Page 1

20120815-SUPP--1-NAT-CCI-WN_--

8/14/2012

7:07 PM

Page 1

W E D N E S D AY

DAY

2

AUGUST 15, 2012

SWANA’s

Crain’s News Source for Environmental Management

Burns’ early death casts shadow over Wastecon By Jeremy Carroll

Courtesy, Effingham County (Ga.) Chamber of Commerce

NATIONAL HARBOR, MD. – The Queen of England didn’t parachute in to kick things off, but Wastecon has an opening ceremonies tradition that might be just as cool. (OK, that’s an exaggeration. Still, Wastecon’s kickoff provides some chills – and it’s not tape-delayed.) To formally start the convention, the flags of John Campanelli each state or province with a chapter are paraded into a ballroom, led by a bagpiper. It’s enough to give goosebumps to even the most grizzled garbage veterans who have witnessed dozens of these ceremonies (the flag parade dates back almost to SWANA’s birth 50 years ago). An awards breakfast follows, with members honored for excellence in a wide array of categories. The flags themselves are carried by chapter members, and all of them look at the job the same way. “To represent our chapter and

Connie Burns, center, sanitation director for Effingham County, Ga., sings during the Olde Effingham Days Festival. Burns was an active member of SWANA. She died suddenly on Sunday, while preparing to attend Wastecon.

See COMRADES, Page 26

WRN reporter NATIONAL HARBOR, MD. – As Wastecon kicked off, a somber mood spread over the event as news spread of the sudden and unexpected death of a vibrant member of the Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) community. Connie Burns, sanitation director for Effingham County, Ga., died Sunday as she prepared to come to the event. She was 43. “Anytime you talked to her, she had a pleasant smile,” said Billy Malone, assistant director of public works for DeKalb County, Ga. In addition to her work with the county, Burns was active in SWANA, serving as the director of the group’s communication, education and marketing division. That role just scratched the surface of all the volunteer work she did in the Effingham County community, including serving as director of Keep Effingham Beautiful and coordinator for Rivers Alive Effingham. She was also on the Governor’s Task Force on Litter Abatement and Prevention and the advisory board for the Effingham United Way. “She was one of these people that couldn’t say no and was so enthusiastic,” Malone said about her volunteer work. “But she wouldn’t let anything drop. Anytime she committed to something, she went through with it.” Anne Germain, incoming president of SWANA and chief of engineering and technology for the Delaware Solid Waste Authority, said Burns instantly became everyone’s best friend as soon as she met them.

“She radiated that Southern hospitability and she was so lively,” Germain said. Will Flower, an industry veteran who recently retired from Republic Services Inc., said he got to know Burns over the course of the last 10 years because Republic was contracted through Effingham County to pick up solid waste and recycling. “She was just a good person,” Flower said. “You always had that feeling that when she was talking to you, her world was revolving right around you. She

made everyone feel special.” Appointed as sanitation director in 1998, Burns was a pioneer, Flower said. She was among the first women to be appointed to such a high position. “Her passing leaves a great void in the industry,” he said. Aside from her passion for the industry and helping others, she was an avid follower of the Green Bay Packers and the University of Georgia Bulldogs, said Steve Carr, regional director of municipal services for Republic Services. “She was always the comic re-

lief for the group,” Carr said. “She lived life very much at the level where nothing really bothered her.” Malone said Burns had a tremendous impact and will be greatly missed. “She was the type of person that was determined to make a difference in this world,” Malone said. “And she was making a difference in this world.” 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Jeremy Carroll at jcarroll@wasterecycling news.com or 313-446-6780.

The Industry Standard in Weighing and Routing Software! Real-Time Processing • Accounts Receivable • Reporting • Security • Video Monitoring • Scale Monitoring • SQL Database Oracle Database • Recyclers • Scrap • Landfills • Transfer Stations • MRFS • Quarries • Aggregate • Unattended Facilities PCI Compliant and Validated Credit Card Processing • Web Access Reporting

Sold and supported exclusively by Paradigm Software LLC

12WCmastheadDay2FINAL.indd 1

SWANA’s camaraderie ties industry together

INSIDE ■ Picture This ■ Session coverage ■ SWANA award-winners ■ Historical SWANA photos ■ Consultant rankings

Online Day 2 video live at Wastecon www.wasterecyclingnews.com

FREE

All rights reserved. ©Entire contents Copyright 2012 by Crain Communications Inc.

See Us at

WasteCon Booth#1600

For more information please visit our website or call us.

7/18/2012 3:41:18 PM


WNpageAD.qxp

8/6/2012

6:11 PM

Page 1


20120815-SUPP--3-NAT-CCI-WN_--

8/14/2012

7:09 PM

Page 1

AUGUST 15, 2012 ● 3

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Nearly four times more injuries in public sector Days lost to injuries and illnesses, 2008-10 (Refuse and Recyclable Materials Collectors) Average Total of Days Lost to Injuries and Illnesses

80,000

Estimated No. Workers (2009)

70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0

ic bl r P u cto Se

te iva r Pr ecto S

5,000

Hamilton, Ontario, finds diversion success by limiting amount of trash bags at curb

4,000

By Shawn Wright WRN reporter

3,000

2,000

1,000

0

ic bl r P u cto Se

te iva or Pr ect S

Sources: David Utterback, BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses and National Employment Matrix

MARIA KIRCH / WASTE & RECYCLING NEWS

More safety problems in the public sector? Data shows large disparity for public versus private By Jim Johnson WRN senior reporter NATIONAL HARBOR, MD. – Four times as many publicly employed trash and recycling collectors miss work because of injuries and illnesses than their brethren in the private sector, according to statistics revealed at Wastecon on Tuesday. The startling numbers were unveiled by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. They show an average of 4,017 public workers missed at least one day of work annually between 2008 and 2010. That compares with an annual average of 1,070 collection workers in the private sector, according to David F. Utterback, a senior health scientist at NIOSH. But, as with many statistics, there might be more to the story. Utterback uses the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) on accidents, injuries and fatalities to try to better understand trends in the solid waste and recycling industries. “The big picture is there are very serious injuries and illnesses in the solid waste industry as a whole,” Utterback said. Drilling down into the issue of injury-rate differences between the public and private groups, Utterback struck a balance between presenting the data and offering opinions about what’s behind the numbers. He repeatedly cautioned that his statements were speculations, but he did provide some insight: 䡲 Employees at private companies may be underreporting their problems. “There are genuine concerns about employees keeping accurate logs,” Utterback

It’s not a bag ban, but it’s really close

Courtesy, David F. Utterback

said, adding that the BLS found underreporting in other industries. Public employees, he said, also may be more likely to report an accident once it happens. 䡲 Equipment may be less upto-date in the public sector, which might lead to more injuries and illnesses. That includes the use of automated collection equipment. “Again, that’s conjecture,” Utterback said. 䡲 One other factor the health scientist has considered is the nature of the two types of organizations. Solid waste management companies could be more likely to have job-specific safety training as opposed to more generalized training given to different types of municipal workers. “I think in both cases, the risk for injuries and fatalities are elevated greater than for U.S. industry has a whole,” he said. Chris Marlowe, a safety and health manager for CDM Smith, a consulting firm that serves the industry, was also on the safety

panel Tuesday at Wastecon. “I think that part of the deal is that the costs associated with an accident are more well-hidden in the public sector. The direct responsibility for economic losses like accidents are a little more clearer in the private sector, where often the public [and] government doesn’t see that quite as fast,” he said. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration also is more effective at reaching private companies than public entities, Marlowe said. “In general, the private sector receives a lot more encouragement through OSHA,” he said. “An example of this is if you knowingly do something that kills a worker in [the] private sector, you as an individual manager can serve six months in jail. And in general, in state regulations, that’s not there. So I think that there are a bunch of dynamics that our country maybe should be ashamed of that caused this to happen,” Marlowe said. 䡲

NATIONAL HARBOR, MD. – Here’s a riddle: How many trash bags can someone put on a curb? Answer: One – if you live in Hamilton, Ontario. Since 2008, the city about an hour west of Toronto has decreased its nine-bag trash maximum to one bag or one 36-gallon container per resident per week. The maximum weight is 50 pounds. “The question is: How much garbage should we pick up?” Raffaella Morello, Hamilton’s project operations manager, told a packed audience during Tuesday’s technical session at Wastecon. “In 2000, six former municipalities merged together to form the new city of Hamilton. At that time, those former municipalities had different levels of service.” With a population of 530,000, the city manages about 529 million pounds of waste per year. Its annual operating budget is about $32 million. In 2000, the waste diversion rate was 16%, Morello said, mostly due to the nine-container trash limit. “That’s an awful lot of garbage,” she said. From 2001 to 2006, the city changed its solid waste management master plan. It upgraded its materials recovery facilities, added a central composting facility and community recycling centers, increased community outreach and expanded diversion programs. The rate rose to 40%. But the nine-container limit was still too much, and a phasedin approach was implemented. In 2008, the city went to a three-container limit. The following year, it rolled out a “one-plusone” limit (one container and one clear bag). And in 2010, the city went to the one-bag or one-container system. “We took a step-by-step approach to introduce the one-container limit,” Morello said. “Sometimes you need to take very small steps in order to reach your target.” Shelley Pardy, waste diversion communications supervisor with the St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Department of Public Works and Parks, came to the session to learn from her Canadian counterpart. St. John’s has a 10-container limit. “We’ve been looking at reduc-

Raffaella Morello,project operations manager for Hamilton, Ontario: “We took a step-by-step approach to introduce the one-container limit. Sometimes you need to take very small steps in order to reach your target.”

Shelley Pardy, waste diversion communications supervisor for the St. John’s Department of Public Works and Parks in Newfoundland and Labrador: “We’ve been looking at reducing the bag limit. We’re not ready to do that yet, but we would like to, at some point, introduce that to our residents.” ing the bag limit. We’re not ready to do that yet, but we would like to, at some point, introduce that to our residents,” Pardy said. There’s been a 98% compliance rate with the one-container limit in Hamilton since April 2010. Over-the-limit incidences decreased from 1,500 per month in 2010 to 500 per month so far in 2012, Morello said. Those who don’t comply get at least three warnings before receiving fines. “For the most part, residents were receptive,” Morello said. “There’s always going to be a couple people opposed to any change, but you have to work with them.” 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Shawn Wright at swright@wasterecycling news.com or 313-446-0346.

For the record On Page 10 of Tuesday’s Wastecon Show Daily, the mug shot identified as that of John Foden, speaker for the Tuesday session “Lesson Learned: Winning Approval for the Toughest Projects,” was actually Mitch Kessler, who is scheduled to speak at noon on Thursday in a session titled “Share the Love: Public-Private Partnerships that Work.”

Mitch Kessler


20120815-SUPP--4-NAT-CCI-WN_--

8/14/2012

5:00 PM

4 ● AUGUST 15, 2012

Page 1

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

U.S. EPA shows that it does more than preach going green By Shawn Wright WRN reporter ARLINGTON, VA. – When it comes to sustainability and the environment, the U.S. EPA’s Potomac Yard building doesn’t just talk the talk. On every floor, one can find recycling bins that capture just about every waste stream, areas for food scraps and organics, and water and energy conservation techniques that earned the building LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. “This building was a speculative building,” said Marlene RedDoor, environmental program manager for the U.S. EPA’s Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery. “We retrofitted the design and worked with the construction company to make it water efficient and energy efficient.” The sustainable building was showcased during the Solid Waste Association of North America’s Aug. 13 “Washington Insider’s Experience” with a group of nearly 30 industry professionals. Prior to Potomac Yard, EPA employees had been working in three separate buildings in the Crystal City area of Arlington, Va. In 2006, they were then moved into the newly constructed building that combined two existing buildings, now known connectedly as Potomac Yard One and Two. A small “green roof” that has plants and outdoor seating was installed on the area of roof that connects Potomac Yard One and Two. On a recent mid-August day, Jane Smith, a senior advisor with the EPA, was making the outdoors and a recycled content picnic table her makeshift office. “Since we have portable media, why do I need to sit at a desk indoors?” Smith said. “It’s the EPA; we like to be outdoors.” The building saves water through the use of low-flow uri-

Photos: Maria Kirch, Waste & Recycling News

Wastecon attendees toured the LEED-certified Gold Potomac Yard U.S. EPA building in Arlington, Va., on Monday. nals, dual-flush toilets and lowflow faucets with electronic shutoff. Rooms have sensors that detect how light or dark it is outside and will adjust or dim the lights accordingly. The wood comes from certified sustainable forests. The walls are made from soy-based materials. The kitchen counter tops are made from recycled scrap aluminum. Despite the best recycling efforts, there was still waste going into the trash. After doing a few dumpster dives, RedDoor said they found that a lot of the waste being thrown out was mostly paper towels and food. Now, that waste stream doesn’t go into landfills. Instead, it gets stored in any one of seven 96-gallon containers and three 48-gallon containers on the building’s rear loading docks. The carts are emptied three times a week. “We’re the only EPA building with compostable waste,” RedDoor said. “We work with the building owner, vendors and operators.” Colin Hood, assistant property

Washington Insider’s Tour members prepare to enter Potomac Yard. manager for Jones Lang LaSalle, Potomac Yard facility manager, said the building is currently at a 67% diversion rate from landfill. “Once you get things established, it’s not so bad,” said Wayne DeGroat, chief engineer

Publishers V.P. / Group Publisher KC Crain Publisher Brennan Lafferty 313-446-6768

EDITORIAL

OFFICE

1155 Gratiot Ave., Detroit, MI 48207-2912 Telephone: 313-446-6000 Fax: 313-446-6384 Website: www.wasterecyclingnews.com Email: editorial@wasterecyclingnews.com Waste & Recycling News is published 26 times a year by Crain Communications Inc. For new subscriptions, renewals or change of address write Waste & Recycling News, Subscription Department, 1155 Gratiot Ave., Detroit, MI 48207-2912 customerservice-wrn@crain.com (U.S. only) 877-320-1719 (Outside U.S.) 313-446-0401 Fax: 313-446-6777. Reprints: The YGS Group 717-505-9701 or 800-501-9571 info@theygsgroup.com www.theygsgroup.com

Colin Hood, assistant property manager for Jones Lang LaSalle, the Potomac Yard facility management company, said the building diverts 67% of its waste from landfills.

Editorial Editor John Campanelli 313-446-6767 Managing Editor Douglas D. Fisher 313-446-0449 Senior Reporter Jim Johnson 937-964-1289 Reporter Jeremy Carroll 313-446-6780 Reporter Shawn Wright 313-446-0346 Editorial Intern Kerri Jansen 313-446-6098 Correspondents Chris Gigley (N. Carolina) Chrissy Kadleck (Ohio) Andrea King (Michigan) Cartoonist Leo Michael Publisher’s Assistant Lonnie Curri 313-446-5869 Joe Truini Reporter (1971-2009)

for Jones Lang LaSalle. “It’s just like anything else that you have to establish a process.” 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Shawn Wright at swright@wasterecycling news.com or 313-446-0346.

Digital Web Coordinator Maria Kirch 313-446-6761 Marketing Marketing Manager Kim Winkler 313-446-1652 Marketing Coordinator Rhonda Lubinski 313-446-6090 Marketing Intern Kayla Rusin 313-446-0425

EVENTS COMING EVENTS Aug. 26-29 – Georgia Recycling Coalition Conference, St. Simons Island, Ga. Contact Gloria 404-634-3095 or visit www.georgiarecycles.org. Aug. 30 – The Environmental Research and Education Foundation Fall Classic Golf Tournament, hosted by Waste Management Inc. and Waste Connections Inc. at the Panther Trail Course at Canongate in The Woodlands, Texas. Proceeds support EREF’s mission to fund scientific research and educational initiatives for waste management practices. For Visit www.erefdn.org. Sept. 10-12 – Corporate Recycling & Waste Conference, Orlando, Fla. Contact Brennan Lafferty 313-446-6768 or visit www.crwc conference.com. Sept. 12-14 – Arkansas Recycling Coalition Conference & Trade Show, Little Rock, Ark. Contact Cherie O’Mary 866-290-1429 or visit www.recycleark.org. Sept. 16-18 – 5th Annual Waste-to-Fuels Conference & Trade Show, Mystic Marriott Hotel & Spa, Groton, Conn. For more information, access www.waste-to-fuels.org. Sept. 30-Oct. 3 – Global Waste Management Symposium, Arizona Grand Resort, Phoenix. Visit www.wastesymposium.com. Oct. 5 – Sustainability Forum 2012. Peania, Athens, Greece. Contact Peter Michel Heilmann +30 210-927-1117 or access www.euro charity.eu/en. Oct. 9-11 – Scrap-to-Profit Conference, Montgomery, Ala. Visit www.scraptoprofit.org. Oct. 17-19 – Rubber Association of Canada Rubber Recycling Symposium, Toronto. Visit www.rubberassociation.ca. Oct. 18-20 – ReuseConex - 2nd National Reuse Conference & Expo, Portland, Ore. Visit www.reusealliance.org. Oct. 23-26 – BSR sustainability conference, New York City. Email confernce@bsr.org or call 212-370-7718. Oct. 31-Nov. 1 – GOVgreen Expo, Washington D.C. Contact Stacey 703-706-8214 or visit www.govgreen.org. Nov. 4-5 – Corporate Boundaries on Social Responsibility Workshop, Ottawa. Contact Bruce Piasecki at 518-583-9615 or www.ahcgroup.com. Nov. 12-13 – The Canadian Waste & Recycling Expo, Toronto. For more information, access www.cwre.ca. Nov. 12-13 – 2012 Southeast Food Waste Reduction Conference, Charlotte, N.C. Contact Brian Rosa 877-972-0007 or visit www.cra-recycle. org/foodwasteconference. March 19-21 – Residential Recycling Conference, contact Brennan Lafferty 313-446-6768 or visit www.residentialrecyclingconference.com.

To have your conference or event appear in Waste & Recycling News, email wastenews@crain.com or send mail to WRN Coming Events, 1155 Gratiot, Detroit, Mich., 48207.

Audience Development Mgr. Julie Brown 877-320-1719 Assistant Circulation Manager Jen Natone 877-320-1719 Production Vice President of Production Dave Kamis 313-446-6055 Production Supervisor Larry F. Williams 313-446-0301 Production Manager Wendy Kobylarz 313-446-6064

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $74 per year in the United States and its possessions, $84 per year in Canada and Mexico, $179 per year for all other countries. ADVERTISING SALES

OFFICE

1725 Merriman Road, Akron, OH 44313-9006 Telephone: 330-836-9180 Fax: 330-836-1692 Advertising Director / Eastern Sales Manager Corporate National Accounts Mgr. / Western Sales Manager Central Sales Manager

Linda Hickey 330-865-6184 Fern Sheinman 619-944-5114 Sarah Winner 313-446-6775 Classified Sales Manager Wendi Lionetti 330-865-6165 Sales Administrative Ast. Debbie Hershfield 330-865-6140

Crain Communications Inc. Keith E. Crain Rance E. Crain Chairman President Mary K. Crain Merrilee P. Crain Treasurer Secretary William A. Morrow Robert C. Adams Executive V.P., Operations Group V.P., Technology, Circulation, Manufacturing Dave Kamis V.P. Production & Manufacturing G.D. Crain Jr. Gertrude R. Crain Founder (1885-1973) Chairman (1911-1996)


WNpageAD.qxp

8/7/2012

5:29 PM

Page 1

Let’s Bury the Whole Notion of Landfills.

Next generation technology for Energy-from-Waste. Clean, renewable energy for communities of all sizes. Approximately one-quarter of the world’s landfilling takes place in the US—250 million tons each year. Landfills are not just an eyesore. They consume valuable land and are one of the largest man-made emitters of methane—a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than CO2.

The CLEERGAS™ process requires much less air than waste combustion leading to smaller, less costly equipment and resulting in higher energy recovery efficiency, reduced boiler fouling and corrosion, and minimal formation of pollutants.

Covanta Energy is now offering communities of all sizes a first-of-its-kind gasification technology, CLEERGAS™, or Covanta Low Emission Energy Recovery Gasification. This breakthrough technology gasifies unprocessed, post-recycled MSW, while producing 6-8 MW of clean, renewable energy with superior availability—more than 95%.

Communities of all sizes that are interested in emerging recovery technologies can now partner with Covanta’s industry-leading team to ensure successful project execution.

How Does It Work?

STEAM USED DIRECTLY AS HEATING/COOLING

MSW, which does not have to be pre-processed in COMBUSTION OF SYNGAS

any way, is subjected to high temperatures and reduced air on the gasification platform, where it

SYNGAS

UNPROCESSED, POST-RECYCLED MSW

undergoes a chemical reaction that creates a synthesis gas, or syngas. The syngas is then

HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION PLATFORM

combusted and processed through an established ENERGY RECOVERY & EMISSIONS CONTROL SYSTEM

DISTRIBUTED ELECTRICITY

energy recovery system, followed by a state-of-the-art emissions control system.

Begin your commitment to smarter waste solutions & lowering greenhouse gases, today. Call a CLEERGAS™ representative at 862.345.5000, or visit CovantaEnergy.com/Cleergas.aspx You can also visit us at Booth# 1039.


20120815-SUPP--6-NAT-CCI-WN_--

8/7/2012

2:06 PM

Page 1

6 ● AUGUST 15, 2012

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Recycled drywall touted as potential boost to biofuels SWANA scholarship winner expected to provide update on his research today By Kerri Jansen WRN reporter Scrap metal, wood, masonry materials – common construction and demolition debris are often recycled after a development is completed. But some leftover materials – gypsum

aged, he wrote in an email from his homeland. He’s been working with waste drywall for three years, exploring ways to divert the material from landfills. When drywall is sent to a landfill, it can produce hydrogen sulfide, a corrosive and potentially deadly gas. Discarding gypsum drywall wastes resources, particularly calcium sulfate, from which the material is made. Besnard said that is a valuable soil amendment.

wallboard, for example – can be harder to recycle. Fabien Besnard, an environmental engineering doctoral candidate at the University of North Carolina Charlotte, is studying ways waste gypsum drywall can be reused as a soil additive. The potential of this technology will be the focus of his presentation today. Originally from France, Besnard has always been interested in the way waste is man-

Fabien Besnard, a graduate student at the University of North Carolina Charlotte, grew wheat as part of an experiment testing the potential of waste gypsum drywall. Besnard is studying ways it can be reused, including as a soil additive. Courtesy, Fabien Besnard

During his Wastecon lecture, Besnard will present the results of his research into the effects of calcium sulfate on a canola crop.

If all you see is a cart, you’re missing the big picture. Let Rehrig show you a Complete Asset Management Solution Route Number: 238 Account Address: 3492 Oak St. C.A.R.T.S. Identified: Two containers collected with only one container on billing record. Route Number: 238 Account Address: 6939 Maple Dr. C.A.R.T.S. Identified: Missing container #95G000231, located at non-paying account.*

Route Numbe

Recycling r: 238 - Monthly

Participation R

ate = 53%

Providing Measurable Value Since 1913 Rehrig Pacific’s C.A.R.T.S. Program manages and tracks every container asset in inventory to deliver measurable results to your bottom line. Visit our website or scan the QR code and download our white paper, “There is More to Collection than Just Carts” to see how.

He chose to work with canola because the plant has biodiesel potential, he wrote. “I will mainly show how waste gypsum drywall can be used to increase the yield of a biofuel crop such as canola ... and how it can also be used to sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide, which is a greenhouse gas,” Besnard wrote. Besnard is a recipient of the Solid Waste Association of North America’s Hickman Scholarship, which is intended to help students develop their skills in investigative and analytical research. Besnard completed laboratory and field tests with gypsum drywall as a surface-applied soil additive, dosing a variety of plants with ground gypsum drywall and monitoring the plants’ growth and yield. He also studied the potential for waste drywall to boost carbon sequestration in soil. During the span of his research, Besnard has worked with conventional, fire retardant and moisture-resistant brands of drywall and plants ranging from lettuce to sunflowers. As Besnard’s research progressed, he focused on canola plants. A practical method for recycling waste drywall would be beneficial in several ways, Besnard wrote in the email. Construction managers could save money because collecting the waste drywall for recycling would cost less than hauling it to a landfill. And landfill operators would reap rewards, too, he said. “Reducing the amount of drywall being discarded will reduce the health hazard for [landfill] employees, and the stress of the landfill system due to a reduction of hydrogen sulfide, dust and other negative impact resulting in the management of drywall,” Besnard wrote. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Kerri Jansen at kjansen@wasterecycling news.com or 313-446-6098.

Come see us at Wastecon Booth #1003

œ˜Ì>ˆ˜iÀÊ>˜>}i“i˜ÌÊ*Àœ}À>“ÃÊUÊÃÃiÌÊEÊ-iÀۈViÊ/À>VŽˆ˜}ÊUÊ,œÕÌiÊÕ`ˆÌˆ˜}ÊEÊ,i«œÀ̈˜}ÊUÊ*Ài“ˆÕ“Ê7>ÃÌiÊEÊ,iVÞVˆ˜}Ê œ˜Ì>ˆ˜iÀà *C.A.R.T.S. customers have reported a 90% retrieval rate on lost/stolen containers

Phone: (800) 421-6244 Email: info@rehrig«>VˆvˆV°Vœ“ Web: ÜÜÜ°Ài…Àˆ}«>VˆvˆV°Vœ“

SESSION PREVIEW What: “Hickman Scholarship Project Report: Uses for Waste Virgin Gypsum Drywall” When: 2:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Speaker: Fabien Besnard

A FAMILY TRADITION OF GROWTH, SERVICE AND INNOVATION


WNpageAD.qxp

7/10/2012

3:21 PM

Page 1

Only one of them will consistently deliver maximum compaction inyour landfill.

SEE US AT BOOTH 1435


20120815-SUPP--8-NAT-CCI-WN_--

8/9/2012

1:07 PM

Page 1

8 ● AUGUST 15, 2012

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Special issue: Trash truck history Waste & Recycling News to commemorate ‘100 Years of the Garbage Truck’ By Shawn Wright WRN reporter Cruising up and down America’s streets on a daily basis, they work to keep society clean. No, we’re not talking about police officers. It’s the garbage truck. And it doesn’t always get the recognition it deserves … until now. On Oct. 15, Waste & Recycling News will publish a special issue:

“100 Years of the Garbage Truck.” In it, readers will learn about the garbage truck’s storied journey to cultural icon. “We can’t let this milestone pass without celebrating one of the most important and iconic vehicles to ever take our streets,” said WRN Editor John Campanelli. “Where would we – and our public health – be without the garbage truck? I don’t even want to think about a world without them.” The closest reference point to the first trash truck is about 1912, when Americans were beginning to see these motorized

marvels collect trash, keeping streets and cities clean. It was the start of a century of awe and wonder that continues to captivate children at the curb and veteran waste workers and drivers around the country. In addition to containing original content, articles, historical perspectives and photos, the “100 Years of the Garbage Truck” is a chance for advertisers in the industry to celebrate the vehicle that has been – and will continue to be – a mainstay in waste collection for generations to come. “So many marketers have cho-

sen to be part of this issue,” said WRN Publisher Brennan Lafferty. “This issue is of those once-ina-lifetime advertising opportunities. Good advertising tells a story, similar to a news article. Some customers are using a more historical context with their ad, while others are focusing on the future of the truck and how their company fits into what’s next for the trash truck.” To reserve your space in this collector’s issue, contact WRN Advertising Director Linda Hickey at 330-865-6184 or lhickey@ wasterecyclingnews.com. 䡲

CALL FOR PAPERS What will the next 50 years have in store for the municipal solid waste industry? SWANA wants to know what you’re doing that is shaping the future of solid waste management. We are seeking abstracts and presentation proposals that demonstrate programs and ideas that will advance the practice of solid waste management over the next 50 years. Submit your proposal online at www.WASTECON.org.

Deadline: September 30, 2012 September 17-19,

Long Beach Convention Center Long Beach, CALIFORNIA

2013

www.WASTECON.org

Network at corporate waste conference Learn how sustainability managers handle waste By Jeremy Carroll WRN reporter Aimed at environmental executives and sustainability officers, the Corporate Recycling & Waste Conference (CRWC) will be held Sept. 10-12 near Orlando, Fla. Co-organized by Waste & Recycling News and Republic Services Inc., CRWC focuses on waste stream management and profit maximization for businesses. The event will feature networking forums and exhibits for procurement managers, corporate sustainability officers, business owners, commodity managers, waste handlers and many more waste and recycling professionals. At the Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center, the conference will have more than 50 exhibitors on site and more than 20 industry experts discussing various topics in the general session. This is the second CRWC, with the first event held at the same location in 2011. “The CRWC brings together the environmental managers at Fortune 1,000 firms with the companies that service their waste and recycling needs,” said WRN Publisher Brennan Lafferty. “While the presentations from major corporations are highly educational, it’s the dinner meetings and hallway conversations where connections are really made. I witnessed several instances of that last year and expect more of the same in Orlando again.” Topics planned for discussion by speakers include commercial single stream recycling; waste audits; working with vendors to include waste diversion; protecting data when recycling electronics; food waste recycling; implementing sustainability programs; and engaging employees on safety. Speakers include sustainability executives from Costco and Family Dollar. In addition to speakers, exhibitors and networking events, the conference also features the Green Corporate Citizen Award, given to a business that made a major effort to lessen its environmental footprint. The CRWC will be the second conference organized by Waste & Recycling News and Republic Services in 2012. The companies put on the Residential Recycling Conference in March and are planning the 2013 RRC to be held March 19-21 in Chicago. For more information, visit www.wasterecyclingnews.com/se ction/events#conferences. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Jeremy Carroll at jcarroll@wasterecycling news.com or 313-446-6780.


WNpageAD.qxp

4/24/2012

3:30 PM

Page 1

Waste Expo Booth No.

1326

MODEL 100

Engineered For Longer Life, Less Maintenance, Lower Cost of Ownership Our mission is all about keeping things simple. Diamondback 3rd Man Cart Tippers are made with fewer moving parts, which means fewer parts to break, fewer parts to inventory, and less maintenance altogether. Unlike most lifter companies, we hope you never have to order a part from us....and you probably won’t. Pretty simple, right?

Specialty Lifters and Custom Designs

4-WHEEL CART DUMPER

Designing a simple lifter means we concentrate more on quality and performance. Our patented spring bottom latching system virtually eliminates bottom bar cart damage; we use self-aligning ball bushings made of corrosion resistant, hardened steel; cushioned cylinders are standard; and every tipper we make is protected by a durable powder coat paint finish. Nobody else does that. But nobody else thinks like we do, that a cart tipper should be a simple thing that will last the life of your truck.

• Our Most Basic Model • All The Diamondback Features

MODEL 200 • Fewer Working Parts • Kicker Bar Friendly

MODEL 450 • The Only Fully Adjustble Side Load Cart Lifter in the Industry • 26K Rotary Actuator

MODEL 500 • High Dumping Rear Load • Superior Ground Clearance

EUROPEAN DOCK DUMPER

European Style Cart Tippers MODEL 600 • Kicker Bar Friendly • Superior Ground Clearance

MEDICAL DOCK DUMPER

ECONOMY DUMPER

MODEL 300

MODEL 300HM

CUSTOM DESIGNS! Yes, there is still a company that will listen...and design a specific dumper to fit your unique needs. That company is Diamondback Products! Call us to discuss a custom design for your business.

MODEL FLC500 • 3 Yd3 Front Load Container • Diamondback 500 Tipper

MODEL 350

MODEL 450E

Simple is Better. Quality is Best. 40 West 12th Ave., Lexington NC 27292 • Toll Free 888-313-1424 • www.diamondbackproducts.com


20120815-SUPP--10-NAT-CCI-WN_--

10 ● AUGUST 15, 2012 2012 SWANA awards The Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) has announced the recipients of the 2012 Excellence Awards. SWANA’s Excellence Awards recognize solid waste programs and facilities that advance the practice of environmentally and economically sound solid waste management. Programs also must demonstrate that they are fiscally and environmentally responsible through their compliance with all applicable federal, state and local regulations. COMMUNICATION Gold: City of St. John’s; St. John’s, Newfoundland & Labrador Silver: Gwinnett County; Lawrenceville, Ga. Bronze: Charlotte Solid Waste Services; Charlotte, N.C.

8/7/2012

6:02 PM

Page 1

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY PUBLIC EDUCATION Gold: Emerald Coast Utilities Authority; Pensacola, Fla. Silver: County of Orange & Discovery Science Center; Santa Ana, Calif. Bronze: Eco-Cycle; Boulder County, Colo. MARKETING Gold: Charlotte, Solid Waste Services; Charlotte, N.C. Silver: Castro Valley Sanitary District; Castro Valley, Calif. Bronze: Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo & The DAGNY Partnership; Wood Buffalo, Alberta COLLECTION SYSTEMS Gold: City of Fort Wayne; Fort Wayne, Ind. Silver: City of College Station; College Station, Texas Bronze: Emerald Coast Utilities Authority; Pensacola, Fla. TRANSFER STATION Gold: Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County, Southwest County Transfer Station; Palm Beach County, Fla. Silver: Central Los Angeles Recycling & Transfer Station; Los Angeles Bronze: County of Hawai’i, Department of Environmental Management, Solid Waste Division; Hawaii LANDFILL GAS CONTROL

Gold: IESI Timber Ridge Landfill, Progressive Waste Solutions; Richwoods, Mo. Silver: Vogel Holding Inc., Seneca Landfill; Mars, Pa. Bronze: Oklahoma Environmental Management Authority & Boral Bricks; Union City, Okla. LANDFILL GAS UTILIZATION Gold: Golden Triangle Regional Solid Waste Management Authority; Starkville, Miss. Silver: Ameresco City of Santa Clara; Santa Clara, Calif. Bronze: Prince William County Public Works Solid Waste Division; Prince William County, Va. LANDFILL MANAGEMENT Gold: Seneca Meadows, Inc.; Waterloo, N.Y. Silver: Regional Municipality of Halton; Halton Region, Ontario Bronze: City of Hamilton Glanbrook Landfill; Hamilton, Ontario LANDFILL RE-USE Gold: City of Hamilton Rennie-Brampton Landfills; Hamilton, Ontario Silver: Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority, Turkey Point Renewable Energy Park; Lancaster, Pa. Bronze: Interstate Waste Services South Hadley Landfill & ARM Group, Inc.; South Hadley, Mass.

INTEGRATED SOLID WASTE SYSTEMS Gold: Sacramento County Department of Waste Management & Recycling; Sacramento, Calif. Silver: Sandoval County Public Works/Solid Waste; Rio Rancho, New Mexico Bronze: Kent County Department of Public Works; Grand Rapids, Mich. RECYCLING SYSTEMS Gold: Rethink Waste; San Carlos, Calif. Silver: Rumpke Recycling of Columbus, Ohio; Columbus, Ohio Bronze: University of Virginia Recycling; Charlottesville, Va. SPECIAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Gold: City of Casper Regional Solid Waste Facility; Casper, Wyo. Silver: City of Denton Solid Waste & Recycling Department; Denton, Texas Bronze: Region of Peel Waste Management; Mississauga, Ontario COMPOSTING SYSTEMS Gold: Spotsylvania County Utilities and Public Works; Fredericksburg, Va. Silver: Bakersfield Solid Waste; Bakersfield, Calif. WASTE-TO-ENERGY Gold: Covanta Onondaga Inc.; Jamesville, N.Y.

Silver: Covanta Fairfax Inc.; Lorton, Va. Bronze: Covanta Marion Inc.; Brooks, Ore.

Historic awards Professional Achievement – Public Member 2011: Tanya Adams 2010: Lannie Brant, Phil Hoderfield 2009: Russ Reiserer 2008: Pat Raidy, Russ Rutkowski, Brian Tippetts 2005: William Merry 2004: John B. Abernethy 2003: Michael D. Long 2001: Tom Smith 1999: Daniel M. Gutierrez 1998: Craig “Pete” Duffy 1997: Thomas Horton 1996: Dave Myers 1995: NC Vasuki* 1994: Peter Wong, Gary Martin 1993: Kenneth Smith 1992: Danamarie Schmitt 1991: Taylor Knowles 1990: Ben Masengil*, Bill Johnston, David Gunn, Durwood S. Curling* 1989: Robert Damjanovich 1988: Arthur Dunn 1987: Dennis Kerton 1986: Paul Clovechok 1985: Wilbur Larson 1984: Earl Smith 1983: Philip Richmond 1982: Jerry Carter 1981: Robert L. Lawrence Professional Achievement – Private Member 2005: James Caron 2003: Richard D. Haughey 2000: Deanna Ruffer 1998: Jack Carmichael 1997: Timothy Hunt* 1996: Marlene Feuer 1995: John Pacey 1994: Steve Viny, Fred Rice 1993: Harvey Gershman 1992: Ellen Bogardus 1991: Marc Rogoff, Robert Hatch 1990: Don Warren* 1989: Jim Jones 1988: Floyd Forsberg 1987: Marden Spencer 1986: Jesse Sparks 1985: Frank Gerdnic Jr. 1984: Richard Eldredge* 1983: Frank Borchardt* 1982: Dick Townley* 1981: Jay “Spider” Davis Professional Achievement – Retired Member 2006: John Boss 2005: Arnold “Duffy” Thompson 2004: Paul Smilanich, Pete Chavez 2003: Laurence S. Carter 2002: Murray Ashton Professional Achievement – Life Member 2008: Robert A. Epler 2004: Jack Friedline 2003: H. Lanier Hickman* 2002: Stephen Lippy Robert L. Lawrence Distinguished Service Award 2008: Richard J. Mauck 2007: Lisa Skumatz 2005: John Lackie 2004: J. David Myers 2003: N.C. Vasuki* 2002: Ronald Driedger 1999: Durwood S. Curling* 1998: H. Lanier Hickman* 1997: Raymond L. Huitric 1996: Clay Ervine 1995: Roger Power 1994: Timothy Hunt* 1993: Frank Bowerman 1992: Richard Eldredge* 1987: Robert Stearns 1986: Jerry Fairbanks 1985: Norman Jones Life Member Award 2011: Dave Crafton 2010: Frederick C. Rice 2009: Patrick J. Holland, Robert P. Stearns 2008: Willie Black 2007: Ross Maybee 2004: Paul Stoller 2003: Mack Belue 2002: Roy Barbatti 2001: Jerry Springer 2000: John G. Pacey 1998: Kay Hickman 1997: H. Lanier Hickman* 1996: Frank Borchardt* 1995: Richard Eldredge* 1994: Don Warren* 1993: Ben Masengil* 1991: Dick Townley* 1985: Charles Norton * Denote professionals who received an award in more than one category.


WNpageAD.qxp

6/28/2012

3:20 PM

Page 1

BOOTH NO. 1804

WASTECON Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center, August 14-16, 2012

100% MADE in the USA

Currently seeking sales representatives for our North American Market.

CHECK OUT OUR

SHOW

SPECIALS

BALE TIES for the recycling industry

Donner Industries, Inc. manufactures, stocks and ships bale tie wire across the country. Each bundle is individually stretched-wrapped in 100% recyclable plastic, which makes it easy to pull from a pallet and reduces risk of injury or strain.

OTHER FINE PRODUCTS

• Custom • Lawn and Garden • Tomato Supports • Blazin Gemz™ Collection

1-800-328-5062 | www.glamoswire.com


WNpageAD.qxp

8/6/2012

5:35 PM

Page 1

closed-loop recycling systems QDWLRQZLGHUHQWDO多HHW full turnkey setup made in the u.s.a.

manufactured by:

NeptuneWash.com

501.525.8484 866.303.4IES Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas


Consultants - Wed SD.qxp

8/7/2012

12:17 PM

Page 13

AUGUST 15, 2012 â—? 13

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Consultants are based in the United States and Canada. They are ranked according to the numbers of recycling/waste/sustainability consultants on their staff. The list was created from company-supplied information. It is not a conclusive list.

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 8 8 10 11 11 13 14

Company/ Location Bureau Veritas North America, Inc. Ft Lauderdale, FL Golder Associates Wixom, MI ERM Rolling Meadows, IL RockTenn Recycling & Waste Solutions Norcross, GA Applied Ecological Services Brodhead, WI Insurance Office of America Longwood, FL Perry Johnson Registrars, Inc. Troy, MI The Shaw Group Baton Rouge, LA NTH Consultants, Ltd. Northville, MI Quest Recycling Frisco, TX Aquaterra Environmental Solutions, Inc. Overland Park, KS TRC Environmental Corp. Madison, WI T&M Associates Middletown, NJ Atlantic Coast Consulting, Inc. Roswell, GA

See Footnotes on Page 21

Number of recycling/waste/ sustainability consultants

Annual revenue from recycling/waste/sustainability consulting services

More than 300

Areas of expertise

Company website

More than $70 million

3,4,7

www.us.bureauveritas.com

Approx. $50 million

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8

www.golder.com

100-150

Did not disclose

2,3,4,5,7

www.erm.com

150

Did not disclose

1,2,5,6,7

www.rocktenn.com

117

Did not disclose

3,4

www.appliedeco.com

100

$5 million

insurance/risk management

www.ioausa.com

100

Did not disclose

7

www.pjr.com

75

Did not disclose

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8

www.shawgrp.com

75

$15 million

2,3,4,5,6,7

www.nthconsultants.com

60

Did not disclose

1,2,5,6,7

www.questrecycling.com

50

$7.23 million

2,3,4,5,6,7

www.aquaterra-env.com

50

$10 million

2,3,4,5,7

www.trcsoutions.com

46

$9.2 million

2,3,4,5,6,7

www.tandmassociates.com

40

$5 million

1,2,4,5,6,7

www.atlcc.net

300

Ranking continues on Page 16

BC 472 RB 52,900 lbs Refuse Compactor

WHEELS THAT WORK!


20120815-SUPP--14,15-NAT-CCI-WN_--

14 ● AUGUST 15, 2012

8/8/2012

3:02 PM

Page 1

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

SWANA in pictures (1978 to present)

Steve Viny at the podium in 1991. Viny won SWANA’s Professional Achievement-Private Member award in 1994 and is a past president of SWANA International.

The group now known as SWANA held a M*A*S*H theme party at the Reno, Nev., show in 1986.

Native Americans put on a powwow for attendees to the show in Tulsa, Okla., in 1989.

Judy Caron plays with a big wheel at one of the show booths in Reno, Nev., in 1986.

SWANA staff members gather for a photo at Wastecon 2001, held in Maryland.

John H. Skinner, SWANA executive director, and his wife, Pat, hit the dance floor in 1996.

Photos: Courtesy, Solid Waste Association of North America

Who are “the Dapper Six”? That’s the name of this photograph as it appears in the SWANA archives from 1978 in San Diego. Return this photo to the Waste & Recycling News booth No. 1222 with the names of these six men written in below to be entered in a drawing to win a WRN t-shirt or hat of your choice. Add your phone number so we can notify you. The winner will be recognized in tomorrow’s WRN Wastecon Show Daily.

Your name: _________________________

Phone number: ___________________

“The Dapper Six,” from left to right, are: Nancy Nevil, center, basks in the limelight at Wastecon in 2007, which was also held in Reno, Nev. Nevil is the director of sustainability and environmental services for the city of Plano, Texas.

1. ________________________

3. ________________________

5. ______________________

2. ________________________

4. ________________________

6. ______________________


20120815-SUPP--14,15-NAT-CCI-WN_--

8/7/2012

11:53 AM

Page 2

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Photos: Courtesy, Solid Waste Association of North America

Kay Hickman, center, shares a drink with the boys in 1991. Notice the awesome SWANA shirts they’re wearing. Are those are available in the SWANA store at Wastecon 2012? Save us one if they are.

AUGUST 15, 2012 ● 15

Durwood Curling won the Robert L. Lawrence Distinguished Service Award in 1999. SWANA says the award is its highest honor.

Tom Parker, right, CDM Smith’s national solid waste practice leader and a past president of SWANA International joins the crowd on the dance floor at Wastecon in 1996.

Smoking on the Wastecon show floor? You won’t see that anymore, but at the Denver show in 1985, no one paid any attention to it.

SWANA members usher in the flags from their respective states to mark the opening of Wastecon in 1998.

Fleet Maintenance Supply Experts. Find Profit Loss.

Reduce overstocked and obsolete inventory.

Customized Solutions. Take control of 1 shop or 100 shops.

Maximize. Increase shop efficiency and profitability.

1-888-256-8496

www.imperialsupplies.com


consultants - wed sd.qxp

8/10/2012

9:53 AM

Page 16

16 ● AUGUST 15, 2012

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Consultants are based in the United States and Canada. They are ranked according to the numbers of recycling/waste/sustainability consultants on their staff. The list was created from company-supplied information. It is not a conclusive list.

Rank 14 14 17 18 18 18 18 18 18 24 25 25 25 28

Number of recycling/waste/ sustainability consultants

Company/ Location

Joyce Engineering Richmond, VA Cascadia Consulting Group Seattle Impact Environmental Bohemia, NY Solid Waste Solutions Corp. Evanston, IL ReSource Waste Advisors Inc. Boston CHA Consulting, Inc. Albany, NY Advanced Environmental Optons, Inc. (AEO) Spartanburg, SC AeroMetric Inc. Sheboygan, WI Foth Infrastructure & Environment, LLC Green Bay, WI Superior Acquisitions & Consulting Smyrna, GA Sanborn, Head & Associates, Inc. Concord, NH Dvirka and Bartilucci Consulting Engineers Woodbury, NY Gershman, Brickner & Bratton, Inc. Fairfax, VA Global Alliance Connections Romeoville, IL

Annual revenue from recycling/waste/sustainability consulting services

Areas of expertise

Company website

40

Did not disclose

2,3,4,5,6,7,8

www.joyceengineering.com

40

$3 million

2,7

www.cascadiaconsulting.com

30

$30 million

2,3,4,6,7

www.impactenvironmental.com

25

$2.5 million

2,5,7,8,9

www.solidwastesolutionscorp.com

25

$5 million

1,2,6,7,8

www.resourcewasteadvisors.com

25

$3 million

2,3,4,5,6,7

www.chacompanies.com

25

$3.8 million

1,2,3,6,7

www.aeoweb.com

25

$2 million

2,4

www.aerometric.com

25

$4.5 million

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8

www.foth.com

22

Did not disclose

1,2,4,6,7,8,9

n/a

20

$3.5 million

2,3,4,5,7

www.sanbornhead.com

20

$7.5 million

1,2,3,5,6,7,8

www.dvirkaandbartilucci.com

20

Did not disclose

1,2,4,5,6,7,8

www.gbbinc.com

15

$500,000

1,2,4,6,7

www.gotogac.com

See Footnotes on Page 21

Ranking continues on Page 18

GeoShack - Your GPS Specialists

DensityMAX

ARE YOU USING GPS YET?

Let GeoShack Show You What GPS Can Do for Your Landfill Operation.

What is DensityMAX™ by GeoShack?

DensityMAX is a wireless enhanced GPS system that combines the reliability of Topcon GPS Machine Control with the XQLTXH&DUOVRQ/DQG¿OO6RIWZDUHWRPD[LPL]H\RXUODQG¿OOGHQVLW\

DensityMAX Allows You To: ‡0D[LPL]H8VDEOH$LUVSDFH ‡,QFUHDVH:RUNLQJ)DFH'HQVLW\ ‡&RQWURO:DVWH3ODFHPHQW*UDGHVDQG6ORSHV ‡5HDO7LPH'HQVLW\5HSRUWLQJ

‡7UDFN'DLO\)LOO9ROXPH ‡2EVHUYH&RPSDFWLRQIURP5HPRWH/RFDWLRQ ‡,PSURYH(I¿FLHQF\E\$YRLGLQJ 8QQHFHVVDU\&RPSDFWLRQ3DVVHV

For Details Please Call 972-415-7942 or visit www.densitymax.com


WNpageAD.qxp

7/13/2012

3:08 PM

Page 1


consultants - wed sd.qxp

8/7/2012

4:20 PM

Page 18

18 â—? AUGUST 15, 2012

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Consultants are based in the United States and Canada. They are ranked according to the numbers of recycling/waste/sustainability consultants on their staff. The list was created from company-supplied information. It is not a conclusive list.

Rank 28 28 28 32 33 34 34 34 34 38 38 38 38 38

Company/ Location Resource Recycling Systems Ann Arbor, MI Galli Engineering, PC Melville, NY Biggs and Mathews Environmental Mansfield, TX SENES Consultants Limited Richmond Hill, Ontario EmCo Consulting, Inc. Pensacola, FL International Environmental Alliance Tustin, CA Kessler Consulting, Inc. Tampa, FL Reduction In Motion Fallston, MD Premier Facility Managment Wayne, NJ WIH Resource Group, Inc. Phoenix Environ Strategy Consultants, Inc. Orange, CA HUB International Environmental Services Westlake Village, CA Omni Resource Recovery Colton, CA EmCo Consulting, Inc. Pensacola, FL

See Footnotes on Page 21

Number of recycling/waste/ sustainability consultants

Annual revenue from recycling/waste/sustainability consulting services

Areas of expertise

Company website

15

$1.5 million

1,2,5,6,7

www.recycle.com

15

$2.3 million

2,3,4,5,6,7

www.gallieng.com

15

$4 million

2,4,6

www.biggsandmathews.com

14

$1.8 million

1,2,3,4,5,6,7

www.senes.ca

13

$1 million

1,2,7,8

www.emcoco.com

12

$30 million

1,6,7

www.iea-llc.com

12

$2 million

1,2,4,5,7,8,9

www.kesconsult.com

12

$750,000

2,7

www.reductioninmotion.com

12

$5.5 million

7

www.pfmgreen.com

10

Did not disclose

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9

www.wihrg.com

10

$2.5 million

2,3,4,5,6,7

www.environstrategy.com

10

$25 million

insurance/risk management

www.hubinternational.com

10

$11 million

1,2,5,6,7

www.omnirecovery.com

10

$3.75 million

1,2,5,6,7

www.emcoco.com

Ranking continues on Page 21

LORDSTOWN CONSTRUCTION RECOVERY, LLC CONSTRUCTION & DEMOLITION DEBRIS LANDFILL LORDSTOWN OH State-of-the-Art C&D Landfill Located on CSX main rail line Equipped with a rail car Rotary Tipper Aggregate backhaul opportunity For information call Tim Page 800-936-3469 or 330-394-3469


WNpageAD.qxp

7/3/2012

9:19 AM

Page 1


WNpageAD.qxp

8/8/2012

1:47 PM

Page 1

EUREKA!

Shoreway Environmental Center, San Carlos CA

2012

STRIKES GOLD Congratulations to RethinkWaste for winning the 2012 Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) Gold Award for Recycling Systems. These awards honor the best solid waste programs and facilities in North America based on excellence and innovation. We’re proud and honored to be a part of our customers’ success. Let the global leader show what we can do for you. bulkhandlingsystems.com BULK HANDLING SYSTEMS

Eugene, Oregon USA

866.688.2066

What’s next.


consultants - wed sd.qxp

8/7/2012

12:23 PM

Page 21

AUGUST 15, 2012 â—? 21

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Consultants are based in the United States and Canada. They are ranked according to the numbers of recycling/waste/sustainability consultants on their staff. The list was created from company-supplied information. It is not a conclusive list.

Rank

Number of recycling/waste/ sustainability consultants

Company/ Location

Annual revenue from recycling/waste/sustainability consulting services

Areas of expertise

Company website

38

Caraustar Recycling Dalton, GA

10

Did not disclose

1,6,7

www.caraustar.com

38

Product Stewardship Institute, Inc. Boston

10

$137,000

7

www.productstewardship.us

38

Wright-Pierce Topsham, ME

10

more than $500,000

2,3,4,6

www.wright-pierce.com

38

Pannone Lopes Devereaux & West LLC White Plains, NY

10

more than $2 million

1,4,5,6,7,9

www.pldw.com

38

Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis Pittsburgh

10

Did not disclose

9

www.schnader.com

48

EarthCare Technologies Inc. West Fork, AR

9

less than $500,000

1,3,6

www.ecticompost.com

48

Tire Recycling Consultants Fort Lauderdale, FL

9

$1.8 million to $2 million

1,5,6,7,8

www.recyclingtires.com

48

Assurance Schaumburg, IL

9

$2 million

insurance/risk management/ safety

www.assuranceagency.com

51

D. Edwards, Inc. Brea, CA

8

$1.3 million

1,2,4,5,6,7,8

www.dedwardsinc.com

51

Innovative Waste Solutions Frederick, MD

8

$1 million

2,7

www.innovativews.com

51

MSW Consultants New Market, MD

8

$850,000

1,2,5,6,7,8

www.mswconsultants.us

51

Elytus Ltd. Columbus, OH

8

Did not disclose

1,2,7,

www.elytus.com

AREAS OF EXPERTISE 1 = Collection services 2 = Solid waste planning 3 = Remediation 4 = Landfills (including engineering, management, monitoring and/or landfill gas systems)

5 = Waste to energy (including alternative waste solutions) 6 = Facilities (transfer, recycling and/or processing) 7 = Sustainability (including waste audits, policy development and/or waste management) 8 = Financial 9 = Legal

Information submitted by consultants and companies.

For complete listings, including contact information, of more than 230 recycling, waste and sustainability consultants, please visit www.wasterecyclingnews.com/datasearch

BC 1172 RB-3 123,000 lbs Refuse Compactor

W E N Tie

e rc r 4i M

ede s

WHEELS THAT WORK!


WNpageAD.qxp

8/6/2012

6:21 PM

Page 1


20120815-SUPP--23-NAT-CCI-WN_--

8/14/2012

9:32 PM

Page 1

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

AUGUST 15, 2012 â—? 23

John Campanelli, Waste & Recycling News Shawn Wright, Waste & Recycling News

Miriam Zimms, director of program planning for Tampa, Fla.-based Kessler Consulting Inc., gets drawn by Dallas artist Charles King on Tuesday during Wastecon at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in National Harbor, Md.

Bagpiper Eric Rice-Johnston of Falls Church, Va., waits for the go-ahead to start leading the flag procession that formally kicked off Wastecon Tuesday morning.

Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Raquel Rimbach of Pollution Equipment News talks with Gerry Noble of Clean Energy on the Wastecon show floor Tuesday.

Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Michelle Leonard of HDR Engineering blows up a beach ball on Tuesday.

Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Donna Verrow, left, of LSC Environmental Products, and Andrew Crane check out the guitar made from a toolbox on the show floor.

Wastecon participants take notes during one of the many technical sessions at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in National Harbor, Md., on Tuesday. Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Maria Martinez, a retired librarian, reacts to the drumming of Steve Linder, of the band Vocal Trash, who is playing on drums made from recycled PVC on the Wastecon floor Tuesday. Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

University of Virginia Facilities Manager Sonny Beale, right, learns about PenPlast Environmental’s recycling bins from Craig Bolton on Tuesday.


WNpageAD.qxp

8/8/2012

11:06 AM

Page 1

High Torque = High Profits

The

is The Crambo

dual shaft shredder

world getting

greener The Terminator

The Topturn

single shaft shredder

compost turner

Dual Power = Low Cost

The Cribus

Hybrid drum screen

The Multistar

Hybrid star screen

The Hurrikan

Hybrid wind sifter

p 720-890-9090 | f 720-890-5907 | e info@komptechusa.com

We make technology for a better environment, with performance and efficiency features others often imitate but never equal. Our build quality and innovations lead the industry, so you can lead yours.

w w w. k o m p t e c h u s a . c o m


20120815-SUPP--25-NAT-CCI-WN_--

8/14/2012

9:38 PM

Page 1

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Bob Brockway, left, of Terra Compactor Wheel, talks with Kyle Vallet of SSG Holdings on the Wastecon show floor on Tuesday.

AUGUST 15, 2012 â—? 25

Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Whitney Brockay of Terra Compactor Wheel takes a break from her booth with an ice cream bar courtesy of Al-jon Manufacturing on the Wastecon show floor at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in National Harbor, Md.

Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Joel Lanz of LSC Environmental Products checks to see if the toolbox guitar is in tune during Wastecon on Tuesday.

Fran LaSala, left, of the Environmental Services Department for Tuscon, Ariz., and Leanne Spaulding of the U.S. Composting Council chat at the water cooler on the Wastecon show floor. Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Rob Eck, not pictured, shows family photos of his children with colleague Colleen Reilly at Rehrig Pacific Co.

Barbara Jaeckle, center, and Gary Patterson of The Hauler Magazine chat with Dian Sommers, left, of Snyder Industries on the show floor Tuesday.

Wendy Cravens, left, of Benton County Solid Waste District, and Richard Ludt of Interior Removal Specialist snag some beach balls at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in National Harbor, Md., on Tuesday.


3:41:18 PM

20120815-SUPP--26-NAT-CCI-WN_--

8/14/2012

7:08 PM

Page 1

26 ● AUGUST 15, 2012

W E D N E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Comrades: Flag ceremony is special

WRN STOCK REPORT Company Ticker Casella Waste CWST Caterpillar CAT Clean Energy CLNE Clean Harbors CLH Covanta Holding CVA Darling International DAR Deere & Co. DE Dover Corp. DOV Ecolab Inc. ECL Heritage-Crystal HCCI Layne Christensen LAYN Macquarie MIC Progressive Waste BIN Republic Services RSG Stericycle SRCL US Ecology ECOL Veolia VE Waste Connections WCN Waste Management WM

Close* $4.16 $87.87 $14.15 $55.30 $17.38 $16.85 $80.13 $56.99 $64.79 $17.93 $20.74 $42.48 $19.95 $28.67 $90.00 $19.45 $10.20 $30.07 $35.21

P/E N/A 9.83 N/A 22.49 31.72 14.59 11.11 12.39 37.00 145.77 N/A 45.19 N/A 15.78 30.51 16.62 N/A 22.34 17.84

Market Cap $112.25M $57.4B $1.23B $2.95B $2.31B $1.98B $31.87B $10.42B $18.95B $326.56M $403.85M $1.98B $2.3B $10.47B $7.71B $355M $5.16B $3.70B $16.32B

* As of Aug. 14. To request to add your company to the WRN stock report, contact managing editor Douglas D. Fisher at dfisher@wasterecyclingnews.com.

Continued from Page 1 the union of all these states, it’s an honor,” said Tim Roehl, environmental technician for the South Central Solid Waste Management District in Eunice, Mo., as he held the Missouri flag moments before the processional be-

gan at 8:30 Tuesday morning. Standing next to Roehl was Tony Miano, deputy director of Public Works for Phoenix. He had been drafted to carry Mississippi’s flag. “They asked me, and I thought it would be an honor.” Some flag-bearers had probably hesitated when the alarm

WHAT’S NEXT IN WASTE & RECYCLING NEWS The CEO Issue Sept. 3 issue

CRWC Show Issue Sept. 17 issue

Recycling Rankings Oct. 1 issue

COMINGOCTOBER10.15.12 Be a part of History. Reserve your ad today. H Here’s your chance to reserve your ad in the th 100 Years of the Garbage Truck issue w where your message will be seen for years to come. TThis coffee-table keepsake issue will journey j through the past century unveiling tthe 100 most important people, companies aand stories that have impacted this mechanical marvel. 100 years. 100 stories.

Special

HARD-BOUND ISSUE AVAILABLE

I S S U E D AT E | 1 0 . 1 5 . 1 2

$59

C L O S E D AT E | 9 . 1 . 1 2

went off; a few might have been over-served Monday night as they caught up with old friends and networked with new ones, but they shook off the cobwebs. They weren’t about to miss the chance to carry one of the 68 flags (the newest is Quebec) into the Maryland Ballroom. There were zero no-shows. I’ve been a part of our industry a relatively short time, just more than a year, and I’ve noticed that SWANA is different than other associations in this industry and even in others. There is real camaraderie when members get together, not competition. When people meet in the airport, hotel lobby or on the show floor, it’s a reunion with hugs, not a handshake. Miano thinks he knows why. “It’s all about sharing,” he said. When a state, county or city has an idea or technological innovation that solves a recycling or waste problem, it doesn’t get rushed to the patent office, it gets rushed to other members in other cities and states. “That’s what we do,” Miano added. SWANA Executive Director and CEO John Skinner says there’s only one reason behind the fellowship of his members. “It’s the people,” he says. “We are a not-for-profit, professional association. It’s our members.” Back home, those members have to deal with slashed budgets, the demands – often unreasonable – of politicians and residents, and other challenges our industry brings. At Wastecon, they are together, unified. They not only share ideas and best practices, they share war stories. Wastecon is therapy, a latesummer salve to the grind of local government bureaucracies, a chance to strengthen the bond among friends and compatriots. The flag ceremony symbolizes it. “It’s very special,” said Skinner. “It is one of the great traditions of the organization that people hold very dear.” And no matter how tough things get, when they have their friends at their sides, they’ll have someone and someplace to turn to before they ever have to reach for a different sort of flag ... a white one. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News Editor John Campanelli at jcampanelli@wasterecycling news.com or 313-446-6767.

Space is limited. Contact your sales manager today. ADVERTISING DIRECTOR EASTERN SALES MANAGER Linda Hickey lhickey@crain.com 330.865.6184

CORPORATE NATIONAL ACCOUNT MGR. WESTERN SALES MANAGER Fern Sheinman fsheinman@crain.com 619.944.5114

CENTRAL SALES MANAGER Sarah Winner swinner@crain.com 313.446.6775

CLASSIFIED SALES MANAGER Wendi Lionetti wlionetti@crain.com 330.865.6165

John Campanelli, Waste & Recycling News

Visit www.wasterecyclingnews.com/100years.

Tony Miano, deputy director of Public Works for Phoenix, left, chats with Tim Roehl, environmental technician for the South Central Solid Waste Management District in Eunice, Mo., before the flag procession to formally kick off Wastecon Tuesday morning.


WNpageAD.qxp

7/13/2012

11:30 AM

Page 1

WHEELS THAT WORK!

FEATURES s 0!+!,,0OLYGONAL$ESIGN s #HILL#AST4EETH s 0REMIUM7HEEL7ARRANTY s %FlCIENT3CRAPERSAND 7IRE#UTTERS s -INIMIZES7IRE7RAP s %XCELLENT4RACTIONAND 'RADEABILITY s %XTEND3ITE,IFEAND 0RESERVE!IRSPACE s #LEAN7HEELS#OMPACT


DBpageAD.qxp

7/19/2012

9:38 AM

Page 1

Out on the road, there’s an unspoken code we live by. Mack believes in this code. We helped build it. You could say our whole business for more than 100 years has been about building respect—for customers, for drivers, for the trucks, for the road, for a job well done. That’s why so many people put their trust in Mack.

watch the video

MackTrucks.com

Wastecon - Day 2  

Highlights for the day 2 of Wastecon

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you