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Monograph

Stowa

UHREN-MAGAZIN

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EVERY CASE IS POLISHED BY HAND. EVERY TIMEPIECE IS A PERSONAL ARTEFACT BY SCHAUER

Unmistakable style. For more than 20 years. The elaborate manufacturing is reected in the strict limitation: a maximum of 500 watches per year. For more information please visit www.schauer-germany.com or call: +49-7082-930 60


Stowa

Stowa: Stowa’s watches were popular throughout the world; Jörg Schauer preserves the tradition today.

Traditional German Watchmaking Translated into the Present Day Stowa is one of the few watch manufacturing companies in Germany that can look back upon more than eighty years of uninterrupted business history and watch production. Thanks to online distribution, Stowa’s watches are now available in nearly every country around the world.

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Another important phase in the company’s history began in 1938 with the construction of the firm’s own building. Production of marine observation watches and the “Große Fliegeruhr” commenced the following year. In 1940, the “Wehrwirtschaftsamt” [Defense Office of Economic Affairs] decided to commission various manufacturers to produce “Beobachtungsuhren” [observation watches], which were commonly known by their German abbreviation “B-Uhren.” In addition to Stowa, the military authority also ordered such timepieces from A. Lange & Söhne, Laco (Lacher & Co.) and

alter Storz, who founded a firm that’s still present on the market today, coined the name for his new company by putting the first syllable of his family name in front of the first syllable of his given name. When he set up his business in Hornberg in the Black Forest in 1927, he had already enjoyed success as a watch merchant. Walter Storz relocated his business to Pforzheim in 1935, where he was very successful, primarily through sales of wristwatches marketed under his brand name. A few pocket-watches in Art Déco style rounded out the collection until the beginning of the 1930s.

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Stowa Wempe. Another supplier was the International Watch Company (IWC) in Schaffhausen, Switzerland. The Stowa building was destroyed during the Allies’ aerial bombardment of Pforzheim on February 23, 1945. The construction of a factory building in Rheinfelden, Baden in 1951 was probably motivated by familial reasons. Rapid growth thanks to Germany’s economic miracle made it necessary to expand the premises in 1954 and again in 1966. “Rufag” (Rheinfelder Uhrenteilefabrik = Rheinfeld Watch Component Factory) was founded in 1954 to produce shock absorbers for PUW (Pforzheimer Uhrenrohwerke = Pforzheim Watch Ebauches) and Durowe (Deutsche Uhrenrohwerke = German Watch Ebauches). The manufacturing sites in Pforzheim were rebuilt as well. Stowa’s collection from those years was diverse and versatile. The brand concentrated on making affordable watches in contempo-

rary designs and without elaborate horological complications, although Stowa’s catalogues also offered a classically elegant gold wristwatch to wear with one’s Sunday best and diamond-studded timepieces for gala occasions. Stowa’s watches were exported to more than eighty countries. The brand even developed its own mechanical alarm timepiece with an electronic alarm: it was the world’s smallest alarm timepiece when it debuted in the

Prominent guest: Ludwig Erhard visits Stowa’s stand at the industrial fair in Hannover.

Bauhaus design: Bauhaus styling distinguishes the design of Stowa’s historical “Antea” watch, which is on display in the museum.

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Stowa

History: Stowa’s collections have always been moderately priced – and the contemporary watches are likewise affordable.

1970s. After Walter Storz passed away in 1974, his son Werner Storz became director of the business. Jörg Schauer took over the firm from Werner Storz in 1996. Schauer, a trained goldsmith and autodidactic watchmaker, first attracted the admiring attention of watch aficionados when he launched a collection of his own watches in 1995. In his quest for old watch movements, he visited Stowa and learned that the executives there were no longer interested in continuing the brand. After Schauer agreed in writing to preserve the brand’s reputation, he was allowed to take over the firm and its trademark rights. Initial difficulties were soon overcome and Jörg Schauer went on to lead his brand to its current success. Especially as a consequence of his decision in 2005 to rely on factory outlet sales and direct sales via e-commerce, the brand again became very interesting in its traditional price segment. With exemplary candidness, Stowa’s homepage explains that some

Coining a name: Stowa’s founder Walter Storz created the brand’s name by appending the first syllable of his given name to the first syllable of his family name. Alarm: a Stowa brainchild, this mechanical construction has an electronic alarm.

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Stowa components are sourced from Far Eastern suppliers. Jörg Schauer’s decision to establish a company museum proved to be a particularly far-sighted measure: its collection has expanded to include some 300 watches, and a virtual museum continues to grow online. The museum’s collection is a source of inspirations for new watches, primarily contemporary reinterpretations of the firm’s heritage. Since November 2009, the Vorwerk Holding Company has contributed not only capital, but also its expertise in direct marketing. Fourteen people are currently employed on the firm’s premises, which were built entirely anew in 2009. The staff ’s efforts will result in the production and delivery of approximately 4,000 watches in 2011. A second storey is being added to the manufacturing site this year to provide space for further growth.

Advertisement: the former manufacturing sites in Rhein felden and Pforzheim are depicted on a historical advertisement. Entry tower: the firm’s present-day building in Engelsbrand (near Pforzheim). Jörg Schauer: the current owner puts the finishing touches on a display at the new watch museum.

Stowa-Museum: the brand’s museum displays more than 300 artifacts and documents the history of the Stowa firm, which has done business uninterruptedly since 1927.

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Stowa

Stowa Flieger Chronograph The radical elimination of everything inessential for the display and measurement of precious time

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ispensing with a date display and showing the seconds on a designated subdial give a very special look to Stowa’s Pilot’s Chronograph. Exclusive concentration on the display and measurement of time prioritizes the purpose for which pilot’s watches were originally designed. Heat treatment gives the noctilucent hour-hand and minute-hand their characteristic blue color.

Name

Flieger Chronograph

Reference

StowaFliegerChrono

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

41,0/14,7 mm

Caliber

ETA/Valjoux 7753, automatic

Functions

Hour, minute, chronograph

Historic Pilot’s Watches The German composite noun “B-Uhr” is an abbreviation of “Beobachtungsuhr,” which can be translated as observation watch. In 1940, the “Wehrwirtschaftsamt” decided to commission various manufacturers, including Stowa, to manufacture watches of this kind. Common denominators of all pilot’s watches are luminous numerals and hands with active luminous material (radium) on a matte black background. The large, readily grasped crowns are likewise very distinctive: they’re sometimes called “onion crowns” because of their special shape.

with counter for 30 elapsed minutes Variants

Brown or black leather wristband with pale or dark stitching, metal bracelet

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Stowa

No logo, but with the date at “6 o’clock.”

Stowa’s logo adorns the dial of this variant.

Stowa Flieger Name

Stowa Flieger no Logo

Reference

FliegerOhneLogomitDatum

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

40,0/10,2 mm

Caliber

ETA 2824-2, automatic

Functions

Hour, minute, central second

Variants

With Stowa’s logo but no date

A pilot’s watch was often worn over the sleeve of an airman’s coveralls and had a diameter of 55 millimeters

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pecifications for pilot’s watches were formerly very strict. Each watch was subjected to a rigorous examination. A doubly riveted strap kept the timepiece securely fastened to its wearer’s wrist. Stowa’s pilot’s watches follow this historical pattern, but have contemporarily large diameters.

at “6 o’clock,” rhodium-plated metal dial, chronometer version, various leather straps with and without rivets

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Stowa

The hours yield the foreground to the minutes.

Stowa originally manufactured only forty-two pieces of this model variant.

Stowa Flieger Baumuster B Name

Flieger Baumuster B

Reference

FliegerBaumusterB

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

40,0/10,2 mm

Caliber

ETA 2824-2, automatic

Functions

Hour, minute, central second

Variants

With rivets, crocodile-skin

This altered arrangement on the dial became the norm in January 1941

T

he high-quality craftsmanship of historical pilot’s watches and their appreciation among collectors continues to make them indispensable in many collections. Stowa originally manufactured only a small number of these “Baumuster B� [construction pattern] models.

straps in various colors, Milanese wristband

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Stowa

Stowa Seatime This diver’s watch can withstand the pressure that reigns 300 meters below the water’s surface

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he Stowa Seatime is extremely robust and watertight to 30 bar, which is equivalent to the pressure at a depth of 300 meters below the water’s surface. Other quality features: the sapphire crystal is three millimeters thick and has been antireflectively treated on its inner surface, and the bezel can only be rotated counterclockwise.

The metal bracelet of the Seatime has a secure folding clasp.

Name

Seatime

Reference

SeatimeSchwarzMetall

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

42,0/13,5 mm

Caliber

ETA 2824-2, automatic

Seatime – A Successful Model Since 1963

Functions

Hour, minute,

Stowa’s “Seatime” has been very popular ever since its debut in the early 1960s. This sporty watch was manufactured in various versions until late in the 1970s. One of these Seatime models has an inwardly biased bezel: the current model revives this detail, which helps to prevent scratches on the surface of the inset aluminum ring. The basic shape of the case is likewise inspired by an earlier Seatime.

central second, date Variants

Red, brown, blue, yellow or stainless steel bezel, leather strap, rubber wristband, chronometer

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Stowa

Sporty: watertight to 1,000 meters and with bright orange hands.

The lime-colored dial is one of many variants of the Prodiver.

Stowa Prodiver Name

Prodiver

Reference

ProdiverRhodiumKautschuk

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

42,0/15,6 mm

Caliber

ETA 2824-2, automatic

Functions

Hour, minute, central second, date

Variants

Carbon, rhodium, lime or orange dial,metal bracelet, chronometer

A helium-release valve shows that this watch is built to descend to great depths

T

he “Prodiver,” a professional diver’s watch, augments Stowa’s Seatime collection. The robust construction with a massive stainless steel back can resist the pressure that water exerts at a depth of 1,000 meters [3,280 feet].

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Stowa

Arabic numerals: black dial, polished stainless steel case.

Roman numerals: white dial, matte stainless steel case.

Marine Original Name

Marine Original

Reference

MarineOriginalRömischWeiß

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

41,0/11,0 mm

Caliber

ETA/Unitas 6498-1,

Functions

Hour, minute, small second

Variants

Polished stainless steel, black

hand-wound

dial, Arabic numerals

Its movement with screw balance and swan’s neck fine adjustment already ticked in the original version

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eck and observation watches have always been expected to offer excellent legibility and accurate rate behavior. This wristwatch recalls Stowa’s Marine Pocket-watch, of which only 288 specimens were manufactured from 1938 to 1940.

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Stowa

Marine Automatic Heat-blued steel hands circle above the silver dial of this observation watch

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he silky matte dial (crafted from solid 925 silver) and the date display characterize this high-quality version of the self-winding Marine wristwatch. The onion-shaped crown underscores its similarity to the original timepiece – a Stowa observation watch from the 1940s.

Name

Marine Automatic

Reference

MarineAutomatikmitDatum

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

40,0/10,2 mm

Marine Watches

Caliber

ETA 2824-2, automatic

Functions

Hour, minute,

Deck or observation watches were very important aboard ships. The time they indicated on the ship’s deck was regularly compared with the one broadcast by naval observatories. The dials of these very highly legible watches were often completely coated with luminous material. Specially made wooden boxes, often watertight and shock resistant, protected the watches. Naval officers used observation watches to assist with navigational tasks.

central second, date Variants

Without date, Milanese wristband, various leather straps, polished stainless steel case, white dial

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Stowa

The natural brown tone of the indices corresponds with the red gold of the hands.

Name

Chronograph 1938

Reference

Chrono1938cremematte

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

41,0/14,7 mm

Caliber

ETA/Valjoux 7750, automatic

Functions

Hour, minute, small second, chronograph, date

Variants

Black dial with date, polished stainless steel case, Milanese wristband, various leather straps

The variants with a black dial has an embossed and stamped date display.

Chronograph 1938 The elaborately crafted dial is inspired by an old pocket-watch in the Stowa Museum

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n eight-phase embossing process is used to adorn the dial of Stowa’s chronograph. Afterwards, the silver coating is removed from the numerals, which gleam in their natural bronze hue.

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Stowa

Antea Small Seconds This model series is available in three different sizes, of which the hand-wound model is the smallest

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hand-wound movement contributes to the slim elegance of the Antea, which measures just 6.8 millimeters in height. The ennobled caliber with its typical subdial for the seconds at “6 o’clock” can be admired by peering through a pane of sapphire crystal in the back of the case. Another feature shared by all modern Antea models is the use of numerals rather than indices to mark the hours.

Name

Antea Small Seconds

Reference

Antea small seconds silver

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

35,5/6,8 mm

Caliber

ETA/Peseux 7001, hand-

wound Functions

Hour, minute, small seconds

Variants

Various leather straps, black dial, Milanese wristband

Bauhaus In the 1930s, Stowa manufactured numerous models based on the principles of design that were first articulated at the world-famous art academy. Excellent legibility and a sleekly simple case with downwardly angled horns are salient features. The present-day Antea reinterprets this Bauhaus style by reviving the look of the original watches in Stowa’s museum, which displays timepieces with round or rectangular cases made of steel, gold or with galvanic ennoblement.

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Stowa

The self-winding version with central seconds also has a date display.

Name

Antea 365

Reference

Antea365

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

36,5/9,2 mm

Caliber

ETA 2824-2, automatic

Functions

Hour, minute, central second, date

Variants

Various leather straps, Milanese wristband, chronometer

Crocodile-skin straps are available in various colors.

Stowa Antea 365 With a forty-hour power reserve and a date display, the self-winding version is ideal for everyday use

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polished stainless steel case that’s watertight to five bar combines with flat, scratch-resistant sapphire crystals above the dial and in the back to make the Antea 365 an uncomplicated companion for daily wear and robust use. Heat treatment gives the steel hands their characteristic blue color.

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Stowa

The big automatic watch has contemporary yet typically slim architecture.

The day-of-the-week display’s arcing window fits neatly into the dial’s overall styling.

Antea 390/Day-Date Name

Antea 390

Reference

Antea390

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

39,0/9,2 mm

Caliber

ETA 2824-2, automatic

Functions

Hour, minute, central second, date

Variants

As Day-Date with day of the week, height = 9.7 mm

The big sister has a rotor made of nickel silver and is optionally available with a day-of-the-week display

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his model is distinguished not only by its larger diameter, but also by its german silver rotor, which is handmade in Stowa’s workshops. The watch is optionally available with a day-date display, which increases the case’s height to a modest and stylistically appropriate 9.7 millimeters.

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Stowa

Marine Original Durowe Redesigning the bridges is the first step toward Durowe’s own movement

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he trend toward larger watches ultimately prompted the choice of the Unitas 6498 to serve as the basis for the brand’s own caliber. A large supply of these calibers has been secured, so to give the movement an identity of its own the redesigned bridges will be succeeded by other components which the brand can either manufacture on its own or order from good suppliers.

Name

Marine Original Durowe

Reference

MODurowemattsilver

Case

Stainless steel

Diameter/height

41,0/12,0 mm

Durowe

Caliber

Durowe, hand-wound

Functions

Hour, minute, small second

Variants

matt case in 750/- rose gold

“Deutsche Uhren Rohwerke” (Durowe = German Watch Ebauches) manufactured 140 different mechanical calibers in Pforzheim between 1934 and 1983. Jörg Schauer acquired the rights to use the traditional name in 2002. His hand-wound Durowe 7440 with swan’s neck fine adjustment mechanism is based on the Unitas 6498, but has its own bridges. Other constructive changes will be forthcoming.

or 750/- white gold, Milanese wristband, various leather straps

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ABOUT The “Stowa” monograph is a special publication of UHREN-MAGAZIN. All rights reserved. Editorial office: UHREN-MAGAZIN, Riedstrasse 25, D-73760 Ostfildern, tel. +49 711/44 00 76-0, fax +49 711/44 00 76-11, redaktion@uhrenmagazin.de

Editor-in-chief: Thomas Wanka (responsible for the contents; see “Editorial office” for address) Publisher: Ebner Verlag GmbH & Co KG, Karlstrasse 41, D-89073 Ulm Layout & graphics: Florian Ludwig, Berlin Pre-press & printing: Dr. Cantz’sche Druckerei Medien GmbH, Zeppelinstrasse 29–31, D-73760 Ostfildern


WE OWE ALL PROGRESS TO THOSE WHO DO NOT ADAPT

Jรถrg Schauer favors straight design and high-grade surfaces. That is why he creates every watch himself and polishes every case by hand. For more information please visit www.schauer-germany.com or call: +49-7082-930 60

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