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T U E S D AY

DAY

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AUGUST 14, 2012

SWANA’s

Crain’s News Source for Environmental Management

Extra! Extra! WRN staff here to deliver you the news Most of us will spend the week here at Wastecon – working, learning and interacting. We’ll also be sleeping here (or nearby), eating our meals and, hopefully, unwinding a bit. In other words, this week, the Gaylord National will be our world. And the convention floor, training classrooms and technical sessions will be our neighborhood. Waste & Recycling News will be the neighborhood newspaper. We’ve brought our team of reporters here to Washington, and

we’ve set up a mobile newsroom near Exhibit Hall A. Why? Today, tomorrow and Thursday, we are going to produce daily newspapers here John Campanelli at Wastecon. We call them “show dailies.” These are going to be true morning papers, produced the night before and printed overnight.

Each edition – you’ll see them everywhere as you enter the hall – will provide the latest and best coverage of one of the premier annual events in the solid waste industry. This conference, its exhibitors and attendees deserve this kind of timely reporting. Each morning paper will feature convention news, previews of events and plenty of photos from the floor, sessions and Wastecon parties. (So look both ways before doing any “body shots” at receptions and net-

working events.) Don’t be surprised if a reporter approaches you and asks for your thoughts and expertise. We want to hear your opinions and what you want to accomplish this week. Make it a point to look at the advertisements in these morning newspapers, too. Many are announcing new products here, offering promotions or just sharing important information. We are honored to be producing show dailies here at Wastecon. We feel an obligation to our

industry and are aware of the importance of this event, especially in 2012, when we celebrate SWANA’s 50th birthday. When you see me or another Waste & Recycling News reporter, feel free to stop us, introduce yourself and share your thoughts. Or stop by our newsroom to say hello. Your picture just might end up in the morning paper. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News Editor John Campanelli at jcampanelli@waste recyclingnews.com or 313-446-6767.

‘Insiders’ say tour of EPA lacks insight ‘Bureaucrats’ disappoint visitors from Calgary, SWANA Caribbean chapter

INSIDE ■ Today’s sessions ■ Fairfax County, Va., waste and recycling tour ■ History of SWANA ■ Top hauler rankings

By Shawn Wright WRN reporter

Don’t worry, guys, we can relate! Above: Victor Ayres, deputy director for the Houston Solid Waste Management Department, searches for a lost golf ball during the Wastecon golf tournament on Monday at Laurel Hill Golf Club in Lorton, Va. Ayres’ colleague, Harry Hayes, director of the Houston Solid Waste Management Department, won the longest drive and closest-to-the-pin contests. Right: Darrin Dillah, an environmental engineer and vice president at SCS Engineers in Reston, Va., watches in horror as his tee shot goes astray during the Wastecon golf tournament on Monday. See Page 25 for more photographs of the golf tournament.

ON A TOUR BUS AROUND WASHINGTON, D.C. – They came from as far away as Guam, Calgary and Puerto Rico to get an inside view of the U.S. EPA. Many left disappointed. From waste-to-energy professionals to municipal solid waste district directors and recycling coordinators, nearly 30 people boarded a bus to take part in the Wastecon “Washington Insider’s Experience” on Monday. They got a chance to visit the federal regulatory agency’s LEED Goldcertified Potomac Yard building in Arlington, Va.

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䡲 Tweets from the Insider’s tour Page 3

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AUGUST 14, 2012 ● 3

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hed

@WasteRecycNews

Tour guide says the 45-minute tour of where our money is printed isn’t worth the $. #wastecon.

We talk more than trash. We are the leading information source for environmental managers, recyclers & businesses that generate and manage waste. Follow along with Waste & Recycling News’ own Maria Kirch, web coordinator and social media extraordinaire, as she tweeted her way through the Washington, D.C. beltway on Monday during the Wastecon Washington Insider’s Experience.

Tweets

Lunch time! Old Ebbitt Grill. Pretty sure most of us are starving.

Local veggies and protein here at Old Ebbitt Grill – the restaurant composts its food waste.

@wasterecycnews @WasteRecycNews: Good morning, National Harbor, Md. It’s a good day for the Washington Insider’s Experience – and for coffee! @SWANA #wastecon

View photo

Chicken and mashed potatoes with green beans in the cabinet room of Old Ebbitt Grill.

Eco-friendly way to get around DC: bike taxi.

On the bus for the Washington Insider’s Experience @SWANA #wastecon.

View photo (at right) Photos: Maria Kirch, Waste & Recycling News

There is a water taxi from the @gaylordnational to Old Town Alexandria and a free trolley to all the good restaurants.

Maria Kirch, Waste & Recycling News’ web coordinator, shows off her badge and itinerary for the Washington Insider’s Experience.

The obligatory White House shot with @shawnmwright.

View photo (at right)

Airport-like security measures before getting the tour of an EPA building. (No photos allowed)

Attendees of this Washington Insider’s Experience range from those based in Virginia to Guam & Puerto Rico. Interesting folks #wastecon.

WRN reporter Shawn Wright and web coordinator Maria Kirch pose in front of the White House. And of course protesters at the White House. #wastecon.

View photo

Cabinets in this EPA building are made from recycled aluminum cans.

View photo

The Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery’s kitchen cabinets inside the Potomac Yard headquarters of the U.S. EPA are made from recycled aluminum. It is a certified LEED-Gold building. Green roof goes dormant in the winter and reseeds in the spring #wastecon.

Waste & Recycling News reporter @shawnmwright talks with LEED assistant property manager Colin Hood at Potomac Yard.

Stop at Lincoln Memorial with @matthuffman from VCore USA.


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A chance to see how others work Facilities tour an eye-opener for New Zealand manager By Jim Johnson WRN senior reporter They came from places like Lancaster, Pa., and Tucson, Ariz., from Halton, Ontario, and Columbus, Ga., from the Cayman Islands and New Zealand. All to look at trash … and recyclables. For eight hours Monday, these waste industry professionals bused their way around sites in both Prince George’s County, Md., and Fairfax County, Va., to drink in as much knowledge as they could at a recycling center, a transfer station and waste-toenergy plant. They even got a peak at an ash monofill. On a typical day, some 500 to 600 tons of recyclables find their way to the Prince George’s County Recycling Center in Capitol Heights, Md. The county-owned facility is operated by Waste Management Inc., which pays a host fee for each of the 139,000 tons of materials that run through the singlestream facility each year. The materials recovery facility has been open since 1993 and upgraded to single-stream processing in 2007, causing a noticeable jump in throughput. “Our curbside rates have increased substantially – about 25% – from dual stream to single-stream,” said Desmond Gladden, an environmental planner for the county. As recycling manager at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, Tim Nance was one of about 40 people on the tour looking at how other people in the business approach their work. Stops included Covanta Energy Corp.’s waste-to-energy site in Lorton, Va., as well as Fairfax County’s adjacent monofill that takes in ash from the burner. Folks even got a peak at Fairfax County’s I66 transfer station that routes waste to the incinerator. “I was just seeing if there was

Photos: Jim Johnson, Waste & Recycling News

Lenny Wright, manager of the I-66 Transfer Station Complex in Fairfax County, Va., leans around to answer a question while standing in a landfill gas processing plant at his facility. any new technology that we haven’t seen around. Every once in a while you come across something new,” Nance said while standing in an observaBruce Bowie tion area at the recycling center. Bruce Bowie came a considerably farther distance. Bowie literally traveled halfway around the world to take part in the tour organized by the Solid Waste Association of North America as part of Wastecon. As manager of the Hampton Downs landfill in North Waikato, New Zealand, he also is on a search for information. “New Zealand is such a small country; you’ve got to really look outside the country, look outside the box to make sure what you’re

About 40 people on Monday’s tour got up close and personal with a whole lot of trash at Covanta Energy Corp.’s waste-to-energy plant in Lorton, Va., where this giant grapple feeds trash into furnaces. doing is world-standard,” he said. It will take Bowie about 20 hours to get home, including a two-hour layover in Los Angeles. But he said the trip to Wastecon is worth the effort.

Publishers V.P. / Group Publisher KC Crain Publisher Brennan Lafferty 313-446-6768

EDITORIAL

OFFICE

1155 Gratiot Ave., Detroit, MI 48207-2912 Telephone: 313-446-6000 Fax: 313-446-6384 Website: www.wasterecyclingnews.com Email: editorial@wasterecyclingnews.com Waste & Recycling News is published 26 times a year by Crain Communications Inc. For new subscriptions, renewals or change of address write Waste & Recycling News, Subscription Department, 1155 Gratiot Ave., Detroit, MI 48207-2912 customerservice-wrn@crain.com (U.S. only) 877-320-1719 (Outside U.S.) 313-446-0401 Fax: 313-446-6777. Reprints: The YGS Group 717-505-9701 or 800-501-9571 info@theygsgroup.com www.theygsgroup.com

Editorial Editor John Campanelli 313-446-6767 Managing Editor Douglas D. Fisher 313-446-0449 Senior Reporter Jim Johnson 937-964-1289 Reporter Jeremy Carroll 313-446-6780 Reporter Shawn Wright 313-446-0346 Editorial Intern Kerri Jansen 313-446-6098 Correspondents Chris Gigley (N. Carolina) Chrissy Kadleck (Ohio) Andrea King (Michigan) Cartoonist Leo Michael Publisher’s Assistant Lonnie Curri 313-446-5869 Joe Truini Reporter (1971-2009)

“Being so isolated down there, you have to branch out to see what everyone else is doing,” he said. “We really need to, being right down at the bottom of the world.” 䡲

Digital Web Coordinator Maria Kirch 313-446-6761 Marketing Marketing Manager Kim Winkler 313-446-1652 Marketing Coordinator Rhonda Lubinski 313-446-6090 Marketing Intern Kayla Rusin 313-446-0425

EVENTS COMING EVENTS Aug. 30 – The Environmental Research and Education Foundation Fall Classic Golf Tournament, hosted by Waste Management and Waste Connections Inc. at the Panther Trail Course at Canongate in The Woodlands, Texas. Proceeds support EREF’s mission to fund scientific research and educational initiatives for waste management practices. For more information or to register, visit www.erefdn.org. Sept. 10-12 – Corporate Recycling & Waste Conference, Orlando, Fla. Contact Brennan Lafferty 313-446-6768 or visit www.crwc conference.com. Sept. 16-18 – 5th Annual Waste-to-Fuels Conference & Trade Show, Mystic, Conn. Access www.waste-to-fuels.org. Sept. 18 – Green is Good for Business Conference, Columbia, S.C. Contact Mary Pat Baldauf at 803-545-2722 or access http://2012gbc.event brite.com. Sept. 20 – 5th Annual Waste-to-Fuels Conference & Trade Show, Mystic Marriott Hotel & Spa, Groton, Conn. For more information, access www.waste-to-fuels.org. Sept. 30-Oct. 3 – Global Waste Management Symposium, Arizona Grand Resort, Phoenix. Visit www.wastesymposium.com. Oct. 9-11 – Scrap-to-Profit Conference, Montgomery, Ala. Visit www.scraptoprofit.org. Oct. 18-20 – ReuseConex - 2nd National Reuse Conference & Expo, Portland, Ore. Visit www.reusealliance.org. Oct. 23-26 – BSR sustainability conference, New York City. Email conference@bsr.org or call 212-370-7718. Oct. 31-Nov. 1 – GOVgreen Expo, Washington D.C. Contact Stacey 703-706-8214 or visit www.govgreen.org. Nov. 12-13 – The Canadian Waste & Recycling Expo, Toronto. For more information, access www.cwre.ca. Nov. 12-13 – 2012 Southeast Food Waste Reduction Conference, Charlotte, N.C. Contact Brian Rosa 877-972-0007 or visit www.cra-recycle. org/foodwasteconference. Nov. 12-14 – RE3 Conference, Atlantic City, N.J. Contact Travis Bowman 704-728-5800. Jan. 28-31 – U.S. Composting Council 21st Annual Conference and Trade Show, Orlando, Fla. Visit www.compostingcouncil.org. March 10-13 – The 28th International Conference on Solid Waste Technology and Management, Radisson Warwick Hotel, Philadelphia. For more information, visit solid-waste.org March 19-21 – Residential Recycling Conference, contact Brennan Lafferty 313-446-6768 or visit www.residentialrecyclingconference.com.

To have your conference or event appear in Waste & Recycling News, email wastenews@crain.com or send mail to WRN Coming Events, 1155 Gratiot, Detroit, Mich., 48207.

Audience Development Mgr. Julie Brown 877-320-1719 Assistant Circulation Manager Jen Natone 877-320-1719 Production Vice President of Production Dave Kamis 313-446-6055 Production Supervisor Larry F. Williams 313-446-0301 Production Manager Wendy Kobylarz 313-446-6064

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Crain Communications Inc. Keith E. Crain Rance E. Crain Chairman President Mary K. Crain Merrilee P. Crain Treasurer Secretary William A. Morrow Robert C. Adams Executive V.P., Operations Group V.P., Technology, Circulation, Manufacturing Dave Kamis V.P. Production & Manufacturing G.D. Crain Jr. Gertrude R. Crain Founder (1885-1973) Chairman (1911-1996)


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T U E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

The curious case of migrating gas Detective work helps solve landfill gas mystery By Kerri Jansen WRN reporter

File: Shawn Wright, Waste & Recycling News

A Duncan Disposal Systems LLC truck empties its load at a landfill in Michigan. Residents near landfills often complain about escaping landfill gas. An expert at Wastecon is planning to talk about what to do when complaints arise.

When potentially harmful gas is detected on property near a landfill, it’s often easy to blame the neighbor. But while landfill gas does sometimes migrate underground, in some cases another source is responsible for the problems. Patrick Sullivan, senior vice president at national engineering and construction firm SCS

Engineers, has the job of determining whether a landfill is truly at fault when potentially harmful gas is detected. At Wastecon, Sullivan will share case studies and discuss the investigative techniques he uses to address landfill gas concerns. Sullivan manages the SCS Engineers’ solid waste consulting practice in the western U.S., specializing in landfill gas- and greenhouse gas-related issues. He’s also the chairman for Solid Waste Association of North America’s Rules and Regulations Committee in its landfill gas division, and works with other na-

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tional organizations to represent the waste management industry in those areas, particularly on a federal level. Sullivan has been involved Patrick Sullivan with several lawsuits filed by people living near landfills who thought their property was impacted by landfill gas, as well as some post-regulatory projects, he said. He picked some interesting examples for his Wastecon presentation – times when standard monitoring of gas wasn’t enough. “Landfill gas migration isn’t a new topic, but these parties went beyond the typical regulatory framework for landfill gas migration,” Sullivan said. Existing regulations are very general when it comes to landfill gas migration, Sullivan said. The regulations focus on explosive concentrations of methane, but are less clear about other components the gas may contain – toxic organic chemicals like benzene, for example. In one case Sullivan will discuss, engineers analyzed the chemical “fingerprint” of gas found on property neighboring a landfill to determine whether it matched gas from the landfill. In another case, methane from a landfill was matched to gas found on a neighboring property, and engineers had to determine the extent of the impact. Sullivan said he will use the specific case studies to illuminate the investigative techniques that can be used when a landfill is accused of having gas impacts on neighboring property. It’s also important that people realize the impact such accusations can have on a business. “[The presentation is] partly to make sure people understand what techniques can be used when they’re faced with these kinds of situations, but also the potential for these types of lawsuits to be out there,” Sullivan said. Even when it’s found that a landfill is not responsible for gas impacts, it can be very difficult to recover the cost of defending a landfill in a lawsuit, Sullivan said. “In many cases when you win, you didn’t quite really win,” he said. 䡲

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You sold it; now you have to recycle it Calif. county mandates that stores collect certain items By Jeremy Carroll WRN reporter In order to keep fluorescent lights, household batteries, medical sharps and latex paint out of the landfill, San Luis Obispo County, Calif., passed a voluntarily takeback program for retailers that sold those items. The program was a dud. “You had varying degrees of participation [from retailers], so

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it was difficult for the consumer to know which store took back which item,” said Travis Wagner, an associate professor with the University of Southern Maine. The county then switched to a mandatory takeback program, which has been very successful, he said. Wagner, who has a doctorate in public policy with a concentration on environmental and natural resources policy, will be speaking about mandatory retail takeback programs. Wagner said retailers in San Luis Obispo, home to 267,000 resi-

CALL FOR PAPERS What will the next 50 years have in store for the municipal solid waste industry? SWANA wants to know what you’re doing that is shaping the future of solid waste management. We are seeking abstracts and presentation proposals that demonstrate programs and ideas that will advance the practice of solid waste management over the next 50 years. Submit your proposal online at www.WASTECON.org.

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dents, collected 7.78 million medical sharps, 2.52 million household batteries and 118,850 fluorescent lights between April 2009 and April 2012 under the proTravis Wagner gram. Retailers have also collected 3,200 liters of latex paint between September 2009 and April 2012. Nearly all of those items would have gone into residential garbage otherwise, he said. “One of the most successful aspects is the dramatic increase in convenience for customers,” Wagner said. “Now the convenience has increased so much that it’s only a little more inconvenient than throwing it away as trash. Now there is more parity in the convenience; people are more willing to not throw it away.” Under the program, retailers who sell the item must collect it. Once they have a bin full of the material, they contact the county for pick up. The retailer pays a $40 collection fee and pays for the management of the waste as well, Wagner said. Retailers are barred from charging a specific line-item fee to pay for the program but are free to charge on the front-end if they wish. “That’s their choice – they can increase the price, but they can’t charge a separate fee,” he said. “We’ve done some very informal surveys, which have found there is not an increase in prices. But that needs more research.” Unlike extended producer responsibility laws, the manufacturer of the product doesn’t pay for the management of the waste in the program. The onus is on the retailers selling the items. However, retailers reported that a side benefit to the program was more customers coming to the store after they dropped off items. Setting political aspects aside, Wagner said, the program could be replicated elsewhere if the costs are kept low. “The collection rates are pretty amazing,” Wagner said. “If they didn’t have this program, most of these wastes would still be disposed of in municipal solid waste. They are able to divert that out and satisfy the state landfill waste.” 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Jeremy Carroll at jcarroll@wasterecycling news.com or 313-446-6780.

SESSION PREVIEW What: “Increasing Diversion of Universal Waste through a Mandatory Retail Take-Back Program: The Case of San Luis Obispo County, Calif.” When: 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Speaker: Travis. P. Wagner


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T U E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Lessons in public acceptance of projects You can’t convince everyone, WTE coalition leader says By Jeremy Carroll WRN reporter

Courtesy, Covanta Energy via McMillan Associates Architects

The Durham York Energy Centre in Ontario was approved recently.

Embracing the public process and being as open and honest with residents, politicians and regulators are the best ways to help get approval for some of the toughest projects. Or so says John Foden, executive director of the Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition and consultant on various matters.

Foden will be discussing how to get over hurdles in the approval process. Foden said while he’ll be using waste-to-energy projects as an example, the process can be applied to all different types of controversial projects. “If someone wants to extract lessons on how to build a [medical waste facility] or build a landfill, I think the lessons are generic enough for that,” he said. Foden, who is based in Toronto, said public acceptance is the toughest part of the approval process.

“I think the public is generally inclined to say no, and the closer these facilities are to their home, the more quickly they are inclined to say no,” he said. John Foden In the case of WTE facilities, Foden said a lack of understanding of how the project will be developed and how it will operate lead to public apprehension. “If you outline the benefits, if you outline the rationale, if you outline it transparently and very publicly … a lot of those early challenges tend to go away,” he said. Early public meetings are often big, but those are important in answering questions that will arise, he said. “People are reasonable, they have a set of questions and if they get good, solid and reasonable answers to those questions, they start to understand the project and aren’t as frightened,” Foden said. Then, of course, there are people who won’t listen and will oppose the project from start to finish. But that’s perfectly OK, he said. “I think you have to accept there are going to be people you can’t convince,” Foden said. “I think you are fooling yourself if you think you can convince everyone to think this is a good idea. People tend to get overzealous about their original positions. “I think you have to work very, very diligently to work with people who can be convinced.” By working through the project, as you answer questions, the skeptics will start to fall away, he said. “The number becomes smaller, smaller and smaller the more transparent and more proactive you are in informing and educating,” Foden said. Having strong political leadership is important as well. “You need a political champion to step up. They don’t have to put their political career at risk although they should be aware of that risk,” Foden said. “But they [should not be] afraid of half a dozen zealots who might show up at a meeting.” 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Jeremy Carroll at jcarroll@wasterecycling news.com or 313-446-6780.

SESSION PREVIEW What: “Lesson Learned: Winning Approval for the Toughest Projects” When: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Speaker: John Foden


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AUGUST 14, 2012 ● 13

Achievable diversion before zero waste, expert advises By Shawn Wright WRN reporter

SESSION PREVIEW

When considering the definition of zero waste, it’s not always about what can be readily seen. For example, Phoenix-based North Transfer Station and Material Recovery Facility’s steel framing is made from approximately 90% recycled content. It’s these sorts of projects that Brea, Calif.-based J.R. Miller & Associates Inc., an architectural building design company, sees as the impetus of instituting a zerowaste culture. “It starts with how do you define zero waste,” said James Miller, president and CEO of J.R. Miller & Associates. “I think different people have different opinions of exactly what that means. My opinion is that you do the best job to divert the most materials you can and, therefore, recover and reuse the most materials you can. At the end of the day, the minimum amount goes to a landfill.” In addition to the recycled steel, the transfer station and MRF has fly ash content for all concrete, photovoltaic solar panel rays and

What: “Planning / Design of Facilities to Support a Zero Waste System Transformation of Transfer Station and Recycling Facilities” When: 4 to 5:00 p.m. Speaker: James Miller Courtesy, J.R. Miller & Associates Inc.

The Phoenix-based North Transfer Station and Material Recovery Facility’s steel framing is made from approximately 90% recycled content. Brea, Calif.-based J.R. Miller & Associates Inc., an architectural building design company, worked on the transfer station and sees these sorts of projects as the impetus of instituting a zero-waste culture. the interior finishes are made with recycled material content. Nearly four years ago, Miller’s company also designed the only U.S. Green Building Council LEED Platinum certified jet hangar in the world. Hangar 25 in Burbank, Calif., used 35% recycled content material and 48% local building materials for construction, recycled 77% of building waste during construction, and features photovoltaic solar power to achieve 110% of the

building’s energy needs. As Miller attests, going zero waste has its hurdles, which include having the proper infrastructure to collect and reclaim materials, participation from consumers and businesses and political will. But having periodic zero-waste targets and patience can go a long way. “If you look at those obstacles, those can’t be resolved overnight, particularly the public participa-

tion part,” Miller said. “It takes a lot of education, incentives, marketing and all sorts of things that just can’t be achieved overnight. … Another one, James Miller though, is being willing to commit the resources to do it right.”

One main key to successfully going zero waste is being realistic in the definition. “Zero waste doesn’t mean zero,” Miller said. “I think that’s the same thing as wanting to be perfect. We all know we can’t be perfect. If you’re not perfect, does that mean you failed?” 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Shawn Wright at swright@wasterecycling news.com or 313-446-0346.

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SWANA traces origins to humble beginning After initial meetings at restaurant, chapters sprang up across North America By Jim Johnson WRN senior reporter When a handful of men from Southern California met in late 1961 at a restaurant to discuss the possibility of forming a group that one day would become the Solid Waste Association of North America, one thing was decided. Everybody was going Dutch. But the men also knew that aside from the need to split the check, there also was a need to create an organization that would allow the exchange of information and knowledge among refuse supervisors and managers. So officials from the cities of Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Pomona, San Bernardino, Glendale and Long Beach met at the Huddle Restaurant in West Covina about two weeks before Christmas that year to hatch a plan. Looking back at Dec. 12, 1961, some might argue that historians don’t think much really happened that day. Irish singer Daniel O’Donnell was born and Norwegian silent film start Hauk Aabel died. But the date stands out in solid waste history as the initial meeting to form what would soon become the Government Refuse Collection and Disposal Association, or GRCDA. Three decades later, the group would change its name to SWANA. Grant H. Flint, from Los Angeles, became chair during this initial meeting. Flint, just a week before, had suggested the men get together to talk about the potential of forming a group. Up until this point, the opportunity to share information was fairly limited and chiefly depended on meetings of the American Public Works Association. But that group represented a wide range of public works issues, and these men were looking to create an organization solely focused on trash collection and disposal. By February 1962, a name for the group was selected and bylaws and a constitution were developed for consideration. An attorney was brought in to discuss incorporation, and Flint was elected the group’s first president. The Huddle Restaurant, by that point, had become a favorite

“They made it very clear to me: If I was going to be paid, I was going to have to raise the money to be paid.” – H. Lanier ‘Lanny’ Hickman SWANA executive director from 1978-96 meeting place for the fledgling group. With its so-called “googie” architecture, it’s exactly what you would expect to find in the early 1960s Southern California with is modern building design. The GRCDA stayed local as it got its sea legs, but not for long, as efforts were made to expand the group beyond its Southern California roots. “Obviously Grant had given the idea a good deal of thought, as what was to be done and what he thought the organization should do. Over the next several months Grant took command of the organization and with his leadership a number of steps were taken and initiatives began,” wrote H. Lanier (Lanny) Hickman, the group’s executive director from 1978 to 1996, in a history of the organization. Information was gleaned from that extensive historical account to serve as a key basis for this story along with an interview with Hickman last month. Chapters sprung up in other parts of California in 1963 and 1964 as the concept of the organization took hold elsewhere. The late 1960s and 1970s saw the group grow beyond its traditional California base to include chapters in the Pacific Northwest, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Canada. By 1978, folks in Florida and Oklahoma had gotten into the act with the creation of chapters there. With chapters being added around the country around this time, the decision was made to move the organization’s headquarters to Washington, D.C., and Hickman was hired. Hickman took over for Ben Warner, who was previously executive director of the group from 1974 to early 1978 when the two sides had a falling out, according to Hickman’s history. Warner had been publisher of a magazine called Solid Waste Systems that became property of the GRCDA. After his departure, the magazine ceased publishing in 1979. Hickman, who had just retired from the federal Office of Solid

Waste, was brought on as a parttime employee and quickly learned the GRCDA had only enough cash to keep the office open for about a year in the nation’s capital. “I was a little surprised that there wasn’t much documentation and no business files. They worked out of a checkbook. They kept good records of the meetings they were having. The annual meeting that is now Wastecon started in about the third year after the association was formed,” Hickman said. “I was more surprised [by] the checkbook that had about $12,000 in the bank account and here we were opening an office in Washington, D.C.,” he said. “They made it very clear to me,” Hickman said. “If I was going to be paid, I was going to have to raise the money to be paid. That surprised me more than the lack of information.” But with his governmental pension and some money for consulting work, Hickman said he got along just fine in those early years. “So, it was a leap of faith for both sides,” Hickman wrote. Hickman spent his first months on the job creating operations in Washington. “Many things had to be established as the association had been operating literally out of the car trunks of officers since the 1961 startup of GRCDA,” Hickman wrote. By 1982, the group’s executive committee started examining whether a name change “to be more reflective of the association and the field of practice (solid waste management)” was feasible, according to Hickman’s history. That work included approaching chapter presidents for their opinions and discovering there was little support for such a move at that time. The following year, Hickman was directed by the group to trademark the GRCDA logo and name under federal laws. It wasn’t until 1990 that the organization started taking the steps to change its name to the Solid Waste Association of North

America. “Over several years the idea of changing the name of GRCDA was an issue addressed by the membership, the EC (Executive Committee) and the IB (International Board). Pressure for a name change came from some officers, directors, and the Executive Director,” wrote Hickman. “The ED continued to make the point that what GRCDA was now was nothing like what was in the early 1960s when it was formed. Further, Lanny pointed out that the terminology of refuse was out of step with current terminology – solid waste. He further pointed out that “we were more than a collection and disposal organization – we were into waste-to-energy, recycling, landfill gas management, manager/executive training, advocacy,” he wrote. With both the committee and board interested in a name change, the task turned to selecting a new moniker that had to meet two important criteria: The new name had to use the words “solid waste” and include a geographic designation. A couple of options rose to the top as executive committee members pondered the name change – the Association of Solid Waste Professionals and, of course, the Solid Waste Association of North America. SWANA, which flowed off the tongue more easily than ASWP, eventually was selected to go before a vote of the general mem-

bers at the 1990 annual meeting. SWANA also represented what Hickman called the “international nature of the association.” “The consideration was an emotional one and there was a strong minority of long-term members who really wanted to keep the GRCDA name. However, there was an overwhelming majority to change the name and the proposed Solid Waste Association of America was approved,” Hickman wrote. Another change that occurred during Hickman’s early years was the group’s decision to move out of Washington and into nearby Silver Spring, Md. The savings in rent and expenses allowed the organization to start building a staff beyond Hickman, but there still were some lean times through the mid-1980s. Having a Washington address was important to the group’s board at the time, but Hickman convinced the group that the association could grow by moving to less expensive quarters. “So we moved out to Silver Spring. Why Silver Spring? Because I lived seven miles from the office out there and it was most convenient for me, first, and second, it was right at the end of the red line of the Metro. I could walk one block to the Metro and be downtown in six minutes,” he said. In those days, the association bought used furniture for the new offices and sometimes had to See SWANA, Next Page


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SWANA Continued from Page 14 make careful decisions about how to spend its money. Salaries, rent and the telephone bill always came first, Hickman said. The group always paid its bills, but it sometimes had to put off other projects it was interested in pursuing. “The first thing we always did when we started having staff is they always got paid. And the landlord got paid and the phone got paid. Because if we didn’t have those three things, we wouldn’t have been in business,” the former executive director said. Hickman stayed on at SWANA until 1996, through a five-year transition period that allowed for the name change, before he decided to retire after 18 years with the organization. He had indicated to the group’s board back in 1991 about his interest to retire, but continued to work for the industry for another half a decade. Hickman’s departure allowed for the hiring of another leader who has ended up spending years with the group as well. John H. Skinner, executive director, was hired to succeed Hickman and remains in that position to this day. That means the group only has had two leaders since 1978. Skinner was quite familiar with SWANA, and vice-versa,

Courtesy, Solid Waste Association of North America

From left, John Skinner, current executive director of the Solid Waste Association of North America, H. Lanier Hickman, former executive director, and Mark Hammond, SWANA International past president, shown here in 1999, are among the leaders of the group, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary. from his years working at the U.S. EPA, where he retired in 1996 after 24 years. Skinner’s EPA stint included time as director of its Office of Solid Waste, and joining SWANA after his federal retirement has allowed him to continue working in the solid waste field. Since Skinner’s arrival, SWANA has grown from about 5,000 to 8,000 members and the annual budget has increased from about $3.5 million to about $5.5 million. That’s a far cry from the $12,000 that Hickman was handed back in the day. Skinner, when he arrived at SWANA, said he saw the need to increase member services and encourage chapters to play a bigger role in delivering those services.

Member services such as training and education are at the heart of SWANA’s mission, he said. So the association also adopted a model where training and education was pushed out toward the chapter level in an approach aimed at becoming more affordable and more accessible to local members. Beefing up this outreach also helped SWANA raise more money needed to operate the organization. “The bottom line was to make us more financial stable. When I came on board, our assets were very, very small. They might have been negative for one year. Our board was very concerned that we didn’t have reserves necessary to carry the association through any difficult times in the future,” he said.

During the ensuing years, SWANA has built its rainy day fund to about 50% of its annual budget, or about $2.5 million. The goal for the nonprofit group is to eventually get that number to equal one year’s worth of expenses. “It was tough. It was a tough couple of years. We really had to tighten our belts and we had to look at our programs and decide which ones we could continue and where we could grow,” Skinner said of his early years with the group. “We had to look at operating SWANA like a business.” With SWANA being a nonprofit group, the association is not concerned with making money. But the group still can use its cash flow as an indicator of whether it is meeting goals. While there were some tough times at the beginning of Skinner’s leadership at SWANA, there also have been some challenging times in recent years as a result of the recession. Membership, however, increased last fiscal year to reverse a trend first seen when the recession hit in 2008. “When we went into the recession, we did not grow. In fact, we had some small declines then and a couple of flat years. But last year we came back for the first time and we’re back at the 5% (growth) level,” he said. That’s a growth rate more typical of the decade or so prior to 2008, he said. Membership, at the end of the fiscal year that ended June 30,

AUGUST 14, 2012 ● 15 stood at 8,082, the second highest in the history of SWANA. Only the 8,184 members registered at the end of June 2008, right before the recession hit, is higher, Skinner said. “We don’t have a big endowment that we can draw [on] and [can’t] pay salaries if we are not successful financially. We live from the revenues that we produce every year. We’ve got to be doing things that people want and are willing to support financially,” Skinner said. “We’ve got to be very flexible and be able to move quickly into new areas when we see them developing,” he said. Membership renewal, during the recession, stayed at its typical rate of about 85% as some retire or move on to jobs in other professions. The difficulties came in attracting new members, which typically account for about 20% of the roster in any given year. New membership fell to below 10% at some points, meaning SWANA’s ranks shrank some years. “The significant thing is that our existing members stayed with us. They saw the value in the organization and continued to support the organization,” the executive director said. “I believe that we’ve turned things around and we’ll be growing at the 4% or 5% ever year, which I think is strong for our organization.” 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News senior reporter Jim Johnson at jpjohnson@waste recyclingnews.com or 937-964-1289.

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16 ● AUGUST 14, 2012

T U E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Companies are based in the United States and Canada. They are ranked according to revenue from hauling, disposal and transfer of all types of residential, commercial and industrial waste. The list excludes revenue from incineration and the sale of recyclables.

2011 Rank

2010 Rank

Company Name Headquarters / Ownership

Top Waste Executive

In millions of dollars 2011 2010 Hauling Hauling & Disposal & Disposal Revenue Revenue

Types of Waste Managed#

No. of Hauling Trucks

No. of Rolloff 2011 Containers Employees Website

S,H,M,C,L

32,000

NR

44,300

www.wm.com

14,950

186,426

30,000

www.republicservices.com

2,900

NR

7,000

www.progressivewaste.com

1

1

Waste Management Inc. Houston / Public

David P. Steiner President/CEO

13,300.00

12,900.00

2

2

Republic Services, Inc. Phoenix, Ariz. / Public

Donald W. Slager President/CEO

7,610.00

7,610.00

S,C,L,O

3

4

Progressive Waste Solutions Ltd. Joseph D. Quarin CEO Vaughan, Ontario / Public

1,706.38

1,340.40

S,C

4

3

Stericycle Inc. Lake Forest, Ill. / Public

Mark Miller CEO

1,676.05

1,439.40

M

NR

NR

11,122

5

5

Waste Connections Inc. The Woodlands, Texas / Public

Ron Mittelstaedt CEO

1,510.00

1,320.00

S

3,000

35,000

6,000

www.wasteconnections.com

6

6

Veolia Environmental Services North America Corp. Chicago / Public

Richard Burke President/CEO

1,200.00

1,100.00

S,C,H,L,M,N,O 2,700

NR

9,600

www.veoliaes.com

7

7

Clean Harbors Norwell, Mass. / Public

Alan S. McKim President/CEO

830.53

720.60

H

4,879

10,500

8,320

www.cleanharbors.com

8

17

PSC Environmental Services Houston / Private

Bruce Roberson President/CEO

599.00

576.00

H,L,M,O

193

N/A

3,038

www.pscnow.com

9

9

Recology San Francisco / Private

Michael J. Sangiacomo President/CEO

591.00

490.00

S,C,O

1,431

5,700

2,555

www.recology.com

10

11

Rumpke Consolidated Companies, Inc. Cincinnati / Private

William J. Rumpke Sr. President/CEO

444.61

413.47

S,C,O

1,421

NR

2,207

www.rumpke.com

11

12

Waste Industries USA Inc. Raleigh, N.C. / Private

Lonnie C. Poole III CEO

436.00

397.00

S,C

950

NR

1,985

www.wasteindustries.com

12

15

Advanced Disposal Services Inc. Charlie Appleby Chairman/CEO Jacksonville, Fla. / Private

351.00

322.00

S,C

940

8,149

1,559

www.advanceddisposal.com

See Footnotes on Page 21

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18 ● AUGUST 14, 2012

T U E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Companies are based in the United States and Canada. They are ranked according to revenue from hauling, disposal and transfer of all types of residential, commercial and industrial waste. The list excludes revenue from incineration and the sale of recyclables.

2011 Rank

2010 Rank

Company Name Headquarters / Ownership

Top Waste Executive

In millions of dollars 2011 2010 Hauling Hauling & Disposal & Disposal Revenue Revenue

Types of Waste Managed#

No. of Hauling Trucks

No. of Rolloff 2011 Containers Employees Website

13

16

Waste Pro USA, Inc. Longwood, Fla. / Private

John J. Jennings President/CEO

343.70

270.00

S,C,O

1,450

5,426

2,400

www.wasteprousa.com

14

14

Safety-Kleen Systems Inc. Plano, Texas / Private

Dave Eckelbarger Executive Vice President

330.00*

326.00

H,L,O

2,200

N/A

4,500

www.safety-kleen.com

15

10

Casella Waste Systems, Inc. Rutland, Vt. / Public

John Casella Chairman/CEO

306.50

311.60

S,C,L

NR

NR

1,349

www.casella.com

16

18

WCA Waste Corp. Houston / Public 2

Tom J. Fatjo Jr. President/CEO

273.81

229.48

S,C

750

NR

1,211

www.wcawaste.com

17

13

Heritage Environmental Services Bill McDaniel President Indianapolis / Private

273.20

344.40

S,H,L,M

260

1,150

875

www.heritage-enviro.com

18

19

EQ-The Environmental Quality Company Wayne, Mich. / Private

David Lusk President/CEO

244.00

225.00

H,L,O

709

852

921

www.eqonline.com

19

20

Interstate Waste Services Basking Ridge, N.J. / Private

Michael de Castro CEO

202.70

170.90

S,O

336

2,702

630

www.interstatewaste.com

20

21

Solid Waste Services Inc. / J. P. Mascaro & Sons Audubon, Pa. / Private

Pasquale N. Mascaro President

160.00

150.00

S,C

300

700

750

www.jpmascaro.com

21

22

EnviroSolutions Inc. Manassas, Va. / Private

Eric Wallace CEO

155.00

150.00

S,C

NR

NR

350

www.esiwaste.com

22

28

U.S. Ecology Boise, Idaho / Public

James Baumgardner President / CEO

154.90

104.80

H,L,N

0

349

387

www.usecology.com

23

23

CSX Transportation Jacksonville, Fla. / Public

Henry Connors Director

146.94

132.40

S,H,C,L,N

N/A

N/A

6

24

24

Ming’s Recycling 1 Sacramento, Calif. / Private

Kenny Luong President

120.00

120.00

S,O

N/A

17

35

See Footnotes on Page 21

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Ranking continues on Page 21

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AUGUST 14, 2012 â—? 21

T U E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Companies are based in the United States and Canada. They are ranked according to revenue from hauling, disposal and transfer of all types of residential, commercial and industrial waste. The list excludes revenue from incineration and the sale of recyclables.

2011 Rank

2010 Rank

Company Name Headquarters / Ownership

Top Waste Executive

In millions of dollars 2011 2010 Hauling Hauling & Disposal & Disposal Revenue Revenue

Types of Waste Managed#

No. of Hauling Trucks

No. of Rolloff 2011 Containers Employees Website

24

24

Terra Renewal 1 Richardson, Texas / Private

Andy McNeill President/CEO

120.00

120.00

L,O

290

55

500

www.terrarenewal.com

26

31

Action Environmental Group, Inc. Ron Bergamini Newark, N.J. / Private CEO

109.00

87.30

S,C

100

1,200

365

www.actioncarting.com

27

—

Consolidated Waste Service Corp. Gurabo, Puerto Rico / Private

Carlos Contreras Moreno President

98.00

90.00

S,M,O

200

225

1,200

28

29

Galaxy Recycling Inc. 1 Jersey City, N.J. / Private

Gary Giordano President/CEO

95.00

92.50

S,C,O

95

675

295

29

30

1-800-GOT-JUNK? Vancouver, BC / Private

Brian Scudamore CEO

91.50

88.20

S,C

1,000

0

1,500

30

33

Coulter Companies, Inc. Peoria, Ill. / Private

Royal J. Coulter CEO

87.60

75.00

S,H,C,L,N

265

2,500

517

www.pdcarea.com

31

32

Tully Environmental Inc. Flushing, N.Y. / Private

Peter K. Tully President

87.53

79.94

S,L

72

105

146

www.tullyconstruction.com

32

34

Rock River Environmental Services Rockford, Ill. / Private

John Lichty President/CEO

79.00

73.61

S,C,H,L,M

172

22

258

www.rresvcs.com

www.conwastepr.com

www.galaxyrecycling.com www.1800gotjunk.com

WASTE KEY

FOOTNOTES * - Estimated 1- Company supplied data in 2011. Information is estimated using 2011 data, staff research and other sources

2 -WCA Waste became private in 2012 NR - Not reported

S = Solid waste M = Medical waste L = Liquid waste H = Hazardous waste

METHODOLOGY Companies are ranked according to revenue from hauling, disposal and transfer of all types of residential, commercial and industrial waste. Data for these rankings was obtained from company surveys. In cases where current data was not provided to Waste & Recycling News, company data was estimated using staff research and other sources. Questions about these rankings? Please contact Waste & Recycling News Editor John Campanelli at jcampanelli@wasterecyclingnews.com

N = Nuclear waste C = C&D debris O = Other #=

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T U E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

AUGUST 14, 2012 â—? 23

Robert Craggs of SAIC and Rick Sapir of Hawkin Delafield and Wood chat during the Wastecon opening reception. The reception celebrates SWANA’s 50th anniversary with entertainment from Vocal Trash, a music and dance group which uses recycled items to make their music. The reception was held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in National Harbor, Md.

An attendee keeps time with the beat at the opening reception.

Pamela Gratton dances with friends during the reception.

Photos: Garrett Hubbard, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Kay Hickman is greeted by another attendee before she is honored on the stage at the Wastecon opening reception.


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T U E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

AUGUST 14, 2012 ● 25

Fore! Wastecon 2012 attendees hit the links Photos: John Campanelli, Waste & Recycling News

Gary Bruns, policy analyst for Washington County, Minn., blasts a shot on the driving range before the Wastecon golf outing on Monday at Laurel Hill Golf Club in Lorton, Va. Bruns said his philosophy is simple: “Putt for dough.”

James Allen, executive director of the Raleigh County Solid Waste Authority in Beckley, W.Va., stands over team member Bill Bray, west region sales representative for Al-jon in Ottumwa, Iowa, as they line up a putt at the Wastecon golf outing on Monday at Laurel Hill Golf Club in Lorton, Va.

Course “beer girl” Linda Pecora from Long Island, N.Y., takes a drink order next at her cart during the Wastecon golf tournament on Monday, as Scott Brinkerhoff, vice president of Hallaton Inc. in Baltimore, looks on.

Robin Roddy, a facility manager for the Delaware Solid Waste Authority in Dover, Del., screams for her drive to get close to the hole on No. 16. A hole-in-one on that hole would have won her $10,000.

Dan Williamson, executive director of the Plainfield Municipal Utilities Authority in New Jersey, shows some frustration with his putting on the practice green.

Anne Germain, chief of engineering and technology at the Delaware Solid Waste Authority in Dover, Del., tends a flag during the golf tournament. Germain is also taking the flag, so to speak, as the incoming president of the Solid Waste Association of North America this week.

Jeff Ray, sales manager for All State Fire in Rowlett, Texas, winds up to blast a drive during the golf tournament.


3:29:21 PM

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26 ● AUGUST 14, 2012

T U E S D A Y W A S T E C O N S H O W D A I LY

Insiders: Learning from one another

WRN STOCK REPORT Company Ticker Casella Waste CWST Caterpillar CAT Clean Energy CLNE Clean Harbors CLH Covanta Holding CVA Darling International DAR Deere & Co. DE Dover Corp. DOV Ecolab Inc. ECL Heritage-Crystal HCCI Layne Christensen LAYN Macquarie MIC Progressive Waste BIN Republic Services RSG Stericycle SRCL US Ecology ECOL Veolia VE Waste Connections WCN Waste Management WM

Close* $4.2 $88.61 $13.92 $54.80 $17.29 $16.93 $79.76 $57.00 $65.1 $18.28 $21.01 $42.08 $20.17 $28.72 $89.77 $19.64 $10.18 $30.04 $35.01

P/E N/A 9.91 N/A 22.29 31.55 14.71 11.06 12.39 37.18 148.62 N/A 64.64 N/A 15.81 30.43 1.79 N/A 22.32 17.74

Market Cap $113.33M $57.89B $1.21B $2.92B $2.3B $1.99B $31.72B $10.42B $19.50B $332.93M $409.11M $1.96B $2.32B $10.49B $7.67B $358.47M $5.15B $3.70B $16.23B

* As of Aug. 13. To request to add your company to the WRN stock report, contact WRN managing editor Douglas D. Fisher at dfisher@wasterecyclingnews.com.

Continued from Page 1 170,000 people. Perron said he hopes to begin the country’s first large-scale single-stream operation in the coming year or so. He’s working with a pilot program now. “We’re starting to get more

into the same systems that they use in the U.S. [mainland],” Perron said of Guam, a U.S. possession in the western Pacific Ocean. “We were behind the times for the longest time on Guam, as far as hauling technology. Now, we’re using the frontloaders, automated tippers and

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things of that nature. We’re finally starting to advance and catch up a little bit with the U.S. and the types of things they do here with trash collection.” Perron, who will be taking part in the Solid Waste Association of North America’s Recycling Systems certification test on Wednesday at Wastecon, said he foresees a single-stream system starting out as a manual pickertype, due to the initial low-volume estimate of 2,000 tons to 3,000 tons per year. Others who came from faraway places were hoping for a little more from the tour. Fernando Rodriguez, president of the SWANA Caribbean Chapter, wanted substantive information. He said he’s attended the past F. Rodriguez four Wastecons. “I was hoping to learn more of the regulatory part, which is the EPA. We work with that every day,” Rodriguez said. “We are disappointed because Hanna Rodriguez of a lack of scheduling and information brought by the bureaucrats.” Hanna Rodriguez, environmental engineer from CHES Services Corp. in Puerto Rico and international representative of the SWANA Caribbean Chapter, also said she was looking for something more substantial. Rick Billington, superintendent for collection and recycling services for Calgary, Alberta, said it was interesting to see the sights in Washington, such as the Lincoln Memorial and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. But he, too, wished there was more tangible information. “I wanted to get a little bit of insight as to how the U.S. government puts in controls for the solid waste business and how that affects each state,” Billington said. “Unfortunately, I didn’t really find that out today.” 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Shawn Wright at swright@waste recyclingnews.com or 313-446-0346.

“I wanted to get a little bit of insight as to how the U.S. government puts in controls for the solid waste business and how that affects each state. Unfortunately, I didn’t really find that out today.” Rick Billington Superintendent for collection and recycling services for Calgary, Alberta


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Wastecon 2012 - Day 1