptor role.' 5th annual Nursing and Midwifery Research Conference in UCC on Saturday 17th September. Best Poster Award


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All staff in the School of Research and Innovation are based on the second floor of the Walton Building. Contact details are as follows:

Dr Willie Donnelly, Head of School of Research and Innovation, Office: IT 2.11 Tel: +353 – 51 – 845596 or Internally ext 5596 Email: wdonnelly@wit.ie Kathryn Kiely, Manager External Services, Office: IT 2.08 Tel: +353 – 51 – 302034 or Internally ext 2034 Email: kkiely@wit.ie

Susie Cullinane, Projects Manager, Research Support Unit, Room IT 2.10 Tel: 353 – 51 – 845503 or Internally ext 5503 Email: scullinane@wit.ie

Denise Breen, Administrative Assistant, Research Support Unit, Room IT 2.10 Tel: 353 – 51 – 845501 or Internally ext 5501 Email: dbreen@wit.ie

Tom Corcoran, Manager Innovation Centre , Tel: +353-(0)51-302975 or +353-(0)87-7954400 Internally ext 2975 Email: tcorcoran@wit.ie

Jenny Murphy, Administrative Assistant, Research Support Unit, Room IT 2.10 Tel: 353 – 51 – 845501 or Internally ext 5501 Email: jmurphy@wit.ie

Rita Dalton, Administrative Assistant, School of Research and Innovation, Room IT 2.10 Tel: 353 – 51 – 845596 or Internally ext 5596 Email: rdalton@wit.ie

Research Matters is published twice a year by the School of Research & Innovation in Waterford Institute of Technology. Please address any comments or suggestions that you may have on this publication to Kathryn Kiely, External Services Manager. Email: research@wit.ie. Edited by Margaret Grene

Research Matters Issue 5 - Winter 2005  
Research Matters Issue 5 - Winter 2005  

WIT Research Matters Issue 5

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