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F R E E

M U S I C

WWW.WARPMAGAZINE.COM.AU

&

A R T S

FEBRUARY 2014

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/WARP.MAG

*CHARLES BRADLEY

+

DAVE GRANEY Billy Bragg DJ SHADOW HUSKY JOSH PYKE PARTY IN THE PADDOCK PROGRAM GUIDE SCOT COTTEREL THE GIN CLUB UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA


Unknown Mortal Orchestra Wednesday February 5

The Woohoo Review Friday February 7

Dave Graney Saturday February 15

Tassie Cider Fest Sunday February 23

February The Embers + La Zingara $5 Saturday 1st Corona Summer Party With Freq Nasty + B Side + Max Power vs DJ Secrets + Rola + Kireesh Free Entry 2pm Sunday 2nd Rod Fritz + Zach Spinks 8:30pm Sunday 2nd Helen Crowther Monday 3rd Ross Sermons Tuesday 4th Unknown Mortal Orchestra $30pre/$35door Wednesday 5th Caravana Sun + Younger Dryas $12pre/$15door Thursday 6th The Woohoo Review + Guerilla Zingari $12pre/$15door Fri 7th Kim Churchill + Adam Cousens + Lauren Hill $10 Saturday 8th Laura Hill Sunday 9th Joe Pirere Monday 10th Billy Whitton Tuesday 11th JaJa Wednesday 12th Transvaal Diamond Syndicate Thursday 13th Chase City + Dark Matter Of Sotry Telling $10 Friday 14th Dave Graney Band + Starling $15pre/$20door Saturday 15th Republic Music Quiz 2pm Sunday 16th Peter Hicks And The Blue Licks 9pm Sunday 16th

G.B. Balding (Finger Picking Blues) Monday 17th Baker Boys Band Tuesday 18th Cleveland Blues Music Wednesday 19th Son Del Sur (Cuban Salsa) $5 Thursday 20th Sugartrain $4 Friday 21st Boil Up $5 Saturday 22nd Tassie Cider Fest: In our Beergarden, Free Tastings + Food + Live Music With Joe Pirere Free Event 12pm Sunday 23rd Wahbash Avenue 8:30pm Sunday 23rd Quiz Night (Returns) Monday 24th Pat Bereche Tuesday 25th Edge Radio Social Night Wednesday 26th Dave Wilson Band Thursday 27th Australia Made $5 Friday 28th March Nina Las Vegas + Motez $25pre/$30door Saturday March 1 Los Coronas $25pre/$30door Thursday March 13 Uncle Jed $15pre/$20door Saturday March 15


3 BRISBANE STREET HOBART 6234 4920

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(vic) w/ Ironhawk + Ruiner & Th e s p a ll o C rns + The e t t a P j's h urers + D t w/ Speec n e v d A eezer + + Uncle G



February 12th Opposer

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February 8th (vic) s u s e J k c la B + ll ra h T e Threshold Forms

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th 9 y r a u r b Fe Club The Gin + James Parry

awless w/ The L

Quartet

February 15th Wicked City (vicun)cher

+ Shark P w/ Mess O Reds + Speakeasies

February 22nd Ampocalypse VII (All Ages / 3pm)

w/ King Parrot + H ammerhead + Evil Intent + The Arbiter + Encounter + The Absolution S equence

8th 2 y r a u r b Fe on s k c a l b y m Robbie

Nine + Lil w/ Sue O DJ JSB + C T B + DJ

w/ Interview With an Escape Artist + Dawn Of Your Disco Tent + Uncle Geezer

February 19th Side Show Cabare t (New Monthly Cabar et)

d February 22n (18+) VII AmpocalypseManiaxe (VIC)

(VIC) + IC) w/ King Parrot + Evil Intent (V e g or f p ro D + 's (VIC) eather + DJ F + The Arbiter A f O s t a + Dracula + B + Hammerhead

March 1st ass B We Love er) v o e k a T y da (1st Birth rous & VLTRN foe, J.Nit feat. Killa

Pub Meals

Lunch - Tues till Fri 12:30 till 2:30 Dinner - Tues till Sun - 5:30 till 8:30 *** New Mexican Night!!! Mexi-Cantina Wednesday's with Sir Mex-a-Lot*** Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday are counter meals as usual. Awesome and cheap


AN EVENING SKY. A LIVE ORCHESTRA.

Summer on the island doesn’t get any better than RACT Symphony under the Stars. Kick back with family and friends at these FREE outdoor concerts. SATURDAY 7.00pm 15 February Tolosa Park, Glenorchy

MARKO LETONJA’S SEASON 2 014

SATURDAY 7.00pm 22 February City Park, Launceston


News

News in Brief GARDEN OF EDEN Karise Eden will be roaming the top part of the state at the start of the month, playing three shows as part of her “Intimate Summer Series 2014”. Friday January 31 will see her performing at The Cinema in Burnie (kicking off at 7:30pm), Saturday February 1 will see her performing at Manhattan Wine Bar in Launceston (8pm start), and on Sunday February 2, she will be playing a relaxed afternoon set at Drift Café and Restaurant in Devonport (this one starts at 4pm). Tickets for each gig will cost $35 +GST & BF. To purchase, or to get more info, jump on www.ticketbooth.com.au, or get in touch with the peoples at the places.

month rolls past and you are back on the horse. This time it’s in aid of local punk band, Speech Pattern’s EP launch. Along for the ride and inevitable hangover are Victorian outfit Collapse plus Uncle Geezer and Adventurers. All happening at The Brisbane Hotel on Friday February 7. POP-UP BEBPOP

The Woohoo Revue crew are due to do the do for you. Do you want them to? Of course you do. Holy crap, that really, really sucked. It’s lucky I’m not a rapper, or anyone that gets paid to write. Anyway, you all know who The Woohoo Revue are by now, so let’s get straight to the guts. On Friday February 7, they’ll be playing at The Republic Bar in Hobart with Guerilla Zingari. On Saturday February 8 they’ll be playing at The Royal Oak in Launceston with The Embers. As always, you can get in touch with the venues if you’d like to grab yourself some tickets.

you to come watch it. It’s like when people stand around to watch NASA rockets take off. Maybe it’ll be a success, maybe it’ll explode in the lower atmosphere and result in the horrific deaths of all involved. Either way, if you’re at Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall on Friday February 21, you’ll be able to tell your grandkids you saw it. Support acts include Michael Priest and Matt Doyle, and DJs Max Power, Secrets and Wax Dr West. Kicks off around 8.30pm, and entry is free, Free, FREEEE! LIFE SHOULD BE ONE BIG HOLIDAY

THE SOUL OF CANADA

ON THE HUNT It’s part scavenger hunt, part race, part pub crawl, part madness; it’s the Great Tasmanian Beer Hunt! The Great Tasmanian Beer Hunt will take teams of between 2 and 6 on a quest throughout Hobart’s finest beer bars (and everywhere in-between), solving beer and local knowledge related trivia questions, and completing challenges. Photos and videos of various ‘situations’ will win you and your team bonus points, as will various items from bars and places. Saturday February 8 is the day it’s all going down, to register, join the Great Tasmanian Beer Hunt page on facebook, or get in touch with the folk at Tattersall’s Beer and Food Hall. You, could become the ultimate beer-hero (a “beero“, if you will)! THE HARDEST CLUB IN HOBART

Jazz Pianist Tom Vincent is always superbusy, his recent shows on the mainland were all raging successes and he’s returned home to show the locals what they missed out on. He’s gonna do it with his new Grand Piano too, which is always, err, grand! From Friday February 7, the Tom Vincent Jazz Club will be putting on Pop-Up Bebop nights every Friday at Hobart’s Art Hotel Studio Lounge, on the waterfront. With some of Australia’s leading Jazz musicians as guest artists, you’d better book in early before they sell out! Tickets are $20 each, and you can obtain them by jumping on the interwebs and typing tomvincent.com.au into your computer box. WOOHOO

So this should be an interesting one. Ann Vriend will be playing at The Homestead in Hobart on Friday February 14, and at MONA on Saturday February 15 and Sunday February 16 (daytime gigs, those last two). Ann has risen to prominence in her native Canada of late, winning the “She’s the One” contest at the Ottawa Bluesfest in the solo category. She’s in Australia to promote a new single called Rush of Your Wings from her upcoming new soul album For The People in the Mean Time. A spectacular performer with an amazing voice, instrumental prowess, and impressive song writing ability. What more could you ask for?

The Holidays never seem to stop working. Which kinda sounds like my job, eh, ayoooo. Anyway*, they’ve just confirmed the release date for their second album, and then they went ahead and announced a national tour, and then they cured cancer and fixed up that whole global-warming thing. Cheers, fellas. Real Feel will be on shelves Friday February 21, which gives you just enough time to listen to it non-stop for a day before seeing The Holidays live on stage at the Waratah Hotel on Saturday February 22. You should really thank them in person for fixing up the holes in the ozone layer and whatever, that’s top work. GYPSY PIRATES INVADE TASMANIA

SHOW IN A SUITCASE

Newly formed 5 piece funk/soul outfit “The Briefcase” are having a launch. They’re launching themselves, and they’re inviting

DAMAGE just keeps rearing its ugly head. No sooner have you recovered from one overly mind numbing hangover, another

Warp Tasmania FEBRUARY 2014

Editor Nic Orme nic@warpmagazine.com.au

ART Andrew Harper andrew@warpmagazine.com.au

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GIG GUIDE Submit your events to

gigs@warpmagazine.com.au

Writers MARK ACHESON, SHANE CRIXUS, LISA DIB, STEPHANIE ESLAKE, HANNAH GREY, ANDREW HARPER, BRIDGET HICKEY, BRIONY KIDD, ERIN LAWLER, CALUM MAX POWER, LUCINDA SHANNON, PIP STAFFORD NEWS Submit your press releases plus publicity images through to the appropriate editor for consideration.

Ungus Ungus Ungus is a bloody weird name for a band. But they’re a tops band, so we’ll let it slide, this time. You just watch yourselves though. Anyway, they’re a little bit prog-rock, a little bit gypsy, a little bit psych, and a lot of fun,

ALL SUBMISSIONS REMAIN THE PROPERTY OF WARP MAGAZINE. ALL CONTENT IS COPYRIGHT TO WARP MAGAZINE AND CANNOT BE REPRODUCED IN WHOLE OR PART WITHOUT WRITTEN AUTHORISATION OF THE PUBLISHERS. WARP MAGAZINE makes no guarantees, warranties or representations of any kind, whether express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of the information provided. WARP MAGAZINE will not be liable for incorrect use of the information and will assume no responsibility for consequences that may result from the use of the information. WARP MAGAZINE is not responsible of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. The opinions expressed in Warp Magazine and Warp online do not necessarily reflect those of the editors or publishers.


and they’re coming to Tasmania as part of their 2014 “Rumpapo Tour”. On Friday February 21 you’ll be able to catch them at The Homestead in Hobart. On Saturday February 22 you’ll be able to catch them at Fresh on Charles in Launceston. Maybe sometime on Saturday arvo you’ll be able to catch them driving up the Midlands Highway. Camp out at Campbell Town and see, I dare you. But make sure you make it to their gigs too. VEGAS COMES TO HOBART

Nina Las Vegas knows how to party, and to prove it she is taking a bunch of her friends around the country coming back to Hobart. Again. For the 80th time this year. It’s only February. I don’t know how that works either. What I do know though, is that people obviously love what she does. If you’re reading this, you’re probably a people, so you’ll probably love her stuff too! I mean, even if you’re a google-bot scouring this article online, you’d probably get in to her tunes too. Actually, if you ARE a googlebot, please go to the gig, I’ve never actually met a real life google-bot, I bet you party real hard and know all the very bestest cocktail recipes. Saturday March 1 at the Republic Bar and Café, let’s all go do the electric slide with the google-bots. FLY ON THE WALL

you’ve got what promises to be another amazing experience. Saturday March 1 is the date, lock it in your calendars, tickets are available now via the MONA website, and will run you around $70.

heaps of brand new stuff from that bad boy. To cop a piece of that sweet, sweet, beat action, get along to The Grand Poobah on Thursday March 20. Tickets on sale now from www.dubfxopiuo.com. Boom.

THE PAYBACK

HERE COMES THE BLISS AND THE ESO (AND THE ISM)

Hobart Blues/Soul duo “The Paybacks” will be launching their debut EP at The Homestead on the Friday March 7. The Paybacks, made up of Joel Imber (guitar/ vocals) and Alex O’Leary (lead guitar), have been gigging and busking around Hobart for the last year with a range of soul, blues and funk music. You’ve probably seen them. They’re pretty good. The whole night will be a showcase of blues, funk and soul, with support from Devon Robson, Matt Bayes, Michael Priest and The Briefcase. It’s kicking off at 8.30pm, and it’ll cost you $5 on the door. For another fiver you can even grab a copy of their debut EP!

CABARET IS HERE TO STAY Yay! 2014 has spawned yet another arty and creative “festival” event. This time it’s the Tasmanian Cabaret Festival. This means Tasmania is now part of the “Cabaret Circuit”, which I guess is a good thing? I mean, it couldn’t be a bad thing. Could it? Dates for the Tas Cab Fest are Monday July 7 and Tuesday July 8, as part of the Festival of Voices Voicebox series. Which means it’ll all be taking place at City Hall, all dressed up in fancy red velvetness. Submissions to perform at the inaugural fest are now open, so if that’s your thing, head over to www. tasmaniancabaret.com to find out how to apply. Fancy!

PUTTING THE LOS BACK INTO CORONAS

Sure, Corona may be a terribly bland macro beer that is only ever consumed by people that have smoked away all their taste buds or people that picked it up by mistake because they saw bright yellow fizzy crap in a clear bottle and thought it was creaming soda, but LOS CORONAS are a different thing entirely. Don’t get them confused. Los Coronas are a legendary Spanish band that are returning to Australian shores for the second time in two years. Los Coronas are awesomely cool, smooth, bold, and original, Corona beer is none of these. Vote One, Los Coronas. Thursday March 13, at the Republic Bar and Café.

the U.S. Ceekay Jones. Saturday May 31 is the date they’ll be in Hobizzle, playing at Macquarie Wharf 2. Tickets go on sale on February 10, and will be available via Ruffcut Records, or online via moshtix. Better start warming up your squealing voices now.

Bliss N Eso have announced a “massive outdoor tour!”. So they’re playing indoors in Hobart. Lulz. The “Circus Under the Stars” tour will take them around the country to play fifteen gigs. All areas will get touched. Joining them on their shenanigans will be Elefant Traks pinup kids Horrorshow, Jimmy Kimmel’s favourite Australian rapper Seth Sentry, and special guest from

DAMAGE LABOR DAY WEEKEND KICK OFF

HEAVY BASSLINES AND FX

(THE SMITH STREET BAND) MONA have been killin’ it lately! Killin’ it, mate! Following hot on the heels of the sold out DJ Shadow gig, they’ve announced yet another American beat-genius gig in the form of Flying Lotus. FlyLo is revered by the new generation of producers and hip-kids as being one of the pioneers of the future beat movement through his use of incredibly intricate, lush and vivid soundscapes. Add this to his new visual show (three layers of semi-transparent projected screens to create an enveloping three-dimensional effect), support from some of the finest from Tasmania and abroad, at MONA’s always epic Void, and

Loopstation phenomenon Dubfx and electro freak Opiuo have joined forces for a coheadline tour of Australia and New Zealand in March and April. We’re somewhere between Australia and New Zealand, so they’re dropping in on us along the way. Dubfx has just released a new album titled Theory of Harmony, which is sure to be deep and rich as ever. Ex-Kiwi Opiuo has a new album on the way, so we’ll be sure to hear

(SIGNALS MIDWEST)

7TH MARCH - THE BRISBANE HOTEL, HOBART DOORS 8:00PM - MUSIC FROM 8:30PM $20 OR $18 HOST - INC. DRINK CARD DJ’S - ASHA TRAY, DOLLAR BINNIE, RAT SHADOWS

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Music

Photo credit: Loren Wohl

IT’S NOT JUST ALL FUNK AT PANAMA IT’S NEW AND SHINY AND HIDDEN IN THE FORESTS OF THE NORTH EAST OF THE STATE. PANAMA FESTIVAL IS SET TO OFFER AN INTIMATE WEEKEND OF LIVE MUSIC FUSED WITH DJS, CABARET, FOOD AND MARKET STALLS UNDER A PRISTINE BACKDROP OF TALL TIMBERS.

So how did Panama come about? We caught up with Tim Carroll, the festival’s Artistic Director to find out. Like many great ideas, the festival was born over several rounds of drinks amongst friends over many late nights. Tim and fellow Panama compadre Dan Rooke have spent much of their adult life on the festival scene. “We used to work back in our teens on the UK summer festival at Glastonbury, The Big Chil... from the very big to the very small.” Tim (originally from Brisbane) started to make his way to Tasmania for the biennial Circus Fest where he never quite learnt how to juggle and invariably ended up stuck behind the bar. He however did manage to find a talent for music and is playing in one of the bands on the Panama line up, Holy Holy. Moving on to become the current booker for the Black Bear Lodge in Fortitude Valley has given Tim the contacts to pull together a group of bands using the approach of “what are the acts that we think are making great music”. One such act making great music and the headliner for the festival is American funk/ soul singer Charles Bradley. Signed to the Daptone Records, Bradley has been a front runner in revival of the 60s/70s funk and soul sound. This will be the second

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time that Bradley has made it to Australia, having done a small run of dates in 2012. Tim first heard Bradley when a friend came home with a record from one of these shows, which he instantly fell in love with. As fate would have it at last year’s Bigsound conference in Brisbane, he discussed the idea of festival with agents and how much he would love to have Charles Bradley for it, only to find out he was returning to Australia in 2014. Charles Bradley can be considered a late bloomer, at age 65 he released his second album Victims of Love in 2013. Having only reached commercial success in the later years of his life, Bradley’s earlier years were marked with hardship and heartache. Years of homelessness and family issues plagued the singer, while he worked in kitchens and moonlighted in small local clubs. Much of his singing career was devoted to being a James Brown impersonator performing under the stage name “Black Velvet”. This all featured in a 2012 documentary about the singer, Soul of America, which debuted at the SXSW Film Festival in Austin, Texas.

small festivals. Boogie...Merideth... We want to make an event for all the right reasons.” Says Tim. “We’ve also been to a lot of festivals where we’ve seen alot of rubbish left over. We want our festival to be immaculate and are implementing a zero waste policy”. That means the guys expect you to take any rubbish you generate with you at the end of the event. Car pooling is promoted and people are encouraged to camp for the duration of the festival. This ethos is set to make Panama are unique and exciting event in Tasmania this March. NIC ORME

Bradley will be touring with his band a mixture of the Daptone Record’s to label instrumental bands, The Budos Band and Menahan Street Band. So what else is happening at Panama? Melbourne act Saskwatch will be adding to the funk feel of the festival (although a separate night to Bradley), but Tim has been careful to make the festival open to a wide range of styles. Crowd favourites Husky and Big Scary bring up the indie rock component of the event. Garage pop, folk and electronic all pop up through the festival line up. One of the biggest thing being pushed by the Panama crew is the the overall festival environment. “We have always enjoyed

Come to Panama Festival in Golconda on March 8 & 9. Tickets available from the website at www. panamafestival.com.au.


Music

Music

MORTAL COIL HARD WORKING IS AN UNDERSTATEMENT… AMERICA, EUROPE, ASIA AND NOW AUSTRALIA – UNKNOWN MORTAL ORCHESTRA LOVE LIFE ON THE ROAD. SO MUCH SO THAT AT LEAST EIGHT OR NINE OUT OF THE LAST TWELVE MONTHS HAVE BEEN SPENT LIVING OUT OF A SUITCASE, TAKING THE SOUNDS OF UMO FAR AND WIDE ACROSS THE GLOBE.

about 6 or 7 I think. Eventually I think the band’s reputation gets known in other countries and these new opportunities to visit different places come up. Are they places you’ve always wanted to travel or play in? Yeah. I’m looking forward to Shanghai always wanted to go there, Hong Kong as well. I really want to go to Rio. Also India. Europe is done and dusted. How did that part of the tour go?

And come February, they will be setting Australia alight with their unique psychedelic sounds. Ruben Neilsen took some time out from their tour to answer a few questions for us. Where are you now? I’m at home in Portland. We just finished a month long tour in Europe. How long have UMO been together for? We’ve been touring about 3 years. How did the UMO start? I started making music at home and posted a song to bandcamp which ended up going viral on music blogs. I started getting contacted by record labels and put a live band together to go on tour. It all happened really quickly. Where are each of you based? Two of us are in Portland and one is in Brooklyn. You are currently on a small hiatus on this diverse and amazing tour, spanning Europe, Asia and Australia - how did you come to be playing gigs in places like China, Thailand and South Korea? We’ve been touring for about three years and we’ve been a lot of places. We’ve toured the US about 12 times and Europe

It was really fun. We sold out our biggest headline show at the beginning of the tour which was in London and then broke our own record on the last show in Portugal. We didn’t imagine it was going to be quite that successful. Our rise in the US has been very gradual and logical and based on hard work but in Europe we went from being nobody to suddenly being quite big all within one year. Any favourite/stand out places? Budapest was really cool. Porto in Portugal. Bergen, Norway. How much time did you spend on tour in 2013? Around eight or nine months. Where else did you go in 2013? We did three American tours this year, including Canada along the way. We were in Aussie and New Zealand at the beginning of the year. Europe four times which included Eastern Europe and Scandanavia. That’s it basically.  What plans do you have for 2014? After this Asian and Australasian tour I’m taking some time off of touring (relatively) to work on the third record. We’re playing a couple of festivals in the states and maybe we’ll go to South America but apart from that it’ll be writing and recording.

Any time off planned after this tour? I might go away to a log cabin somewhere in Oregon for a while to decompress. I’d like to go to Hawaii and visit family. Have you been to Tasmania before? Yeah. We played there in early 2012. I went to MONA as well. Very cool. Any pre show rituals? It changes all the time. Sometimes we pretend to do the U2 type huddle and say insulting things to each other. How do you spend your time when not with UMO? I hardly leave the house. I play with my babies (I have a four year old and a three year old) and work in my studio and my workshop. I build a lot of my own equipment and I record in my basement studio. It becomes my full time job hanging out down there. I’m preparing to make another album so I’ve been really busy building and buying things for it. Favourite gig you’ve ever been to? I saw the Stooges play when Ron Asheton was still alive. I also saw Pharaoh Sanders play once and that was cool. Bill Frisell was amazing. I saw Lightning Bolt play a warehouse show in 2004 and I guess that’s stuck in my memory too. Gig you wish you had been to? I really want to see Prince. I wish I’d seen Sly and the Family Stone. I’d love to see Led Zeppelin. I want to see Throbbing Gristle play one day. I wish I’d seen Miles Davis.  KYLIE COX

Catch Unknown Mortal Orchestra as they take a break from their various Laneway Festival shenanigans and hit up The Republic Bar in Hobart on Wednesday February 5. Support for the show will come from locals Venuslight Overdrive.

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Music

FISHING FOR A NEW TUNE HUSKY’S MUSICAL TRAJECTORY OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS HAS BEEN AIMED SKYWARD, TO SAY THE LEAST – AND WITH THEIR NEW ALBUM SET TO BE RELEASED BY SUB POP EARLY NEXT YEAR, THEY AREN’T SHOWING ANY SIGNS OF SLOWING. I SPOKE TO THE BAND’S TITLE FIGURE, HUSKY GRAVENDA, AHEAD OF THEIR UPCOMING SLOT AT THE NEW PANAMA FESTIVAL IN MARCH.

In November, Husky played two shows at the Theatre Royal supporting City and Colour. “We’ve been down to Hobart quite a few times now, but we’d only ever played at the Republic Bar – we’d never played the Theatre Royal before. It’s an amazing little theatre; really, really grand but also quite intimate, which is kinda unusual for theatre spaces. We had a great time playing those shows.”

Pop, and she was talking about something totally unrelated to us. At the time we’d only ever released our music in Australia. She gave him a record, and then they got in touch to say that they really loved it and wanted to put it out. That was a big surprise – we weren’t really reaching out for that at the time... To work with them is definitely a privilege, and something we wouldn’t have expected in the earlier days.”

Panama Festival will see Husky take a similarly picteresque, but very different stage – the natural ampitheatre of the Lone Star Valley ranch in Golconda. “We’ve always talked about doing a show somewhere kind of... different. They’re the best. Natural outdoor ampitheatres are the greatest spaces to play in.”

As to his songwriting process, Husky’s approach is quite holistic. “I guess as a band the process is just to get together and workshop stuff until it starts to feel right and we feel excited about it. On a personal level, when I’m on my own, it’s a pretty boring routine really.

In March last year the band were chosen to support Neil Young on his national Crazy Horse tour. “Obviously Neil Young is someone we, and probably just about everyone else, grew up on. He’s certainly one of those ubiquitous musicians, and his music’s touched everybody in one way or another,” says Husky. “It was a great tour. We played stadiums all around the country and that was definitely a first for us. It’s kind of the opposite to what I was saying about the Theatre Royal in Hobart. That intimacy is definitely not there. I never really pictured our band playing in stadium spaces, so that was certainly interesting and a learning experience for us as a band.” They also recently became the first Australian band in history to be signed to the inaugural label Sub Pop. “They sort of randomly got hold of our record,” explains Husky. “Our manager was over in the States and was talking to the head of Sub

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I try to set aside days or weeks to write, and I pretty much get up, have a shower, have something to eat and sit down at my desk – no matter how I’m feeling, whether I feel inspired or not, the aim is to make sure I’m sitting at my desk so that when some sort of inspiration comes I’m there, waiting for it, ready to grab it. It comes, it comes eventually, even if it takes days. I point to the often underestimated quality of being patient during the creative process. “Yeah, I think that’s exactly the word – patience!” says Husky.

But you’ve got to do all of that sitting and waiting, and eventually (hopefully!) you catch a fish. The other thing is, it’s good to have a good space for writing in, a place that feels comfortable. I’ve got a room in the house I live in. There are double doors that I can open up, and let lots of light and air in. There’s a little garden outside that I’ll often walk around, pace up and down. It’s pretty simple. A bit of greenery’s always good. A tree or two... You can’t underestimate a couple of trees [laughs].” The routine seems to be working – in October, the band estimated having close to thirty songs recorded for the upcoming album. “It’s probably more like 40 or 50 now,” chuckles Husky; their set at Panama, then, will be brimming with fresh tunes. “It’s coming together really well [the new record] and we’re really excited about it. We played a lot of the new songs on the road recently, and it was great to road-test them and see both how they came across live and what the response was. We feel like it’s a step in a slightly different direction – a progression of some sort, which feels great. With the recent material, there are all of these new dynamics to the live show, which is pretty exciting.” CHLOE MAYNE

“It’s almost like fishing, you know. Most of the time you’re not catching a fish, you’re just sitting there".

Husky will play alongside Charles Bradley, Saskwatch, Super Wild Horse, The Frowning Clouds and many more at the new Panama Festival, situated at Golconda in the State’s North-East.


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Music

KINGS OF THE WOOD AUSTRALIAN ROCK OUTFIT KINGSWOOD ARE RIDING HIGH OFF THE BACK OF THEIR RECENT TRIPLE J HOTTEST 100 SUCCESS. NOW THEY ARE COMING BACK TO PLAY THEIR CLASSIC ROCK N ROLL SOUND AT TASMANIA’S PARTY IN A PADDOCK FESTIVAL THIS MONTH. JUSTIN DEBRINCAT DRUMMER FOR THE BAND TOLD US WHAT WAS UP WITH THE KINGS. How was Nashville for Kingswood? Is it the rock and roll mecca we’ve come to assume? Nashville was super awesome in that not only is it the music capital, it was a completely foreign environment that like most holidays do, put us in a great place which I think translated in our music. Apart from almost any piece of musical instrument desired being available, and recording gear that would make Crosbie our soundie blow his load/mind, a walk downtown Nashville gave us at least 5 nightly renditions of sweet home Alabama, ring of fire and wagon wheel in that order.  Tell me about the forthcoming album.  The album is not what you’d expect. It’s dangerous, exciting and in my opinion, a significant progression that will hopefully delight.  A lot of rock outfits seem to end up in America. Is that the end game, or a possibility?

A HUMBLE ‘90S ROCKER HARDCORE GUITARIST, SONGWRITER AND PERFORMER DAVE GRANEY HAS BEEN HAILED AS A “CRYPTIC ROCK VOYAGER,” A “TOOLED UP CLOWN,” AND A “FREEWHEELING CHAMP” DURING HIS 25 YEAR ALBUM CAREER. THE ‘90S ROCKER WILL BE PLAYING TWO TASMANIAN SHOWS THIS MONTH, AND SHARES THE UPS AND DOWNS OF HIS CAREER IN THE AUSSIE MUSIC INDUSTRY.

Who knows what the future holds. I can’t tell you what will be happening in 6 months’ time. Just as Homme put it, no one knows. The album could become number 1 in Norway and we may end up there permanently. Anything is a possibility. In saying that, America is great.  You guys made it into the Hottest 100 (congrats!); is it the youth that’s driving the music industry these days, as you might expect?  Thanks! I think to a degree it is. Almost all local bands are born through community radio and progress up to triple j then commercial. More often than not these radio stations are run by the youth.

Australia is chock full of summer music festivals. Best way to enjoy a festival?  No formula, but for me I enjoy music, so I try not to spend large amounts of money on tickets to just camp and drink. But sometimes it’s not easy to get out there. So my advice, do what feels good.  Rock and roll ain’t noise pollution. Great song that helped Brian earn his stripes. LISA DIB

There are some fab beards in this band. Secrets to beard maintenance?  Depends what beard you are going for/can foster. Some go for the rough and ready minimal maintenance beard while others go for the regularly trimmed. It’s horses for courses.

You’ve said your music is loaded with ideas and emotions- what really gets you going as a musician? I love guitars and guitar sounds. New music I guess. I don’t listen to music for nostalgic reasons. I like the Melbourne music scene – there’s always so much going on. So many of the musicians are also from Tasmania, actually. I like grooves and voices, so I really tuned into country music, hip hop and reggae:all places for great voices. When does a new idea come to you, and how do you keep ideas fresh after so long?

See Kingswood at Party In The Paddock, Feb 21 – 23. Tickets available from Ruffcut, Red Hot Music and Mojo Music.

I haven’t really been any good at fitting in. Would be nice to feel at one with my contemporaries or peers. I went down roads that interested me. Digital recording is great. Old school studio skills are amazing too, and it’s great to be able to know people who have them – people who know about things from before the digital era. People who use their ears and know about mic placement. I would disagree that today’s standards are high. Certainly not as high as Frank Sinatra in the ‘50s or ‘60s. Today’s world is coarse and crude in many ways, with a thin veneer of sophistication, and this very much applies to recording.

Time is irrelevant in music. It never gets boring. I wish it did,but it’s a chaotic and unpredictable world.

What are some of the important attitudes and life lessons from your long standing career that you have chosen to hold with you today?

Based on what you’ve observed in the industry, do you think today’s bands will live on for decades? Is it possible or has the nature of ‘fame’ changed so that we don’t tend to put musicians up on pedestals as we once did?

Enjoy yourself? There is no industry. Social media is a hoax. Sorry, I haven’t learned much. I like to play music live. That’s about it. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

Jeez, fame is for that TV talent show world. It’s embarrassing to talk about that sort of thing. I liked music because it was a secret underworld. That’s the best part of it, the underworld, not the mainstream. Though, it’s great when something weird crashes into the straight world and smashes everything. That’s the best. You like to play on “cheap guitars” - do you think with today’s modern technology and high quality recording standards, it’s more about that highly produced effect and less about the music itself? How do you fit in? 12

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Hear Dave Graney live at Tapas Lounge Bar in Devonport on Friday February 15 and in Hobart at The Republic Bar on Saturday February 16.


Music

A SHADOW IN THE VOID DJ SHADOW IS AN ICON TO AN ENTIRE GENERATION OF MODERN MUSICIANS, MUSIC PRODUCERS, AND MUSIC FANS ALIKE. HIS EARLY WORK HAS BEEN REFERRED TO AS GENRE-BENDING, GENREBLENDING, AND GENRE-DEFINING.

Shadow’s 1996 release, Endtroducing….. blazed a trail that modern producers are still trying to follow, 18 years later. His production on the debut Unkle album, Psyence Fiction, his work with Quannum Projects, his live albums with Cut Chemist, and his subsequent solo studio releases are held in equally high-regard.

"There seem to be two kinds of people that come to the shows, on one side there are people that, for them, those early albums were really important to them, and maybe some of those older heads feel let down by what I’ve done more recently. Then there’s the other side that are really up to date and see the progression in what I’m doing now.”

Since then, there have been tours, remixes, more albums and even a little bit of bizzarro controversy (do a google search for “DJ Shadow” and “Mansion night club” for more on that) for good measure. It’s been a long, decorated, and highly scrutinised musical evolution; and you can’t please all the people, all the time.

Wary of the need to remain fresh and interested in your work, Shadow has developed the way he works, alongside the kind of work he does. Originally using an Akai MPC 60 to create beautiful sample based soundscapes and intricate drum patterns, he has kept in step with the ever evolving world of audio technology. “I used an MPC from ‘92 to 2003 or 2004, and only used Protools for mixing and editing, from the mid nineties to the mid noughts I used Protools a lot. I pretty much use Ableton for everything now. Every time something new comes out, a new program or a new piece of equipment, it’s like learning a new language. Things are a lot different now, there aren’t any of the limitations that were present back then. You had to find new

“I think I’ve successfully shed any allegiance to my older work, I’m not turning my back on it at all, but I don’t want to be that guy doing the same thing over and over again."

ways to do things in order to get around those limitations, now you almost need to scale yourself back from trying to do too much.” As admired for his relentlessly productive work rate as much as his creativity, he is showing no signs of slowing down. “I just got a collaborative project mastered, today actually, and I’ve just finished a remix, and I’ve just recently started working on my own music for the first time in a while, which has been fun. But right now I’m really just preparing for the Australian tour.” The upcoming Australian tour won’t be his first, but it will be the first time he touches down in Tasmania. “I’ve toured to Australia a few times and I’ve always seen it on maps and wondered if people get to play there, so it’s always been on my shortlist of places to visit. I’ve played in a lot of places, and as I get older that’s really made me look further out into the world. There’s a shortlist of places I’d still like to get to, so it’ll be good to tick another one off the list. But I asked who else had been there, and I heard the Beastie Boys played there, and Public Enemy, and maybe Ice-T? I asked the tour manager about MONA, I’ve heard it’s a crazy museum all built by one guy, but that’s all I’ve heard.” Despite a hectic schedule and workload, Shadow still finds time to check the moves being made by the next generation of producers, constantly keeping an eye on the direction the music is headed. This generation of producers got to where they are, by checking every move Shadow has ever made. “I’ve really taken to the internet, and the whole online community of producers. I’m constantly on Soundcloud and Bandcamp searching for new music, there may be a certain tag that I’ll follow that will take me to producers from a certain country or area or something like that. Not just anyone can release music on iTunes, there’s a whole process you have to go through, so the other outlets on the internet are a great resource. But as far as producers, and names that people can look up, I’m really liking a local Cali producer called Salva, and another guy who I think is really going to blow up, or has really blown up lately, is Mr. Carmack. I think both of those guys just really have a great ear and great sound, and they’re really forward thinking producers.” The diggers mentality hasn’t changed, whether it be searching through musty, dusty record store basements (in the process of acquiring some 60,000 records), or clicking links on the interwebs. “You always get those people that are like ‘why aren’t you only playing vinyl?’, well, it’s because a lot of this stuff doesn’t exist on vinyl.” So when Shadow is on stage, it’s best to keep an open mind. It is, after all, DJ Shadow. He is known for genre-bending, genre-blending and genre-defining. “There’ll be a few familiar things, but I really like to put in a lot of left turns. It’s about having it seem fresh to me, as much as to everyone else. There’ll be things like builds in momentum, and things that you’d traditionally find in a DJ set, but there will be a lot of left turns.” SHANE CRIXUS

DJ Shadow is playing in The Void at MONA on Wednesday February 12. Tickets are sold out.

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MELBOURNE

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Music

HAIL TO THE KINGS THE AUSTRALIAN KING PARROTS LAY THEIR EGGS ON A BED OF DECAYED WOOD-DUST AT THE BOTTOM OF A DEEP HOLLOW IN THE TRUNK OF A TREE. THAT HAS NOUGHT TO DO WITH THE MELBOURNE METAL BAND, BUT IS INTERESTING NONETHELESS. KING PARROT VOCALIST MATT YOUNG (“YOUNGY”) HAD YET MORE INTERESTING THINGS ABOUT THE UPCOMING AMPOCALYPSE FESTIVAL (NUMBER VII FOR THOSE PLAYING AT HOME) AND SHITTING YOURSELF.

“It means not pretending to be something other than what we are” Young says when asked what his band means when they talk of being “uniquely Australian”. “If you take the time to check the band out or come and see us play live then you would know what I’m talking about. There’s no pandering to trends or fashions of the day with King Parrot. We play brutal uncompromising music and put on a live show that will leave you with at the very least brown stain on your underpants. Most likely a full blown turd if you haven’t seen us before.”

Is there such a thing as ‘too metal’?

With the Ampocalypse gig on the horizon ending a massive spate of gigs for the band, I ask Young how difficult it is to tear the audience a new one each and every night. Ah, such is the life of a metal god.

“We are touring Australia at the moment and going all over the place. Check the ol’ Facebook page for details of when we’ll be in your area. In March and April we head over to the US for a tour and SXSW and then I think we’re going to Asia for some shows over there. All the while trying to write new material for our second album, it’s coming up a treat.”

“This is what we love to do, and it is our pleasure to rip you a new one every time we take to the stage. There is always more energy to do this and put on shows. I wish we could play two shows in one day more often. This band thrives on energy and we have it in abundance.” “A lot of farts usually” says Young when I ponder how a touring band with their schedule kill time on the road. “Farts are always funny, I don’t care what anyone says. No other sound has the ability to make a bunch of people crack up laughing more consistently than a fart. We also play eye-spy a lot, and show and tell, which sometimes becomes a bit gross, smelly and unpredictable. The other day Slatts our bass player pulled his pants down and showed us that he has two penises.”

A GIN OR NINE THE GIN CLUB ROLLED THROUGH THEIR TEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY TOGETHER AS AUSTRALIA’S PREMIERE ECLECTIC ECCENTRIC INTROSPECTIVE COLLECTIVE. WITH A FIFTH STUDIO ALBUM SOON TO BE RELEASED, AUDIENCES WILL BE ABLE TO PREVIEW THE NEW MATERIAL IN A SERIOUS OF SHOWS THIS MONTH. MEMBER BEN SALTER TALKED TO US ABOUT THE BAND.

What was the source of The Gin Club’s name? “We were trying different names but The Gin Club was one that just stuck. It started at the Troubadour Bar in Brisbane, which is sadly no longer there. We were tossing around a few names and one night decided to call ourselves The Gin Club, it was a name which no one hated. I think people like it because it sounds similar to The Gun Club. I like their music but the similarities between them and The Gin Club stop there”. How does a nine person band function? “Well the numbers are always fluctuating, dependent on what members are doing at the time. It somehow manages to work if there are people missing, even at our live shows, but I believe it’s always different and unique because of that. We work hard and even though we don’t write together it helps that we are a group of friends that enjoy playing music”. But with this number of people there must be some primadonnas in the band? “Well, everyone has their moments and yes sometimes someone will act like that, not to name any names but, well, me. hahahaha”.

Ampocalypse promises to knock your head off with Maniaxe, The Arbiter, Dropforge, Evil Intent, Bats of a Feather and more. Sponsored by Ruffcut Records and Tommy Gun Records, it’ll certainly blow your head off. LISA DIB

It all goes down at the Brisbane Hotel in Hobart on Saturday February 22 with an all ages show running from 2pm – 7pm, followed by an 18+ show from 8pm.

looking forward to catching up with them. We’ll be down for the whole weekend to check out a few places and see MONA again, that’s always interesting. There are a lot of good memories from Hobart”. What would you say was your best memory from playing in Tassie? “The first time we played there was in the Brisbane Hotel. We had a really bad day and were communicating with the sound guy, Ivan, through text message. As is with text conversations it’s hard to gauge people and we were all in a bad mood anyway, so not looking forward to the gig that night. However, we eventually arrived and the folks there were so lovely and made us feel very welcome. The gig was so much fun it lasted about three hours. At one point there was even a giant conga line going through the audience”. Where do you see the band in the next few years? We hope to pretty much be doing the same thing, keep playing music and doing more shows. We’d love to get to travel more and eventually get to Europe. It’s funny to think we started at an open mike night. Do you have a philosophy as a band?

“Oh I would have to say Hendricks. But I am fond of Bombay Sapphire and Tankery, though that is usually at the priceyer end of the market. I’m not as fond of gin as I used to be so I’m more a beer drinker these days”. Are you looking forward to returning to Hobart?

“We don’t take life too seriously and well, it’s all about having fun”.

“Yes definitely. The Brisbane Hotel is a venue that we love to play at. We’ve got some really good mates in Hobart and made so many friends in the past couple of years. I’m really warpmagazine.com.au

What’s in the future for King Parrot?

“Yes I’d say we have a really good team culture. We are a big group of mates so that helps keep us together. When we started this we knew we were not going to be super famous like the Beatles or anything. But for a side project we have done some incredible things, like playing the Big Day Out, which we are so grateful for”.

What is The Gin Club’s Gin of choice?

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“Yes! I see it all the time, but it’s great. Some metal heads are so passionate and dedicated its just awesome to see. Alot of people don’t give a shit about anything else at all. Especially for us being a metal band, it means people get tattoos of our band name on them, and all sorts of other crazy shit. Metal rules much more than any other genre of music. Fact.”

LYLE MITCHELL The Gin Club play The Brisbane Hotel on Sunday February 7, with support from the Lawless Quartet and guests.


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Music

TAKE A PYKE JOSH PYKE IS WHAT YOU MIGHT CALL A JUGGERNAUT- OR AT LEAST A STOPPING-ALL-STATIONS TRAIN. PYKE HAS JUST RELEASED HIS FOURTH FULL-LENGTH ALBUM- HIS ELEVENTH OVERALL!- AND WILL BE BACK ON THE TOURING WAGON SOON ENOUGH. WILL THIS MAN EVER STOP? PROBABLY, AND HOPEFULLY, NOT. Emblazoned upon the cover of his latest record, The Beginning And The End Of Everything, is Josh Pyke beautifully morphing into a wolf head. Thus my first question to the Sydney singer-songwriter is: why the obsession with various fauna? “For whatever reason, it’s always been the way that I express different influences in my life; the negative part is [animals like] crows and wolves; the positive might be birds and rabbits and foxes...I’ve thought about all those over the years, wolves are strong majestic beasts. It’s something that I can relate to when I’m writing the songs, when I’m thinking about the persona, they just fit the bill. I try not to overanalyze it, I can’t really explain why. I’m trusting my instincts” The Beginning And The End Of Everything, released July 2013, is classic Pyke as we know and love him: sumptuous and melancholic folk, sometimes delicate and sometimes raw and unapologetic. Pyke’s charming folk this time around possibly comes from shutting out other musical influences for a while... “I kinda stopped listening to music before this album...stopped listening to music for about six months so my mind wasn’t gonna draw upon things I’d heard before. It was me and the producer for four weeks making the album, I didn’t wanna have these outside influences, I wanted it to be me coming through the record.” Another string to Pyke’s bow is his interest in philanthropy and charity; Pyke is involved with the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, Busking for Change and his very own Josh Pyke Partnership, a fund designed to finance an unsigned musician and give them the opportunity to receive mentorship and funding to help grow their career. Pyke

discusses why it’s important to help one another. “I think it’s fair to say the music industry is getting tougher and tougher. I felt at this point in my career, I’m lucky, I make a good living, I can play nice venues and have a nice time doing what I do. In Australia, there’s not that many avenues or opportunities for young people. With ILF, I just think i’m in a position to potentially help some people, it’s as simple as that. I’m passionate about literacy, it has opened every door for me in my life. ILF are great, they don’t force anything on anybody, they just raise money to get books in English and various indigenous languages, and just distribute them to various communities. It’s about giving people options.” One thing you might notice in Pyke’s record is a sense of whimsy; fantasy; romance. Pyke is the first to admit he’s the type. “I definitely think I’m romantic, in a kind of deluded kind of way. I remember having romantic fantasies of girls I would see on the bus when i was a kid. Although all of my songs, when you kinda get past the first layer, they’re about finding good things in bad situations. I am optimistic, I’m a normal person. The best songs are those happy-sad songs.” LISA DIB

Josh Pyke plays the Waratah Hotel in Hobart on February 14, 2014. The Beginning And The End Of Everything is out now.

IRISH SUNDAY SESSION KITCHEN OPEN FOR LUNCH AND DINNER 5 CIDERS TO CHOOSE FROM

LIVE MUSIC 6PM TILL — LATE

p u C t r a b o H Party SUNDAY FEB 9

HUGE night of live music lined up to keep your Cup celebrations going Live music kicks off at 6pm with SEROTONIN

St Patrick’s Day festival 2014 HUGE 2 DAY FESTIVAL SUNDAY 16 & MONDAY 17 MARCH TH —

TH —

MASSIVE LINE UP OF LIVE MUSIC, PROMOS AND GIVEAWAYS

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Music

Photo credit: Karen McBride

POWER TO THE PEOPLE Billy Bragg is nothing if not a poetic soul. A grassroots leftie, Bragg has more campaign causes than Bono and is decidedly more likeable. With his interests deeply rooted in English national identity, socialism, social justice and the Occupy movement, the highly political, prolific folk rocker has been singing the working man’s blues and crying out for the underdog for over thirty years and shows no signs of weakening- only changing. Especially in the face of new and interesting social media advances. “For someone like myself whose bottom line is communication- picking up ideas and spreading them around- social media is pretty good for that. Personally engaging does help you to get your message out there a lot better if they feel like it’s you that’s saying it. If you get your troll armour on and don’t respond to every single troll, just the odd one that needs engaging with and shutting up…[social media] is very useful for telling people about gigs, there’s no worry about getting your article in the NME.” “There was a young woman who posted something about how Twitter had just recommended that she follow Billy Bragg and she said “fuck that” so I just tweeted, “that’s a brilliant idea, I’m just gonna send a “fuck that” to everyone that Twitter says i should follow” (laughs) and we ended up having a dialogue and following each other. This person was a person of the left who thought I wasn’t left enough…” I start to mention a number of excellent Tumblr blogs he might be interested in, but Bragg is already overwhelmed. “I only take two drugs: Twitter and Facebook. If I start mainlining Tumblr, I might as well be doing crack cocaine”

Bragg hops from one idea to the next, constantly brimming with possibilities, solutions, resolutions. An adroit ideas-man, Bragg has a variety of political passionsfeminism being one that I am chuffed to discuss...not that Bragg needs any prodding in that area.

space for themselves in a post-ideological world. It’s up to this new generation to articulate their views and address the problems we face. Gender and class is a spectrum, and it’s those people who try to narrow it down that are defining who is working class and who isn’t”.

“YOU CAN GET AN APP THAT MAKES THE NOISE OF HOWLING WIND. WITH GOOGLE EARTH, YOU CAN WANDER LONELY AS A CLOUD ANYWHERE YOU GO” “I’m anti-racist, but I’m never gonna be a person of colour, am I?” Bragg says on being a male feminist- a difficult world for some. “In the sudden amount of debate around feminism, it’s women clearing some ideological space. It’s women that have gotta take the platform, it’s women that need to speak the issue. The problem with the old left, it was sublimated to class. Gender is much more important, daily, than class. The 20th century left tried to keep that argument down. People are defining themselves in different ways, if you see gender as a spectrum, which you should, rather than left and right.” “Already there are people saying [that] the campaign against Page 3 [in short, a campaign to stop UK tabloid The Sun from publishing half-naked women on the infamous page three of their rag], it’s not as important as the campaign about female genital mutilation. But that will always happen, whatever issue you’re working on, there’s always someone thinking this issue over here is more important. No More Page 3 and Everyday Sexism are high-profile issues that connect women, especially young women without much experience of the feminist movement and if they’re so inclined, they move beyond that. These women are creating a new ideological

Bragg has also been an outspoken representative of the voice of the working class. The sounds of his snarling folkpunk have been the soundtrack of the downtrodden working class and underdogs in the UK. “I grew up working class, until I was 25, when I first started doing gigs. I left school at 16, now I live in a nice big house by the ocean. I earn my living without getting my hands dirty...am I still working class? My values are, but my lifestyle isn’t. The right accuse me of not being working class, as if only the working class can talk about a fairer society. It’s part of the human condition. The way the world changes, you get people of similar views and you work on those issues. There’s a real world out there beyond politics and the internet that you have to deal with.” LISA DIB

Billy Bragg plays the Federation Concert Hall in Hobart on Wednesday March 12.

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Music

UNDER THE STARS

LUTE AWAY

IF YOU’RE HUNGERING FOR A HIT OF CLASSICS TO GET THE YEAR STARTED, THE TASMANIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ARE ABOUT TO OFFER UP A MEGA FEAST TO FILL YOUR EARS. DON’T WORRY ABOUT BRINGING YOUR WALLET – IT’S ON THE HOUSE.

YOU MAY HAVE HIT UP MORE THAN A FEW FESTIVALS OVER THE SUMMER, BUT I GUARANTEE YOU WON’T HAVE EXPERIENCED ANYTHING QUITE LIKE THIS. BETWEEN FEBRUARY 8 TO 17 WILL BE THE TASSIE LUTE FEST, SO TIGHTEN THOSE GUITAR STRINGS AND HEAD OUT TO LILYDALE, BRUNY ISLAND AND HOBART FOR A GOOD DOSE OF MEDIEVAL MUSICAL MAYHEM.

The TSO’s Symphony under the Stars events have been around almost as long as the works performed – and if you didn’t go as a kid, you had no childhood. However, you’ve got the chance to redeem yourself on February 15 in Glenorchy’s Tolosa Park and February 22 in Launceston’s City Park (score extra points by going to both). Feel the romance as Tchaikovsky fills the glistening sky with music from Swan Lake, and prepare to be blasted to life with the overture to Strauss’ Die Fledermaus– the original ballet was complete with themes of adultery, intoxication and imprisonment. Bizet’s Carmen will be sure to seduce – but despite all this fun, it is indeed a family friendly event. The hilarious Guy Noble will conduct the event and Tassie born musical genius Katerina Nazerova will take us away with her violin. The first time she played with the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra she was just 11 years old, and she joins them again now after stints with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and the

London Symphony Orchestra. Did I forget to mention she won the 2012 ABC Symphony Australia Young Performers Awards? Come see the child prodigy in the flesh – and bring a picnic basket.

STEPHANIE ESLAKE

STEPHANIE ESLAKE

RACT Symphony under the Stars will be held at Tolosa Park on 15 February and City Park on 22 Februaryat 7pm. Check out www.tso.com.au for more information on the concert and Live it Up Live Season Passes.

PRINCIPLE TUBA – TASMANIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

World renowned performers Hopkinson Smith will rock up with baroque guitar, John Griffiths with his vihuela de mano, and Andrew Byrne on the German baroque lute. And if you’re a musician yourself, you can even learn how to read the centuries old musical notation with Smith and musicologist Karin Paulsmeier – cooler than your regular tabs, huh? In between gigs and workshops, check out the Lilydale markets. The Sunday February 9 market will coincide with the Lute festival and there’ll be local beer on tap, local produce, handcrafted jewellery, organic espresso, and everything else that makes our humble island a world class destination. You can also catch up with Tim Guster at the market – a highly skilled craftsman who will reveal his secrets on how to craft a lute with bare hands.

While the 2014 RACT Symphony under the Stars is a free gig, the orchestra’s 2014 concert season does come at a price. Luckily, if you’re a student, it’s next to nothing. Flash your full time ID card and save hundreds with a Live it Up Live Season Pass. $35 and you can check out over 30 concerts for free. Looks like I’ve got another year of study ahead for me, that’s for sure.

TEN QUESTIONS WITH TIM JONES

Think back in time – no DJs, no amps, no crazy lighting. Just good music – replicated in the Lute Fest program which will bathe you in music by Francesco Guerau, J. S. Bach, Antonio de Santa Cruz, and Santiago de Murzia. The main feature, however, will be Gaspar Sanz who wrote gorgeous dances which you are more than welcome to party along to.

Check out www.lutefest.com for tickets and information on the many concerts and workshops held February between 8 – 17, at various locations statewide.

What’s your earliest musical memory? 20 Electrifying Hits, my first LP. Age four, I think. When and why did you first pick up the tuba? I got the music bug when I was about eight. My school teacher got me started on recorder and put a tuba in my hands a couple of months later. I liked big things at that point in my life.

What’s the strangest experience you’ve had on tour? A performance art piece that involved someone on stilts, a bright red suit and dodging traffic in the Melbourne CBD. Most challenging piece you’ve played? Schnittke’s Concerto Grosso as a rookie at the last minute with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. I was physically shaking. Who are your inspirations? Lots of professional musicians you’ve probably never heard of. Favourite bands? I like music with lots of fine studio musicians playing live in a town like LA, New York, London, etc. I rarely get past 1979 as a result. Pink Floyd, The Who, Bob Marley and the Wailers, Earth Wind and Fire are all long-time favourites. What’s your practice routine? Depends on other musical activities, but generally seven to 15 hours a week. 40 to 60 hours of music all up a week. What do you get up to when you’re not making music? Relax, hang out with the family, and listen to music. If you could perform anywhere in the world, with any orchestra or ensemble, what would be your dream performance? I’d like to go back in time and be the tuba player on the Miles Davis, Gil Evans recordings. Porgy and Bess in particular. What do you love about your instrument? Usually there is only one. I like the bass role and it is powerful for an acoustic instrument. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

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GIMMIE SOME LOVO WHEN YOU LIVE IN A MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY, WORLD MUSIC IS RIGHT AT YOUR DOOR STEP. AUSSIE BAND LOVO LOVINA HAVE BROUGHT TOGETHER MUSICIANS FROM ALL CORNERS OF EUROPE TO CREATE A MELTING POT OF GYPSY MADNESS, AND ARE BRINGIN’ THEIR THANG TO THE HOMESTEAD ON FEBRUARY 7. LEAD SINGING GYPSY SARAH BEDAK TELLS US WHY LOVO LOVINA IS, ACCORDING TO BRIAN ENO HIMSELF, “THE FUTURE OF MUSIC.”

Lovo Lovina has Ukrainian, Romanian, Hungarian and Brazilian band members – but despite their differing backgrounds, they’re able to achieve the perfect balance of tastes and traditions. “We have matching skill, passion, drive, dedication and desire to play and celebrate our peoples’ music as well as we possibly can,” Sarah says. “We are blessed to have found each other and to have this amazing opportunity to work with one another.” After meeting in Serbia three years ago, the musicians “clicked perfectly, musically” and got straight into recording and performing styles ranging from tango, British pop, flamenco, and gypsy swing. “A lot of people replicate gypsy music, but what we are doing right now is the total real deal and we’re very excited about it!” Though Sarah herself was brought up in Sydney, her Budapest-Romani Gypsy background is the essence of her music.

around Europe in a gypsy circus. It’d be safe to assume some incredible stories are told over the family dinner table. “My family played jazz illegally during the Communist occupation of Hungary, in dug out hidden basements. Can imagine how cool that would have sounded?” Lovo Lovina may not perform for us in a hidden basement, but the band will be sure to bring their vibrant, traditional, and overwhelmingly sultry music to our Tassie ears. “Our music is impassioned and alive. Sexuality is, of course, a part of this. I feel most myself when I’m singing and I focus on giving love and gratitude to the audience for being with us. I hope the audience is inspired to celebrate life when they hear our music.” STEPHANIE ESLAKE

“I am in love with Gypsy music,” Sarah says. “It is the sound of who I am. It is in my blood.” Sarah continues a long history of performing gypsy music, with family relations to violinist Roby Lakatos, folk composer and violinist Danko Pista, and trapeze catcher father who travelled

IF IT AINT BAROQUE DON’T FIX IT FIVE TASSIE MUSOS, FIVE NIGHTS, FIVE BUCKS A POP. SOUND GOOD? THEN CHECK OUT THIS YEAR’S HOBART BAROQUE FESTIVAL AND BE PREPARED TO HEAR SOME OF THE GREATESTS WORKS IN EXISTENCE.

Hobart Baroque first graced the music scene in April last year, and is set to become a staple Tasmanian festival. Showcasing some of the finest works in history through performers from Finland, Spain, Russia, Israel, Greece, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Turkey, and a little closer to home, Hobart Baroque makes a gorgeous range of music accessible to all ears. This year’s Hobart Baroque program has scheduled a 5x5x5@5 Town Hall series, where you can rock up to the door with the $5 you didn’t spend on beer the night before so you could support our incredibly skilled young musos. Artistic Director Leo Schofield says “They were chosen because they are all outstanding musicians.”

Join Sarah in Lovo Lovina at the Homestead at 9.30pm on February 7. Tickets available at the door.

“Some have already distinguished debus or overseas experience. What they bring to the festival is youth, energy, enthusiasm and audience appeal. Audiences rejoice in seeing and hearing talented young people who’ve dedicated their lives to study and performances.” If you think the skill in Tassie will have a tough time measuring up to the foreign talent about to touch down on our shores, then you’re selling our humble state short. “Nothing could be more foolish than to deny local performers the chance to measure themselves against their international contemporaries,” Leo says. “Besides, there is – or should be – a residual effect after any proper international festival. What is left behind in terms of artists’ ambitions and audience expectations is invaluable. Any festival such as Hobart Baroque ‘raises the bar’ on many fronts.” While it’s always a challenge to accept entirely different genres of music without hesitation, Leo remarks wisely that “interest is sparked in many ways, usually by experience. There is only one way to become familiar with classical music and enjoy it and that is to listen to it live.” And besides, it costs “less than a packet of chips and may prove more enjoyable.” STEPHANIE ESLAKE

Hobart Baroque runs from 28 March to 5 April and the program is available at www. hobartbaroque.com.au.

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FRIDAY 21 FEB

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SUNDAY 23 FEB 2ND STAGE

DJDB 2.45 Gentle Hurst 2.00 2am

Joshua Hodson Smith, AKA, Nelson the Old Dog 2.00

Crab Tower DJs 12.55 Thomas Jack 12.45

1am

the Lawless Quartet 12.10 12mid

Kingswood 11.30 Benjalu 11.00 11pm

STICKY FINGERS 10.15 The Embers 10.00 10pm

The Lazys 9.05

STONEFIELD 9.00

9pm

Guthrie 8.15 KINGFISHA 8.00 8pm

Trolly dog and the dog squad 7.55 Younger dryas 7.00 7pm

The Blue Ruins 7.15 Seth henderson 6.55 The Lyrical 6.05

6pm

Lyall Maloney 6.15 The Mornings 5.15

5pm

Christopher Coleman Colective 5.15

the bone shack 5.05-5.55

Pete Cornelius and the devilles 5.00

zac SLATER trio 4.25 Big Nothing 4.15

The 88s 4.10

4pm

The Vanns 3.35 captives 3.45 3pm

jed appleton 3.25-4.15

The Beautiful Chains 3.20

Dark Matter of story telling 3.00 The Pretty Littles 2.45

Nez Pearce 2.30

Heloise 2.15 SAM SIMMONS 2.00

2pm

joseph joseph 1.45 Enola Fall 1.30 botleg rascal 1.15 sahnti dreads 1.00

1pm

tim whybrow12.45 Chase City 12.30 yan and mcdougal 12.15 12pm

Denni 12.00 Lulu and the Paige Turners 11.45

11am

adam cousens 11.35-12.20

leo creighton 11.30

7th Street Entry 11.00 sex sex sex 10.45 Ursine 10.15

10 am


Drink

SAINT JOHN CRAFT BEER IN THE ALL-TOO-QUICKLYPASSING FEW HOURS I HAD TO ENJOY AT LAUNCESTON’S NEWEST BAR, I OVERHEARD NO LESS THAN 6 CUSTOMERS THANK THE GUYS BEHIND THE BAR FOR OPENING THE PLACE LIKE THAT. LAUNCESTONIANS MUST HAVE BEEN CHAMPING AT THE BIT FOR THIS SORT OF THING, AND NOW YOU’VE FINALLY GOT IT. The design at Saint John is clean and cool, the selection is extensive and affordable, and Luke and Ryan (the guys behind the bar, and behind the endeavor) were exactly what you would hope to find in a brand new establishment of this sort. They were welcoming, super knowledgeable, and glad to see the work they had put in being warmly appreciated by the punters. It’s an exciting new addition for Launceston, with five beers and one cider on tap, a good range of wine and spirits and about a hundred different bottles of goodness available to drink in the bar, or as takeaways. But back to those taps, they’ll be getting rotated quick smart. Only ordering one keg of any particular brew (with a few exceptions) at a time means there’ll be something new every time you visit, which is a big drawcard for us craft beer nerds, we tend to get off on diversity and variety. But as with most good bars, it’s the vibe and the people that will have you coming back, the beer is just the icing… the sweet, sweet icing. The vibe at Saint John couldn’t be better, everyone is happy to be there, and excited to try new things. The bartenders were flat out, but still knew almost every customer by name, and still managed to take the time to chat. You really can‘t ask for more than that, so kudos to you Saint John, and congratulations to you, Launceston craftbeer community!

Epic Armageddon IPA 6.66% (NZ)

Ironhouse Dunkelweizen 5.8% (Tas)

Stone & Wood Pacific Ale 4.4% (NSW)

It was a beautiful day for an IPA, but every day is a beautiful day for an IPA. Armageddon is a big one, not an overpowering one, just an ace one. It comes with a round, full malt profile that lays a great foundation to showcase the hoppy flavour. Those hops are bold and lingering, and that’s exactly the kind of goodness that west coast IPA’s are all about! It’s a good take on a west coast IPA too, making use of a classic selection of US hops (Cascade, Centenniel, Columbus, and Simcoe for good measure), and then piling a farms worth of ‘em into each keg. Citrusy and hoppy, but not face-wrenchingly bitter. It’s yet another tops brew from a tops New Zealand brewery. Those crazy Kiwis really know how to make a great beer!

You don’t see many Dunkelweizen’s around these days. Well, I don’t anyway. So props to the people at Ironhouse for knocking this one out. For those that don’t know, a Dunkelweizen is essentially a darker version of a Hefeweizen (“Dunkel” being German for dark, and “Weizen” meaning wheat beer) with the darker malt bill providing a more chocolate-and-coffee kind of flavour to combine with the traditional banana and clove notes of a Weizen. This offering from Ironhouse puts a big fat tick in all of those boxes, and then adds in a bit of smooth smokeyness to boot. There’s a lot going on in the glass, but it’s not complicated or overcrowded, it’s a beer to think about while you’re drinking it.

Stone & Wood Pacific Ale is just an allaround great session ale. It’s malty but not sweet or dark. It’s resinous and hoppy but not bitter. It’s incredibly easy to drink, and it’s lucky (for me) that it’s only 4.4% abv. It’s ok to get excited about session ales. There’s nothing wrong with that at all. Not every beer needs to be a super hoppy Double IPA or a thick and gooey 10% Imperial Stout. This is light, it’s fresh and it’s palate cleansing, and if you’re new to the craft beer world, it’s a great place to start. There’s a reason why Pacific Ale is consistently sitting near the top of BestAustralian-Craft-Beer type lists. By the sound of it, Pacific Ale will be one of the few regular beers on draft at Saint John, so there’s no excuse for not getting in there and trying it! SHANE CRIXUS For all your beerly pleasures, St John Craft Beer is located at 133 St John St, Launceston. Opening hours are 2pm - 12am, Wednesday to Saturday and 12pm – 10am on Sundays.

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Arts VISUAL ART:

ACTS OF EXPOSURE THERE ARE ART CLICHÉS AND THERE ARE ART CLICHÉS. IN TASMANIA, WORK ABOUT PLACE AND SPACE IS THE OVER RIDING ONE. PEOPLE MAKE ENTIRE CAREERS OUT OF ENGAGING WITH SOME OF THE MORE INTERESTING AND EXTREME LANDSCAPES THAT ONE MAY FIND SCATTERED ALL OVER THE ISLAND. TO BE FAIR IT’S ALWAYS GOING TO BE FASCINATING, BUT WHEN A NEW EXHIBITION TACKLES IDEAS AROUND SPACE AND THE BODY IN SPACE, AND THINGS LIKE THAT, SOMETHING NEW NEEDS TO BE BROUGHT TO THE TABLE. THE CHOICE OF ARTISTS HERE, SELECTED BY CONTEMPORARY ART TASMANIA, WHO HAVE COLLABORATED WITH TMAG TO REALISE THIS SHOW, SEEMS TO BE BEEN A THOROUGH ONE.

THE HISTORY OF ARTS FUNDING I GOT HOODWINKED RECENTLY. ONE OF THOSE ANNOYING MEMES ONE SHARES ON SOCIAL MEDIA DRIFTED THROUGH MY VISION, AND I WAS TRICKED. PERHAPS YOU'VE SEEN THE CLAIM THAT WINSTON CHURCHILL, WHEN ASKED TO CUT ARTS FUNDING DURING WORLD WAR TWO, REPLIED “THEN WHAT ARE WE FIGHTING FOR?” Great sentiment but it's not quite true. Churchill rather thought the existing art was worth hanging on to. I thought it was neat, and wrongfully shared it about. When the error was pointed out to me, I began to delve into Arts Funding itself, and found that what became the British Council for The Arts was actually set up in World War Two. Art production was seen as having social and cultural worth at one of the most dramatic times in Britain's history, and when under the massive military threat, the reaction was that the Arts had great importance.

Michael Schlitz, who is best known as a print maker, is an artist known for his interaction with, and reverence for, the landscape of Tasmania, has cast his mythmaking eye into a world that smacks of mysterious legend and even magic. It’s slightly different work from this very reliable artist, and it’s good to see that he has not settled into a shtick. His images are incredibly distinctive and filled with the artist’s character and hand, and it’s something of challenge for him to subvert this, but he’s really made an effort here. Schlitz is always worth a look basically, and can surprise, so if you think you know his work and find it a bit yawnsome, perhaps go and have another glance. Mark Shorter is a performer. He has a character, a wild, feathered beast that stumps mawkish and ruinous through a familiar landscape (and a detail of a Glover work) made unfamiliar by his presence. This takes the form in the gallery of video work, partially manipulated, so it’s not quite strict performance and not quite video art. It’s very humorous work, a bit scatological, and certainly confronting – full frontal urination is a hell of an analogy, but I like the immediacy of such a move. Spraying toxic waste about like an un-gelded tomcat is a blatant metaphor, but if you’re talking

about the European settlement of Australia, it’s a fair and accurate reading. Subtly is only useful as far as it goes, and it’s artist like Shorter who are prepared to confront and use weirdness that seem really necessary when talking about massive and thorny issues. This is a polarising work but it makes the exhibition all the better for it. Leigh Hobba’s installation is an imaginative exercise in re-visiting one’s childhood. Hobba’s work is always at its best when he dares to be personal and it seems that as he has aged as an artist and a human, he cares less and reveals more. With Sailing To Samoa, Leigh exposes an awful lot – about his idyllic and possibly idealised childhood, about where he is now in life and about that moment where you confront your own fear and one’s capability of having an adventure. The work is filled with one of those emotional overloads where the past is contained by the present, made vibrant and yet inaccessible. Hobba has reached for and created something really beautiful, and it deserves your attention. It’s a hymn to the heaven of childhood, where all our emotions and experiences are vital and sharp. You may not have grown up in distant Samoa, but if you were fortunate enough to have a happy childhood, something in this work will resonate.

Acts Of Exposure is an exercise in contrast. Schlitz’s rough-hewn, hand made beauty exists in stark contrast to the video work of Hobba and Shorter, while those two demonstrated between themselves the great range video work might take – Shorter’s precise and intelligent critique sitting almost at odds with the seductive sentimentality of Hobba’s installation. It’s an excellent show, with much meat to chew on. There’s an artist’s talk at TMAG on Sunday February 16 from 1pm, it promises to be very rich indeed. Get along. ANDREW HARPER

The timing is fascinating. One can only speculate why, when so much of the UK had been devastated by bomb attacks, and so many lives lost, why the Arts were considered important. I like to think that it was recognised that celebrating and growing culture is exactly what is needed after such a trial. Whatever the reason, the fact of the timing remains. It is this I would remind our various levels of government of. No, Churchill did not give a glib one-liner that looks good made into a Facebook meme. He did, however, preside over a government that, under about the most extreme conditions a government can be under, deemed it important to oversee the creation of a body whose purpose was to encourage the Arts.

Acts of Exposure is on show at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, through to February 23.

ROUND ROOM GALLERY IS SEEKING ARTISTS TO EXHIBIT HOUSED IN THE HUMBLE SURROUNDINGS OF THE HOMESTEAD TASMANIA, LOCATED AT 304 ELIZABETH STREET, NORTH HOBART, THE ROUND ROOM GALLERY IS A NEW SPACE PROVIDING ARTISTS THE OPPORTUNITY TO EXHIBIT THEIR WORK. SOLO, GROUP AND CURATED SHOWS ARE WELCOME AND THE SPACE IS ALSO OPEN FOR THE USE OF MEETINGS, FORUMS AND WORKSHOPS.

Have a think about that: an archly Conservative government, when under air attack and nightly bombing raids, didn't just think to keep what existed already in galleries safe, but to begin a programme to make more art. That program was CEMA (Committee for Encouragement of Music and the Arts) and in 1941, the great economist John Maynard Keynes was its chair. In 1945, CEMA funded 46 organisations, becoming the Arts Council of Great Britain in 1946.

Applications for shows and expressions of interest for other uses are now open. Email roundroomgallery@gmail.com for more information and application form.

I have no doubt that times are tough, but in all my adult life I do not recall times when they were not, and Australia is not the Third World any more than it is wartime Britain. All kinds of public programs are important for Australia to be a great place to live in and something to be proud of, and what we present to the world is important – how we treat the original inhabitants of this country, how we look after the most vulnerable people in our society and how we express ourselves culturally. Arts funding is not the entire solution to these very complex issues, but it's a part of it. It's important, it is not disposal and it is not a luxury. The Arts show us who we are, and we probably need to work on that one a bit in Australia in 2014. No wonder the knife is looming. ANDREW HARPER

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Arts

IN THE STUDIO WITH

SCOT COTTERELL RAT PALACE, HOBART

Where is your studio, how long have you been there and what is it like? I’ve had one regular space, and some form of satellite space on and off for a while now. One messy space at Hopkins Hall (The Rat Palace) for many years it’s old, dusty, cold and over the last 5 years, a desk space at an architecture studio for a while, an honours/postgrad studio at UTAS after that, and recently lucky to have another small room in a friends building to have gear for sound projects and work on a show isolated from the clutter of my regular space. Now i’ve got a very small home space, and the big old dusty one. The two work in conjunction, one is where stuff happens quite uncontrolled and the other is where it is refined/considered. What is the most important thing about having a studio space for you? It’s a place to capture, sort and process. To leave and return. To re-order. I work in fairly itinerant fashion; a lot of my work only really exists when it comes together in the gallery, the rest of the time its components, stored poorly. Shifted around and added to. A lot of work happens at home out of

necessity also. Because I move around mediums, some works are made in gallery, some on stage and some in studio. What is your dream working space? Two big rectangles, like CAT [Contemporary Art Tasmania] gallery. A big working studio gallery, and a handy nearby storeroom workshop. Lots of power points. A big exterior window. Maybe a mezzanine, roller door, movable interior walls, a lighting grid. Since this is a dream we might as well attach a big minimalist rectangle of a house to the side with a dedicated audio workspace separate to the main studio. What is your working routine? Every waking minute after family and work... a bit to a lot every day. In sporadic intensity leading up to an event. Till the wee hours. During lunchbreaks. Occasionally I am lucky enough on a project or residency to spend whole chunks of time on one project but usually it’s a bit more piecemeal than that. There are usually two projects or more running concurrently.

You’ll be surprised where an arts degree can take you.

Right now I just wrapped up a solo show at Penny Contemporary, am working towards a solo in Bangkok opening in March, a performance in early Feb and putting finishing touches on a film clip for a Darwin-based producer, and doing preliminary meetings with writers and curators for my CAT solo late 2014. Do you listen to music while you work? If so, what? Really varied selection – One of the things I make as an artist are funny noises so the glitch, noise, doom, drone thing is never far away. In the studio of late, Ludovico Einaudi’s In a time-lapse. Sonny Terry and Brownie McGee, some cassettes Drunk Elk and MO1O’s latest. Downloaded recordings of shows also lately – the third sea battery point gig, and the klapperstein headphone festival gig also recently. ABC Classic FM. And quite often found sound that becomes sampled or absorbed into works – just unearthed two truly disturbing cassettes of lectures given by cosmic ascension cultleaders that are quite exciting.

The best place to start is my website – www.scotcotterell.com which has links to everywhere. soundcloud and vimeo have a lot also http://vimeo.com/scotcotterell http://soundcloud.com/scotcotterell Google will spit back a fair whack also. IRL you can see work In March in Bangkok at Speedy Grandma, in September/October a solo of new work at CAT in Hobart. My Hobart gallery Penny Contemporary always has work available also. PIP STAFFORD

Tell us a bit about your work and where we can find your stuff online.

Photographer

Journalist Web Designer

Historian

Writer

Tomorrow starts today.

utas.edu.au/arts | 13UTAS USRM11397rj CRICOS Provider Code: 00586B Academic Ranking of World Universities 2013

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Arts

Image credit: Gladdish Grace - Wattlebird

CALL FOR ENTRIES ENTRIES ARE NOW OPEN FOR THE 2014 BENDIGO BANK MATERIAL GIRL, TASMANIA’S PREMIER ART AWARD FOR WOMEN.

Photo credit: Lara Merrington

VISUAL ART:

PAINTFACE

Curated by Polly Dance, PAINTFACE aims to challenge and expand contemporary painting in Tasmania by offering artists IN JANUARY, THE USUALLY CLEAN the opportunity to present experimental WHITE WALLS OF CONSTANCE work. As Dance explains, Tasmania has ARTIST RUN INITIATIVE (ARI) BECAME a strong commercial painting scene with a well-established history, particularly A LITTLE MESSIER. PAINT WAS SPLASHED FROM CEILING TO FLOOR in the landscape genre. However gallery representation often requires artists AND THE GALLERY LITTERED WITH to produce consistent bodies of work. GUNKY BRUSHES, DISPOSABLE Consequently, commercially represented PALETTES AND OTHER DETRITUS painters often lack the opportunity and support to push the boundaries of their USUALLY FOUND IN AN ARTIST’S STUDIO. THE CAUSE OF THIS CHAOS practice. PAINTFACE supports artists from varying career stages to experiment with WAS THE LAUNCH OF PAINTFACE, unconventional sites and the materiality of A YEARLONG EXHIBITION SERIES paint.

PRESENTED BY THE GALLERY.

The project launched last month with four exhibitions: three at Constance ARI and one at the nearby Penny Contemporary Gallery. In Constance’s Main Space, Rob O’Connor’s Searched Hard For You and Your Special Ways transformed the gallery into a staged studio, complete with theatrically paintspattered clothing, paint tubes, sketches and other studio junk. This set-up seemed to reference the painter as mad-genius stereotype, made popular by artists such as Jackson Pollock. At the same time, many of these objects seemed to be O’Connor’s personal belongings, reflecting to some degree his own working methods.

responded to the idea of thresholds or inbetween spaces—a decision I’m sure Dance took into account when allocating Taylor the Foyer Space. The artist’s delicate circular watercolours were mounted on Barbie pink walls, creating an unsettling passageway between the other exhibitions. At Penny Contemporary, Melbourne artist Henry Jock Walker presented a series of live painting performances, collectively titled Painting Machines in Paradise. Established in 2012, Penny Contemporary has until now functioned as a traditional commercial gallery. While economic viability is crucial, it would be great to see more experimental work in the gallery. In addition to these exhibitions, the PAINTFACE launch also included an open studio by acclaimed artist Chen Ping. PAINTFACE runs through February and across 2014. The next instalment of this ambitious project has yet to be announced, but expect further experimental painting by artists such as Catherine Woo, Grant Nimmo, Fernando do Campo and Mae Finlayson. More information can be found at http://constanceari.org/. BRIDGET HICKEY

In the Paddy Lynn Space, Josh Foley’s exhibition Caffeine also responded to the studio space. Widely recognised in Tasmania for his brightly coloured landscapes, Foley departed from the canvas with a video piece and installation. Unlike O’Connor, Foley’s work comprised of authentic video footage and painting equipment taken in and from his studio, offering a more intimate portrait of the artist. To my mind, emerging artist Ben Taylor’s exhibition was the most intriguing. Titled Standing on the outside looking in, the work 26

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See the exhibition at Constance ARI, located on 100 Goulburn St, Hobart and Penny Contemporary is located on 187 Liverpool Street.

Tall Poppies: Late Bloomers is this year’s theme, and all media are welcome. Renowned for its quirkiness, in recent years a diverse range of mediums have been entered in the competition, including a short film, a diorama and a Facebook page. Now in its thirteenth year, Material Girl is an annual, themed, art award that began as an International Women’s Day event in 2002 and is presented by Tasmanian Regional Arts. It continues to support, celebrate and promote female creativity in Tasmania, and to encourage people to consider women’s roles in society. The catchy name was chosen to acknowledge that textiles were a traditional female art form, and originally focused heavily on textiles. Now encompassing all media, this everpopular competition ensures a dynamic exhibition for audiences. Two exhibition openings will be held, one each in the south and north-west of the state – at Moonah Arts Centre, Moonah from May 9 to May 24, and the Burnie Regional Art Gallery, Burnie from May 30 to June 29. This year’s prize money has increased from long-term sponsor Bell Bay Aluminium, and the Zonta Emerging Artist Award, offered by the Zonta clubs of Devonport, Launceston and Hobart Derwent, is now open to all ages. Entries close April 11, 2014. For the entry form and all details go to www. materialgirlartaward.com or email materialgirl@tasregionalarts.org.au


Arts

SAWTOOTH IN FEBRUARY SAWTOOTH ARTIST RUN INITIATIVE (ARI) IS ONE OF LAUNCESTON’S PREMIER GALLERY SPACES FOR EMERGING AND EXPERIMENTAL ARTISTS. ITS FEBRUARY EXHIBITION PROGRAM FEATURES FIVE SHOWS BY SIX DIVERSE ARTISTS FROM QUEENSLAND, NEWS SOUTH WALES AND VICTORIA. INCLUDED ARE PAINTING, VIDEO, SCULPTURE AND WORK BY A MULTI-AWARD WINNING PHOTOGRAPHER. In the Front Gallery, Brisbane-based painter Simon Degroot will present a series of small-scale abstract works that mimic industrial surfaces. Aptly titled Reflective Fragments, the artist was inspired by the Cubist work of Fernand Leger. With a background in commercial painting techniques, Degroot skilfully manipulates depth and texture. Expect an impressive body of work. In the New Media Gallery, Amanda Wolf will explore Unknown Pleasures. A recent graduate of the Queensland Collage of Art, Wolf makes work about the basic drivers of human nature: food and sex. Her colourful hand-sewn sculptures juxtapose appealing surfaces with crude bodily functions and feature a suggestive array of holes, lumps and leaks. For the Sawtooth show, these grotesque objects will be displayed in conjunction with a video projection.

Image credit: ‘Cement Mixer’ (2013) Deb Mansfield. Photo-tapestry, 66cm x 80cm

The curiously named Softening (or break the legs of what I want to happen) is a series of works by photomedia artist Deb Mansfield to be displayed in the Middle Gallery. Based in Sydney, Mansfield’s practice explores littoral zones, a term that refers to the area of ground in which a body of water meets land. The artist has travelled around the globe researching littoral spaces, including visits to Louisiana, Newfoundland, South Africa and Tasmania.

Finally, in the Project Gallery will be Waiver, a work exploring the dynamics of personal relationships by Melbourne-based artists Marian Patterson and Ross Vaughan. This will be presented as a two-channel video and sound installation. The @Sawtooth program is a new initiative by the gallery aimed at establishing a stronger platform for critical engagement and writing in Tasmania. This February, they’ll be holding a pop-up exhibition titled Screen Culture by Victorian artist Delly Carr. Internationally renown for his sports photography (Carr has been Photography Ambassador for Nikon, Creative Ambassador for Subaru and photographed six Olympic Games), this should be interesting and rare opportunity to see his screen and film work. BRIDGET HICKEY

Sawtooth ARI is located on Level 2, 160 Cimitiere Street Launceston. The artspace is open midday to 5pm Wednesday to Friday, and 10am to 2pm Saturday.

THE COMEDY ROUNDUP:

THE TAPESTRY OF THE LAUGH RIGHT! THERE’S ALMOST TOO MUCH ON AROUND THE FAIR STATE OF TASMANIA TO DO ANY ONE THING JUSTICE, SO HERE IS YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THE FUNNY THAT’S ON OFFER AND WHERE TO HUNT IT DOWN OVER THE NEXT MONTH. DON’T SAY WE DON’T WANT YOU TO CHEER UP AND LAUGH YOUR GUTS OUT.

Raw Comedy 2014. Here it is folks – the annual event that presents the Shock Of The New. RAW Comedy is an Australian institution, building careers and filling wet, tender eyes with hopes and dreams. If there’s anything that reflects how we have grown here in Tasmania, it’s the growth of RAW itself down here. RAW is about giving new comics a break so when you get along – and get along you really need to – you see fresh young minds desperate to impress and eager to win that coveted spot in the RAW national final! RAW is now so big that there will be three heats; Hobart on Thursday 6 February, Kingston on Friday 7 February, and Launceston on Thursday 13 February. Topranked performers from all heats will then compete in the Tasmanian state final at the Mt Nelson Theatre (Hobart College) on Saturday 8 March, where the state winner will be selected. Anyone wanting to come along as an audience member to the Tasmanian heats or final can find out more and purchase tickets online via www.tadaa.com.au/ bookings.html. Tickets are $12 for the heats and $15 for the final (plus 30c booking fee per ticket. Door sales will be available if not sold out beforehand. The Barn Comedy Festival Over February 7th and 8th the first Barn Comedy Festival will be held at Rosny’s historic venue as part of the Clarence City Council’s Summer Concert Series. Tim Logan, Hobart comedian and writer of online digital series Noirhouse, spent most of 2013 in the U.S, and is now back in town and looking forward to taking these shows to this remarkable venue on the Eastern Shore. ‘I’m really excited about the Friday night

show, Summer Stories. It’s something we haven’t done before, a live storytelling show featuring comics and locals telling true tales from their own lives, I can’t wait to see and hear what people want to share.’ Summer Stories - Live Storytelling Show - 7:30pm Friday, February 7 Join a line-up of locals, comedians and personalities as they share true life stories ranging from the hilarious and embarrassing to the uplifting and affecting, all told live, within the beautiful sandstone of the Rosny Barn. Everyone has a story from their past that is worth sharing. Want to tell yours? Email artsandevents@ ccc.tas.gov.au Tickets: $10 Risqué Matinee - 1pm Saturday, February 8 A best of collection of local comedy and variety acts including Danger Academy, Hobart’s improvised comedy troupe, expect an afternoon of madcap absurdity! Tickets: $7 Saturday Night Gala with Dave Thornton - 7:30pm Saturday, February 8 The Saturday Night Gala will be filled to the brim with the best Tasmanian Performers and headlined by special guest Dave Thornton (The 7pm Project, Talkin’ bout Your Generation). Our mini festival’s main event, get your tickets now as we expect this night to sell out! Tickets: $15 Bookings: www.trybooking.com/EAIV Late Show Go! Why watch Hobart’s very own Late Night talk show at home on the WIN network, when you can come along to Night Owl Studios and see it LIVE!

Late Show Go! is Hobart’s very own live late night talk show. Premieres Wednesday 12th February at The Night Owl in Hobart’s laughingly described CBD. $5 at the door to see Celebrity interviews, Hilarious Guests Stand Up Comedians and One Man Band, Mick Lowenstein, ALL LIVE and hosted by Tim Logan. Late Show GO! The Do Not Miss Awesome Regular Gigs Apart from the above special events, there’s all the regular stuff that goes down to make sure there’s all you eager punters keep on chuckling. In February You can check out: CLOUD COMEDY up at Soho on February 5 from 8pm for just $5 and see the local comics get their polished material out, you can run to THE COMEDY FORGE for all-new material by decree of law at The Brisbane Hotel on Thursday February 27(The Forge is the last Thursday of every month) also for the bargain rate of $5, you should also totally not miss THE CLUBHOUSE PRESENTS SAM SIMMONS supported by Mick Lowenstein, Tim Logan and Stewart Bell. Hosted by Tracey Cosgrove at The Waratah Hotel, 272 Murray St, Hobart, the Clubhouse runs from 8:00pm on Thursday February 20, $15 on the door, or pre sales available from the venue. You can also catch Sam Simmons in Launceston at FRESH COMEDY on Friday February 21 at Fresh on Charles, $15 for General Admission or $20 for Reserved Seating. Door entry on the night. So that’s ELEVEN fabulous opportunities to get a laugh in Tassie this February and I just bet there’s something I’ve missed. Sorry. The baby is just about to eat the cat’s tail. Doesn’t end well. ANDREW HARPER

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Arts

ART SOUTH OF HOBART:

BALFOUR HOUSE, CYGNET LOCATED IN THE CENTRE OF CYGNET, BALFOUR HOUSE WAS ORIGINALLY BUILT BY THE HARVEY FAMILY. MR HARVEY BUILT IT AS A WEDDING GIFT FOR HIS BELOVED DAUGHTER, MELISSA AND IT WAS INTENDED AS A STATEMENT OF LOVE AND WEALTH. NAMED FOR HARVEY’S MOTHER, BALFOUR HOUSE IS NOW OWNED BY MANAGER, CLAIRE BYERS’ FAMILY.

“My late father, Peter Byers, was a firm believer in arts infrastructure and the role that it can play for artists and greater community benefit.” Claire says. An artist in her own right, Claire Byers has had a practice in merino scarves, but has now put that to the side to concentrate on an industrial textile design career and managing Balfour House. Now a grand old cottage, Balfour House is home to an artist run initiative and community arts hub that boasts a program of events and workshops throughout the year, with high quality learning experiences with professional artists and passionate teachers. Some of the highlights of this year’s program include Till Julien’s screen-printing workshop, Vicki Taiwo taking Shibori and Leonie Oakes teaching bookbinding. “Techniques are taught that are transferrable to a home practice or kitchen table”. If you are in Hobart or elsewhere, classes start at 11am to allow for travel, Claire states that past programs have been enjoyed particularly by Hobartians who love the excuse to take a trip to the scenic country, learn something wonderful and enjoy the food and pace of Cygnet. The house is open on market days and visitors are welcome to knock on the door, wander through the former-residence and take a peek at what the resident artists are up to. In it’s 10 year history as an art space Balfour House has been a low cost studio to over 25 artists, is the home of both adult’s and children’s workshops (including after school art classes) and in the future may 28

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develop an artist in residence program. More information about the 2014 program, special events and workshops can be found at: www.balfourhouseartscentre. wordpress.com. PIP STAFFORD

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Arts

Gallery

performing arts

Guide

Guide

South 146 ARTSPACE 6 Feb – 6 March Design Tasmania ART MOB 7 Feb – 23 Feb Taking Flight: Birds in Australian Indigenous Art BETT GALLERY Feb ProppaNOW CONTEMPORARY ART TASMANIA Until 16 Feb Melanie Herbert – it called out… COLVILLE GALLERY Until 19 Feb Ian Parry 21 Feb – 12 Mar Young Moderns: Julia Castiglioni-Bradshaw, Joshua Simpson, Tim Price CONSTANCE On-going PAINTFACE DESPARD 12 Feb – 3 Mar Lucia Usmiani HANDMARK On-Going Summer Exhibition INKA Feb 6- 26 Stephanie Parkyn- City Light Feb 27- 19 Mar Margaret McAteer – screenplay ONEWALL Feb Di Scarlett PENNY CONTEMPORARY From 23 Jan Henry Jock Walker – Painting Machines Made in Paradise ROSNY BARN - SCHOOLHOUSE GALLERY 9 Feb – 2 Mar Art Deco and the Jazz Age - Items from the Sound Preservation Association of Tasmania collection SALAMANCA ARTS CENTRE LIGHTBOX 1 Feb – 28 Feb reFraming the Light SIDESPACE: 18 Feb – 27 Feb Rebecca Brogan – Signs of the Times

TOP GALLERY: 7 Feb – 27 Feb Kasia Rose Tons - Poubelle Baba-two Michal Mitro - I Consume Therefore I Am TMAG Until Feb 23 Acts of Exposure: Leigh Hobba, Michael Schlitz and Mark Shorter

NORTH BRAVE ART GALLERY (Longford) 1 Feb - 23 Feb Robert Habel Cate Blackmore BURNIE From 8 Feb DaVinci Machines DEVONPORT REGIONAL GALLERY 15 feb – 23 march Bea Maddock – Leaving a Mountain GALLERY PEJEAN 12 Feb – 8 Mar Kath Sinkora – Far Away QVMAG Until Feb 16 Into the Wild: Wilderness Photography in Tasmania Nov 2 – May David Keeling - A Dreamer’s Keepsake SAWTOOTH 7 Feb – 1 Mar FRONT GALLERY Reflective Fragments Simon Degroot (QLD) MIDDLE GALLERY Softening (or break the legs of what I want to happen) Deb Mansfield (NSW)

SOUTH

NORTH

COMEDY

COMEDY

BRISBANE HOTEL 27 Feb The Forge

COUNTRY CLUB 6 Feb Comedy Central - Dave Eastgate

THE BARN COMEDY FESTIVAL ROSNY BARN 7 Feb 7.30PM Summer Stories 8 Feb 1PM Risque Matinee 8 Feb 7.30PM Saturday Night Gala with Dave Thornton

DICKENS CIDERHOUSE Feb 12 Uber Comedy

THE WARATAH Feb 20 The Clubhouse: Sam Simmons supported by Mick Lowenstein, Tim Logan and Stewart Bell. Hosted by Tracey Cosgrove.

FRESH ON CHARLES 21 Feb Fresh Comedy presents Sam Simmons supported by Dylan Hesp plus others. Hosted by Stewart Bell.

SOHO Feb 5 Cloud Comedy

FILM RAW NERVE – SALAMANCA ARTS CENTRE, FOUNDERS ROOM 5 Feb 7PM Screening and Launch CINEMONA Starts Feb 16 Jewels: Music by Faure, Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky Starts Feb 22 William Shakespeare’s Coriolanus (NT Live)

THEATRE PLAYHOUSE 14 Feb – 22 Feb Blitz! A Sentimental Journey THEATRE ROYAL 16 Feb – 20 Feb An Evening with John Cleese

PROJECT GALLERY Waiver Marian Patterson and Ross Vaughan (VIC) NEW MEDIA GALLERY Amanda Wolf (QLD) @Sawtooth Pop-up #Exhibition Screen Culture Delly Carr (VIC)

WARP RECOMMENDS… The Clubhouse and Fresh Comedy present

SAM SIMMONS Sam Simmons is one of the most daring and unconventional comics in Australia, completely original and vastly absurd, he has one foot firmly planted into the soils of reality, and the other rooted deep into the psyche of being silly. Sam is a multi-award winning cult figure within the Australian comedy scene. He has collected awards, glowing reviews, and played to sell out houses around the world. Sam take home the award for Best Comedy Show at the Adelaide Fringe Festival, not to mention scoring a nomination for a Barry Award for his solo show, “The Precise History of Things” and a nomination for Edinburgh’s top Fosters Comedy Award (the comedy equivalent of an Oscar) for “Meanwhile.” Joyous on the radio waves, Sam has made Australian youth radio network “Triple J” his own. He was at the helm of the “Weekend Breakfast Show” as well as weekday “Breakfast and Drive” Shows and he is still now a regular contributor across the station. Thursday February 20 at The Waratah Hotel and Friday Febuary 21 at Fresh On Charles.

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CD Reviews

Best enjoyed with a Savoy Corpse Reviver, crushed ice and a bear hug, all whilst contemplating the existence of your feelings and how you can be so easily transformed into a blubbering mess. From the very first few moments where we’re introduced to The Things We Think We’re Missing we’re treated instantaneously and almost unflinchingly to such a rich, spacious sound that just deserves your attention, as it literally feels like being sucked into their emotive space they had created sonically, playing around with jagged harsh distortion tones and smooth reverbs like it’s child’s play, within a depth that doesn’t withdraw throughout the whole album. Yet the track “Parachutes” is a perfect starter to the whole album,

Balance and Composure The Things We Think We’re Missing

Frankie Rose

as it submerges you slowly into the rich, emotive thickness that is easily manoeuvred by Jon Simmons’ powerful vocals and dreamy subject matter that explores the complexities of loss and the temperatures of lost love. This album is beautifully sculptured through the production guide of Will Yip, who lent his flawless studio style to several indie/ post-hardcore acts such as Title Fight, Circa Survive and Koji; yet it feels like this album is the best example of the newer directions that post-hardcore music is taking, which is more of an experimental wing of the regular old post-hardcore guideline. That direction can be witnessed within the balance of guitar layers in “When I Come Undone” and “Notice Me” that Erik Petersen, Jon

Bedouin Sea

Herein Wild

Bedouin Sea

Simmons and Andy Slaymaker seem to sync harmoniously with the control of heavy distortions and wet-reverb/delay effects, which equates to something similar to an psychological rollercoaster through brilliant production quality. That is where the beauty of this album lies: it doesn’t feel overproduced and fake, but more so like a live session of a band that is a wellfunctioning unit that has mastered all of their instruments. This is at its height during the transcendent track “Keepsake”, where we have a prominent juggle of speed and depth with strong screaming backup vocals and incredible mid-tempo grooves that bend through several genres. Damn. So good, so very good. Double good plus brilliant.

Crooked Fiddle Band Moving Pieces of the Sea

Frankie Rose’s last album Interstellar won a swag of awards and was generally regarded as pretty damn amazing. No prizes for guessing what this means for reviews of the follow-up Herein Wild In short, Herein Wild sounds in many ways as if Rose has attempted to make an Interstellar II. Having said that, it’s a long way to fall from Interstellar and Rose has not really descended all that far.Whereas the predecessor was lyrically airy, watery and intentionally vague, Herein Wild sees Rose more present and purposeful, creating a more intimate listening experience. Rose sure knows how to write a pop song; “Heaven” is a catchy singalong with a cracked and edgy rhythm section, and first single Sorrow is – in the best possible way – the best of The Cure meets Neverending Story. Perhaps the most exciting song is the garage rock departure, “Cliffs As High”. With its carefully selected naughty notes, high altitude dizziness, and a lyrical and musical sense of slow motion falling, this is subtle, surprising and ruminative. “Cliffs As High” is halfway through the record and it is worth waiting for. Give it a few listens and see what it does to the rest of the songs. You might be surprised.

This is the sound of youth enjoying their time in the sun, enduring their first winters. It’s joyous and wounded, openhearted and vulnerable. Opening track “Drunken Kings and Shiny Things” is a summer outdoor singalong waiting to happen. It smells like sunscreen and beer. Crisp electric guitar, driving drums, a dancing bass line and the flicker of a strummed acoustic. “Dancing In The Dust” rollicks with an easy country twostep and a fantastic chorus, but we’re still ruminating. It’s an attempt at redemption, but references to monsters under beds, darkness and “hanging from the ceiling” keep us tied to the record’s moodier moments. Perhaps the live acoustic closer “Simple Men” is the promised land for which we have been wandering through the desert – the shore for which we have been sailing the seas: “We will carry on / With or eyes to the sea and our backs to the sun / Oh, stand strong / This battle is won through courage and strength and our hearts and our songs / A new song to sing from the god who can hear.” Bedouin Sea. Go wandering – or sailing – and find them. Daniel Townsend

Daniel Townsend

Musically, there is a lot going on here; endangered time signatures and cosmopolitan sound blends, schizophonic genre shifts and dark, driving rhythm sections beneath the deflowering of virgin violins. It’s live music for dreadlocked festival goers, warehousing party kids and anyone with honours in Contemporary Music Performance. The record is held together thematically with an oceanic concern, with the titles of the album and one of the songs being drawn from a Jacques Cousteau quote: “Twilight was turning to sheer darkness, and our structures became eerie shadows. The fish were just moving pieces of the sea. I smiled because I knew you would always seek after the vanishing shapes of a better world.” After opening with a seven-minute minor key odyssey, it will take a committed listener to stick with it to the fourteenminute album closer, “The Deepwater Drownings - Part II – Moving Pieces of the Sea”. The musicianship is flawless, but what of the humanity? Crooked Fiddle Band makes brilliant music for memorable live shows. It’s music for whirling and spasming to, it’s music for watching and for experiencing. But in your headphones or in your lounge room, it’s intensely difficult listening: “Twilight turning to sheer darkness” without hope for the dawn.

Seb Alvarez

The Naked and the Famous In Rolling Waves

There is always a hard pressure to circumnavigate when it comes to follow up albums; this varies due to popularity and acclaim, where expectations are either met within listeners or completely severed disappointingly. In Rolling Waves would certainly fall into this trap, as it doesn’t have the same vibrant intensity as Passive Me, Aggressive You, which might not satisfy a few listeners. But this in no way is a standpoint in claiming that this album isn’t any good, no, quite the opposite really. In Rolling Waves is accomplished, and beyond its age, as it carries you along spacious soundscapes and sensual vocal melodies provided by Alisa Xayalith’s fragile voice and Thom Power’s deep emotive responses, that it unnervingly manages to rattle the cages of your heart-shaped box. It may divide the devout fans, yet overall with those who remain will enjoy the more interesting path the group has chosen, one that is slightly darker and emotionally engaging. And after several listens it’s easier to see the bridges connecting both albums, but their new sound is more enrapturing and hypnotic and provides more space for an emotional attachment. Either way, it’s an amazing album and definitely worth letting it’s waves envelope you. Seb Alvarez

Daniel Townsend

Unknown Mortal Orchestra Wednesday, February 5 Republic Bar Support: Venus Light Overdrive Presales: $30 plus b/f available from www.moshtix.com.au / Ruffcut & the venue. 30

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CD Reviews

Be Kind, Unwind features 11 songs that clock in at just 27 minutes. At times it is like listening to an old jukebox or radio. It may also leave you scratching your head and wondering how this guy has managed to fit more hooks into it than a storeroom. Feelings has risen up like a phoenix out of the ashes of Philadelphia Grand Jury; the fans looking for a complete sequel to Hope Is For The Hopeless will inevitably be disappointed. Because, while this album uses rock ‘n’ roll, punk, garage rock and eighties pop as touch points, it is also a different beast. It is one that is more focused on maintaining a pretty pop sensibility than the snarling angst and attitude that typified the trio’s debut. But that said, this record

Feelings Be Kind, Unwind

Major Tom & The Atoms

Heroes, Villains, Boom Boom Boom!

Ground control to Major Tom, what happened here? Former Little Red member ‘Major’ Tom Hartney has released his debut album with The Atoms, Heroes, Villains, Boom Boom Boom! and it’s an atomic, blues-rock explosion. Hartney stammers and shakes like Nick Cave throughout an album of songs that sound like they were written for the Sweeney Todd or Sherlock Holmes soundtracks. Bloodhounds, dragons, and alligators roam through these fantasy tracks like lost pets. While lyrically Hartney may be on a different planet, the songs on the album are often well grounded. “Wishing Well” is a highlight, and “Confusion” has a jaunty, danceable beat--although can we please ban the rhyming of ‘down’ and ‘Chinatown’? Essentially, Heroes, Villains, Boom Boom Boom! sounds like the Little Red songs that never fit in. Strip away the doo-wop harmonies, surf guitars, and former frontman Dominic Bryne’s falsetto, and you’re left with a collection of songs that sound like “Witch Doctor” or “Coca Cola” if they were sung with the theatrics of Tim Curry. Take your protein pills and put your helmet on, Heroes, Villains, Boom Boom Boom! is a bumpy ride. Roshan Clerke

is still energetic and light-hearted fun that would make you want to party, party. Berkfinger’s vocal delivery works best in “Intercourse” where he is also found doing his best Prince impersonation. The tune features its fair share of dance-pop moments loaded with sex, passion and lust and the high-pitched singing sounds an awful lot like the purple king. You probably could substitute this song for “Kiss” in the film Pretty Woman when Julia Roberts sings in the bathtub- it would work! There is also the slacker ballad filled with jangle, “Bring On The Night”. One thing is for certain, this album does take in a few different genres but it is linked by the fact

Public Service Broadcasting Inform Educate Entertain

that it seeks to provide a rollicking, good time by its end. It is overall, one fun and expansive adventure through time and sound. In writing Be Kind, Unwind, Berkfinger said he wanted to step out of his comfort zone and retain more freedom. He has certainly achieved this by mining his record collection to create one extensive sound. But what does let him down is the lack of standout tracks that made Hope Is For The Hopeless so popular. In short, this one is cleaner and more polished but there will be many fans who will prefer to party on and get dirty with The Philly Jays’ first.

Kronos Quartet

Aheym: Kronos Quartet Plays Music by Bryce Dessner

Natalie Salvo

Astrid and the Asteroids Astrid and the Asteroids

Public Service Broadcasting is the pseudonym for musicians J.Willgoose ESQ and Wrigglesworth. According to the internet, their purpose is “To teach lessons from the past with the music of the future”. Each one of their songs samples news clips and propaganda messages around snippets from public information films.

Bryce Dessner is mostly known for his guitar playing in melancholy Americana merchants The National, but, since his days studying music at Yale, he has always alternated between musical worlds. This album presents his collaborations with Kronos Quartet, with whom he has been working since 2009.

Hailing from the expeditiously growing music scene of Brisbane, Astrid and the Asteroids have released a new selftitled EP on the back of their previous Horoscopes. Combining 90’s pop finesse with wafting moments of melody, this five-track mini-album will leave you either dancing or sitting down in awe.

This concept for the album isn’t exactly new. The Books have been doing it for years, the difference being is The Books were more of a chilled-out, laid back group as the Public Service Broadcasting make you want to jump onto the dance floor. The album manages to successfully amalgamate different styles without sounding overly ambitious. The song “Spitfire” has a ‘90’s Britpop sound to it mixed up with a ‘60’s spy movie rock beat.

The title track is a spirited celebration of Dessner’s Jewish ancestry (the word ‘Aheym’ means ‘homeward’ in Yiddish). It begins with a blood-surging rhythm that gradually breaks up and complicates before more delicate tones emerge. The strings then duck and weave around each other, gradually building in urgency, although never achieving the breathlessness of the opening bars.

The first single and opening track “West End” explores the indie scene of the Brisbane suburb of the same name. With Super Mario-esque keyboards and prominent bass this song is a pool of upbeat instrumental layers and sharp spoken vocals that make the song just so darn catchy.

The rest of the album squiggles and squirms through various genres and manages to keep the listener enticed and coming back for more, The theme from Public Service Broadcasting is slight afrobeat with a electro beat to it. For a first album these guys have managed to pull off a great summer party album, all we need now is to see these guys in the live setting, which I think they will really shine. Mark Ireland

‘Tenebre’ is a tender subversion of a traditional Easter service in which gathering darkness evokes the death of Christ. Dessner reverses this progress, moving from dark to light. This long, complex work begins moodily, the sorrowful strings swelling into staccato rhythm. The interweaving of the players becomes playful and then a touch psychotic, before the multilayered vocals of Sufjan Stevens infiltrate and urge the music to its invigorating conclusion. As a celebration of multicultural America, it continues their commitment to producing music that blends the emotional with the political.

“Autopsy” has understandably stolen the spot of second single; beginning with a breezy planetary flow the drum kit is slowly introduced and the chorus is a blast of electric guitar, piano and jumping vocals. This increasing inclusion of instruments and contrast between sections means once you get to the chorus, you have started jiggling in your place without realising. Through the superb songwriting of leading lady Astrid Jorgensen, Astrid and the Asteroids have produced a fantastic, versatile album that will certainly give them the credit to create a astronomical LP soon. Maddison McHugh

Colin Varney

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Event Guide

Hobart Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Date

February Saturday

Sunday

1

2

Brisbane Hotel Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Front Bar - Unfolding Vostoks + The Infants (vic) + Heart Beach + The Exo Skeletal Crack Show + B-Film & The Cannibalistic Po Howard Band + Kitchen Witches + DJ Lovely Clear Water

Grand Poobah

Electronic / Techno

Observatory Main Room

DJ B-Rex

Republic Bar & Café

The Embers + La Zingara 10pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Sweet Potato Trio & Guests

The Coterie

The Suffrajettes 2:30pm

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

3 4

5

6

Saturday

7

8

PlanB

A Sides, Presented by PlanB and Broken Panda

Republic Bar & Café

Kim Churchill + Adam Cousens + Laura Hill 10pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Cool Change

The Homestead

Zen Mechanics (Netherlands) + Local Support

The Winston

Tim & Scott 10pm

Waterfront Hotel

Jerome Hillier 8pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

The Gin Club + The Lawless Quartet + James Parry

Brisbane Hotel

Bingo w/ Rambling Ryan

Republic Bar & Café

Laura Hill 8:30pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Endless Summer - Rooftop Cinema Series 8pm

The Winston

The Darktown Strutters 10pm

The Coterie

Amy & Joe 2pm

Waratah Hotel

The New Saxons + Oh Pep! (vic) + Seth Henderson 9pm

The Homestead

Priscilla + Billy

Waterfront Hotel

Motor Road 8pm

The Winston

Stolen Moments 5:30pm

Waratah Hotel

Reggae Sundays feat. Reggaeink + Oh Pep! (vic) 12pm

Waratah Hotel

Reggae Sundays feat. Reggaeink 12pm

Waterfront Hotel

Double Down + Tony Voglino 12:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Joe Pirere 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Quiz Night 6:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Billy Whitton 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Pete Thomas 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Opposer + Interview With an Escape Artist + Dawn of Your Disco Tent + Uncle Geezer

Jason Patmore 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Bingo w/ Rambling Ryan

Republic Bar & Café

Corona Summer Party with Freq Nasty + B Side + Max Power Vs DJ Secrets + Rola + Kireesh 2pm

Monday Tuesday

10 11

Republic Bar & Café

Rod Fritz + Zach Spinks 8:30pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Endless Summer - Rooftop Cinema Series 8pm

The Winston

Old Time Jazz 5:30pm

Waterfront Hotel

Pete Thomas + Manhattan 12:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Jaja 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Tattersalls Upstairs

DJ Shadow After Party

Republic Bar & Café

Helen Crowther 8:30pm

The Homestead

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8pm

Transvaal Diamond Syndicate (QLD - Stomp Rockin’ Blues)

Republic Bar & Café

Ross Sermons 8:30pm

The Void (MONA)

DJ Shadow + Dameza + Paulie 2X

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Grand Poobah

Velvet & Valentinos Variety Night

Republic Bar & Café

Transvaal Diamond Syndicate 9pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Tattersalls Folk Club 8pm

The Homestead

James Robert Leon Basser

Wrest Point Show Room

Charmaine Wilson

Art Hotel

Tom Vincent Pop-Up Bebop Jazz Club 8pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Grand Poobah

The Birdman & The Flying V Formation

Mickeys Bay (Bruny Island)

Andrew Byrne 6:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Chase City + Dark Matter of Story Telling + Pro Vita 10pm

The Homestead

Anne Vriend (Canada)

The Winston

The Breed 10pm

Waratah Hotel

Josh Pyke (Lone Wolf Tour) + Jackson McLaren + More

Waterfront Hotel

Tony Mak 8:30pm

Wunderland

The Gentlemans Valentines Day Annual feat. Hayden Calin

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Wicked City (vic) + Mess O Reds + Shark Puncher + Speakeasies

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Quiz Night 6:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Pete Thomas 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Unknown Mortal Orchestra 9pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

The Soul Sessions DJs 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Caravana Sun + Younger Dryas 9pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Tattersalls Folk Club 8pm

Thursday

12

13

Friday

14

Finn Seccombe + Simon Reid

Art Hotel

Tom Vincent Pop-Up Bebop Jazz Club 8pm

Birdcage Bar

Jerome Hillier 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Damage! w/ Speech Patterns + The Collapse (Vic) + Uncle Geezer + Adventurers + DJs

Republic Bar & Café

The Woohoo Review + Guerilla Zingari 10pm

The Homestead

Lolo Lovina’s Serbian Gypsy Quartet + Local Support

The Winston

The Racoons 10pm

Waratah Hotel

The Phosphenes + The Truth About You + The Pearly Whites

Waterfront Hotel

Cam Stuart 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

warpmagazine.com.au

Wednesday

Glen Challice 9pm

Republic Bar & Café

Brisbane Hotel

32

9

Amanda’s 80’s Dirty Disco Party

Rebel Music, Roots, Reggae + Dub. Feat. Ham, Dom, Sista Nell + Max Power

The Homestead Friday

Sunday

Acts / Start Time

Grand Poobah

The Homestead

Birdcage Bar

Monday

Back Bar - Primitive Calculators (Vic) + The Native Cats + Evil Goat

Venue

Thrall + Black Jesus (vic) + Ironhawk + Ruiner & The Threshold Forms

Saturday

15


Event Guide

Date

Sunday

16

Monday

17

Tuesday

18

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

19

20

21

Saturday

22

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Republic Bar & Café

Dave Graney + Starling 10pm

The Homestead

Dysphemic + Miss Eliza (Vic) + Local Support

St Johns Church

Hopkinson Smith 8pm

The Winston

Tamba 10pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Paddy Curley

Waratah Hotel

Aleksander Nettelbeck + Ben Langdon 7:30pm

The Homestead

We Love Bass - Audio/Visual Spectacular

Waterfront Hotel

Tony Voglino 8pm

The Winston

The Bobcats 10pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 8pm

Tolosa Park Glenorchy

RACT Symphony Under the Stars 7pm

Brisbane Hotel

Bingo w/ Rambling Ryan

Waterfront Hotel

Shaun & Joel 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Tassie Cider Fest + Joe Pirere 12pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 8pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Endless Summer - Rooftop Cinema Series 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Bingo w/ Rambling Ryan

The Coterie

Billy Whitton 2pm

Republic Bar & Café

Peter Hicks and the Blue Licks 9pm

The Homestead

Cleveland Blues (QLD) + The Blue Ruins

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Endless Summer - Rooftop Cinema Series 8pm

The Winston

Stolen Moments 5:30pm

The Coterie

Laura Hill Blue Skies 365 Tour 12:30pm

Waratah Hotel

The Homestead

Ben Kelly Solo

Reggae Sundays feat. Reggaeink + Aleksander Nettelbeck + Ben Langdon Duo 12pm

The Winston

The Mangus Trio 5:30pm

Waterfront Hotel

Mojo + Tony Voglino 12:30pm

Waratah Hotel

Reggae Sundays feat. Dub Bredda + Reggaeink 12pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Quiz night (returns) newcomers welcome!

Waterfront Hotel

Sambo + Goodfellas 12:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Game On

Republic Bar & Café

G.B. Balding (Finger Picking Blues) 8:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Pat Bereche 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Quiz Night 6:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

Quiz A Saurus

Birdcage Bar

Pete Thomas 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Baker Boys Band 8:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

Drayfus’ Epiphany + Verticoli

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Quiz Night 6:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Edge Radio Social Night 9pm

Birdcage Bar

Pete Thomas 8pm

The Homestead

Brad Gillies

Brisbane Hotel

Side Show Cabaret (New Monthly Cabaret)

Wrest Point Show Room

Dead Daisies

Republic Bar & Café

Cleveland Blues Music 9pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 8pm

The Homestead

Jazz Hop with Squish and Friends

Brisbane Hotel

The Comedy Forge

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Republic Bar & Café

Dave Wilson Band 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

4 String Phil + The Briefcase + Matt Bayes

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Tattersalls Folk Club 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Son Del Sur (Cuban Salsa) 9pm

The Playhouse Theatre

Lior Solo 8:30pm

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Tattersalls Folk Club 8pm

Art Hotel

Tom Vincent Pop-Up Bebop Jazz Club 8pm

The Homestead

Helen Crowther (Solo - Jazz/Motown)

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Art Hotel

Tom Vincent Pop-Up Bebop Jazz Club 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

myblackson + Sue O Nine + Lil Robbie + DJ BTC + DJ JSB

Brisbane Hotel

BAD VIBRATIONS!

Grand Poobah

Omahara & Friends

Republic Bar & Café

Sugartrain 10pm

Republic Bar & Café

Australia Made 10pm

The Homestead

Kraken Pirate Party feat. Ungus Ungus Ungus (syd) + Dead Maggies

The Homestead

Dublo + DJ’s

The Winston

Billy Whitton & The Hepcats 10pm

The Winston

The Roobs & The Phosphenes 10pm

Waratah Hotel

Waterfront Hotel

Jerome Hillier 8:30pm

Dan Sultan Under Your Skin Tour w/ The Medics & More

Wunderland

We Love Funk: Max Power + Secrets + Wax Dr West 11pm

Waterfront Hotel

DJ Gezza 8:30pm

MARCH

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Saturday

Brisbane Hotel

Brisbane Hotel

Ampocalypse VII - ALL AGES - King Parrot + Hammerhead + Evil Intent + The Arbiter + Encounter + The Absolution Sequence 3pm

We Love Bass - 1st Birthday Takeover feat. Killafoe, J. Nitrous & VLTRN

Republic Bar & Café

Nina Las Vegas + Motez 10pm

The Coterie

The Suffrajettes 2:30pm

The Homestead

The Sketches + Concrete Lines + Wham Bam Superman + Matty Bailey

The Void (MONA)

Flying Lotus + Om Unit + Silent Jay + Akouo

Waratah Hotel

Cookie Baker Band 7:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

Bingo w/ Rambling Ryan

Tattersalls Beer and Food Hall

Endless Summer - Rooftop Cinema Series 8pm

Waratah Hotel

Reggae Sundays feat. Reggaeink + Cookie Baker Band 12pm

Brisbane Hotel

Date

Sunday

23

Monday

24

Tuesday

25

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

26

27

28

1

Ampocalypse VII - 18+ - TMS Stage - King Parrot (vic) + Maniaxe (vic) + The Arbiter (vic) + Dropforge - TRASH STAGE - Evil Intent (vic) + Hammerhead + Dracula + Bats of a Feather + DJs

Grand Poobah

Stu Larsen & Jack Carty

PlanB

PlanB Presents DJ Yoda

Republic Bar & Café

Boil Up 10pm

Sunday

2

www.facebook.com/warp.mag www.facebook.com/warp.mag 33


Event Guide

Launceston Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

FEBRUARY Saturday

Sunday

NORTHWEST Date

CITY

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Unbalance 9pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

No Soda For Yoda 9:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

The Ringmasters

FEBRUARY 1

2

Fresh on Charles

Hugo Race LIVE w. support Sam Cole (The Mornings)

The Royal Oak

Live Music

Tonic Bar

Matthew Merry Garwood 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Andy & The Woodman 7pm

Show Room (Lawns)

Red Hot Summer

The Royal Oak

Open Folk Session

Tonic Bar

Ball & Chain 7pm

Watergarden Bar

Tony Voglino 7pm

Saturday

1

Thursday

6

Devonport

Molly Malones

Jerome Hillier 8:30pm

Friday

7

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Poppet the Clown

Saturday

8

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Nic & Carmel 9pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

Slats & Big Natural 9:30pm

Tuesday

4

Lloyds Hotel

Classic covers/Originals

Wednesday

5

The Royal Oak

Mr Black & Blues

Watergarden Bar

Trevor Weaver 6:30pm

Thursday

13

Devonport

Molly Malones

Slats’ S.O.U.L. 8:30pm

The Royal Oak

Kim Churchill

Friday

14

Latrobe

The Consultants 7pm

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Mandi’s Face Painting

Watergarden Bar The Royal Oak

Caravana Sun

Saturday

15

Latrobe

Clay Soldier 9pm

Tonic Bar

The Doctors Rocksters 9pm

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Watergarden Bar

Matthew Merry Garwood 7pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

The Collection 9:30pm

North Lilydale

Hopkinson Smith 2:30pm

Monday

17

Ulverstone

Ulverstone Wharf

The Royal Oak

Woo Hoo Revue

George Washingmachine 7:30pm

Tonic Bar

Sambo 9pm

Thursday

20

Devonport

Molly Malones

Unbalance 8:30pm

Friday

21

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Poppet the Clown

Saturday

22

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Weekend Sessions 9pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

Midnight 9:30pm

Thursday Friday

Saturday

Sunday

6 7

8

9

Watergarden Bar

Matthew Merry Garwood 7pm

Fresh on Charles

Our House ft Lancelot (Sydney)

The Royal Oak

Open Folk Session

Monday

10

Lilydale Uniting Church

Andrew Byrne 6:30pm

Tuesday

11

Lilydale Uniting Church

John Griffiths 7:30pm

Lloyds Hotel

Classic covers/Originals

Wednesday Thursday Friday

Saturday

12 13 14

15

Show Room

Charmaine Wilson

The Royal Oak

Andy Collins

Watergarden Bar

Trevor Weaver 6:30pm

The Royal Oak

Live Music

Watergarden Bar

The Consultants 7pm

Fresh on Charles

Island Reggae’ w. Shanti Dreads, Dub Bredda & Bad Beef Live

The Royal Oak

Mic Attard

Tonic Bar

The Usual Suspects 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Andy & The Woodman 7pm

The Royal Oak

Live Music

Tonic Bar

Matthew Merry Garwood 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Nic & Carmel 7pm

Sunday

16

The Royal Oak

Open Folk Session

Tuesday

18

Lloyds Hotel

Classic covers/Originals

Wednesday

19

The Royal Oak

Brian Fraser

Watergarden Bar

Trevor Weaver 6:30pm

The Royal Oak

Samuel Bester

Watergarden Bar

The Consultants 7pm

The Royal Oak

Reggae Inc

Tonic Bar

DJ Randal Foxx 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Brett & Josh 7pm

City Park

RACT Symphony Under the Stars 7pm

Fresh on Charles

Ungus Ungus Ungus Live

The Royal Oak

Live Music

Tonic Bar

Matthew Merry Garwood 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Jerome Hillier 7pm

Thursday Friday

Saturday

20 21

22

Sunday

23

The Royal Oak

Open Folk Session

Tuesday

25

Lloyds Hotel

Classic covers/Originals

Show Room

Dead Daisies

The Royal Oak

Open Mic Night

Watergarden Bar

Trevor Weaver 6:30pm

The Royal Oak

Live Music

Watergarden Bar

The Consultants 7pm

The Royal Oak

Live Music

Tonic Bar

Luke Parry 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Andy & The Woodman 7pm

Wednesday Thursday Friday

34

26 27 28

warpmagazine.com.au

Thursday

27

Devonport

Molly Malones

Ringmasters 8:30pm

Friday

28

Burnie

Burnie High School Performing Arts Centre

Michelle Nicole Quartet

Wynyard

Hotel Federal

The Richie Benaud Allstars 8:30pm

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Mandi’s Face Painting

FEBRUARY Saturday, 01 Feb Live Music Sunday, 02 Feb Open Folk Session Wednesday, 05 Feb Mr Black & Blues Thursday, 06 Feb Kim Churchill Friday, 07 Feb Caravãna Sun Saturday, 08 Feb The Woohoo Revue Sunday, 09 Feb Open Folk Session Wednesday, 12 Feb Andy Collins Thursday, 13 Feb Live Music Friday, 14 Feb Mic Attard Saturday, 15 Feb Live Music Sunday, 16 Feb Open Folk Session Wednesday, 19 Feb Brian Fraser Thursday, 20 Feb Samuel Bester Friday, 21 Feb Reggae Inc Saturday, 22 Feb Live Music Sunday, 23 Feb Open Folk Session Wednesday, 26 Feb Open Mic Night Thursday, 27 Feb Live Music Friday, 28 Feb Live Music

~ Live Music ~ ~ Great Food ~ ~ Open 7 Days ~ ~ Open Mic Night the Last Wednesday of the Month ~

14 Brisbane St Launceston 7250 (03) 6331 5346


MARCH 8&9 2014

L O N E S TA R VA L L E Y • G O L C O N D A • TA S M A N I A

CHARLES BRADLEY H U S K Y • B I G S C A RY • S A S K W ATC H TWERPS • SUPER WILD HORSES THE FROWNING CLOUDS • AINSLIE WILLS H O LY H O LY • K A R L S. W I L L I A M S S P E N D E R • T H E PA N A M A J A Z Z B A N D • M c K I S K O TOM COONEY • TIGER CHOIR THE BABE RAINBOW • TIMOTHY AND WILDERNESS DJ SOUL TRAIN • DJ BLACK AMEX TICKETS ON SALE NOW

plus WO R L D C L A S S C A BA R E T, DEL I C I O U S C A F E S, G R E AT BA R S A ND L AT E N I G H T V I N Y L S O U L C L U B S full details and ticket sales at

PA N A M A F E S T I VA L . C O M . A U p r es ented by

Warp Magazine February 2014  

Warp Magazine is Tasmania's only monthly street magazine focussing on Music & the Arts.

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