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CPARTS Arts Desk

Bloomingdale gets a brand-new performance space: washingtoncitypaper.com/go/improv

ShortAuthority

This year’s DC Shorts Film Festival is throwing local filmmakers some extra recognition. At noon on Sept. 16, the festival will screen six short films— comedies, docs, experimental stuff, the works—by artists from the District. With a 40-minute runtime, the showcase is designed to fit into a hypothetical lunch break. Trade that soggy Pret wrap for a crab pretzel at E Street Cinema and see some choice films by and about your neighbors. —Christina Cauterucci

Screened

FILM: DIRECTOR: Benjamin Ross RUNTIME: 3 minutes STORY: Two days in the life of a dude who wanders through Arlington with his eyes glued to his iPhone and computer screens. TAKEAWAY: Wouldn’t you know—we should look up every once in a while.

FILM: The Wait: A Mural by Nekisha Durrett

DIRECTOR: Lorie Shaull RUNTIME: 12 minutes STORY: Durrett, a Duke Ellington graduate (and now teacher), installs a mural of a spaceship landing on the side of now-defunct Mothership diner in Park View, invoking commentary on gentrification. TAKEAWAY: Slo-mo beauty shots of Georgia Avenue NW and the people who spend time there will remind viewers of its converging cultures and the accessibility of public art.

Tides

FILM: DIRECTOR: Irem Dogancali RUNTIME: 4 minutes STORY: During a therapy session, a woman remembers her late lover in flashbacks. TAKEAWAY: There are infinite ways to process grief.

John’s Follies

FILM: PRODUCER: Bruce Dale RUNTIME: 9 minutes STORY: After confronting his mortality over a game of golf, a Virginia man devotes his life to building more permanent structures out of stone. TAKEAWAY: Stones are made out of dead, decomposed people. Also, river stones, ocean stones, and glacier stones are different things.

Gender Bender

FILM: DIRECTOR: Austin Bragg RUNTIME: 7 minutes STORY: To settle the Mars vs. Venus debate once and for all, the members of a hetero couple switch genders for a few days. TAKEAWAY: Women get free drinks from strangers and men get to take their shirts off when they’re sweaty. Read: A woman’s life is delimited by her sexual objectification.

Holla at Me

FILM: DIRECTOR: Michael T. Miller RUNTIME: 3 minutes STORY: To the spoken words of a poem by Kenneth Carroll, a young black man walks the streets of D.C. considering his ambitions and station in life. TAKEAWAY: Competing demands, heavy familial responsibility, and the pressures of systemic inequity can’t keep this guy from his dreams.

washingtoncitypaper.com august 28, 2015 23

Washington City Paper (August 28, 2015)  

Cover story: "A House Provided: After crisis intervention, domestic violence survivors face another hurdle: D.C.’s affordable housing crunch...

Washington City Paper (August 28, 2015)  

Cover story: "A House Provided: After crisis intervention, domestic violence survivors face another hurdle: D.C.’s affordable housing crunch...

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