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3/28/2012

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Thursday March 29, 2012

W O H Y L S I A D

Crain’s News Sour ce for Envir onmental Management

‘Show Daily’ adds to RRC experience GRAPEVINE, TEXAS – In addition to offering informative sessions, engaging exhibitors and excellent networking events, the Residential Recycling Conference is now offering something extra special ... a morning newspaper. What you’re holding in your hands is the first-ever Waste & Recycling News show edition. It was created last night, printed in Dallas and delivered John Campanelli this morning. You’ll get another one tomorrow. Our staff of reporters is here at the Gaylord Texan Resort, covering sessions, interviewing people, previewing events and looking for interesting news and stories that we hope will add another dimension to your visit. You will see them snapping photos, taking notes and asking questions as they tap into the expertise of recycling professionals. Feel free to talk to them – and me – about your recycling ideas, concerns and the information you think we need to know. These “hot-off-the-pressesâ€? editions are a first for us, and we are excited to provide you with fresh news to make this week even more educational, enlightening and, perhaps, more profitable. Thank you for taking the time to read the RRC’s own special “morning paper.â€? 䥲 Contact Waste & Recycling News Editor John Campanelli at jcampanelli@crain.com or 313-446-6767.

wasterecyclingnews.com

A peek inside a recycling facility

Getting ready for some face time

Tour showcases Greenstar’s single-stream plant By Shawn Wright WRN reporter

Pallets holding displays and boxes sit here and there throughout the 30,000 square feet of space and more are on the way, as forklifts make their deliveries to booths. It’s still early in the day on Wednesday, but the folks at Otto Environmental Systems are already busy in their booth space. Large wooden crates holding the company’s display come rolling down the aisle. All told, the company shipped more than three tons to Dallas for the show, according to Kirsti Nelson, marketing director for

GARLAND, TEXAS – In 25 years, Greg Maxwell has seen the recycling industry go from drivers sorting recyclables at the curb to the technological marvel of singlestream collection and processing. On Wednesday, 90 Residential Recycling Conference attendees boarded buses to get a first-hand look at Greenstar Recycling’s single-stream materials recovery facility in Garland, Texas. Among them was Greg Maxwell, senior vice president of Chicago Ridge, Ill.-based Resource Management Cos., which handles, processes and markets recyclable materials. “I think it’s an important asset for the Dallas-Fort Worth area,� Maxwell said. “Obviously, residential single-stream has been growing and growing. [Greenstar is] stepping up, taking this material and making it into a product that’s going to be useful and used over again for recycling.� The Greenstar facility, which opened in 2007, is a single-stream operation that processes about 500 tons of recyclables per day. Robert Taylor, plant manager, said the facility is processing

See EXHIBITS, Page 15

See TOUR, Page 13

Jim Johnson, Waste & Recycling News

Kirsti Nelson, marketing director for Otto Environmental Systems, surveys her booth space Wednesday morning in preparation for the Residential Recycling Conference at the Gaylord Texan Resort.

RRC marketers relish opportunity Show gives executives a chance to meet with potential customers and existing ones face-to-face By Jim Johnson WRN senior reporter GRAPEVINE, TEXAS – It’s a few minutes before 8 a.m., and the exhibit hall is already alive with activity, as 20 or so folks are doing what they need to do to help prepare the open space. In the hours ahead, they will be joined by dozens of others as booths take shape in preparation for another Residential Recycling Conference.

䥲 Picture This! WRN’s photo page from Day 1 Page 14

All rights reserved. ŠEntire contents Copyright 2012 by Crain Communications Inc.

           

  1 17  

䥲 Photos from the tour Page 3 䥲 Greenstar Recycling executive says stewardship ‘here to stay’ Page 3

RecyclePerks Register Recycle

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March 29, 2012

Greenstar Recycling tour Left: Don Doaty, day shift lead supervisor for Greenstar Recycling in Garland, Texas, discusses the bounce adherence table during a tour of the company’s facility on Wednesday. Right: Tour leader Robert Taylor, from left, plant manager for Greenstar Recycling, talks with Gary Gilliam, sales manager of Resource Management, and Greg Maxwell, vice president of Resource Management.

A total of 90 people from the Residential Recycling Conference went to the Greenstar Recycling facility tour in Garland, Texas, on Wednesday. Photos: Jeremy Carroll, Waste & Recycling News

Greenstar executive: Recycling ‘here to stay’ By Vince Bond Jr. WRN reporter The luxury of a Cadillac isn’t only reserved for the highways of Texas. Greenstar Recycling’s facility in Dallas boasts the Bollegraaf singlestream processing system, which General Manager Rick Peters compared to General Motors Co.’s line of vehicles. The 155,000-squarefoot facility opened in Rick Peters 2007 and processes 500 tons of recyclables a day, 126,000 tons annually, Peters wrote in an e-mail interview with Waste & Recycling News prior to the Residential Recycling Conference tour on Wednesday. Q: Is there anything that sets your facility apart from other operations? A: Greenstar does not own landfills and, as a result, our focus is 100% on recycling. We are also now accepting asep-

tic packaging in our single stream and are the first to do so in our marketplace. Q: Describe the processing equipment. What are some of the main features? A: Greenstar is using a Bollegraaf single-stream system. This is the Cadillac of single-stream processing systems. One of the main features of this system is an OCC screen at the front end of the system, a glass crusher, a bounce adherence table, magnets for the steel cans, an eddy current for the aluminum cans and a Titech optical sorter that fires on PET containers. The MSS Carton Sort system was added just about six months ago that helps sort out the aseptic packaging. Q: What are some of the daily challenges? A: Daily challenge at our facility is small, plastic grocery bags that get wrapped around the shafts of our equipment and loose shredded material. These grocery bags result in downtime to cut them out and clear them away. Let’s keep those small plastic bags out of the recycling bins! Another challenge can be loose,

shredded material. It flies everywhere! Shredding is a great way for people to ensure their information remains confidential. However, we ask that people place this material in a large, see-through bag. That way the material is confined and easy to handle. Q: What would you tell someone who says recycling is just a fad that won’t maintain its momentum? A: Recycling is here to stay. Singlestream systems such as ours make it so easy to recycle. With the cost going up to create new products, it only makes sense to reuse what we can. We should always try to recycle and recover what we can before sending something to the landfill. It’s better for the planet and the bottom line. With commodity demand rising and landfill costs increasing, businesses and municipalities will be increasingly focused on cutting costs by increasing their recycling volumes. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Vince Bond at vbond@crain.com or 313-446-1653.

3

Best of the RRC From an authentic Texas-style hoedown to discussions about how to get the most out of a recycling program, there will be a lot to see and do at the third Residential Recycling Conference, including more than 60 booths and nine breakout sessions: 䡲 Multifamily recycling: A four-person panel will tackle one of the toughest nuts to crack in recycling: multifamily units. Executives from Greenstar Recycling, Coca-Cola, Sims Municipal Recycling and the city of San Antonio will share their successes in the multifamily recycling market. The discussion will take place at 8:45 a.m. today following opening remarks by Kurt Blascoe of Republic Services. 䡲 Walk the floor: Be sure to bring comfortable shoes for laps around the vendor booths. With more than 60 booths planned, there will be plenty to see, touch and talk about. 䡲 RRC hoedown reception: The hoedown will feature a mechanical bull, the band 3 Fools on 3 Stools (whose website proclaims concertgoers will have a “root’n, toot’n, heck of a time!”), and an open bar with appetizers. Cowboy boots and hats are not mandatory, but tomfoolery is strongly encouraged. The party gets going at 6 p.m. today. The event will give conference attendees the best opportunity to network, exchange ideas and business cards. Otto Environmental Systems North America Inc. will also be giving away a hefty cash prize to one lucky participant, drawn from those who enter. The winner must be present to win. 䡲 Innovations in collection and processing: Representatives from ReCommunity and Republic Services Inc. will be discussing the latest and greatest in collection and processing in the recycling industry. The discussion, at 8:30 a.m. Friday, will focus on innovations that make collection more efficient, environmentally friendly and cost effective. 䡲 Green City Award announcement: Ninety-two communities were nominated for the Green City Awards this year, designed to recognize municipalities that are setting an example for how cities should be handling recycling and waste. The awards look for innovative communities who get real results in recycling. The honors for best small city (100,000 residents or fewer), medium city (100,001 to 500,000 residents) and large city (more than 500,000 residents) will be handed out at 12:30 p.m. Friday. The finalists are: Allen, Texas; Whiting, Ind. (in partnership with the Lake County Solid Waste Management District); Rockville, Md.; Ann Arbor, Mich.; Anaheim, Calif.; Bellevue, Wash.; the regional municipality of Halton, Ontario; Honolulu; and San Jose, Calif. 䡲 – Jeremy Carroll, WRN reporter


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Rules change from town to town, so even the experts need education By Shawn Wright WRN reporter

Photos.com

Increased recycling opportunities for multifamily units would go a long way toward increasing the national recycling rate, experts say.

Sorting technology key to multifamily recycling By Jim Johnson WRN senior reporter Investments in education and technology are needed to make multifamily recycling a success, according to one official at Sims – New York City, which handles a large amount of the city’s recyclables. New York, with the highest concentration of multifamily dwellings in the country, relies on Sims to process residential recycling collected by city crews and taken to company sites in the Bronx, Queens and Jersey City, N.J. Sims is in the process of building a new processing facility in partnership with the city that will open in Brooklyn in 2013. Once the new Brooklyn processing facility opens, the company will handle half of the city’s recycled paper collected from residents instead of the small portion it handles now. “The material tends to be a lot dirtier because you don’t have that feeling of being in a singlefamily home and being responsible for the material,” said Maite Quinn, manager of business development and marketing for Sims – New York City. Quinn is part of a panel of recycling experts that will discuss “Multi-Family Recycling: It Can be Done!” following the welcome and opening remarks at 8:45 a.m. today. She will be joined by Neha Patel, manager of recycling relations at Coca-Cola Co., and Josephine Valencia, assistant director of solid waste management for the city of San Antonio. The session is being moderated by Steve Dunn, vice president of

Courtesy, Sugar Land, Texas

Automation and sorting technology can be used to help increase recycling at multifamiliy residences, experts say.

Maite Quinn

Josephine Valencia

municipal development at Greenstar Recycling. Multifamily dwellings make up 70% of the housing stock in New York City, and the language barrier in a city where 170 different languages are spoken can be challenging, Quinn said. Residents in multifamily units, because of the communal nature of trash disposal and recycling, tend to place more contaminants in with their recyclables. Sims has found that contamination runs from 10% to 15% in multifamily units in New York City, higher than the 2% to 5%

seen in smaller communities. That means more work must be done on the back end once the recyclables are collected. And that’s where investments in sorting technology make a difference, Quinn said. While technology can help separate trash from recyclables, she said investments in education as well as equipment are both needed for a successful program. Educating building superintendents and maintenance workers, who often are required to help separate waste and recyclables onsite before they are collected by city crews, is vital, Quinn said. That’s because residents can get away with not paying close attention to recycling, but building owners can be fined if they do not comply with city rules. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News senior reporter Jim Johnson at jpjohnson@crain.com or 937-964-1289.

Sandra Keil was taken aback when she received a note from her recycler in Arlington, Va., notifying her of improper recycling and a $50 fine that could come along with it. She had moved from neighboring Alexandria a month earlier, just three miles away, and didn’t know she was doing something fine-worthy. “How on Earth am I recycling wrong? I am a recycling expert,” said Keil, vice president of government relations and industry affairs for Earth911, a company that provides consumers with recycling information. “I was horrified.” Keil was putting her paper into the recycling bin, and in Arlington, she was supposed to put it on the side of the bin. “That is just an anecdote of why it’s really confusing for consumers,” Keil said. “The local communities, I think, do an excellent job. But, again, you have to continually give that message to consumers over and over again. You have people that just move in, you change the rules, [and] people forget. Whatever the program is and whatever the rules are, they’re going to be different community by community.” Keil and Heather McNamara, senior vice president of Hill and Knowlton Strategies, which works with the nonprofit group Curbside Value Partnership, will be speaking about the importance of effective recycling education during their presentation “Educating the Community – Residential Responsibility” at 10 a.m. today. “What I emphasize over and over is recycling is local, local, local,” Keil said. During her presentation, Keil also will highlight that producers and manufacturers have a responsibility to help make their packaging and products easier to recycle. For McNamara, recycling operations and communities need to think more strategically in the ways they educate and are educated on recycling, in terms of messaging and targeting. “So often, and I see this through social media and just in general, people are just preaching to the choir, over and over again,” McNamara said. “It’s important to continue to motivate, keep those that are already on board informed. But if that’s all you’re

H. McNamara

Sandra Keil

“Whatever the rules are, they’re going to be different community by community.” Sandra Keil Vice president of government relations and industry affairs for Earth911 doing, you’re not really going to get new recyclers, necessarily.” During the conference, Curbside Value Partnership plans to launch CVP Connect, a free, web-based training tool designed to help those who manage curbside recycling programs. “It’s basically going to get you to think differently about education, to be much more targeted in terms of who you’re reaching and you’re messaging,” McNamara said. “There’s also a whole bunch of tips and best practices, so we share a lot of what’s worked for other communities.” In addition, CVP Connect will have design files and creative campaigns that communities can take, adapt and localize. McNamara stressed that it is not a cookie-cutter approach filled with random education campaigns. “First, to get there, there’s a whole bunch of different questions and tools to get communities thinking about what’s going to make the most sense for their program,” McNamara said. “With CVP Connect, it’s really designed to foster a habit of backspace decision-making. So, it’s reinforcing the importance of developing performance metrics to help gauge the impact of education on actual recycling tonnage.” Education can only go so far to get someone to recycle, McNamara said. Sometimes, it’s just as much about motivation. “There are some people you’re going to reach with just flat education,” McNamara said. “And once you’ve gotten all those people on board, then you need to look at that next level, next step. That’s going to take a little bit deeper [effort]; it’s a little harder.” 䡲


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Choose e-waste certified recyclers, expert advises

Coming events COMING EVENTS

By Jeremy Carroll WRN reporter In developing an electronic waste collection event, it is important to know the recycler you are working with is certified by a third party and not sending the material to China or other developing countries. That emphasis will be part of an ewaste collection discussion March 29 at the Residential Recycling Conference at the Gaylord Texan in Dallas. Electronic waste experts will discuss the right way to conduct an e-waste collection drive or hold regular e-waste collections for residents. CEO of AERC Recycling Solutions Bob Landmesser was a late scratch at the Residential Recycling Conference. But he still spoke with Waste & Recycling News ahead of today’s 2:30 p.m. session, “E-waste Collection E-gads: There’s a Right Way?” Jori Pascarella of Intercon Solutions is scheduled to take his place. Q: Talk about the need for proper e-waste collection. A: According to a Business Week article from 2010, approximately 85% of all the electronics that is discarded in the United States goes [to] the landfill. Of the 15% that was left, 12% was going overseas to places like Africa, Southeast Asia and China. Those numbers have changed, but I’d say 20% is being recycled in the United States today and being done under what would be considered a certified recycler. Q: Why is it important to use a certified recycler for e-waste collection? A: So you have now two standards that are being certified in the industry. One is called R2 Rios and the other is eStewards, which is a method in which people are judged and allows third parties to say, “OK, you’ve been certified,”

Photos.com

E-waste, the fastest growing stream of the U.S. solid waste business, is expected to be a hot topic today at the Residential Recycling Conference. to give you an idea that the company you are dealing with is using proper standards to ensure environmental compliance and industrial hygiene. There’s a need to have the standards and so when governmental agencies, state agencies, county or municipal agencies try to do proper recycling, they should look to people who are certified. Jori Pascarella Q: What type of hazards are in e-waste and should it be more tightly regulated? A: Materials that are included in electronics are lead, cadmium, mercury, some beryllium – and these materials are dangerous to the environment and to people. So if we look at the federal laws, these materials are specifically noted as being hazardous materials. And for whatever reason, EPA has been very reluctant to deal with these consumer commodities. … My opinion is they should be regulated as hazardous waste facilities because they are dealing with materials

that are regulated by EPA. Q: Are collection days the best way for a municipality to handle e-waste collection? A: That’s probably the vast majority [of collections]. Sometimes the material is initially controlled by the local municipality or [sometimes] a third party will just conduct the collection and [the municipality] won’t need extra staff. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Jeremy Carroll at jcarroll@crain.com or 313-446-6780.

V.P. / Group Publisher KC Crain Publisher Brennan Lafferty 313-446-6768

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1155 Gratiot Ave., Detroit, MI 48207-2912 Telephone: 313-446-6000 Fax: 313-446-6384 Website: www.wasterecyclingnews.com Email: wastenews@crain.com Waste & Recycling News is published 26 times a year by Crain Communications Inc. For new subscriptions, renewals or change of address write Waste & Recycling News, Subscription Department, 1155 Gratiot Ave., Detroit, MI 48207-2912 or call 877-320-1719 or 313-446-0450. Fax: 313-446-6777. Reprints: The YGS Group 717-505-9701 or 800-501-9571 info@theygsgroup.com www.theygsgroup.com

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April 3-4 – Good Jobs, Green Jobs Regional Conference, Philadelphia. Contact Bob Weidman 612-466-4481 or visit www.bluegreenalliance.org. April 3-5 – Sustainable Packaging Symposium, Houston. Visit www. sustainablepackaging.com/content/waste-energy-exchange. April 15-19 – Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Convention and Exposition, Mandalay Bay, Las Vegas. Visit www.isriconvention.org. April 17 – NERC’s Workshop - Environmentally Sound Mattress Management, Northampton, Mass. Contact Mary Ann Remolador 802-254-3636 or visit www.nerc.org. April 17-19 – Sustainable Operations Summit, New York City. Contact Michael 212-232-8704 or visit www.sustainableoperationssummit.com. April 22-24 – INTERSECT, Annapolis, Md. Contact Lynn 410-216-9447 or visit www.routesmart.com. April 23-25 – NAWTEC 20, Portland, Maine. Contact Kellie Bove at 240-4942256 or visit www.swana.org. April 30-May 2 – Waste Expo, Las Vegas Convention Center. Contact Catherine E. Campfield at 203-358-4128 or registration@penton.com. May 6-8 – 12th Biocomposites Conference, Niagara Falls, Ontario. Contact Kristiina Oksman. May 10-11 – Good Jobs, Green Jobs Regional Conference, Detroit. Contact Bob Weidman 612-466-4481 or visit www.bluegreenalliance.org. May 16-17 – Anaerobic Digestion Conference and Expo, San Francisco. Visit www.renewable-waste.com/anaerobic-digestion-conference. May 20-23 – Federation of New York Solid Waste Association’s Conference, Lake George, N.Y. Contact Luann Meyer 585-325-7190 or visit www.nyfederation.org. June 4-5 – Northeast Recycling Conference & Expo, Manchester, N.H. Contact Caitlin Meaney 603-736-4401 or visit www.nrra.net. June 4-6 – Harvard School of Public Health-Advanced Hands-On CAMEO Training, Boston. Contact Peter J. Bretton 617-384-8965 or https://ccpe.sph.harvard.edu/Advanced-CAMEO. June 12-14 – Waste Fleet Conference, Indianapolis. Contact Brennan Lafferty at blafferty@crain.com or 313-446-6768. July 2-5 – International Waste Management and Environment Technology Exhibition and Conference, Singapore. Contact James Boey +65 6403 2182 or visit www.singex.com.sg. Aug. 5-8 – The California Resource Recovery Association’s 36th Annual Conference, Oakland, Calif. Contact Bob Nelson or visit http://crra.com. Aug. 14-16 – Wastecon, Washington. Contact Kellie Bove at 240-494-2256 or visit www.swana.org. Aug. 26-29 – Georgia Recycling Coalition Conference, St. Simons Island. Contact Gloria 404-634-3095 or visit www.georgiarecycles.org. Aug. 5-8 – California Resource Recovery Association Conference, Oakland. Visit http://crra.com. Sept. 10-12 – Corporate Recycling & Waste Conference, Orlando, Fla. Contact Brennan Lafferty 313-446-6768 or visit www.crwcconference.com. Oct. 18-20 – ReuseConex - 2nd National Reuse Conference & Expo, Portland, Ore. Visit www.reusealliance.org. Oct. 31-Nov. 1 – GOVgreen Expo, Washington D.C. Contact Stacey 703-7068214 or visit www.govgreen.org. Nov. 12-14 – RE3 Conference, Atlantic City, N.J. Contact Travis Bowman 704-728-5800.

To have your conference or event appear in Waste & Recycling News, email wastenews@crain.com or send mail to WRN Coming Events, 1155 Gratiot, Detroit, Mich., 48207.

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The largest U.S. and Canadian companies ranked by revenue from the collection, processing and sale of recyclables.

2010 2009 Rank Rank

Company Name Headquarters / Ownership

Top Recycling Executive / Title

In millions of dollars 2010 2009 2010 Recycling Recycling Recycling Revenue Revenue Employment

2010 Recycling Volume (thousand tons)

Materials# Recycled 1,2,3,6

No. of Recycling Facilities Web site

1

1

Sims Metal Management Ltd.5 New York, N.Y. / Public

Daniel W. Dienst Group CEO

$7,500.0

$8,600.0

5,600

13,300.0

2

3

OmniSource Corp.2 Fort Wayne, Ind. / Public

Mark Millet President & COO

$3,692.4

$3,692.4

2,600

5,600.0

2

45

www.omnisource.com

3

94

Schnitzer Steel Industries Inc. Portland, Ore. / Public

Donald Hamaker President & CEO

$2,000.0

$1,500.0

1,491

N.A.

2

37

www.schnitzersteel.com

4

4

Aleris International Inc.2 Beachwood, Ohio / Private

Terrance Hogan $1,500.0 Vice President and General Manager of Aluminum Recycling

$1,500.0

2,026

1,444.0

2

24

www.aleris.com

5

2

Commercial Metals Co. Irving, Texas / Public

Brian Halloran Vice President

$1,400.0

$785.0

1,496

2,500.0

2

43

www.cmc.com

5

5

Ferrous Processing and Trading Co.3 Detroit, Mich. / Private

Howard Sherman CEO

$1,400.0

$1,100.0

532

3,300.0

2

15

www.fpt1.com

7

7

Waste Management Inc. Houston, Texas / Public

Pat DeRueda President

$1,200.0

$741.0

N.A.

10,200.0

155

www.wm.com

8

International Paper Co. Memphis, Tenn. / Public

Bill Gardner General Manager

$457.00

692

661.0

9

6

Smurfit-Stone Recycling Co.2,7 St. Louis, MO / Public

Michael Oswald $888.0 Senior Vice President, Recycling Division

$888.0

712

6,646.0

10

Safety-Kleen Systems Inc. Plano, Texas / Private

Dave Sprinkle Exec. Vice President of Oil Refining

$631.7

$559.1

650

11

8

Trademark Metals Recycling2 Tampa, Fla. / Private

Tim Brose President

$540.0

$540.0

12

9

Miller Compressing Co.2 Milwaukee, Wis. / Private

John Busby President & CEO

$500.0

13

14

Metalico Inc. Cranford, N.J. / Public

Carlos E. Aguero President

14

12

Cohen Brothers Inc. Middletown, Ohio / Private

Ken Cohen President

15

16

www.simsmm.com

1,2,3

21

www.internationalpaper.com

1,2,3,4

30

www.smurfit.com

780.0

12

47

www.safety-kleen.com

530

989.0

2

17

www.tmrecycling.com

$500.0

285

650.0

2,11

10

www.millercompressing.com

$487.9

$229.2

632

515.0

2,6

25

www.metalico.com

$484.0

$261.0

325

1,100.0

1,2,3,11

28

www.cohenbrothersinc.com

CellMark Corte Madera, Calif. / Private

Vic Rice $395.4 Senior Vice President

$271.6

225

2,000.0

1,2,3

10

www.cellmark.com

10

Allan Company Baldwin Park, Calif. / Private

Stephen A. Young CEO

$364.0

$290.0

215

1,192.0

1,2,3,4,11

13

www.allancompany.com

17

26

Industrial Services of America Harry Kletter Louisville, Ky. / Public CEO

$334.7

$171.8

185

N.A.

2,12

18

23

Republic Services Phoenix, Ariz. / Public

Donald W. Slager President & CEO

$307.1

$181.2

N.A.

N.A.

1,2,3,6,7,8,9,10,11

76

www.republicservices.com

19

24

Cascades Recovery8 Toronto, Ontario / Private

Al Metauro CEO

$294.0

$178.0

1,104

1,561.0

1,2,3,4,11

17

www.cascades.com

20

11

Mervis Industries Inc. Danville, Ill. / Private

Adam Mervis President & CEO

$280.7

$130.8

301

748.8

1,2,3,11

19

www.mervis.com

21

18

The Newark Group Cranford, N.J. / Private

Jonathan Gold $263.0 Senior Vice President

$192.0

195

1,657.0

1,2,3

12

www.newarkgroup.com

22

19

Liberty Tire Recycling LLC Pittsburgh, Pa. / Private

Jeffrey Kendall President & CEO

$244.4

$156.3

1,800

1,300.0

5

38

www.libertytire.com

23

13

Wimco Metals Inc.2 Pittsburgh, Pa. / Private

Glen Gross CEO

$230.0

$230.0

30

75.5

2

1

24

21

Strategic Materials Inc. Houston, Texas / Private

Bill Waltz CEO

$229.0

$208.0

1,182

1,900.0

2,3

45

www.strategicmaterials.com

25

15

Greenstar Recycling Houston, Texas / Private

Matt Delnick CEO

$225.0

$200.0

600

2,000.0

1,2,3,4

14

www.greenstarrecycling.com

26

16

KW Plastics3 Troy, Ala. / Private

Scott Saunders General Manager

$223.0

$223.0

250

315.0

3

4

www.kwplastics.com

27

30

Canusa Hershman Branford, Conn. / Private

Ethan Hershman CEO

$212.0

$132.3

180

140.3

1,2,3,4

4

www.chrecycling.com

28

22

American Paper Recycling Corp. Mansfield, Mass. / Private

Kenneth S. Golden President & CEO

$204.8

$184.2

310

884.0

1,2,3

29

17

Caraustar4 Austell, Ga. / Private

Greg Cottrell Vice President Recycling

$200.0

$200.0

180

1,823.0

See Footnotes on Page 9

$982.0

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, 11,12

240

1,3

4

18

9

www.isa-inc.com

N.A.

www.aprcorp.com

www.caraustar.com

Ranking continues on Page 9


WRN-RecycleRank_0329_Pg8-9-revised.qxp

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1:24 PM

Page 9

March 29, 2012

The largest U.S. and Canadian companies ranked by revenue from the collection, processing and sale of recyclables.

2010 2009 Rank Rank

Company Name Headquarters / Ownership

Top Recycling Executive / Title

In millions of dollars 2010 2009 2010 Recycling Recycling Recycling Revenue Revenue Employment

2010 Recycling Volume (thousand tons)

30

27

Veolia Environmental Services Richard Burke North America Corp. CEO Chicago, Ill. / Public

$193.0

$165.1

450

1,500.0

31

25

Schupan & Sons Inc.1 Kalamazoo, Mich. / Private

Marc Schupan CEO

$177.4

$177.4

178

32

20

Tomra North America Shelton, Conn. / Public

Harald Henriksen President & CEO

$157.1

$148.1

33

29

Commercial Alloys Corp.3,9 Twinsburg, Ohio / Private

Lawrence Musarra President

$149.0

34

37

Heritage-Crystal Clean Inc. Elgin, Ill. / Public

Joseph Chalhoub President & CEO

35

33

Avangard Innovative Houston, Texas / Private

35

32

37

Materials# Recycled

No. of Recycling Facilities Web site

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10, 105 11,12

www.veoliaes.com

215.0

2,3,4

5

www.schupan.com

829

457.6

1,2,3,4

8

www.tomranorthamerica.com

$149.0

175

148.0

2

3

www.commercialalloys.com

$112.1

$98.4

600

N.A.

12

1

www.crystal-clean.com

Rick Perez President & CEO

$170.0

$110.0

765

406.0

1,3,8

8

www.avaicg.com

Potential Industries4 Wilmington, Calif. / Private

Tony Fan President

$110.0

$125.0

270

N.A.

1,2,3,4

5

www.potentialindustries.com

34

B. Schoenberg & Co.3 Yorktown, N.Y. / Private

Matthew Kness Vice President

$102.7

$102.7

60

55.0

3

4

www.bschoenbergco.com

38

35

Calbag Metals Co.3 Portland, Ore. / Private

Warren Rosenfeld President

$100.0

$100.0

70

60.0

2

2

www.calbag.com

38

35

RockTenn1,10 Norcross, Ga. / Public

Erik J Deadwyler Exec. Vice President & General Manager

$100.0

$100.0

150

1,000.0

38

44

Shapiro Metals St. Louis, Mo. / Private

Bruce Shapiro President

$100.0

$59.0

115

120.0

2

8

www.shapirometals.com

41

Newco Metals Inc. Pendelton, Ind. / Private

Chris Rasmussen President

$91.6

$54.0

48

51.5

2

2

www.newcometals.com

42

39

Clean Earth Inc. Hatboro, Pa. / Private

Chris Dods CEO

$88.5

$110.8

170

2,767.0

12

6

www.cleanearthinc.com

43

41

Wooster Iron & Metal3,11 Wooster, Ohio / Private

David Spector President & CEO

$85.0

$85.0

150

285.0

2

5

N.A.

44

40

Universal Scrap Metals Inc. Chicago, Ill. / Private

Jason Zeid Vice President

$84.2

$77.9

74

58.5

2,11

3

www.universalscrap.com

45

47

WTE Corp. Bedford, Mass. / Private

M.Scott Mellen CEO

$77.0

$54.0

140

220.0

2,3

3

www.wte.com

46

55

A&L Iron and Metal Company Gaylord, Mich. / Private

Arnold Higley President

$69.9

$39.0

105

169.8

2

4

www.alironandmetal.com

47

53

Hudson Baylor Corp. Newburgh, N.Y. / Private

H. Scott Tenney President

$64.4

$43.9

531

543.2

1,2,3

48

42

Dekka Resins Inc.3 Brantford, Ontario / Private

Roy Keighley General Manager

$60.0

$60.0

110

65.0

48

42

Envision Plastics3 Reidsville, N.C. / Private

Massoud Rad President

$60.0

$60.0

110

48

49

Merlin Plastics Delta, BC / Private

Tony Moucachen President

$60.0

$50.0

51

45

American Compressed Steel Corp.2 Cincinnati, Ohio / Private

Larry Byer Owner

$57.0

52

46

Custom Polymers Inc. & Custom Polymers PET LLC1 Charlotte, N.C. / Private

Phil Howerton Partner

53

Electronic Recyclers International Inc. Fresno, Calif. / Private

54

48

55

1,2,3,4

38

www.rocktenn.com

12

www.husonbaylor.com

3

2

www.dekkaresins.com

36.0

3

3

www.envisionplastics.com

125

60.0

3

4

www.merlinplastics.com

$57.0

55

146.0

2

1

www.acomsteel.com

$56.0

$56.0

90

158.0

3,7,11

5

www.custompolymers.com

John Shegerian CEO

$54.8

$45.5

568

85.0

11

8

www.electronicsrecyclers

Nexcycle Canada2 Brampton, Ontario / Private

Laurie Borg President

$52.5

$52.5

163

163.0

3,4

4

www.npiplastic.com

68

Great Lakes Recycling Roseville, Mich. / Private

Sanford Rosen CEO

$51.4

$28.7

142

271.9

1,2,3, 8,12

4

www.go-glr.com

56

69

Far West Fibers Inc. Portland, Ore. / Private

Keith Ristau President & CEO

$49.2

$27.6

200

349.0

1,2,3

57

51

Hutcherson Metals Inc.2 Halls, Tenn. / Private

Wiley Hutcherson Sr. President

$47.2

$47.2

84

90.0

5. Rubber 6. C&D Debris 7. Textiles 8. Wood

2

2

www.farwestfibers.com N.A.

FOOTNOTES

# WASTE KEY 1. Paper 2. Metals 3. Plastics 4. Glass

10

9. Yard Waste 10. Food 11. Electronics 12. Other

N.A. — Not available. 1. Company supplied data in 2010. 2. Company supplied data in 2009. 3. Company supplied data in 2006. 4. Company supplied data in 2007. 5. Company supplied data in 2008. 6. Appeared last year as Sims Recycling Solutions Inc., a division

of Sims Metal 7. Acquired by RockTenn in May ‘11 8. ne: Metro Waste Paper Recovery 9. Now Reserve Alloys Corp. 10. Acquired Smurfit-Stone Recycling in May ‘11 11. Acquired by PSC Metals Inc.

9


20120329-SUPP--10-NAT-CCI-WN_--

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3/22/2012

3:16 PM

Page 1

March 29, 2012

Miller: Work together to meet product stewarship goal Private haulers have a stake in product stewardship too, NSWMA leader says By Vince Bond Jr.

will dissect a few of those myths during his presentation “Recycling & Product Stewardship: Know the Laws” at 3:45 p.m. today at the Residential Recycling Conference.

WRN reporter There are some myths going around about product stewardship laws and Chaz Miller plans on dispelling them. Miller, director of state programs for the National Solid Wastes Management Association,

t i s i V

Q: What are some of those myths? A: Well, for a start, there is the idea that local governments are

0

0 2 # th

o

Bo t a s

u

Chaz Miller

burdened by the costs of recycling programs, that taxpayers are on the hook. The reality is that taxes are by no means the sole way of paying for recycling programs in this country. Many communities use fees, which are quite distinct and different than taxes. In other communities, collectors require under terms of the contract to bill the customers for the service. So the idea that product stewardship will ease a burden upon local government’s tax bases is not totally true.

Q: What are some of the problems with product stewardship? A: There are programs for materials that are clearly toxic, which is primarily mercury-containing materials such as thermostats. There are product stewardship laws for materials that are harder to recover, but are not toxic: paint, carpet, things like that. Then there’s the concept of product stewardship with packages and printed material, which are pretty much the heart of any curbside collection program. …

The question of which of these materials that product stewardship worked for best, the jury is still out. We simply don’t have good data on it. Q: Do you think there is enough focus on stewardship from municipalities and businesses? A: I think there is a lot of political interest in the concept of product stewardship. Thirty-two states currently have product stewardship laws, easily covering the majority of the country. Something like two-thirds of the country have laws concerning electronics products. They’re all a function of product stewardship laws. Q: Are these stewardship laws new? A: I think the basic concept is two decades old. ... There is something of a division among product stewardship advocates as to whether or not container deposit laws for beverage containers are considered product stewardship. I think they are. It’s fairly clear [that] those laws have been very effective in getting beverage containers. ... Those laws go back to the 1970s. … The concept is manufacturers should be responsible for the products they make through disposal, and retailers get involved if they are designated as the take-back location. Q: Do you think the recycling community’s role has been too small in the formation of these laws? A: I think the recycling community, for the most part, has been ignored in the formation of these laws. The [U.S.] EPA recently released a report, “The Dialogue on Sustainable Financing of Recycling of Packaging at the Municipal Level.” That report had no representatives of the collection or recycling processing community or the private companies that are actively involved in collecting and processing recyclables throughout the country. The majority of material recovery facilities, both in number and even more so in capacity, were built and financed by the private sector. There is very expansive private sector involvement and investment in recycling and yet the EPA totally ignored [that community] when it put together the group that wrote that report. That just doesn’t make any sense. Q: Why do you think they are being ignored? A: I have no idea. Q: What type of insight could the recycling community provide to the EPA? A: What you provide is the real-world perspective of what’s involved in collecting and processing recycling, the real-world perspective on the extent of the investment and the cost. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Vince Bond at vbond@crain.com or 313-446-1653.


20120329-SUPP--11-NAT-CCI-WN_--

3/21/2012

4:33 PM

Page 1

March 29, 2012

11

Single-stream recycling hurting paper quality? By Jim Johnson WRN senior reporter A growing move toward single-stream recycling certainly has made it easier to collect more tonnage at the curb, alleviating the headache of residential sorting. But the trend also has created a challenge on the processing end, as more and more contaminants are making their way into recycled paper bundles headed for mills both near and far. Bob Tucker, managing director of Reparco USA, a recycled paper trader based in Pasadena, Calif., is scheduled to speak about the trends in recovered paper supply during a session at the Residential Recycling Conference in Dallas. Titled “Begin with the End in Mind: The Commodity Market,” the 1:30 p.m. session today also is slated to include Peter Wang,

Bob Tucker

Peter Wang

CEO of American Chung Nam, the largest exporter of recovered paper in the United States. Declining newsprint usage during the past two decades, along with the increasing popularity of single-stream recycling, has put pressure on the domestic supply of clean, old newspapers (ONP). That’s caused buyers in Asia, who once had a clear preference for North American ONP, to look around the world for that grade and consider their options, Tucker said.

“I’d like to be able to put a little bit of a global view, what’s happening for publication paper, newsprint, that kind of thing, in Europe, North America and Asia,” Tucker said about his upcoming presentation. “Because, when you think about the recovered paper buyer, the Asian buyer that’s so much driving this business these days, they have options to look for fiber supply, and they do it routinely, out of every continent, including Australia,” he said. Single-stream recycling also means there’s more of an opportunity for other recyclables, such as glass and plastic, to get mixed into paper bales because they are placed in the same residential container. His goal for the presentation is to “draw a little bit of picture about the trends and what those trends might imply,” he said. Reparco is a unit of Norske

File: Jim Johnson, Waste & Recycling News

Single-stream recycling processing challenges will be discussed at the 1:30 p.m. session today, “Begin with the End in Mind: The Commodity Market.” Skog, the Norway-based papermaker with 14 mills around the globe. “We’ve seen a huge decline on the amount of newsprint that is consumed in North America, so

that has a direct impact,” Tucker said. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News senior reporter Jim Johnson at jpjohnson@crain.com or 937-964-1289.


20120329-SUPP--12-NAT-CCI-WN_--

12

3/21/2012

1:16 PM

Page 1

March 29, 2012

The challenges of organics By Shawn Wright WRN reporter As organic waste collection becomes more and more common throughout the U.S., companies are discovering that it becomes harder and harder to sell the finished product. “We’re finding that one of the key components to this whole process and system is finding markets for both green waste and food waste compost,” said Mike Huycke, northwest area president for Republic Services Inc. “That’s one thing we’ve been successful at is finding markets to sell this stuff.” Republic’s markets in the Northwest include commercial bagging facilities, companies that manufacture potting soil mixes, nursery yards, berry growers and vineyards. Most of the sales, Huycke said, go toward commercial establishments, but there is a “fairly steady stream of residential customers that buy our product by the yard,” he said. Mark Rose, president and CEO of Dallas-based Living Earth,

Mike Huycke

Mark Rose

says his company has no problems collecting and composting green waste, but food waste is much harder. The duo will be presenting “Organics: From Curbside to Consumer” at 4:15 p.m. today, giving their opinions on the current and future climate of organic waste. “The green waste can be done economically [now],” Rose said. “But in [Dallas], we just can’t do the post-consumer stuff. The spread is not even close, when they can landfill them for so much cheaper and not run additional routes.” Living Earth doesn’t pick up organic waste itself, but works with area municipalities to make sure their green waste collection

programs run properly, Rose said. The company then recycles the green waste at 21 sites, selling compost, mulch and other products. In 2007, the company recycled more than 500,000 tons of green waste. It bulks as many as 18 million bags of compost, Rose said. Varied landfill tipping fees can impact regional communities’ desire to offer curbside collection of food waste, Huycke and Rose said. In many Oregon jurisdictions where food waste is collected, Huycke said, communities pay anywhere from $35 a ton to $50 a ton. “They’re living in a tipping-fee world, where somebody has to pay them $40 or $50 a ton,” Rose said. “While here, with the landfill tipping rates as low as they are, it’s not being done in the Texas market.” In Texas, haulers pay as low as $20 per ton. And with contamination being a big problem with food waste, Rose said costs pile up. “A lot of people don’t like to hear it, but in this market, tipping fees are so low that the post-consumer food waste is not getting compost-

Courtesy, Living Earth

Miguel Munoz, loader operator for Living Earth, stands next to another finished pile of the company’s compost in Houston. ed or recycled,” he said. Organic materials – yard trimmings, food scraps, wood waste, and paper and paperboard products – are the largest component of U.S. trash and make up more than two-thirds of the solid waste stream, according to the U.S. EPA. In 2010, the EPA said, the total municipal solid waste generation was 250 million tons, with yard trimmings and food scraps accounting for 27%. Huycke said making a program

work comes down to a motivation to divert volume, community values and customer demand. “In a lot of the western states, we already have curbside automated collection of green waste,” Huycke said. “So the integration of food waste is a pretty seamless, cost-effective expansion of an existing program.” 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News reporter Shawn Wright at swright@crain.com or 313-446-0346.

Asset Management Simplified Rehrig Pacific Brings Total Control to Your Asset Tracking Needs Rehrig Pacific is known in the industry for continuous innovation. This effort has paid off for customers looking for RFID based asset tracking solutions. Whether starting with your existing containers or new Rehrig Roll-out Carts, our Web-Based tracking software (C.A.R.T.S.) offers the most comprehensive set of capabilities designed to find lost revenue opportunities, increase recycling participation and lower operating costs. With Rehrig you will bring total control to your asset and participation tracking needs. Call Rehrig today to discover how a customized solution will optimize resources, maximize savings and energize participation. Phone: (800) 421-6244 Email: info@rehrigpacific.com Web: www.rehrigpacific.com

Come see us at Residential Recycling Conference Booth #316

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20120329-SUPP--13-NAT-CCI-WN_--

3/28/2012

7:29 PM

Page 1

March 29, 2012

13

Tour: Greenstar has been recycling more than it anticipated Continued from Page 1

1,200 tons a month more than it had projected based on last year’s numbers. Last month, the facility expected 7,800 to 8,000 tons of recyclable material. Instead, it took in about 9,300 tons. “Normally, it slows down after January, after the holiday rush, and stays that way until about April,” Taylor said. “This year,

tonnage has been pretty steady.” Much of this can be attributed to more haulers, such as Republic Services Inc., bringing their material to the facility. “Republic’s [recovery facilities] are at full capacity,” Taylor said, “so they bring us stuff.” Other haulers using Greenstar’s facility include Progressive Waste Solutions Ltd., Waste

Management Inc. and Champion Waste Services LLC. Two-thirds of the plant’s recyclable material comes from five different districts in the city of Dallas, which has its own collection trucks. On the tour, there were recycling coordinators from around the U.S., equipment manufacturers and other professionals. For Gary Gilliam, sales man-

SOLID

Photos: Shawn Wright, Waste & Recycling News

Michael Lee, an environmental engineering associate with the Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation: “I’ve been to several [material recovery facilities] and this was one of the most cleanest and organized MRFs. Their sorting is done very well.”

Sean Duffy, president and chief operating officer for ReCommunity Recycling Inc.: “I’m pleased to see Greenstar’s involvement with the community ... the industrial, commercial and residential.”

ager for Resource Management, facilities like Greenstar’s help make his job easier. “Trying to procure more of the material rather than sell it is being able to sell single-stream, because of the ability of collection, the ability to create the routings,” Gilliam said. “It makes it much easier to sell the idea of recycling today.” 䡲

For over 60 years, American Baler Company has engineered some of the industry’s most advanced baling equipment. As we continue to innovate customer-driven baling solutions, we will continue to influence the way balers should be made. Each machine caters to a specific industry’s needs. All balers are built with a standard 10 year structural warranty. Your baler is more than just equipment - it’s a part of your business. That is what we believe and it’s what our products represent. Solid dependability. The difference is in the name.

Vijit Singh, senior environmental specialist for the Solid Waste & Recycling Division in Grand Prairie, Texas: “It’s one of the more organized and well-developed facilities that I’ve seen. I think it really provides a sense of the volume of materials that come through. Some of the questions we had were sort of answered just by going through this. … It puts into perspective what we do at the front end. It tells [us] what needs to also be done to educate the residents about what happens at the back end.”

Gladiator Series Two Ram Baler americanbaler.com

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20120329-SUPP--14-NAT-CCI-WN_--

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3/28/2012

10:00 PM

Page 1

March 29, 2012

Aaron Eckels, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Carmen Smothers, the sales and marketing manager for Bayne Premium Lift Systems, shares a laugh at the Welcome Reception Wednesday night at Texas Station.

Aaron Eckels, Special to Waste & Recycling News

From left, Kaley Parkinson, environmental services manager for Rehrig Pacific, the Carbon Yeti mascot of Green City Award finalist Bellevue, Wash.; and Scott Lukach, environmental director of sales for Rehrig Pacific, pose at the Welcome Reception. The company co-hosted the event. The Yeti is an early frontrunner for Waste & Recycling News’ 2013 Mascot Madness challenge.

Aaron Eckels, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Maria Kirch, Waste & Recycling News

Aaron Eckels, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Otto Environmental Services’ Mark Anderson is a key account sales and marketing specialist.

Hank, the beloved “pet” at the Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center, is a taxidermist’s re-creation of a real Texas Longhorn. In fact, Hank’s former owners come visit him once a year. You can’t ride this bull, but you can ride a mechanical bull at the RRC Hoedown Reception tonight.

From left, Cynthia Andela, president of Andela Products; Kenny King, regional manager of Sonoco Recycling; and Judy Caldwell, field representative for Sonoco Recycling.

Aaron Eckels, Special to Waste & Recycling News

Representing Welcome Reception co-host Pratt Recycling are, from left, Christi Bartholomew, national accounts manager; Steve Shannon, municipal services manager; Cheri Reynolds, recycling and sustainability outreach manager; and Jim Custer, procurement manager.

Aaron Eckels, Special to Waste & Recycling News

From left, Angela Petyko, Lara Gonzalez, Sarah Austin, Harah Hildebranski from Green City Award finalist Whiting, Ind.


20120329-SUPP--15-NAT-CCI-WN_--

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7:30 PM

Page 1

March 29, 2012

15

Exhibits: Brand recognition crucial Continued from Page 1 Charlotte, N.C.-based Otto, the container maker. For Nelson, getting an early start on the show floor is an important part of making sure everything is in order by the end of the day. “We want to be able to get it up and make sure it’s right because there’s always hiccups. If we have to run to the hardware store, we can do that,” she said. Setting up is old-hat for Nelson at this point; she’s been with Otto for six years. The company displays at five major shows per year, so she has been through this exercise probably 30 times before. Taking the time and making the effort at the show is important to keep the company’s name in front of customers, she said. “A lot of it is building the brand. I spent probably my first three years at Otto building the brand. Now that that’s established, it’s maintaining the brand,” she said as preliminary work was starting on the booth. The Residential Recycling Conference, co-sponsored by Waste & Recycling News and Republic Services Inc., has attracted 59 exhibitors to the Gaylord Texan Hotel this year in Grapevine, Texas, near Dallas. More than 400 people are on the ground looking to learn more about what they can do to improve their residential recycling efforts. Along with the educational sessions, exhibitors are here hoping to show how they can help. Over at the Schaefer Systems International Inc. booth, Michael Knaub said his company sees value in attending shows like the Residential Recycling Conference. “Recycling is such an important part of the world today,” said the senior vice president and managing director of the company’s waste technology division. Exhibiting helps Knaub and his container-making company stay connected with clients. “First of all, we need to see our existing customer base. It’s an opportunity to say ‘hello’ and thank them for the business,” he said. “It’s also an opportunity to meet new people and learn about new projects.” Knaub is at 10 to 12 shows per year and his company displays at even more. “I guess we take it pretty seriously if we’re doing 30 shows a year nationwide,” he said. “The exposure is important to us.” Over in the next aisle, Eric Surratt and Jeff McDonald are hard at work putting their display together for Diamondback Products of Lexington, N.C. Setting up shop at the show, the men said, is all about brand recognition. Diamondback Products,

which makes cart tippers, does what Surratt considers three major shows each year, Waste Expo, WasteCon and this conference. “Brand recognition. Just stay in front of the people,” the company president said. “It’s part of our business exposure.” It’s rare to actually close a deal at a show, he said, but the leads gained on the floor will help win business later. “You can read off a brochure

all day long,” he said, but the real trick is engaging potential customers and existing ones face-to-face. “That’s what matters most. That’s what these shows are all about.” “It’s a big deal for us to be at this. … For us, this is our first show of the year. It starts it off for us,” Surratt said. 䡲 Contact Waste & Recycling News senior reporter Jim Johnson at jpjohnson@crain.com or 937-964-1289.

Jim Johnson, Waste & Recycling News

Diamondback Products President Eric Surratt, left, and Regional Sales Manager Jeff McDonald team up to construct the frame of the company’s RRC display.


3/21/2012

3:55 PM

Page 1

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Residential Recycling Conference - Show Daily - March 29, 2012