Page 1

MUSIC & ARTS • MARCH 2018 WARPMAGAZINE.COM.AU | FACEBOOK.COM/WARP.MAG

a r Ve e u Bl

+

A Festival Called Panama Breabach Doug Stanhope Freq Nasty Hot Dub Time Machine Isla Ka San Cisco Sneaky Sound System

FREE


Camp Cope Wed 14 March

Michael Hurley Thur 29 March

The Black Sorrows Sun 25 March

Butterfingers Fri 30 March

MARCH 2018 Wednesday 7th 8.30pm Holy Locust (USA) Thursday 8th 9pm Catch Club Friday 9th 10pm Roadkill + B.O.M.S. Saturday 10th 10pm The Outfit Sunday 11th 8.30pm Blue Flies Monday 12nd 8.15pm Quiz Night Tuesday 13th 8.30pm Sam Forsyth Wednesday 14th 9pm Camp Cope $35pre/$40door Thursday 15th 8.30pm Hussy Hicks Friday 16th 9.30pm Bootleg Gin Sluggers + Yesterday’s Gentleman Saturday 17th 10pm Everburn $5 Sunday 18th 2.30pm The Raccoons 8.30pm Peter Hicks & The Blue Licks

Monday 19th 8.30pm Priscilla Walters Tuesday 20th 8.30pm Finn Seccombe Wednesday 21st 8.30pm The Great Anticipators Thursday 22nd 8.30pm Tom Dockray Friday 23rd 10pm Uncle Gus & The Rimshots + Wholly Cats Saturday 24th 10pm Boil Up $10 Sunday 25th 2.30pm The Black Sorrows $35 8.30pm AlfanAnt Monday 26th 8.15pm Quiz Night Tuesday 27th 8.30pm The Sign Wednesday 28th 9pm Dave Wilson Band Thursday 29th 9pm Michael Hurley + Darren Hanlon $25pre/$30door Friday 30th 10pm Butterfingers $25pre/$30door Saturday 31st 10pm Spin The Bottle Featuring Seth Henderson, Sam Forsyth, Jed Appleton & Chris Coleman


19 Twenty: an infectious riff and groove based blue-billy-grass-rockin’-roots band... ask for forgiveness not for permission.

Live @ Franko in march 4.45pm

6.45pm

2nd

Billy + the Men of Steel

Mia Palencia-In Good Company

9th

Mouldy Fig

Kashkin

16th Pete Cornelius

19 Twenty

23rd Bootleg Gin Sluggers

Christopher Coleman Songbook

30th

CLOSED GOOD FRIDAY

@streeteatsfranko

StreetEatsFranko


News

News in Brief ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW Ever wanted to learn how to play the ukelele? How about working with polymer clay? Ever wanted to learn how to do that? What about making decorative gift boxes? Or learning about Celtic history? Or leaning how to make dips and flatbreads? Or learning calligraphy? Or leaning how to weave with marine debris? Or how to marble paper? Or how to make DIY sushi rolls? Or learning about fermentation? Or how to remake discarded clothing in to trendy unique wearables? What about twined baskets? Wanna learn how to make them? If you answered yes to any of these, get in touch with the folks at Kickstart Arts, all these courses are on offer as part of Creative Exchange 2018.

Multi-award winning star of stage and screen Lisa McCune will join Hobart born John Xintavelonis, currently appearing nationally in The Wizard of Oz, and renowned actor, producer and presenter of Breakfast on ABC Ryk Goddard in a specially devised adaptation of Grieg’s masterpiece for the concert stage, featuring spoken word elements as well as a majestic interpretation by the TSO, under the baton of chief conductor and artistic director, Marko Lentonja. You can catch the very special performance at The Federation Concert Hall on Saturday March 17, tickets are available from tso. com.au. NICK’S LEGACY

HOT AFTER PARTY

What do after spending a day of drinking wine in the sun at a vineyard while listening to tunes? Well of course go out to an after party and listen to some more tunes! Luen Jacobs who will be performing as part of Hot Dub Wine Machine at Home Hill Vineyard in Huonville, will be taking the party back to the Mez Bar at the Odeon Theatre on Liverpool Street to the wee hours. Joining her on the decks will be Launceston producer, Akouo and Hobart DJ, Finn Whitla. Kicks off at 11.30pm and is $10 on the door.

Friends, family and supporters of the late Nick Balcombe are celebrating the awarding of this year’s grant recipients. The “Live Your Dream” grant features $3000 cash and industry contacts and support, and the “Kickstarter” award features four days of recording made possible by the support of Hobart’s Red Planet Recording Studios. Multi-talented singer songwriter Hugo Bladel will be receiving the Kickstarter Award, and Hobart based group A.Swayze and the Ghosts are the recipients of the Live Your Dream grant. Congratulations to both acts!

The TSO recently announced a star studded line-up for it’s upcoming concert performance of Peer Gynt.

Editor Nic Orme nic@warpmagazine.com.au

ART Nic Orme nic@warpmagazine.com.au

................................. www.warpmagazine.com.au www.facebook.com/warp.mag ................................. INTERESTED IN WRITING FOR WARP? contact ed@warpmagazine.com.au .................................

6

warpmagazine.com.au

Tickets for the Republic Bar & Cafe gig will cost you $28.43, and are available via moshtix. Catch up on popular favourites the legendary folk bard penned in the past like “The Slurf Song”, “O My Stars”, “In The Garden” & “Wildgeeses” plus a host of others. STRANGE THINGS

A NEW KIND OF NEW The Newkind Festival has announced its program for 2018. Presenters from around the world are converging for what is going to be a mind-blowing empowerment experience, overflowing with learning and collaboration opportunities. International guests, local heroes, adventurists, academics, artists, futurists, healers, food producers and activists are all booked in to inspire and activate participants towards effective social change. Taking place between Wednesday March 21 and Sunday March 25, you can find out more information about speakers, tickets and events by visiting www.newkindfestival.com.

Some things are strange. Other things are even stranger. We will let you decide which one of these is a DJ Yoda performance. He hasn’t been back to Australia since 2013, but this time Yoda is making the journey with his Stranger Things show and will take you to “The Upside Down” complete with special effects. Yoda will be performing with support from Dameza, Corney and Luke Monks at the Brisbane Hotel on Friday April 6. Tickets from Oztix.

SLURFIN’ SAFARI

HEART BREAKER

The great Michael Hurley will be setting off around Tasmania next month, playing two shows, one in Launceston, and one in Hobart. On Wednesday March 28 you’ll be able to catch him at Saint John Craft Beer Bar with Darren Hanlon. And on Thursday March 29 he’ll be appearing at the Republic Bar & Cafe in Hobart – again joined by Darren Hanlon. Tickets for the Saint John gig will cost you $30.11, and are available from eventbrite.com.

The teenage bad-boy Reece Mastin, who stole hearts across the country back in 2011, is no longer. In his place stands

ALFALFA SPROUTS

PEER GYNT EH!

Warp Tasmania MARCH 2018

AlfanAnt are returning to Tassie March 23-25 with a string of great dates! The talented duo have recently released their 2nd single and video “Two Weeks” from their Lucky EP in late February. Lucky touches all bases, from the heartbreaking title track, the dynamic call to arms of “Comes a Time”, the intimate harmonies of “2 Weeks”, to the tongue-in-cheek foot stomp of “Your Kind”. You’ll be able to catch them on Friday March 23 at The Royal Oak in Launceston, on Saturday March 24 at Mountain Mumma in Sheffield, and on Sunday March 25 at The Republic Bar & Cafe in Hobart.

DESIGN Miu Heath catspop@gmail.com

ADVERTISING

ads@warpmagazine.com.au

GIG GUIDE Submit your events to

gigs@warpmagazine.com.au

Writers Lisa Dib Keira Leonard Rachel Edwards Shane Millhouse Mackenzie Stolp MARK ACHESON Amanda Vanelk NEWS Submit your press releases plus publicity images through to the appropriate editor for consideration.

ALL SUBMISSIONS REMAIN THE PROPERTY OF WARP MAGAZINE. ALL CONTENT IS COPYRIGHT TO WARP MAGAZINE AND CANNOT BE REPRODUCED IN WHOLE OR PART WITHOUT WRITTEN AUTHORISATION OF THE PUBLISHERS. WARP MAGAZINE makes no guarantees, warranties or representations of any kind, whether express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of the information provided. WARP MAGAZINE will not be liable for incorrect use of the information and will assume no responsibility for consequences that may result from the use of the information. WARP MAGAZINE is not responsible of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. The opinions expressed in Warp Magazine and Warp online do not necessarily reflect those of the editors or publishers.


News

Mastin, a full-grown man; someone contemplative, and earnest – a man who has already lived a lifetime of peaks and pitfalls. Now 23 years old, Mastin is ready to show the world who he really. See him at The Waratah Hotel on Saturday April 14. Tickets from Oztix. LOAD IT UP Front End Loader have never had a lineup change, have never announced an ‘indefinite hiatus’ and, unbeknown to almost the entire population of the world, has continued to write, record and tour original rock music. The years have been downright mean to Front End Loader, and not content with merely catching up, time has lapped them while laughing maniacally. Front End Loader should obviously break up, cease and desist, or to use the perfect word for the action; disband. Front End Loader have therefore decided to release a new album. Neutral Evil is out Friday April 6, and you can help them launch the album at The Republic Bar in Hobart on Friday April 27 (tickets via Moshtix), and the Saloon Bar in Launceston on Saturday April 28 (tickets via Oztix). IT’S A SET (MO) UP

disco debauchery with the boys. They seem so nice and trustworthy (well, until you’ve witnessed the sweaty, multisensory, marathon-set mayhem of their already kinda legendary Stamina Session club nights, that is). Also, your mother doesn’t like you. Anyway, on Saturday April 21, you can catch Set Mo rockin’ out at The Waratah Hotel in Hobart. Tickets are available now via Oztix, and will cost you $23.50.

acts on triple j and most played on triple j unearthed , Didirri Formaldehyde has a promising career ahead of him. He also has a name that you wont be forgetting in a hurry. See him for the first time in Tasmania at The Republic Bar on Friday May 11.

all three gigs are around $33.50, and are available via Moshtix. A ROLLING STONE GATHERS NO MOSS

IN DEEP WITH BLASKO

LOUDMOUTH PSYCHOS

Having sent their previous record labels broke, the Cosmic Psychos will release Loudmouth Soup on April 6 on the band’s own label GO THE HACK Records. The LP was recorded last year on singer Ross Knight’s storied farm, Spring Plains, and produced by longtime collaborator Silvia Vermeulen. Testament to their status as seasoned road dogs, the Psychos will hit the road shortly after the album is released, taking in just about every damn venue that can provide a cold brew and corner to play in. Fortunately Tasmania has a few joints like that. You can catch the Cosmic Psychos on Friday April 27 at Club 54 in Launceston, and Saturday April 28 at The Brisbane Hotel in Hobart.

Newly released, Depth of Field is Sarah Blasko’s latest offering, a mixture of melodies and atmospheric mood. This album is number six for the ARIA winning artist whose career has spanned over two decades. See Sarah perform at the Odeon Theatre on Saturday May 26. Tickets from Oztix.

One of Australia's perennial performers, Ian Moss releases his first studio album in eight years this month, Mossy's first solo album in nine years and his first of all original material in 22 years. "It's a little overdue," Ian Moss says. Simply titled, Ian Moss, the performer will be traipsing around the country showing it off this Winter. Check him when he comes to Tasmania in June, performing at Wrest Point on Friday June 22 and the Country Club Showroom on Saturday June 23.Tickets available from Ticketmaster. ECHO ECHO ECHO ECHO...

THIRSTY AF TBH

DRINK TO SUCCESS

Well groomed, well mannered, well spoken, well dressed, well liked: Set Mo are the DJ / producer duo your mother didn’t warn you about, and in fact, would be glad for you to invite them home for dinner – before happily sending you out for an evening of 21st-century-sophisto-

Picked by triple j for their "10 Best artists we saw at Bigsound" and " 10 best live shows of 2017" , as well as frequently charting in the most played Unsigned

Hot off the road from the first “Take Me Back” shows as well as supporting Bryan Adams on his recent Australian tour, Thirsty Merc aren’t ready to put the car back in the garage and have announced a final round of “Take Me Back” anniversary shows around the country. Tasmania is lucky enough to play host to three of those shows this coming May! On Friday May 4, you’ll be able to see them at the Republic Bar in Hobart. On Saturday May 5 they’ll be performing at Club 54 in Launceston, and on Sunday May 6 they’ll be at the Forth Pub, in Forth, obviously. Tickets for

With their highly anticipated second album Echoes In Blue due for release on Friday April 6, Melbourne four-piece City Calm Down have announced they’re set to undertake their biggest Australian shows to date in June 2018. The “Echoes In Blue” tour will see City Calm Down hit the road for seven massive shows – all before they venture across the seas to perform two special headline dates in New Zealand, their first time in the country. They’re only making one stop in the apple isle, they’ll be playing at The Odeon Theatre in Hobart on Saturday June 30. Tickets are available via Oztix.

SATURDAY 3RD MAR KARAOKE WITH DJ FOXY SPORTS BAR, 8PM TILL LATE SATURDAY 10TH MAR SEROTONIN SPORTS BAR, 8PM TILL LATE SATURDAY 17TH MAR EBENEZA GOOD (ST PATRICK’S DAY SPECIAL) SPORTS BAR, 8PM TILL LATE SATURDAY 24TH MAR GOODFELLAS SPORTS BAR, 8PM TILL LATE

 232 MAIN RD, DERWENT PARK

 (03) 6274 4400

 CARLYLEHOTEL.COM.AU

 FACEBOOK.COM/CARLYLEHOTEL www.facebook.com/warp.mag 7


Music

TRUE BLUE SYDNEY-BASED INDIE-FOLK TROUBADOUR VERA BLUE IS ENJOYING A WELL-EARNED, ALBEIT BRIEF, REST. HAVING TOURED EXTENSIVELY AND RELEASED FOUR SINGLES AND AN ALBUM, PERENNIAL, IN 2017, SHE IS TODAY SIMPLY HANGING OUT WITH HER CREATIVE COLLABORATORS. “I’m in the studio with the producer [Andy Mak] and my co-writer Tom [Macken], hanging out. We’re good friends; they’re working on other stuff. They’re so fun. We haven’t seen each other for a while.”

nice. In the future, there will be moments where I see someone and wanna collaborate with them.”

Of course, it’s never really a rest for a working musician. Since her debut album This Music in 2013 (under her real name, Celia Pavey), Blue has been releasing singles and EPs with proficient regularity, even throwing in a few collaborations for good measure. It was also the year she auditioned for The Voice, where she garnered a huge amount of love and attention with her rendition of Simon and Garfunkel’s Scarborough Fair. It’s been a pretty decently rolling stone since then, with Blue showing no less optimism and creative energy.

“I really admire Harry Styles’ latest record and how he works as an artist, he’s keeping that classic folk rock vibe, our voices could go nicely together. I’m also really liking older artists, like Missy Elliot, at the moment- that’d be a really fun collaboration. I love her music and the way she writes and raps.”

“I’m always writing. I released Perennial last year and we’re still rolling through the singles. The new single, Lady Powers, is out now. I am gonna start working on a new record really soon.” Her previous collaboration singles include 2016’s Papercuts with rapper Illy and 2017’s Fracture with hip-hop/electronic duo Slumberjack; both have come about rather serendipitously. “The collaborations so far have been pretty organic.” Blue says. “Some songs have come through management, a song need vocals or bars that need writing or something; the collab with Illy was special, there’s a really nice bridge in there that I was given the opportunity to write with Tom. I really connected with that. Most things come from people needing something, missing a piece of the puzzle. It’s been really

8

warpmagazine.com.au

Blue also has some seemingly unexpected ideas for ‘dream’ collaborative efforts, too.

The decision to release music under a pseudonym was by no means a way of erasing her past work; the change to Vera Blue as a name also included a creative shift, one that heralded a shift in the tone and shape of her work. With this substantial change, she felt, came a sort of new identity. “The stuff I was writing under my real name was folk music; very stripped back, lots of guitar, folk melodies.” she explains. “That was nearly four years ago, I was going through that phase of trying to find my sound. I went to a bunch of writing camps, which is where I met my producer. I wanted to get into electronic music, I wanted to experiment and try new sounds. The Vera Blue stuff was born and it sounded so different, so it needed a new name. The electronic touch added to the folk gives me a bit of freedom, it allows a version of myself that’s different to the performing version of myself. When I’m on stage I feel a sense of freedom, makes me feel and move in different ways. It’s not necessarily better, but different.”

Blue has a huge amount of affection for her time with The Voice, and the fans she garnered from it. Although some musicians deride the reality television avenue, Blue appreciates that people have found her and her music because of it. “People do recognize me! There’s some people that connect to the artist that I was on The Voice. It’s funny when people come up to me now, it’s really cool. Must be the hair, it always stands out. Love when I see other redheads around. Like we’re in a clan, part of a breed (laughs)” If you haven’t had the experience of seeing Vera Blue live, you should know that she puts a lot of work into making it as immersive and touching as she can. She wants you to walk away having really gotten something substantial out of the gig. “It’s always about feelings.” she says. “If music doesn’t make you feel something, then it’s not the music for you. All the music we’ve written has made us feel something and that’s why we’ve released them. There’s gonna be so many exciting things happening in the show, people joining me for songs...it’s exciting. It’s about giving the audience an experience, something they can relate to.” LISA DIB

Vera Blue plays A Day on the Lawn with Something for Kate, Kim Churchill and more at the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens, Hobart, on Saturday Match 24. Tickets available via Oztix.


Music

HERE COME THE GOONIES SYDNEY LAD TOM LOUD COULD EASILY BE DESCRIBED AS A ONE-MAN PARTY. HIS HOT DUB TIME MACHINE GIGS GO OFF LIKE NOBODY’S BUSINESS, AND HE’S TOURED THE WORLD GETTING PEOPLE DANCING THEIR FEET OFF. BEGINNING AS A RUDIMENTARY AUDIO-VISUAL GIG IN 2011, HDWM HAS GROWN EXPONENTIALLY IN POPULARITY; IN 2017, LOUD HEADLINED FALLS FESTIVAL AND PLAYED FOR 10,000 PEOPLE AT NYE IN THE PARK, A FESTIVAL OF HIS OWN DESIGN. NOW, LOUD IS BRINGING THE SECOND RUN OF HIS AWESOME HOT DUB WINE MACHINE SHOWS TO TASSIE.

Hot Dub Wine Machine is a smaller-scale event than some of the massive fests Loud has played, but it’s lovingly curated, and dedicated to great tunes, nice booze and good times. The HDWM shows will take place at wineries, of course, all over the country. “It’s a chance for me to play different songs” Loud explains. “In Time Machine, I’ve realised people don’t want me to change so much. If I don’t play Madonna, people get upset (laughs), doing mixes online, I get to dig a little deeper. I like the ‘90s mix up there, songs I’d never be able to play live, there’ a bunch of slower songs that mean a lot to me. The live show is about giving people the night of their lives; I try hard to make a show, put music together that appeals to as many people in a room as I can.” “I DJed for ten years before I did Hot Dub, but I was never very successful. I was always worried about what other DJs thought of me, they look down on you if you don’t mix songs together, but sometimes it’s fun to stop a song completely and leave a couple seconds of silence and then drop

the next song in, that suspense. Some songs, like the start of Still Dre or Paint It Black, I wanna hear the introduction!” It was hard to get a succinct handful of tracks that Loud would recommend for a guaranteed banger of a party, but he slip a few notables. “The classic of modern time is Mr Brightside, it’s only gotten better with age; when it came out, I wasn’t totally on board with it, but it’s so great. I go back to the ‘60s: Respect, a wonderful song; Superstition. Oasis, even in America, I didn’t think Oasis would go that well but it did, Don’t Look Back in Anger.” Outside the Time Machine stage, Loud gives himself a wee break from the ‘80s pop bangers, though. “At the moment, I’m loving Gang of Youths, which I know is old news to a lot of people, but I’m always behind the times (laughs), though I can’t quite work out a way of getting them into the show.” So what’s the difference between a Time Machine show and these new wine-soaked gigs? Will it be anything like Loud’s previous Coachella or Splendour in the Grass shows? Not quite. “The location is different, mainly. I play the final ninety minutes of the show. The great thing is these gorgeous places, last year we had the most gorgeous Tassie day in Huon Valley, getting to sit around outside and enjoy other great music. The last time I played in Hobart, I played at Republic Bar, which is an intense venue when it’s sold out; this is the chance to get outside and dance. Wine Machine is a small, independent one-stage festival, with all Aussie acts. We try to put together a day that just delightful; great wine and food and music to build throughout the day.” The lineup is a banger one, too, as you might imagine.

“Sneaky Sound System are fantastic party rockers, they’re the kind of headliner, they’ll close out the day. Before them, all the other acts that we’re excited about; Touch Sensitive is someone whose music I adore, Luke Million is a wonderful keyboard synth player; Owl Eyes is an artist I’ve loved for years, she’s perfect for the sun going down and getting settled into the day.” Although he tours the world with his party wares, Loud has real space in his heart for his hometown of Sydney. “I’m firmly entrenched in Sydney, I love it very much. I get to go and party and come back to my beautiful daughters and little house, it’s a wonderful life me and the wife have created. There’s a huge amount of creative people. People can have a sook, but there’s heaps of people doing great parties. I’ve had my shows shut down by police here, I’ve certainly seen the brunt of that police energy towards live music, but I don’t begrudge them that. I don’t think it’s the death knell of anything, I’m pretty optimistic about it.” LISA DIB

Hot Dub Wine Machine will be on Saturday March 17th at the Home Hill Winery in Huon Valley. Tickets available from www.iwannaticket.com.au/event/hotdub-wine-machine-huon-valley-MTQzMjQ.

www.facebook.com/warp.mag 9


Music

THE SAME BUT BETTER “GENERALLY SPEAKING I THINK WE HAVE TO WORK A BIT HARDER TO BE PROVE OUR WORTH AND BE TAKEN SERIOUSLY IN THE INDUSTRY, AND SOMETIMES IT GETS YOU DOWN AND YOU DON’T FEEL ADEQUATE.” SAYS ISLA KA’S FRANKIE ANDREW.

“Playing in bands is all I’ve ever wanted to do really…” says Frankie Andrew; founder, vocalist and guitarist from Launceston three-piece ISLA KA. Early on, Andrew’s love for music was evident. Playing piano in primary school, the sax in her high school a jazz band, the keyboard in a psych-rock band; and at sixteen years old she started learning guitar, with that, came her confidence to sing. “I think I first knew I loved song writing and singing when I was still in primary school and used to come up with little songs on piano which was my first instrument. I was definitely inspired by Australian powerhouses like Katie Noonan, Adalita, Ella Hooper, Missy Higgins, and a whole bunch of folk artists my parents listened to. When I started learning guitar at 16 I’d already been into a massive range of styles from RnB to Icelandic folk, American indie bands and Australian alt-rock. That’s when my lyrical song writing started really happening.” “I formed my first trio not long after moving to Melbourne in 2010 and we performed as Tea For Frances for almost a year then went our separate ways before I did my second EP under my name in 2011-2012. I continued playing in Melbourne for a few years after that with a friend Dave on electric and banjo then with my most recent (prior to this line up) band mate and allround legend Dave on double bass. It was with him that I started to develop the songs I play now and come up with the name ISLA KA” “ISLA KA took a while to find after moving back to TAS so I played a lot of solo shows for those couple of years. But it’s been awesome and extremely validating from day one with Mary & Yaz and it’s been building on the previous ten or so years of writing and performing in the way I always wanted.” “We first had the conversation about playing together when I went down to Hobart to watch Against Me! and Camp Cope last year and Mary & Yaz we’re supporting them with their other band Bansheeland. We were hanging out after upstairs at The Bris and they mentioned they’d 10

warpmagazine.com.au

love to play with me and from there it grew! It’s awesome that it felt so natural to form this line up with 2 friends who are both awesome musicians. I’ve had a pretty good run with that!” “I guess writing and playing has ended up being my main emotional and creative outlet, but as well as it being therapeutic and a really special way of connecting with others, performing to audiences can also be very exposing and an emotionally exhausting thing to do when you’re not feeling up to it. But there’s almost always something positive to take away even from a bad gig. It could be as small as singing one song better than you did the last time or a friend grinning at you from the audience (which is actually the best and not a small thing!). Playing with the band also makes me feel less vulnerable which helps with the nerves!” ISLA KA’s debut single Sand Castles showcases the talent of all three ladies while lyrically delving right into Andrew’s mind. “Sand Castles is actually not a new song, but I wanted to release a band version of it. I wrote it when I still lived in Melbourne and I’d gotten myself into a rut working uninspiring hospo jobs and really wanted to go back to Uni and grow a little more but started to feel like I didn’t know how. My partner at the time was encouraging me to go for it but I felt torn… I wanted to move home to see if I’d be happier studying there, but it wasn’t going to be right for us. I was scared what that would mean for our relationship because it was, as the song says, everything to me. Four years later and so much has changed, and you really don’t know what’s around the corner.” The fact that this next conversation still has to be had in the year of 2018 in a gut kicker, as Andrew expresses that misogyny is still very present in the music world. “We’ve all experienced misogyny in the music industry. Where there are misogynists there are women on the receiving end. There are the most beautiful supportive men who are equals, and they are the kind we choose to surround ourselves with and share

experiences with; but there are another kind and sometimes you just can’t avoid them or don’t see it at first. How best to tackle this is a question that needs a long answer, but one of the best things we can do as people of any gender in the industry is to call out disrespectful, entitled behaviour and to know what we want and how we deserve to be treated and refuse to work with people who don’t practice those same values of equality and respect.” “Generally speaking I think we have to work a bit harder to be prove our worth and be taken seriously in the industry, and sometimes it gets you down and you don’t feel adequate. And if you do get given opportunities there’s this view some have that it’s because all-women bands are trending, and so we’re getting unfair special treatment. Being in a band with other women shouldn’t be treated any differently to being in a band with only guys, and hopefully one day when there are more diverse line ups it won’t be. There are so many factors in what makes a band come together, gender isn’t necessarily one of them. It’s a first for me playing in a band with other women, and I’m loving experiencing that and the energy is different. At the end of the day it’s so important to focus on all the positive and genuine support we receive and to keep making plans and doing all the things we love to do!” “We’re hoping to get back into recording after summer and releasing a full length on vinyl by the beginning of next year is the goal! We’ll release a couple more songs that we have in the works before then. It’ll have a similar production quality to Sand Castles with a mixture of electric and nylon guitars, some layered and some more stripped back, bass, drums, maybe some cello and some keys and a whole lot of TLC!” KEIRA LEONARD

Isla Ka will be supporting Luca Brasi at The Goods Shed, in Hobart on Thursday March 29. Tickets available from www.moshtix.com.au.


Music

SNEAKY SOUNDS AUSSIE MAINSTAY DANCE ACT SNEAKY SOUND SYSTEM ARE A WELL-OILED MUSIC MACHINE IF THERE EVER WAS ONE. THE DUO- ANGUS MCDONALD AND CONNIE MITCHELL- HAVE BEEN CONSISTENTLY RELEASING MUSIC SINCE THEIR FIRST TRACKS IN 2004, AND RUNNING THE ICONIC SYDNEY CLUB NIGHT SNEAKY SUNDAYS SINCE WAY BACK IN 2001. THEY’RE HEADLINING THE HOT DUB WINE MACHINE GIG AND WORKING RELENTLESSLY ON NEW MATERIAL, AS MCDONALD EXPLAINS.

“[At the moment] We’re working on more Sneaky stuff, a couple of remixes for Pictures and I Love It, tracks that are over ten years old now!” McDonald says. “Straight after that, got a new tune about to hit the airwaves, and a bunch of stuff in the backlog. We’re working on stuff non-stop. We’re not really that impressed at the whole radio vibe at the moment, we don’t really fit in there. Some disco-tinged house tunes coming out.” Although their last full-length album was 2011’s ARIA-nominated From Here to Anywhere, Sneaky have been pumping out tracks and remixes via their Soundcloud and live sets. Tracks like UFO, Pictures and I Love It were indeed the definitive sound of a certain period

of dance music, giving Sneaky mainstream love, although that hype isn’t something that the band is willing to strive to recreate- they just wanna put out tunes they love. “The omnipresence of songs like UFO...it was just unexpected, that took us off in a bit of a different direction.” he explains. “We have our feet firmly planted in club world. We started releasing music in 2004 and we’re still going! It certainly does sound like a long time, but there’s been so many evolutions, though some things have remained consistent. We’re in it for the long-term. One of the beauties of dance music is it’s like jazz; it doesn’t have an end date, and they reward passion.” As mentioned, the band are performing at the Hot Dub Wine Machine show with Owl Eyes, Touch Sensitive, Luke Million, Hot Dub Time Machine himself and more. They’ve already hit other states with the show and it sounds like it’s been a dynamite gig. “It was mental, sold out, they were mad for it. It was a cool thing. Obviously, we’ve done every festival here...it is a shift though, when you go from doing club shows to a festival, it’s very different to suddenly playing to fifteenthousand people, and you gotta adjust your sets accordingly. But we love the yin and the yang.” Sneaky Sundays, in the band’s hometown of Sydney, is a city institution- so much so that the band even take it to the Europe! They’ve been doing Sneaky Sundays in Mykonos, Greece, for a few years now. “Sneaky Sundays is about quality house music. We just wanna make people dance. It’s a party, we’d have nearly one thousand people every Sunday night, international guests popping in. When the lockout laws kicked in and it all turned to shit, we were offered this opportunity to do Sneaky Sundays in Mykonos. That took off really quickly, three thousand people every Sunday! We came back and thought, we gotta find somewhere to keep doing it here. It’s been difficult to find a venue that’s allowed to play music on a Sunday.” “The people that come out on a Sunday are different to people that come out on a Friday or Saturday night. It’s not necessarily people coming out to get wasted. They don’t work nineto-five, a lot of the hospo crowd, that’s their time to blow off stream. Bit more of an exciting crowd. I always feel that little bit naughty going out on a Sunday night.” “People out trying to get laid and wasted...fair play to them, if you’re working nine-to-five, Monday to Friday, it’s tough. Sometimes there’s so many fucking idiots that go out [Fridays and Saturdays] as well, people ruin it for other people.” “Things have changed so much, back then it was enjoyable making albums and people would digest the albums and there was appetite for it. I Love It was in the top 100 for seventy-eight weeks! You don’t hear of things like that now. Things change so quickly, all of those songs were in the charts for a long time. For us, it’s about longevity. We just like putting out a consistent bunch of songs every few months to keep a body of work going for our fans. You’ve gotta evolve, generations change, they don’t want you there all the time. You gotta throw it out there to the universe to see if the time is right. It’s a weird little world, this music game of ours. You gotta stick to your guns.” LISA DIB

Sneaky Sound System play Hot Dub Wine Machine on Saturday March 17th at the Home Hill Winery in the Huon Valley. Tickets available via www.iwannaticket. com.au.

12

warpmagazine.com.au


FREQ NASTY + Max Power & DJ Pressed

THE GRAND POOHBAH SATURDAY MARCH 17 11PM START Presales $15 + b/f from www.moshtix.com.au


Music

THE HEART OF SCOTLAND SOCTTISH BAND BREABACH ARE A RARE EXPERIENCE. MIXING GALEIC AND ENGLISH, MODERN AND TRADITIONAL, THE BAND ARE A BLEND OF SCOTTISH CULTURE PAST AND PRESENT. I SAT DOWN THE FOLK BAND’S VOCALIST CALUM TO DISCUSS THE BANDS UPCOMING HOBART SHOWS, RECENT ALBUM AND FUTURE PLANS.

Breabach have been creating unique Scottish folk music since 2005. Calum describes the identifiable sound of Breabach as “twin bagpipes, Gaelic vocals and harmonies”. The band has evolved greatly since 2005, having been influenced by their discoveries all around the world. “When we first started we just played gigs in Glasgow, and then we ventured out into the rest of Scotland and then we ventured out into the UK. In the last maybe 5 years we have been able to travel all over the world so, we’ve met a lot of people who have influenced our playing and our preforming. Quite an inspiring journey. I guess our sound has been shaped by our surrounds and will continue to change with each adventure” Breabach’s latest album Astair has been released in Europe for some time now, but was finally released in Australia on the second of February. The album received high praise, including the Scots Trad ‘Album of the year Award’. Although the album proved a challenge, with a varying number of influences and collaborations, with the help of Greg Lawson, Breabach created a beautiful, synergetic album. “It was an amazing experience. Greg’s main background is directly with strings, but he has a real orchestral experience, so his playing ability and his ear for harmony was something that we thought was really going to benefit us. He also has his foot into world music so he really brought everything together. This album was a challenge for us, you might describe it as a challenge for him as well, but it was great to rely on him to help us bring it together because we had so many different cultures taking part. We had many friends, friends from Scandinavia, Australia, New Zealand and Quebec, so bringing all these sounds and combining it with our sound was a big task and Greg helped us steer the ship.”

HOT DUB WINE MACHINE AFTER PARTY LUEN JACOBS (Syd) + AKOUO + FINN WHITLA

$10 entry from 11.30pm SAT March 17 Mez Bar - Odeon Theatre

14

warpmagazine.com.au

Astar featured a huge array of talents including two Australian musicians, Mark Atkins and Yirrmal Marika. I asked Calum about this collaboration and how it arose, he spoke of it as a fond and enjoyable experience, and a collaboration that he opens continues in future music. “Well we were over in Melbourne in 2015 and we got involved in workshops with the Black Armband and Yirrmal Marika and Mark Atkins were both in that. So we got to meet them, got to know them and make music with them. Just their musicality and understanding of that deep and nourished culture, it was so invigorating and the way in which we connected with them, it felt like the right thing to continue that it and felt like the start of a journey rather than the end. “Collaborations are something we’ve always enjoyed and getting to meet wonderful people is, for me anyway, why music exists because people love being together, being inspired together and enjoying the change of energy. We’re absolutely going to keep meeting new people and seeing where it takes us.” If the unique sound of Breabach alone hasn’t convinced to come along to one of their three Tasmanian shows, Calum promises the band is lots of fun and every gig is a good time. “People can expect songs in English and in Gaelic, they can expect slow melodies, they can expect fast melodies, they can expect dancing. There’s going to be dancing, there’s going to be piping, and it just might get a little bit crazy. So they can expect that.” MACKENZIE STOLP

See Breabach perform at the Spiegeltent in Hobart on March 13. More information available from www.spiegeltenthobart.com.


Music

TEN YEARS YOUNG NEXT YEAR, FREMANTLE INDIE-POP ACT SAN CISCO WILL CELEBRATE A FULL DECADE AS A BAND. THEY’VE QUICKLY RISEN UP THE RANKS OF LOCAL AUSSIE MUSIC, GOING FROM TRIPLE J UNEARTHED FAVES TO ARIA AWARD NOMINEES IN 2013 (BREAKTHROUGH ARTIST - RELEASE, BEST INDEPENDENT RELEASE AND BEST DANCE RELEASE FOR THEIR SELF-TITLED DEBUT ALBUM, AND BEST VIDEO FOR SINGLE FRED ASTAIRE). THEY’RE ALSO THE FIRST-EVER AUSSIE BAND TO BE SIGNED TO THE US FAT POSSUM LABEL (THE BLACK KEYS, SPIRITUALIZED, DINOSAUR JR.). JORDI DAVIESON (GUITAR/LEAD VOCALS) REVEALS THE BAND ARE ALREADY HARD AT WORK ON THEIR NEW RECORD.

“We’re writing songs, I live with Josh [Biondillo], the guitarist, and we try to spend a couple hours every day writing songs, mapping out lyric ideas, chord progressions. The next step is demo-ing in our home studio. It ebbs and flows- you start off with an idea for a song thinking, “this is awesome”, then you’re working on it and thinking, “this is the shittest thing I’ve ever done” (laughs) and that happens with each song, your feelings towards it are forever changing. You can question it, “I dunno, is that even anything”. We write the very beginning of the song then Scarlett [Stevens, drums/vocals] comes in and shapes things, she’s our second filter.” But what to expect from the new record? Will the band stick to their “squelchy, crispy, streamlined, hairy, indie” vibe, or become experimental? “It’s not gonna be wildly different.” Davieson explains. “I’m personally trying to bring back a bit more of my early songwriting and lyrics, but I think because of how much time we’re putting into the songwriting, hopefully it’s gonna be maybe a bit stronger. We’re really taking our time, getting a lot of material together. You gotta find that sweet spot: you don’t wanna be in a hurry and you don’t wanna be putting stuff out constantly...you don’t wanna disappear for three years at our stage. Us as an independent Australian band, we have to get our timing just right.” The band’s last release was 2017’s The Water, an album that spawned two attention-grabbing singles (Slo-Mo and Hey, Did I Do You Wrong?) and led them onto one of the biggest national tours of their career. Now, only a few months later, they’re heading out again. There’s no stopping them! Davieson explains that coming from Perth, despite (or perhaps because of) its relative distance and isolation from other capitals, has been a boon for the band. “[The music scene] is really good, a guy called Nick Allbrook- he’s the lead singer from Pond- he wrote a really good article on why the creative world of WA is really good. His theory is [that] we’re so detached from everything else, and we’re such a small peer group. There’s heaps of new music and young bands and lots of really good venues that create an arena for that to flourish. It’s such a small group, you have to be different, you have to be doing your own thing. People will notice.” LISA DIB San Cisco play The Waratah Hotel, Hobart, on Friday March 30. Tickets available from Oztix.

DUOWLS THIRSTYROOTS, TRICKLING WATER IS THE LATEST RELEASE BY LOCAL MUSICIAN WILL FAGAN WHO GOES BY THE MONIKER DUOWLS. AFTER PLAYING DRUMS IN PUNK BANDS FOR YEARS, IN 2013 WILL BEGAN WRITING HIS OWN MUSIC.

“ It started off as me just trying to make songs for the sake of it, but I guess after a while I decided I should probably write with some sort of an intent. I try to be as earnest as possible with my song-writing. I don’t really want to confuse anyone about the content of my songs, the depression, anxiety, and heartache that most of my work is talking about. Mostly I write when I am alone and a relationship has ended – or when I buy into the darkness that I am constantly experiencing”. With musical influences such as Phil Elverum of Mount Eerie, Tim Brown, Michael Hurley and Transcription Of Organ Music the result is a beautiful blend of haunting melodies and lo-fi goodness, proving you don’t need a fancy set up to record music. “Everything on Duowls’ bandcamp was recorded by me, using one microphone, a USB interface, and audacity on my desktop PC. I don’t know shit about recording. Mostly I’ve used a condenser mic, but on some releases I’ve used my $3 microphone that I bought to talk to people while I play video games. The scope of my recordings varies a bunch between releases. Falling in Love on Long Distance Flights took me ages – it has a bunch of layers, drums, all this stuff. I was really trying to make an album. Thirsty Roots took me mostly one afternoon. You can hear birds calling in Tongue. They are all mostly one take. They aren’t particularly finished. I like them though.” AMY KERR

Thirsty Roots, Trickling Water is available for download on DUOWLS bandcamp, along with the older releases – www. duowls.bandcamp.com.

www.facebook.com/warp.mag 15


Music

NICE FREQUENCIES FIJI-BORN, NEW ZEALAND-RAISED DARIN MCFAYDEN, BETTER KNOW AS FREQ NASTY, HAS UTILISED A MASS OF INFLUENCES TO CREATE HIS SIGNATURE SOUND. GROWING UP ON THE BEATLES, FIJIAN MUSIC, ROCK AND ROLL AND JAZZ RECORDS, HE QUIT HIS JOB AS A CHEF AND MOVED TO LONDON AT TWENTY YEARS OLD. HE DISCOVERED DUB MUSIC AND QUICKLY MADE A NAME FOR HIMSELF IN THE UNDERGROUND SCENE. CONSIDERED A PIONEER OF THE ‘90S UK BREAKBEAT MOVEMENT, HIS TUNES HAVE BEEN A POPPING MELD OF REGGAE, HIP-HOP AND BREAKBEAT THAT HAVE DELIGHTED CROWDS THE WORLD OVER.

In between studying (“I was studying the Tibetan Buddhist monastic curriculum along with the texts of the Yoga and Advaita Vedanta traditions” he explains) and consistently releasing new music, he also launched a website called Giveback website, a project he co-founded that uses music to raise money for causes like Tibetan people’s rights, safe drinking water in Ethiopia, and rebuilding homes in Haiti. He’s also been working on a tactile-audio technology called SubPac, which allows the deaf and hearingimpaired to experience music. Another of his projects is The Yoga of Bass, a collaboration with yoga teacher Claire Thompson, in which yoga and free movement routines are combined, rather nicely, with some of McFayden’s more atmospheric, earthy tunes. McFayden studied yoga for some fifteen years, and is a longtime Buddhist.

16

warpmagazine.com.au

music multi-instrumentalist David Starfire which includes chanting, visual art and yogic techniques), McFayden allows time for putting out restorative energies into the world and attempting to create social change. “I really try and concentrate on a few things that I can actually do something about rather than follow all of the issues of injustice which I used to do around the time of the ‘Video Nasty Experience’ political live show. In this day and age following every issue, every day, can actually drive you crazy. Right now, I’m focussed on teaching meditation, creating tech, and playing music as a way to use my abilities to bring positive energy to the world.” McFayden has always had a wide variety of influences, as mentioned, and aims to maintain a healthily diverse range, in order to best shape his output. He’s working on new releases at the moment, so you can expect something interesting in the near future.

“It’s been a vital way to deal with the craziness of the music industry and touring” he explains, on the importance of yoga and Buddhism in his life. “but also it has become a way of seeing the world that enables me to live more gracefully, to create less suffering and more happiness for myself and the world around me. It also helps with creativity and workflow.”

“I think I’ll always be interested in drums and drum patterns, as I grew up playing drums as a kid even though I don’t play regularly now” he says. “This explains why I don’t have a whole lot of interest in house music or other ‘4 on the floor’ genres, but am fascinated by breaks, DnB, Jazz, funk and anything else with broken beats.”

“[Buddhism is] a way to be in the world without being buffeted about by the outer force of unrelenting change, the ups and downs of life, and the internal forces of greed and aggression that our mind and brains have evolved to be prone to. As we let go of habitual neurosis, we’re able to find a more authentic way of being that includes a deeper understanding of ourselves, without the judgement and insecurities we all typically suffer from. It’s about living life to the fullest in whatever way we choose, and being able to help others while we do that. Living a good life.”

“When the breaks genre started, there was a variety of tempos as you can hear on my first album [Freq’s, Geeks & Mutilations, 1999]: ambient with minimal or no beats, [1999 single] Boomin’ Back Atcha at 105bpm, and others were up around 130bpm, so I’ve always worked across tempos, even though I became known for producing breaks music.”

Even with all his creative projects on the go (including Dub Kirtan All Stars, a live nine-piece band of singers and musicians led by McFayden and world

Freq Nasty plays The Grand Poobah, Hobart, on Saturday March 17th with DJ Pressed and Max Power. Presale tickets available from www.moshtix.com.au.

LISA DIB


Music

THE FESTIVAL HIDDEN IN THE WOODS A FESTIVAL CALLED PANAMA CAN TRULY CLAIM TO BE AN EVENT LIKE NO OTHER IN AUSTRALIA. ARTISTIC DIRECTORS TIM CARROLL AND DAN ROOKE PUT A WEALTH OF EFFORT INTO MAKING PANAMA BEAUTIFUL, UNIQUE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE. IT’S A SMALLER-SCALE FESTIVAL WITH CAREFULLY-CHOSEN ACTS; IT ALL GOES DOWN IN THE GORGEOUS FORESTS OF THE LONE STAR VALLEY, ABOUT AN HOUR FROM LAUNCESTON. THE ORGANISERS HAVE GONE TO LENGTHS TO FOSTER A RESPECTFUL AND GENEROUS ATMOSPHERE (“SHOW RESPECT AND CALL OUT BAD BEHAVIOUR. PANAMA STAFF ARE ON HAND TO SUPPORT YOU. DON’T BE THAT GUY.”) AND WELCOMING KIDS AND YOUNG FOLKS, TO ALLOW FAMILIES TO ENJOY THE EVENT TOGETHER.

Carroll explains a bit about how they make that happen. “We’ve been lucky with Panama that there’s different people with similar visions for what we want. From the beginning, myself and Dan, we had worked on other festivals in Australia and overseas and one of the big overarching takeaway from that is that small is beautiful and there’s something you can achieve with a smaller event. The vision was always to be small, never to become a ten-thousand-person event.” “I’ve been to Glastonbury, had a good time at Splendour last time I was there...there is something exciting about that scale and madness 18

warpmagazine.com.au

that comes from a big event. We’ve got about two thousand people at Panama, you can get to the point by the end that everyone seems familiar, you’ve crossed paths with people, there’s a bond that forms.” “Panama is the same weekend as Golden Plains and Womadelaide, which is relevant in that we can work with those other events to get artists of great calibre. We only sell 1500 adult tickets, and a couple hundred kids and youth tickets. We focus on critically-acclaimed music across genres. We have a lot of repeat attenders; the first year we didn’t sell out, but every year since we have as people hear about it and wanna check it out. It’s gone up to another level.” Carroll and the Panama team are dedicated to their ‘zero waste’ policy and environmental care, which included only allowing biodegradable soaps and shampoos to be brought to the site, running on solar power, recycling, composting, utilising local vendors for eats and even growing their own veg and brewing their own cider. A festival for folks that care. “We will largely be rolling out the same system [as last year].” Carroll explains. “The part of the event that’s gotten the most attention is the way the patrons leave the campsite, which is pretty immaculate. You can hold the rubbish at the end in one hand, that’s been amazing. It’s the result of a combination of a whole lot of different communication strategies, but ultimately it’s the patrons that do that. Our patrons have been amazing, they need all the credit there.” “I think that kind of spectacle of a festival site the day after, the apocalyptic field of broken singleuse tents and cheap shitty camp chairs...a lot of people are disgusted by that, punters an event organisers. It makes sense.” There’s even a clothes swap!

“There’s a friend of ours that runs clothes swaps called Suitcase Rummage, she organises these small markets where artisans can set up a small market stall with two suitcases. She does that in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne, it was her concept from the beginning. Last year it was like the Christmas sales at Myer (laughs)” The Panama line-up is, as always, carefully chosen to intrigue its audience. This year you’ll see Sampa The Great, Grizzly Bear, Jens Lekman, Thundercat, Lee Fields and the Expressions and more. There’ll also be storytellers, cabaret, as well as ambitious sonic experiments like Ghosting’s Reimagining Miyazaki. As Carroll explains, there’s a lot of thought put into the small, curious line-up. “[Choosing the acts] is a complicated, multifaceted process. We try to be genre agnostic; we’ll present world and indie and hip-hop and spoken word and folk...we also have an eye to represent local talent, a spread around the rest of the states around Australia, a strong representation of female and queer artists, that’s something we put a lot of thought into with the booking process.” “I see each day of the fest as a journey: I can imagine how I would feel. what music I’d wanna hear as the sun is setting at a festival. By the same token, we’re not setting out to be a ‘dance’ festival, we are willing to have a headliner like Grizzly Bear, weird chamber folk or experimental folk music that is gonna be extremely difficult to dance to, but it’ll be a fulfilling artistic experience to end a night with.” LISA DIB

A Festival Called Panama takes place on March 9-11 in the Lone Star Valley. The event is sold out.


Review REVIEW

瀀爀攀猀攀渀琀攀搀 戀礀 䠀伀䈀䄀刀吀 䈀刀䔀圀䤀一䜀 䌀伀䴀倀䄀一夀

ISLAND 152 ISLAND 152 IS AN EXCEPTION ISSUE OF THIS QUARTERLY MAGAZINE. IT’S NOT JUST THE HEFT IT HAS IN MY HANDS, THE PERFUME OF THE INK OR THE EXCEPTIONAL SELECTION OF WORKS IN THIS ISSUE, INCLUDING SOME EXCELLENT SHORT STORIES CHOSEN BY THEIR FICTION EDITOR, ANICA BOULANGER-MASHBERG, IT IS ALSO THE WEIGHT OF FORTY (OR SO) YEARS OF PUBLISHING IN THIS SPACE AND THE WISDOM THAT AFFORDS A PUBLICATION THAT HAS DOCUMENTED THE CHANGING FACES OF WRITING IN TASMANIA AND FROM AROUND THE WORLD. IT IS RARE TO HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO READ ANYTHING FROM COVER TO COVER IN ONE SITTING, BUT THIS EDITION HAD ME ENSCONCED IN THE COUCH, AS I WAS ENSCONCED IN THE WORDS.

This issue has a stand out extract, Salt, from Robbie Arnott’s forthcoming novel Flames (Text, May 2018) and as familiar and adoring as I am of Arnott’s writing I was not prepared for the emotional gutting offered in this short extract. Fine choice of a section to extract Island and a sure sign of the powerful writing we are sure to find in Flames. I am busting to get my hands on the novel itself. It is also great to see a peer of Arnott’s in the Tasmanian writing scene, Michael Blake back in print with the austere short story ‘Breathless’, a quirky and disturbing story of a man who wears different coats. I am sure we will be reading more of both these chaps’ words before the decade is out. Kathryn Lomer’s short story The Big Blue is tricky with its darkness, starting as if it were a benign tale and deepening quickly. I’d heard wonderful things about Maggie MacKellar’s writing, and her essay ‘Ways of Seeing: Helen Garner and her work’ confirmed these rumours. Garner is rich pickings anyway, and this beautifully crafted essay arose from re-exploring Garner’s writing as she was asked to launch Bernadette Brennan’s new literary

biography of Garner and her work, A Writing Life. The other essays that really sing in this edition are Pete Hay’s ‘Tasmanian Writing and the Great Tasmanian Dichotomy,’ (I am always one to pay attention to pay attention to the mention of priggishness in the convict descended fissures in our island) and Nicole Redhouse’s long and considered ‘A Science for Dreaming,’ subtitled ‘how do we sit with Freud now’ which she explores using the starting point of her father’s work as a psychotherapist. Reading the poetry, which is interspersed throughout the essays, art and stories I was halted in my tracks by the inclusion of a poem by Chris Andrews, who I once had the fortune to interview about his work as a translator of my favourite dead Chilean, Roberto Bolaño. This confirms for me the creativity in the task of translation, the interpretation of a score, the reimagining of another’s stories. RACHEL EDWARDS

Island is available from bookshops and newsagencies around the country.

www.facebook.com/warp.mag 19


Books

PAIGE TURNER RECENTLY, I READ A DISDAINFUL COMMENT REGARDING MINDFULNESS AND STORYTELLING, SUGGESTING THAT THEY ARE BOTH FLASH-IN-THE-PAN FADS. OH DISDAINFUL COMMENTATOR, HOW WRONG YOU ARE – BOTH OF THESE ACTIVITIES, PRACTICES AND WISDOMS ARE ALREADY LONG ENDURING AND IT IS WITH DELIGHT THAT I POINT YOU TO A TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY ITERATION OF STORYTELLING - THE STORY ISLAND PROJECT’S FREE, FUN STORYTELLING ACTIVITIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE AT THE MOONAH TASTE OF THE WORLD FESTIVAL ON SUNDAY 25 MARCH. ACTIVITIES WILL INCLUDE LIVE STORYTELLING SESSIONS FROM NOTABLE TASMANIAN CHILDREN’S AUTHORS, BOOK-MAKING CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE TO EXPLORE NEW WRITING IDEAS. COME ALONG AND PICK UP A FREE KIDS’ STORYTELLING ACTIVITY BOOKLET TO TAKE HOME! FOLLOW THE STORY ISLAND PROJECT ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE INFORMATION.

Also, Strategic Storytelling for Social Change is happening – and this is two days dedicated to story, the crafting, capture, and harnessing of story that foster community, explores shared values and creates hope – and ideally influences others on a path of social justice. For more information, check out Storytelling for Social Change on the old F’book, or via the website - www.sparkingchange. com.au.

NEWKIND PIQUED MY INTEREST LAST YEAR, I SAW #NEWKIND SIGNS POPPING UP AROUND THE STATE, READ VISIONARY AND AMBITIOUS STATEMENTS ABOUT HOW A BUNCH OF PEOPLE, WITH WILDLY VARYING SKILLS AND A UNITING BELIEF CAN COME TOGETHER TO MAKE THE WORLD A BETTER, WISER AND WILDER PLACE, AND AT NAYRI NIARA FESTIVAL I SAW ERFAN DALIRI, A DIRECTOR OF THE FESTIVAL PERFORM WITH POISE, POWER AND CONNECTION – AND SOME TRULY EVOCATIVE POETRY. HE KINDLY AGREED TO SHARE SOME OF HIS THOUGHTS ABOUT THIS NEW, KIND SPACE.

Still pondering the very lovely Tamar Valley, the Tamar Valley Writers Festival, which is happening in September this year (14-16, mark your diaries) is co-hosting the Tasmanian part of Tim Winton’s national tour to promote his new novel. Tender Hearts, Sons of Brutes is a one-hourlong presentation conducted in partnership with Penguin and Petrarch’s Bookshop. This is taking place on March 24 at the Tramsheds Function Centre in Inveresk, bookings are essential and details can be found on the Tamar Valley Writers Festival website.

The launch of Jane Williams’ new collection of haiku and senryu echoes of flight will be launched by Lyn Reeves on Saturday, March 17, 11am at the Waterworks (Site number 9, last hut on the left). Lyn will also be leading a short Ginko (haiku walk) following the launch and there will be cake. So many good reasons to go!

Island is at it again, hosting the Writing Cave on March 6,13 and 27, Silent Reading on March 7 at Quartermasters (in partnership with Transportation Press) and Bright Thinking on March 15. For more information on all of these activities, plus Damon Young’s March 22 Philosophy Class, check out the Island Facebook page.

RACHEL EDWARDS

If you have any stor If you have any book or story or writing related news you’d like to share, drop me a line racheledwards488@gmail.com. y or book related news, I’d love to hear from you – racheledwards488@gmail.com.

What is Newkind?

What is something that people won’t expect?

Newkind is what happens when a bunch of artists, activists, anarchists, environmentalists and academics come together to run a festival. It’s equal part TED talks and equal parts activist boot camp. It’s as much anarchist summer school as it is an environment and permaculture convention. We want to actively engage in the process of creating a peaceful, sustainable, just and equitable society. So we decided to use the platform of a 5-day camping festival, and programme it with thought leaders, environmentalists, professional activists, as well as physical trainers and emotional intelligence experts.

If I tell you, then they will expect it... So I can’t really tell you.

Why are you holding this in lovely Tasmania? Tasmania holds a sense of adventure and excitement for a lot of people from the mainland, and we also thought the abundant nature, the strong culture of sustainability and environmentalism, as well as strong connection to agriculture and produce, all made it a very easy choice.

Some of this year’s highlights include the activist discussion panel to be held on the Saturday of the event. Ex-NASA scientist Kelly Snook, coming over from the UK. As well as a keynote presentation by Tenille Bentley on early-childhood emotional literacy. warpmagazine.com.au

Twenty years ago Paul Pritchard wrote an incredible book recounting his catastrophic brain injury on the slenderest piece of rock in the ocean, the Totem Pole. He now has the rights to the book and you can pre-order a copy here: www.pozible.com/project/the-totem-pole-20years-on. A view for Lovers and Sinners examines the blurred lines between love and sin through a collection of short pieces created by Tasmanian artists Kitty Taylor and Nathan Tucker. Each piece combines an image from a unique location with a short fiction response. They will be posted into a Facebook album, at the rate of one a week.

What are some of the highlight’s of this year’s festival?

20

KickStart Creative Exchange are again offering some gems, including sessions on Celtic History beginning on March 25. More information from www.kickstartarts.org/ celtic-history.

Revolutionary Readers Relax! Reading for the Revolution is back. It is a monthly discussion that is taking place in March on Tuesday the 13th at 7.30am, upstairs in the Food Store in South Hobart. March’s discussion will rove around Bruce Pascoe’s Dark Emu, The Uluru Statement from the Heart, and The Referendum Council Final Report. You can search for the latter two readings online. Tamar Valley based writer Shirley Patton has her debut novel The Secrets We Keep launching in Hobart on March 22 at Fullers where she will be in conversation with poet and former Island editor, Gina Mercer. Launceston, fear not! Shirley will be at Petrarch’s Bookshop on April 12. For more details check the Fullers and Petrarch’s Facebook pages.

The Tasmanian Society of Editors, who offer some gems of workshops, are hosting Merridy Pugh to chat about her adventures publishing Pig Tails: The First-Ever Guinea Pig Novel on Thursday March 15, 7pm at Rosny LINC. Details

NEWKIND FESTIVAL

and booking information are on their website. Tasmanian Requiem is a “new work for voice and brass” that is being performed in Hobart in April. Get your tickets soon, this is a short season and it is the piece of theatre I am most excited about in Tasmania this year. More information at www.tasmanianrequiem.com. On March 15 at the Hobart Bookshop, one of Tasmania’s most respected poets, Anne Kellas is launching her new chap book The Netted Air, with official launching duties falling to another poet elder, Sarah Day. CutCommon has released its first ever print issue and it is awesome. Steph Eslake, the editor believes it to be the first classical music street press in the world. Pick it up for free around Tasmania (there are more than 2900 copies being distributed to more than 50 locations as part of a national Roving Launch in the next few months). For more details check out www.cutcommonmag.com.

But what we pride ourselves in, that is not common is that this is a completely drug-free and alcohol-free event, as well as the fact that all meals are provided with the ticket. How do you want people to feel when they leave the festival? We want people to feel brave, courageous, supported and inspired when they leave the event. The aim is that people will feel more empowered to enact change in their own lives, as well as motivated to defend and uphold social justice.  Erfan gently added that while this is called a festival, it is really a life-affirming master class for humans who seek to better the world, and themselves. RACHEL EDWARDS

For more about Newkind, head to the website - www. newkindfestival.com.


Arts

Autumn & WINTER at the PRINCESS

Gonna start off with a cheesy question, can you summarise your comedy in one sentence? Oh, that’s your job. I don’t describe my comedy that would be very, I don’t know what the word is but yeah. I just make the stuff. I leave it to you to describe and critique. I just call it comedy. So you’ve never done a show in Hobart, have you ever been to Hobart before? No, I was going to vacation there just because Tasmania sounds like a funny place to go. Then I looked at some pictures and it didn’t look like there was any kind of beach or anything, nothing held a lot of allure for a vacation so I figured I’d save it until I worked there. Because it’s just as funny to say you worked Tasmania as you’ve vacationed there.

HIGHLIGHTS

OEDIPUS SCHMOEDIPUS by post

Wednesday 4 April & Kenney c M d d To Hayes Nancye

When I said I wanted to go to Tasmania the first time I was in Australia I got “Why the fuck would you want to go there mate? It’s a bunch of inbreds fucking”. I thought yeah that sounds great. I don’t wanna go to a bistro in Melbourne.

AL E AT R I C TWO TH , ONE DS LEGEN KABLE REMAR S TO R Y

Do you have a favourite topic to talk about in your shows? Well the one that always comes up throughout my career is overpopulation. That’s the recurring one. Almost every special I’ve ever done has some kind of shitting on people having kids for whatever reason. I’m sure I have some anti-kid bit [for the upcoming tour].

Last time I was there, was a couple years ago I guess, I had a field day with, I can’t remember his name now [Martin Bryant], but your now second-placemass-murderer, let Norway steal the gold for record kills in a mass murder. I get a lot of mileage out of that. It’s a fascinating story. I don’t think I’ll try to feed it again, because I nailed it right the first time. I’d hate to go back and retrace my footsteps, only for Hobart because I’ve played everywhere else with that material. Maybe if I have a day off I’ll go and find some of the spots where he shot the place up. I don’t have a lot of interests, so places like that, mass murders, prisons, mental hospitals – those are the kinds of places I like.

COMEDY

I’ve read that you like to source new material for new places to keep it relevant, have you found some good material for this tour?

Friday 29 June

CIRCUS

What’s the best response to a joke you’ve ever had? Oh, geez. I’m sure I’ve had people cough drinks through their nose, nothing stands out specifically, no ones ever died. Or shat themselves. Although I did have a seizure recently in the audience, while I was talking about my girlfriend have a seizure and going into a coma. During that bit a guy had a seizure in the middle of the show. That was fun. What can people expect from your Hobart show in April? It’s gonna be my first show in Australia of the tour, my first every show in Hobart. Tell them to lower their expectations, expect very little and you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

ril

y 26 Ap

a Thursd

CABARET

NOTHING IS OFF LIMITS FOR COMEDIAN DOUG STANHOPE, ABSOLUTELY NOTHING. HIS COMEDY GOES FROM OVER-POPULATION TO HIS WIFE’S COMA TO MARTYN BRYANT. I HAD A CHAT WITH DOUG ABOUT HIS COMEDY AND HIS THOUHTS ON TASMANIA.

S AT I R E

DIE LAUGHING

Wednesday 1 August Supported by

MACKENZIE STOLP 57 Brisbane St Launceston Ph: 03 6331 0052 W: theatrenorth.com.au See Doug Stanhope perform at Hobart Brewing on Saturday April 7. Tickets available from: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3194532.

Theatre North Inc. trading as Theatre North at the Princess

www.facebook.com/warp.mag 21


Arts

DEATH BECOMES HER OEDIPUS SCHMOEDIPUS ISN’T A SHOW JUST ABOUT DEATH. WELL, MAYBE IT IS, BUT IT IS ALSO SO MUCH MORE THAN THAT. OEDIPUS SCHMOEDIPUS LOOKS AT DEATH IN WESTERN THEATRE AND THE RIDICULOUSNESS OF THE WAY WE LOOK AND APPROACH DEATH. I HAD A CHAT WITH ACTOR AND DIRECTOR OF THE PRODUCTION MISH GRIGOR TO TELL ME MORE ABOUT THE SHOW.

Oedipus Schmoedipus was first created by theatre company ‘Post’ and Belvoir Theatre in conjunction with Sydney Festival in 2014. Post are bringing the show to the Theatre Royal in April, and Post founder Mish Grigor describes Oedipus Schmoedipus as a “ridiculous look at the ridiculous concept of understanding that you are going to die”. “Well basically we’d been making theatre for about eight years when we made it and we were interested in looking at the history of theatre and the western theatrical canons specifically. We were really fascinated by this way that people describe a canon when they say “universal themes’, like the reason we still preform Shakespeare is because it has ‘universal themes’, like anyone can find meaning from it. So, we were like ‘what is that, how can something possible have universal themes’. So, we thought the only real universal we have as humans is death. That’s the only thing that we can all do – die. We’re all guaranteed. We sort of had this joke-question like ‘what can we learn about an actual universal, this idea of universality that exists with the canon’. So, we just went through the western theatrical canon and read about four or five hundred plays and took every line about death, or a death scene, or someone thinking about what will happen when they die, someone thinking about the afterlife and we compiled a play out of them.” Whilst the play is a satirical look at death in theatre, it is not disrespectful to death itself. Oedipus Schmoedipus takes famous death scenes from hundreds of plays dating back hundreds of years, and showcases the ridiculous aspects of these scenes. Whilst it is a comical 22

warpmagazine.com.au

show, this piece of theatre truly decapitates aspects of the western theatre canon and how we as audiences participate in it. “I guess the thing is that we’re not making fun of the idea of death, what we are making fun of is the way that we as a western culture look at it. The notion that you can have an actor in an important play, and they get shot and die and we’re all supposed to feel sad but you can still see the actor breathing. We’re all pretending to watch this person die in a very ridiculous way. It’s about the idea that we’re all actually amateurs and all the stories we tell ourselves – it’s very much about our own death, because mourning someone else’s death is very different or having a sick family member is very different to understanding your own death. When we try and understand our own death, all the explanations we have, they’re kind of absurd because we can’t know. So I think we find that really funny, that’s what were trying to talk about. Ultimately when you talk about death, all you think about is the opposite, which is to be alive and how exciting being alive can be sometimes and that’s really joyful” One particularly exciting aspect of the show is the use of volunteers. Each performance will exhibit twenty-five volunteers, opening the theatre space to anyone who wishes to participate. Death belongs to everyone, and by bringing the community to the stage, it showcases the communal feelings of death and how it affects everyone, no matter your background or future. “It [including volunteers] was really about this idea of democratising the stage space. We

didn’t like the notion that the canon holds any particular knowledge or that there’s one expert. It’s just about death belongs to everyone, and no one person can give you the answers. So, we wanted to open up that conversation on the stage by inviting all different types of people on the stage with us.” Mish has had a great response from the community and assures that Oedipus Schmoedipus is a show that everyone can enjoy. She encourages everyone to check it out and come along, this isn’t a typical theatre production. “We’ve had responses from really young kids who loved playing out death scenes themselves like eight year olds, and we’ve also had really good responses from like 80 year olds too who’ve been through a lot of loss and personal loss, who’ve been through a lot of the stages of life. So, I think for us we were surprised at how wide-spread the audience for this show is.” “It’s a lot of fun. I mean I love the show, for me I think they should come along so there’s someone in the audience but it’s a really fun and unusual night out in theatre.’” MACKENZIE STOLP

Oedipus Schmoedipus shows at the Theatre Royal on April 6 & 7 at 7.30pm each night. For those that are interested in volunteering to be a part of the show, please contact the theatre via www.theatreroyal.com. au/shows/volunteer-call-out.


Arts

performing arts Guide

Gallery Guide South

NORTH

Contemporary Art Tasmania March 17 – April 22 Cooking the Books – George EgertonWarburton

White Sands Estate Until March 2018 The Bay of Fires Collection – Tim Crawshaw

Bett Gallery Until March 2 Group show: Black March 9 – March 29 Anonymous Souls – Joel Crosswell

Handmark Evandale Until March 7 New Paintings and Works on Paper – Summer Exhibition March 11 – April 4 New Paintings and Works on Paper “Landscape” Exhibition

Colville Gallery March 5 Australian & International Fine Art Auction March 16 Ian Parry Handmark Gallery Until March 19 new paintings – Clifford How Despard Gallery Until March 4 Long Hot Summer Until March 6 Annual Summer Show 17/18 March 7 – April 1 The Evolving Garden – Penny Burnett Salamanca Arts Centre Top Gallery March 2 – April 15 You, The Meta, The Physic, Me and Charon too. - Edith Perrenot Studio Gallery March 1 – March 31 Lost in Tasmania – Hannah Blackmore Sidespace Gallery Until March 6 Papyro March 8 – March 13 Remote Lands – Raymond Dean March 16 – March 26 Carbon Landscapes – Martin Rek March 28 – April 10 The Kingdom Retrospective – Phyllis Fiotakis Lightbox March 2 – March 31 Idoll – Edith Perrenot Long Gallery March 9 – March 20 Where is my Village: Breastfeeding Journeys – Olivia Brown

Burnie Regional Gallery Until April 15 National Geographic 50 Greatest Photographs Devonport Regional Gallery Until April 15 National Photographic Portrait Prize 2017 The Little Gallery Project Space Until April 15 Carbon Capture and Storage / Celebrating 400ppm – Mike Singe Gallery Pejean Until March 17 Eklektic – Richard Klekociuk March 21 – April 21 Book of Seasons – Leoni Duff Sawtooth ARI March 2 - 24 Front Gallery Drawings from Earth Nikala Bourke, Jillian Catto and Linda Crispin Middle Gallery Self Dissolve - Dexter Rosengrave Project Gallery Contemplations on the Coincidence of Matter, Time and Space - Penny Mason Dark Space Gallery Poiesis & Porosity: Models of Human Biology - Susan Quinnand Gate Space Gallery Beauty - Charles Murdock Portal Gallery Sketches for Destruction - Jan Hakon Erichsen (NOR)

SOUTH COMEDY The Polish Corner March 7 Rachel Berger March 14 Gavin Baskerville March 21 Ro Campbell March 28 Marcel Lucont Frank’s Cider Bar & Cafe March 8 International Women’s Day Comedy: Rachel Berger, Alissa Claire, Chloe Black, Tori Hogman, Ashlee Cairns, Helen Shield Brisbane Hotel March 15 Raw Comedy March 29 CULT Comedy Returns Hobart Brewing Co. March 22 The Clubhouse with Bob Franklin

THEATRE Backspace Theatre March 16 – March 17 I Am A Lake March 22 – March 23 The Epic

NORTH COMEDY Royal Oak March 2 RAW Comedy 2018 – Launceston Heat March 23 Fresh Comedy with Bob Franklin Red Brick Road Ciderhouse March 14 Incider Comedy March

THEATRE

Spiegeltent March 14 Dave Hughes: The Snorkeler March 16 Sammy J: Hero Complex March 22 Heath Franklin’s Chopper – Bogan Jesus March 23 A Night with Susie Youssef, Anne Edmonds & Mel Buttle March 28 Sam Simmons: Radical Women of Latin America March 30 Peter Helliar: Big Boy Pants

Earl Arts Centre Until March 3 I Am A Lake March 26 – March 27 Charlotte’s Web

Theatre Royal March 16 – March 17 Doug Anthony Allstars March 28 – March 29 A Prudent Man

Burnie Arts and Function Centre March 9 I Am A Lake March 17 The Epic March 23 – March 24 The Park Bench

Princess Theatre March 15 – March 31 Les Miserables Princess Theatre (Upstairs Foyer) March 21 Conversations With Friends : Greg Leong

Moonah Arts Centre Until March 31 Paint Dreamz – Jacob Leary March 8 – March 31 Dust – Katherine Clayton, Alana Collins, Kathryn Dallimore March 8 – March 31 Essence – Andy Vagg March 10 – March 23 Portrait of a Community TMAG Until May 6 The Remarkable Tasmanian Devil Until March 11 Balnhdhurr – A Lasting Impression Until March 3 Margaret Wilson Paintings Until March 3 Glenorchy Open Art Exhibition 2018 Until July 1 Horizon

www.facebook.com/warp.mag 23


Event Guide

Hobart Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Republic Bar & Cafe

Mama’s Broke (Canada), Holy Locust (USA) 8:30pm

Telegraph Hotel

DJ B-Rex followed by DJ Nik

The Brunswick Hotel

Sam Forsyth 7pm

The Homestead

Nadira and Friends 8pm

The Whaler

Noteworthy: Tony Brennan, Kim Imber, Matt Dean 8pm

Date

MARCH Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

7

8

9

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Jamie 9pm

Grand Poobah

Karaoke with Ocean Man & The Great Muldavio 9pm

Irish Murphy’s

Furphy 9pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Catch Club 9pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Tarik Stoneman 6:30pm

The Duke

Crystal Sky 7:30pm

Sunday

10

11

Monday

12

Tuesday

13

Wednesday

24

14

Friday

15

16

Acts / Start Time

Republic Bar & Cafe

Camp Cope 9pm

Telegraph Hotel

DJ B-Rex followed by DJ Nik

The Brunswick Hotel

Tony Mak 7pm

Birdcage Bar

Fee Whitla 9pm

Grand Poobah

Karaoke with Ocean Man & The Great Muldavio 9pm

Irish Murphy’s

Mayhem & Me 9pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Hussy Hicks 8:30pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Karly Fisher 6:30pm

The Duke

Jay Jerome 7:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Tim & Scott 9pm

Brighteyes Cafe

Moonshine Whiskers and The Ragged Pony 6pm

Brisbane Hotel

Surreal Estate Agents + Jesterpose + Black Hole Sugar + Valkyries

Birdcage Bar

Sambo & Jimi 9pm

Cargo

DJ Sexy Lucy

Brighteyes Cafe

Cascade Swing 6pm

Central Hotel

M.T. Blues Music 4pm

Brisbane Hotel

Intercranial Tremors (Vic) + GAPE + Zero Degrees Freedom + Lab A

Devils Brewery – Margate Train

Madalena 5:30pm

Cargo

DJ Sexy Lucy

Grand Poobah

Go Freek, Fotti P, Berks

Central Hotel

Miss Match 4pm

Hobart College House Band 4:30pm

Devils Brewery – Margate Train

Jay Fraser (UK) 5:30pm

Hobart Twilight Market (Long Beach) Jack Greene

Tim Hibberd

Federation Concert Hall

Beethoven Emperor Concerto 7:30pm

Post Street Social

Tony Mak

Grand Poobah

Function (New York) & Octo Octa (Brooklyn, NY), CJ Steele

Republic Bar & Cafe

Bootleg Gin Sluggers + Yesterday’s Gentleman 9:30pm

Grand Poobah

(Kissing Room) Henry Hugo, Julian Teakle and Ewah

Tasmanian Inn Hotel

Zac Henderson 8pm

Telegraph Hotel

Big Swifty

The Brunswick Hotel

Jensen 7:30pm

The Duke

Private Party

The Homestead

Baba Bruja 9pm

The Whaler

Finn Seccombe Duo, Parlour Band 7:30pm

Willie Smith’s Apple Shed

Jesse McCormack 6:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Tony Voglino 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

The VeeBees (NSW) + White Knuckle Fever (NSW) + The Dreggs + Ultra Martian + The Dead Maggies

Hobart Twilight Market (Long Beach)

Saturday

Thursday

Venue

Lauren O’Keefe, Kim Imber, Tash Zappala, KimberleyMusic 4:30pm

Jack Greene

Terry Nomikos

Post Street Social

Gabriele

Republic Bar & Cafe

Roadkill + B.O.M.S. 10Pm

Tasmanian Inn Hotel

Black Swans of Trespass 8pm Saturday

17

Telegraph Hotel

Micheal Clennett followed by Dr Fink

The Brunswick Hotel

Gabriele Dagrezio 7:30pm

The Duke

Private Party

The Whaler

Dylan Eynon 7:30pm

Cargo

DJ Millhouse

Willie Smith’s Apple Shed

Annia Baron 6:30pm

Carlyle Hotel

Ebeneza Good 8pm

Birdcage Bar

Tim & Scott 9pm

Casino Bar

DJ SupaNova 10pm

Brisbane Hotel

Polymantra w/ Guests

Federation Concert Hall

Peer Gynt 2:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

Late Night Krackieoke

Grand Poobah

FreQ Nasty

Cargo

DJ Rikin

Jack Greene

Terry Nomikos

Carlyle Hotel

Serotonin 8pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Everburn 10pm

Casino Bar

DJ SupaNova 10pm

Spiegeltent

Emma Pask

Grand Poobah

Foxx & Hound presents Acaddamy

Telegraph Hotel

Micheal Clennett followed by Dr Fink

Grand Poobah

(Kissing Room) The Coven

The Brunswick Hotel

Isaac Westwood 7:30pm

Jack Greene

Tony & John

The Homestead

Billy Warner Trio 9pm

Post Street Social

Sam Forsyth

The Whaler

Dean Stevenson 9pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

The Outfit 10pm

Birdcage Bar

Dave Sikk 4tet 6pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Tim Davies 7:30pm

Brighteyes Cafe

One Trick Pony 4pm

The Homestead

Pubstompa! W/ Tetrameth & Pspiralife + Delix & Kireesh 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Brissie Bingo

The Whaler

Black Swans of Trespass 9pm

Devils Brewery – Margate Train

Silk Duo 2:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Dave Sikk 4tet 6pm

Jack Greene

Micheal Clennett

Brighteyes Cafe

Hui & The Muse 4pm

Pier One Deck

DayStar Duo 2pm

Brisbane Hotel

Brissie Bingo

Post Street Social

You Me & The Sea

Cargo

DJ Rikin

Republic Bar & Cafe

The Raccoons 2:30pm

Jack Greene

Micheal Clennett

Republic Bar & Cafe

Peter Hicks & The Blue Licks 8:30pm

Pier One Deck

Sambo & Jimi 2pm

Monday

19

Republic Bar & Cafe

Priscilla Walters 8:30pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Blue Flies 8:30pm

Tuesday

20

Republic Bar & Cafe

Finn Seccombe 8:30pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Quiz Night 8:15pm

Spiegeltent

Kevin Quantum: Anti-Gravity

Sunday

18

Republic Bar & Cafe

Sam Forsyth 8:30pm

The Homestead

Funky Bunch Trivia 7pm

Spiegeltent

Breabach

The Duke

Jazz Jam 7:30pm

The Homestead

Funky Bunch Trivia 7pm

Irish Murphy’s

The Duke

Audition Jam 7:30pm

Noteworthy: Liam Johnstone, Jasmin Bade, Ruby Austin-Lund 8pm

Irish Murphy’s

Noteworthy: Emily Lawton, Zena Mohamas, Even Gowan (Album Launch) 8pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

The Great Anticipators 8:30pm

Telegraph Hotel

DJ B-Rex followed by DJ Nik

warpmagazine.com.au

Wednesday

21


Event Guide

Date

Thursday

Friday

22

23

Venue

Acts / Start Time

The Brunswick Hotel Wrest Point Showroom

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Billy Whitton & Jamie Taylor 7pm

Neika – House Concert

Sara Tindley – Wild & Unknown

Matthew Ives & His Big Band 8pm

Pier One Deck

Sambo & Jimi 2pm

Birdcage Bar

Samuel Bester 9pm

Post Street Social

Tim & Scott

Grand Poobah

Karaoke with Ocean Man & The Great Muldavio 9pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

The Black Sorrows 2:30pm

Irish Murphy’s

Kashkin 9pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Tom Dockray 8:30pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Nick Machin 6:30pm

The Duke

Jay Jerome 7:30pm

Theatre Royal

Tapestry – The Songs of Carole King

Birdcage Bar

The Suffrajettes 9pm

Brighteyes Cafe

Coyote Serenade 6pm

Brisbane Hotel

DARK DAYS TASSIE PUNK FEST w/ TALC (SA) + No Class (Vic) + BOG (Vic) + Ironhawk (Tas) + Altered Visions (Vic) + Reaper (Vic) + Batterey Humans (QLD) + Final Broadcast (Tas) + Antex Attac (Vic) + Al’s Toy Barn (Tas) + Late Night Krackieoke

Cargo

Sunday

24

25

Republic Bar & Cafe

AlfanAnt 8:30pm

Monday

26

Republic Bar & Cafe

Quiz Night 8:15pm

Tuesday

27

Republic Bar & Cafe

The Sign 8:30pm

Spiegeltent

Dan Sultan

The Homestead

Funky Bunch Trivia 7pm

The Duke

Local Act – Cas and Lauren O’Keefe 7:30pm

Federation Concert Hall

Paddington Bear’s First Concert 6pm

Irish Murphy’s

Noteworthy: Lana Chilcott, Joseph Mackey, Tim Chivers 8pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Dave Wilson Band 9pm

Telegraph Hotel

DJ B-Rex followed by DJ Nik

The Brunswick Hotel

Tony Mak 7pm

Birdcage Bar

Anita Cairns Duo 9pm LO’99, Bear Cub, Zios & Berks

Wednesday

Thursday

28

29

Central Hotel

M.T. Blues Music 4pm

Grand Poobah

Devils Brewery – Margate Train

Rubato Express 5:30pm

Grand Poobah

(Kissing Room) Karaoke

Irish Murphy’s

No Felix 9pm

Flamingos Dance Bar

Thloop: Louie Cut (Por) EP Tour + Local Supports

Jack Greene

Tony Mak

Touching Bass supports by Bain Mare & Curlicue

Republic Bar & Cafe

Michael Hurley + Darren Hanlon 9pm

The Brunswick Hotel

Karly Fisher 6:30pm Jay Jerome 7:30pm

Grand Poobah

Saturday

DJ Sexy Lucy

Date

Hobart Brewing Co

Horrorshow – The Grey Space Tour

The Duke

Jack Greene

Terry Nomikos

The Goods Shed

Post Street Social

Tony Mak

Luca Brasi, A. Swayze and The Ghosts, The Sleepyheads, Isla Ka, The Hudson Cartel

Republic Bar & Cafe

Uncle Gus & The Rimshots + Wholly Cats 10pm

Birdcage Bar

Neon Acoustic 9pm

Brighteyes Cafe

The Patron Saints 6pm

Tasmanian Inn Hotel

Dylan Eynon 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

The Saxons + The Midways

Telegraph Hotel

Micheal Clennett followed by Dr Fink

Cargo

DJ Sexy Lucy

The Brunswick Hotel

Jonathan & Alan 7:30pm

Grand Poobah

Konstantin Sibold

The Duke

Jazz

Jack Greene

Matt & Abby

The Homestead

The Bittermen (Vic) 9pm

Republic Bar & Cafe

Butterfingers 10pm

The Whaler

Zac Henderson, The Bootleg Gin Sluggers 7:30pm

Tasmanian Inn Hotel

Patrick Berechree 8pm

Telegraph Hotel

33 Seconds

Theatre Royal

Tapestry – The Songs of Carole King

The Waratah Hotel

San Cisco 8pm

Willie Smith’s Apple Shed

Sara Tindley 6:30pm

The Whaler

Dylan Eynon 7:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Rum Jungle (Tim’s Birthday) 9pm

Willie Smith’s Apple Shed

Jamie Pregnell (Jazz) 6:30pm

Botanical Gardens

A Day on The Lawn: Something for Kate, Vera Blue, Kim Churchill, Mrs Cash, Chase City, Kowl, Little Bear

Birdcage Bar

Matt Edmunds 9pm

Brighteyes Cafe

Djangoes Tiger 6pm

Brisbane Hotel

Diploid (Vic) + Darkhorse (NSW) + Extinct/Exist (Vic) + Uncle Geezer (Tas) + Apteria (SA) + Disparo (NSW) + Debacle (Vic) + Dog (NSW) + Motovilikha (Vic) + The Meat (QLD) + Muffler (Vic) + Terra Mater (QLD) + Creep Diets (Vic) + Break Through (Tas) + Terr

Brisbane Hotel

Black Rheno (NSW) + Mountains Of Madness + Ultra Martian + TerrorBrawl

Cargo

DJ Millhouse

Casino Bar

DJ SupaNova 10pm

Jack Greene

Isaac Westwood

Republic Bar & Cafe

Spin The Bottle Featuring Seth Henderson, Sam Forsyth, Jed Appleton & Cris Coleman 10pm

Brisbane Hotel

Brissie Bingo

Spiegeltent

The Audreys

Friday

Saturday

Cargo

DJ Rikin

Carlyle Hotel

Goodfellas 8pm

Casino Bar

DJ SupaNova 10pm

Copping Hall

Sara Tindley – Wild & Unknown

April

Grand Poobah

Limbo Party

Sunday

Hobart Brewing Co

Blues, Brews & Barbecues 2pm

Jack Greene

Tony & John

Post Street Social

Sam Forsyth

Republic Bar & Cafe

Boil Up 10pm

Spiegeltent

All Our Exes Live In Texas, Michael Griffiths

Telegraph Hotel

Ado & Devo followed by Serotonin

The Brunswick Hotel

Gabriele Dagrezio 7:30pm

Wrest Point Entertainment Centre

Jimmy Barnes: Working Class Man 8pm

Birdcage Bar

The Bootleg Gin Sluggers 6pm

Brighteyes Cafe

Ross Smithard 4pm

Brisbane Hotel

Brissie Bingo

Devils Brewery – Margate Train

Greg Wells 2:30pm

Hobart Brewing Co

Blues, Brews & Barbecues 2pm

Jack Greene

Isaac Westwood

30

31

1

www.facebook.com/warp.mag 25


Event Guide

Launceston / NORTH WEST Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Club 54

Party vs Minimal Feat: Chardy, Coby Watts, Alissa Baylee

Princess Theatre

TSO – Beethoven's Violin Concerto 7:30pm

Tapas Lounge Bar

Ruby Phoenix, Art Supplies, Party Procedure, J-Tee Hayse

The Royal Oak

The Bad Dad Orchestra, Jax and the Wayward

MARCH Saturday

3

Ulverstone Leven Theatre

Elvis: An American Trilogy

Wednesday

7

Bakers Lane

Laneway Sessions: Jimmy Harrison, Taynisha Parry

Friday

9

Club 54

Jax and the Wayward, Dream Sister, Scott Haigh

Gnomon Pavilion

Dark Dayz 5:30pm

Royal Oak

Holy Locust (USA), BrodyGreg, gTmongrel

The Greenwood Bar

Kingfall + Vice

Club 54

Kerser

Earl Arts Centre

Raw3! 2018 Concert Winners 7:30pm

Josef Chromy Wines

The Living End, Spiderbait, Veruca Salt, The Lemonheads, Tumbleweed, The Fauves

The Greenwood Bar

Intercranial Tremors

Saturday

10

Sunday

11

Gnomon Pavilion

Libor Smoldas (Prague) on Guitar 3pm

Wednesday

14

Bakers Lane

Laneway Sessions: Angus Austin, Lachie Unwin

Friday

16

Devonport Entertainment & Convention Centre

The Everly Brothers & Franki Valli & The Four Seasons

Gnomon Pavilion

Grace Badcock and Hanlon Innocent also Sophie Leslie 5:30pm

The Saloon Bar

Signals Midwest, Cuban Heel, Hurricane Youth, Foreign Films

Country Club

The Everly Brothers & Franki Valli & The Four Seasons

Tapas Lounge Bar

Hurricane Youth, The Sleepyheads, Caught in the Eclipse

Bakers Lane

Laneway Sessions: Nick Bennett, Connor Claridge

Devonport Entertainment & Convention Centre

Jimmy Barnes: Working Class Man 8pm

Saturday

17

Wednesday

21

Thursday

22

Latrobe Memorial Hall

TSO Woodwind Serenade 7:30pm

Friday

23

Country Club

Jimmy Barnes: Working Class Man 8pm

Gnomon Pavilion

Danny Kealley, The N.W. Combined Junior Brass Band and Boote, Waddle and Mead 5:30pm

Scottsdale Mechanics Institute Hall

TSO Woodwind Serenade 7:30pm

Sporties Hotel

Scott Lewis

The Greenwood Bar

Disparo/Uncle Geezer

The Royal Oak

AlfanAnt

Country Club

Red Hot Summer Tour – John Farnham

Devonport Entertainment & Convention Centre

Scottish Power

Mountain Mumma

AlfanAnt

The Greenwood Bar

Lab A, Mankind, More TBA

Club 54

Butterfingers

Royal Oak

The Embers, Denni, Emily Lawton

Club 54

Black Rheno – Plague Of Sickness, Interitum, Vice

Gnomon Pavilion

Stephanie Chitty with Jim Reece and Band 5:30pm

Saturday

24

Thursday

29

Friday

30

HOT DUB WINE MACHINE AFTER PARTY LUEN JACOBS (Syd) + AKOUO + FINN WHITLA

$10 entry from 11.30pm SAT March 17 Mez Bar - Odeon Theatre

26

warpmagazine.com.au


IAN MOSS WREST POINT ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE FRIDAY 22ND JUNE 2018 COUNTRY CLUB SHOWROOM SATURDAY 23RD JUNE 2018

Tickets via ticketmaster.com.au phone 136 100 or in person at the venue

Over 18 event


P R E S E N T E D B Y S T R U T & F R E T I N A S S O C I AT I O N W I T H T E N D AY S O N T H E I S L A N D

A night with Susie Youssef, Mel Buttle & Anne Edmonds

SO

LD

OU

T!

Dave Hughes

Celia PacquolA

Sam SImmons

Sammy J

8 M A R - 1 A PR WWW.S P IEGELTENTHOBART.COM

SUPPO RTERS

B EVERAG E PARTN ERS

Warp Magazine March2018  

Warp Magazine is Tasmania's only street magazine

Warp Magazine March2018  

Warp Magazine is Tasmania's only street magazine

Advertisement