algarvePLUS - November '21

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M O R E A D V E N T U R O U S T H A N Y O U E V E R I M A G I N E D

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C T I VE LY S E E K I N G

New Properties Seven Quintas Property Search is actively seeking special new listings, we have discerning clients who are ready to buy a unique property of their own. Yours could be the one they’re looking for… Find your buyer with us. Call Hildegard on (+351) 919 136 146

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Centro O Tradicional - Almancil

hildegard@sevenquintas.com

www.sevenquintas.com

Seven Quintas Property Search Mediação Imobilaria Lda. - AMI 7490


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Quality residential and commercial pergolas, designed and constructed to your requirements. When it comes to pergolas, we have it covered.

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START OFF PLUS

SUSI ROGOL GOODKIND, EDITOR

+351 965 581 831 susi@algarveplusmagazine.com

C O N T A C T S MARTIN GOODKIND

KIM COLLEY

Publisher +351 963 146 398 martin@algarveplusmagazine.com

Art Director +44 (0)7973 426196 dk.colley@btinternet.com

APT 1093, EC Olivas de St Ant (Loulé) 8101-904. Printed by Gráficas Piquer, Almeria Algarve Plus is published monthly. 6,000 copies are made available through a hand-picked distribution network from Faro to Paderne, Almancil, the Golden Triangle, Loulé, São Bras and Santa Barbara. Copyright 2021. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any written material or illustration in any form for any purpose other than short extracts for agreed review purposes, is strictly forbidden. Algarve Plus does not accept liability for loss or damage to any materials submitted for publication. Or claims made by advertisers. The views expressed by interviewees or contributors do not necessarily reflect those of the Editor or Algarve Plus. algarveplusmagazine.com

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One November, a good few decades ago, we had to pull over by the side of the road – it was the EN125, near Boliqueime, then the only way from east to west – because the rain was so heavy it was impossible to see, and the noise on the rooftop sounded like a million stones had showered down. Hours later, and back in our home in the hills, the sky was brilliantly blue, the sun golden and glowing, and the plants – thanks to the rain – green and glistening. Two days later, we had dinner on the beach at Julias, then one table surrounded by tree stumps (first come, first claiming a stump to sit on). If you wanted clams, one of her sons would run down to the sea, pull out a kiddy’s bucket full of them, and with a squirt of lemon, a knob of butter, a glassful of white wine, there was heaven on a plate. Small wonder why we decided early on in our adventures in Portugal, which took us to Lisbon and Porto, Braga and Beja, Guimarães and Coimbra, Aveiro, Arraiolos and Évora, and closer to home, so to speak, the length and breadth of the Algarve from Cape St Vincent to Vila Real de St António, that this was where we wanted to be, full-time and forever. Our own experiences and passions for this country are what have shaped AlgarvePLUS. Every day, including those when the rain is torrential, or lightning wakes us at night, is special. And we try to make every issue special, in order to reflect that, and to share.

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Welcome


The finest art in the Algarve. Tavira d’artes Art Gallery www.taviradartes.com Visit us: Travessa Jacques Pessoa 8,Tavira, 8800-374 Call us: 962 012 111 Email us: taviradartes@gmail.com www.facebook.com/taviradartes

www.instagram.com/tavira.dartes


NEWS PLUS

QUESTION: In a cinema or theatre, which arm rest is yours?

THERE SHE IS Luísa Beirão, one of the great Portuguese top models, remains in the spotlight long after leaving the catwalk. She has just launched her own brand, under the name, Here I Am, of laid back, relaxed clothes – slip dresses, hoodies, sweatshirts, and crop tops – that are also full of attitude. The slip dresses, are available in two sizes, S/M and M/L, and in four colours – cream, magnolia, terracotta and lemon. See more and buy online at hereiamstore.com – prices range from just €40 to €85.

F R O N T COV E R : Pumpkins, a seasonal favourite, every size, every colour and as good for decoration as for eating

IF YOU HAVE ANYTHING YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE, EMAIL US

ALGARVE P L U S

Trust IKEA to come up with a clever idea. This side table – take your pick of a stained oak veneer finish, or streamline white – is more than a practical piece of furniture… it is an air purifier that improves indoor air quality. It can be adjusted manually, set to auto mode, or be connected to TRÅDFRI gateway for full control via IKEA Home smart app. 55cm high x 54cm diameter, it is called Starkvind and priced at €159. See it in IKEA in Mar Shopping.

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PURE THINKING


Portrait of a pet Artist Jilly Menpes Smith specialises in animal paintings, working, in main, from photographs. Her poochy portraits are skillfully observed, every expression is captured, every loving look faithfully reproduced in acrylics on canvas. Call her on 918 754 058 for details or email jillykinsa@gmail.com

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S U N D AY LUNCH Our favourite French bistro, Diplomatico in Quarteira, is now serving Sunday lunch. Starters include escargots and oysters; mains French roast pork, or duck confit, or flambéed prawns; and for pud there is chocolate fondant, crêpes suzette or crème brulée. Hungry just thinking about it.

CRABBY SPOON HOLDER Red Candy delivers here from the UK and we reckon this little rubbery red crustacean could be worth the wait – or certainly worth ordering as a prezzy for someone over there. The ideal, and clever, spoon rest (beats the work surface!) is made from heatresistant silicone and can stand on a flat surface or on the edge of your cooking pot. redcandy.co.uk

LIGHTEN UP These amazing exterior lights, Babu Tribal, are the work of Massimiliano Raggi for the Italian house, Contardi. The steel structure holds a geometric patterned fabric created through an innovative three-dimensional digital printing technique. If you want a talking point on the terrace, one of these this will certainly deliver it. From €1,139. nedgis.com/designers/massimiliano-raggi

PURRFECT BOOK ENDS This two-piece organiser in black metal is practical, yes, and hugely fun. The base is silicon, so your cat won’t slide. Made by Balvi, it is available in December, but there are many other products online at balvi.com

NEWS PLUS


NEWS PLUS

In the papers

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The famous Porto company, Castelbel, is known worldwide for its portfolio of scented products that includes soaps, diffusers, and room sprays. Ange Boutik in São Brás is a stockist, and carries the beautifully boxed drawer liners that come in a choice of cotton flower, white jasmine, lavender, pink pepper and jasmine, rose and verbena. This is a present to buy yourself. €17.40.

Bootiful Portuguese designer shoe label Sophia Costa, with a pedigree going back for 50 years, gives every good reason to look forward to the sandal-free autumn and winter months. The carefullycurated collection for 2021/2022 introduces sharp silhouettes, chunky soles, and chic little details – all glamorous, and with spirit. Visit sophiacostashoes.pt to see the whole collection. The boots shown here are €130 at pt.overcube.com

HANDLING THOSE D R AW E R S PullCast, the Portuguese brand known for its extravagantly detailed hardware that is based on fine jewellery, uses a quote from Coco Chanel to sum up their design beliefs: She said: “If I have chosen the diamond, it’s because it represents, in its density, the greatest value in the smallest volume.” There is no doubt she would have love PullCast’s Tiffany Quartz drawer handle, in cast polished brass with Estremoz marble. €183. pullcast.eu

SHOP BY CANDLELIGHT There’s something special on every shelf in the Algarve Candle Company’s new shop. Same place (off the EN125 just west of the Boliqueime roundabout), but oh so different. Deliciously scented wax candles, handpoured right there and using the finest ingredients – veganfriendly and paraffin and phthalate-free – plus soy wax melts, and diffusers. Find out more at algarvecandlecompany.com

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T H E V I L L AG E O F B E L M O N T E , O N T H E G R A N I T I C H I L L O F S E R R A DA B OA E S P E R A N Ç A , CO M M A N DS A DA ZZ L I N G V I E W O F T H E E AST E R N S LO P E S O F T H E S E R R A D A E S T R E L A M O U N TA I N S . I T I S K N O W N A S T H E L A N D O F THE JEWS, AND THE BIRTHPLACE OF THE CABRALS

Head up to

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HERE’S A REAL history lesson

here. In the 13th century, Belmonte was a rural community, dependent on livestock and agriculture. It came to prominence in the 15th century when King Afonso V, gave the land to Captain-General Fernão Cabral, whose third son, Pedro Álvares Cabral, went on to become Belmonte’s most famous native when he discovered Brazil after a journey of 43 days. There is considerable Jewish history here, too. Four years after Spain published the Edict of Expulsion of the Jews in 1492, the king of Portugal, Manuel I, issued a law ordering all Portuguese Jews to convert to Christianity or leave the country. The Marranos – those who chose to remain – formed a community that survived in secrecy for centuries, hiding all the external signs of their faith. They married among themselves, lit Sabbath candles on a Friday night where they could not be seen, and observed festivals like Passover and Yom Kippur, albeit on slightly different days to the Jewish calendar date, so as not to draw any attention to themselves. Those who supposedly converted, the Conversos, or Crypto Jews, adopted different surnames, many taken from the names of trees, animals and geographic features.


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Opposite page top: the Belmonte synagogue in the old Jewish quarter. Below: in the hills of Sortelha, massive mosaic urns with Portuguese tiles. This page, top: The Centum Cellas Tower. Below: 19th century gothic revival Calvary Chapel

BELMONTE

What to see

Belmonte Castle Museum: The ancient streets of Belmonte lead to the top of a hill where the granite mass of the old castle rises. It dates back to the 13th century, when King Afonso III authorised Bishop D. Egas Fafe to build a tower there. In 1446, King Afonso V gave the castle to Fernão Cabral to build his home. In the late 17th century, a violent fire destroyed the west wing of the palace, after which it was abandoned and

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the family moved to what is now the Discoveries Museum. The castle was declared a National Monument in 1927 and is used for tourism and cultural functions. The open-air amphitheatre was buit in 1992, and the 19th-century Hall was adapted as a museum, dedicated to the history of the municipality and the castle itself. Church of Santiago/Pantheon of Cabrals: Next to the castle is the small Roman-Gothic church dedicated to St James, the annex of which houses the Cabrals’ pantheon, although Pedro Álvares Cabral’s ashes are found in the Igreja da Graça, in Santarém. Classified as a National Monument, it is an example of religious architecture with stylistic Romanesque, gothic and Manueline characteristics, thought to have been built in 1240 by order of Maria Gil Cabral. The Capela dos Cabrais was built there in 1433 by Pedro Álvares Cabral’s parents. In 1630, Francisco Cabral had the façade refurbished, the choir loft built and the frescoes repainted. Inside there are traces of the frescoes and a 14th-century Pietà, which José Saramago said was the finest piece in the church. The frescoes show St James, Our Lady of Hope, and St Peter, the latter which, some say, represents Pedro Álvares Cabral. The nearby bell tower was built in 1860. The ashes of the Cabral family members rest in this chapel.

Pedro Álvares Cabral, son of Captain-General Fernão Cabral, became Belmonte’s most famous native when he discovered Brazil.

Jewish Museum: The old Jewish quarter of Belmonte was located around the current Rua Direita and Rua Fonte da Rosa (the latter originally called Rua da Judiaria). At the

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In 1917, a Galician mining engineer, Samuel Schwartz, discovered a stone dating to 1297 that proved the existence of a synagogue in Belmonte. But it was not until 1989 that the Jewish community of Belmonte was officially recognised. Today, the Synagogue Beit Eliahu (House of Elijah) is active, and the Jewish community of Belmonte is considered to be truly Portuguese, its members descendants of the Crypto Jews. Crowned by a medieval castle, Belmonte stands out for the beauty of its landscapes and monuments, for the richness of its history and resources, for its fabulous strategic position, which has made it dominate, since time immemorial, territories and communication routes. History, heritage and traditions are disseminated in the six museum spaces in Belmonte. In the municipality, the Torre de Centum Cellas, the Roman Villa of Quinta da Fórnea and the Casa da Torre are also noteworthy.

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It’s not just Belmonte’s history that deserves a visit. Get lost in its natural trails. There are two ways to Santiago de Compostela in this municipality: the Via da Estrela from Cáceres, and the Nascente from Évora. top of Rua Direita, there is a square, one of the oldest in Belmonte, which features much of its original architectural detail. Visitors to the Jewish Museum learn about the history of the last Crypto-Jewish community to survive in Portugal. In Rua do Inferno and elsewhere in the Jewish quarter, there are cross-shaped motifs on the doorposts. Some researchers say this was a way for the CryptoJews to state their new religion and avoid being persecuted by the Inquisition; others suggest the cross was used to purify a space considered heretical. Zêzere Ecomuseum: Located in the former Tulha dos Cabrais in Rua Pedro Álvares Cabral, this is an educational museum in which you can follow the River Zêzere from its source to its mouth, and get to know the fauna

and flora in each stretch, including species in danger of extinction. Olive Oil Museum: Making the most of an old olive press in Belmonte, a museum was installed where visitors can see the machinery used for transforming olives into olive oil in the 20th century. Local legend had it that the Lord of Belmonte stood firm against the enemy’s threat and chose to watch his daughter being crushed in an olive press rather than surrender the castle. Museum of Discoveries: Once the Cabral family’s home and now housing the municipal library and archives, this two-storey building bears the only remaining coat of arms of the Counts of Belmonte – all others were mutilated. The Museum of the Discoveries is an interactive

T R AV E L T I P S GETTING THERE Belmonte is in the hills, a three-hour drive from Lisbon and two hours from Porto.

Romanic town of Fórnea: Quinta da Fórnea is a group of Roman ruins dating back to the 2nd century. Excavations have revealed several Roman pieces, presumed to have been the property of a family and servants. Statue of Pedro Álvares Cabral: Sitting in its own gardens, this famous work by sculptor Álvaro de Brée was completed in 1961. It shows the discoverer holding an astrolabe, a sword and a cross. The house where Zeca Afonso lived: José Manuel Cerqueira Afonso dos Santos, a Portuguese singer and composer, better known by his nickname Zeca Afonso, lived in Belmonte. There is a plaque in Largo Afonso Costa recording the fact that this land was his land. Indigenous Exhibition: In the old town hall of Belmonte, this exhibition supplements the displays at the Museum of the Discoveries and includes various objects relating to the everyday life and ceremonies of the indigenous tribes of the Coast of the Discoveries, from 1500 to the present.

W H E R E T O S TAY There are a number of hotels in and near Belmonte, including the 4-star Belmonte Sinai Hotel, 0.2km from the centre, which has express check-in and check-out. belmontesinaihotel.com Set in the medieval Monastery of Nossa Senhora da Esperança, the Pousada Convento de Belmonte is a beautiful boutique hotel with 24 bedrooms, all of which have a balcony facing the spectacular Serra da Estrela mountain range. Beautifully furnished, it also features the Gourmet Restaurant, famous for its traditional dishes from the Castelo Branco district.

museum that transports visitors through 500 years, addressing the history of the Portuguese discoveries that unified the New World, the voyage of discovery of Brazil, the construction of a sister nation, and much more.

Stay at the Pousada Convento de Belmonte for its peace, quiet, stunning views, and the very excellent Gourmet Restaurant where the food and presentation are outstanding

Centum Cellas Tower: Formerly known as the Tower of St Cornelius, this curious Roman monument arouses attention and curiosity. One legend – and there are plenty – suggests that it was a prison with 100 cells, and the place where St Cornelius was held captive. The building resembles an old crown made of stone, haunted by flocks of birds that nest in the crevices. Fascinating, and spooky, too.


Corte-Real

Follow signs from Paderne or Boliqueime

F i n e

A r t

Call us: 961 528 679 912 737 762

Algarve

Email us: algarvegallery@gmail.com www.corterealarte.com

F u r n i t u r e

Gallery Open Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun.

L i g h t i n g

11.30am - 4.30pm

Gallery

Follow us on Instagram: corte_real_gallery

C e r a m i c s

Find us on Google Maps GPS: 37.170100,-8.18205


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S TA L L O R D E R EVERY TOWN ACROSS THE ALGARVE, HAS ITS R E G U L A R M A R K E T D AY S WH E R E YO U WI LL FI N D WONDERFUL LOCAL PRODUCE, AS WELL AS P O T T E R Y, D E S I G N E R LOOK ALIKE SHOES, T- S H I R T S A N D B AG S . H E R E A R E J U S T A FE W. . .

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M A R I LY N S H E R I D A N

ALGOZ W H AT: Farmer’s Market W H E R E : Town centre, in a big field opposite the Centre de Saude W H E N : 2nd Monday of the month W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Local produce, plants, poultry, leather goods and clothing. This market is probably my favourite, and consists of a hodge-podge of stalls and canvas awnings – you have to watch where you put your feet for fear of tripping on guide ropes as you wander round. If you are a ‘market moocher’, or have a special purchase in mind, there will be something to grab your attention – from live chicks, to handmade sweet treats, to plastic buckets. There is also a flea market, on the 2nd Monday of the month, 8:0013:00. Go ready to haggle.

ALTE W H AT: Gypsy Market W H E R E : Town centre, Largo José Cavaco Vieira W H E N : 3rd Thursday of the month W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Fresh fruit and veg, plants, bags and more. Alte is a typical Algarvean village, nestling high in the foothills of the Serra do Caldeirão. It’s a fantastic little market, selling

alongside local produce, pots of herbs, fruit trees, traditional tableware and leather goods. Street vendors might also entice you to sit and enjoy freshly barbequed chicken.

BOLIQUEIME W H AT: Antiques Market W H E R E : R. Dr. João Batista Ramos Faísca, Boliqueime, near the church W H E N : First Sunday of the month W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Antiques and collectables. A huge variety of items to pick from, some interesting, some simply unwanted and going cheap. There is also a street market on the last Thursday of the month in the same location, 8:00-14:00, for lots of locally-grown and deliciously fresh produce.


LEARNING PLUS

FARO The fresh fruit and vegetable options are vast at any Algarvean market and in many you can buy plants to grow your own

W H AT: Municipal Market W H E R E : In the heart of the city, in a large whitewashed building on Rua Dr. Cândido Guerreiro W H E N : Monday to Friday 8:3019:00, Saturdays 9:00-13:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : All things foodie. Take a cooler bag as you'll come away with fish and seafood, meat, fruit and veg, freshly-baked goodies. All indoors, and with underground paid parking.

LAGOA

ESTOI W H AT: Estoi Gypsy Market W H E R E : R. do Cemitério 2, Estoi W H E N : 2nd Sunday of the month, 8:00-15:00 W H AT TO L O O K F O R : Take a big bag – there's lots to buy! Really spread out, and something different wherever you look. Fresh seasonal food products, homemade bread and cakes, hams and cheeses, plants, linens, designer-look bags and accessories, trinkets.

W H AT: Two markets W H E R E : In front of the Fatacil showground, just off the EN125 W H E N : Flea market, 4th Sunday of the month, 11:00-16:00 General market, 2nd Sunday of the month, 8:00-13:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Loads of bargains! The flea market is full of great deals. The regular market has stalls selling vegetables, fruit, clothing, textiles, shoes and household items.

Need a sun hat? A bit of sparkle? A curiosity that has a charm of its own? You might even pick up the odd antique of value

LAGOS

LOULÉ

W H AT: Farmer’s Market W H E R E : Since COVID the market is held outdoors, beside the Lagos em Forma sports centre W H E N : Saturday 7:00-1:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : All things local. Everything from chillis to chickens, olives to eggs, flowers, fruit and vegetables – all fresh, cheap and local, and served with a smile. On Wednesday evenings from 17:00, there is another farmers market, Viv’o Mercado, focusing on organic food, and goods including local craft beer and natural cosmetics. Lagos Fish Market, opposite the Marina, is open 7:00-14:00, Monday to Saturday, but sells fish only from Tuesdays. There are three floors: fish on the ground floor; fruit, veg, nuts, oils, and homemade sauces on the first floor; and above that a restaurant with great views of the harbour.

W H AT: Municipal Market W H E R E : Right in the centre of the town W H E N : Daily, Monday to Saturday, 8:30-15:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Just about everything. This landmark Moorish building offers a fantastic selection of local fish, meats, freshly picked vegetables, artisan breads and cakes, specialty foods, plus stalls selling gifts and leather goods. New, in the heart of the market, and open until 22:00, are two sit-down barbarcue eateries, one meat, one fish, plus 8100 Gelato, for ice creams like you’ve never had before, and the Noori sushi bar. On Saturdays, locals sell their produce around the outside of the market, and there is a gypsy market, opposite Convento do Santo António, that is slowly returning to its pre-covid size.

MONTE GORDO W H AT: Flea/Gypsy Market W H E R E : Near the Tourist Office W H E N : 4th Saturday of the month, from 10:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Fresh produce, clothing, leather goods and more. Once a fisherman’s village, this is a lovely seaside town, and has one of the best beaches in the eastern Algarve. The flea market has the usual traditional fresh foods, along with bricabrac stalls where you can try your hand at bargaining. This side of the Algarve is quite flat, so ideal for walking or cycling – you can rent a bike and take a ride along the largest pine forest in the Algarve to Vila Real de Santo António.


WHERE NOW PLUS

MONCARAPACHO

OLHÃO

W H AT: Gypsy Market W H E R E : Close to the town centre, Largo do Mercado, by the Torrinha football ground W H E N : 1st Sunday of the month, 8:00-13:00 W H AT TO L O O K F O R : Clothing, bags, shoes, plants, fresh fish, fruit and veggies. An enormous, busy market, with lots of stalls, lots of bargains! Everything you could possibly want, from fashion items to tools, plants to live ducks, handbags to polo shirts – and prices will vary from stall to stall, so your haggling skills might be needed! With lots of food (mountains of barbecued piri piri chicken), a really relaxed Sunday can be had while shopping.

W H AT: Municipal Market W H E R E : Waterfront, Olhão W H E N : Monday to Saturday, 7:00-13:00, plus an open-air market on Saturdays W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Fish, food products and handicrafts. This famous market is actually two markets: the fruit/vegetable market and the fish market, each with a separate purpose-built red-brick building, close to where the boats depart for trips to the islands. Olhão is the largest fishing port in the Algarve, and the markets among the biggest. It is a popular spot for people watching from the various cafés and bars outside the market, and on Saturdays there is a huge array of additional stalls, selling local goods, accessories and clothing.

W H AT: Two markets, collectables and gypsy W H E R E : Largo dos Chorões, Monchique WHEN: Collectables, 4th Sunday of the month; gypsy market, 2nd Friday W H AT TO L O O K F O R : Food and agricultural products, wicker, wood and ceramics. Take a tour to the hills of Monchique to get the real feel of Portugal and its traditions, away from the busy coastal areas. Monchique has several restaurants where marvellous authentic Portuguese food is served, and at weekends families gather. LUDI STIEBNER

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MONCHIQUE

In the mood to shop, or simply taking a stroll to see what's on offer, you'll find something to delight your buying instinct

PORTIMÃO W H AT: Municipal Market W H E R E : Avenida São João de Deus between the Aqua and the Modelo shopping centres W H E N : Monday to Friday 7:00-20:00, Saturday and holidays 7:00-14:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Fresh fish, meats, vegetables and fruits, flowers, lots of lovely local goodies. This purpose-built market, erected in 2007, is big, with over 8,000m2 of space, and while lacking the appeal of smaller traditional markets, it is where top local restaurants source their produce, and a foodie's delight when stocking up their kitchen.

SILVES

QUARTEIRA W H AT: Gypsy Market W H E R E : Feira da Ladra de Quarteira, just outside the centre W H E N : Wednesdays, 8:00-15:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Bargains, and plenty for the kids. Lots of clothing, shoes, plants, local produce, cork goods, leather bags, games, toys and much more. This one gets hugely busy, so go early and park wherever you can. In the centre of town, the Quarteira fish market is one of the best, and you’ll see local restaurants stocking up for their daily supplies. It opens at 7:30 and is always packed. There is also a Wednesday produce market off the main thoroughfare.

SÃO BRÁS DE ALPORTEL W H AT: Daily Municipal Market W H E R E : R. Boaventura Passos W H E N : Monday to Saturday, 8:00-13:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Local produce and great quality. This big indoor purpose-built market is known for quality goods. You'll find all manner of foodstuffs from locallu-grown fruit and veg, spices and oils, to an excellent choice of specialist meats and bakery products.

W H AT: Municipal Market W H E R E : Silves town centre W H E N : Monday to Saturday 7:00-14:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Food and related products. Silves is a beautiful historic town with steep cobbled streets and a striking medieval castle. The market is small, but sells all manner of edibles – from fruit and vegetables, to baked goods, fish and and meats. Silves operates a flea market on the shore of the river Arade near Fissul and Modelo on the 3rd Saturday of the month.

TAVIRA W H AT: Municipal Market W H E R E : The market is located on the Avenida Dom Manuel I, on the southern bank of the river on the eastern side of the town W H E N : Monday to Saturday, 7:00-16:00 W H AT TO LO O K F O R : Fresh fish, foodstuffs and a good choice of souvenirs. Purpose built, this one has a lively market inside that spills to the outside – go early to see the fresh fish from the daily catch being sold to local restaurants and traders, together with fruit and vegetables, clothing and antiques. Look for Doce do Algarve, traditional decorated marzipan sweets that have been rolled into beautiful shapes.



T H E S W E E T S M E L L of success C O M P O R TA P E R F U M E S I N T R O D U C E S E L E M E N T S I N I T S F R A G R A N C E S T H AT W E I M M E D I AT E LY A S S O C I AT E WITH PORTUGAL: THE SAND, THE FOOD, THE SEA. THIS IS A SUPERB B R A N D , O N E T H AT I S B O R N O F A T R U E PA S S I O N , A N D

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Pedro Dias knows precisely where he wants to take his luxurious fragrance brand, which involves the talents of some of the world's most highly-respected 'noses'


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HEN YOU meet Pedro Dias, mentor and creator of Comporta Perfumes, you can feel his passion, not only for life, but for perfume and perfume making – a love that turned him into a true specialist. For him, fragrances do not have genders, and he goes to the world’s finest ‘noses’ to get what he seeks. The final result? Unique aromas through which you experience what he wants to offer you: a horse ride by the seaside, a fishermen's quay, a hot fireplace… Here’s the full story:

How did you get involved with the perfume world? About 15 years ago, my brother and I started to discover that there was a world out there of different, specialist perfumes, more complex ones. Through the internet, we began to notice the existence of small, exclusive, independent perfumeries, who could never compete with the big, international brands, but were going their own way and creating incredible niche perfumes in Madrid, in Barcelona, in Paris, in London, and especially in Italy. It was their concept that inspired us to introduce Portugal into the equation.

How do you define yourself (in the perfumery world, of course)? As a collector, I like to try to look for perfumes that, by combining molecules – many of which are not new – can result in a special sensory experience. However, what I like most about perfumery is being able to create elegant, balanced and coherent perfumes – for me, these are the essential elements of a great fragrance. I’m not interested in mixing molecules that have nothing to do with each other, and produce perfumes that often accentuate opposite sides of the olfactory sense.

So tell us the story of Comporta Perfumes. Comporta Perfumes is the Portuguese niche perfume brand dreamed up and designed by me, Pedro Simões Dias. It offers nine different and intimate fragrances, inspired by, and representing, experiences and memories from Comporta, one of the most exclusive getaways and well-kept secrets in Europe, shared only among friends.


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people are very loyal to specific perfumes, and that every time we take a fragrance off the market some customers will be sad… However, we retain almost all the collection, and are looking to redesigning just two fragrances going forward. And there is a surprise in store for 2022.

Comporta Perfumes’ beautiful bottles are designed by the famous Portuguese brand, Vista Alegre. How did that come about? The bottles are indeed designed by Vista Alegre. We like to enhance the creative talent of those who work with us. Just as we put the name of the perfumer on each perfume label, we also felt that the creation of a unique bottle should be a priority. We are also in the process of developing, whenever possible, partnerships with the key luxury companies in Portugal. Vista Alegre is obviously the leading reference in its field, so it’s a great honour to be associated with them.

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Recently you launched a Home Collection. What does this cover? I fell in love with Comporta and decided to include it in my brand’s name. And then I designed the first Portuguese Eau de Parfum line, made up of six exclusive fragrances – Palafítico, Mosquito, Sela, Dona Bia, Areia Salgada and Muda. These perfumes are all about emotions and memories of the unique destination that is Comporta. The story then continued with the launch of the Extrait de Parfum Millésime Line: Ocaso, Mosquito MAN and Palafítico (adapted to an Extrait de Parfum formula). And then, it was on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, in Brazil, that I found more inspiration, and in June 2020 we launched our ninth fragrance, A Olhar Trancoso.

Is there an active fragrance industry here in Portugal today? Perfumery in Portugal is practically non-existent and in niche perfumery there is only Comporta Perfumes. In fact, Portugal had a great tradition of perfumery in the 19th century. The kings had perfumers ‘in house’, but with Salazar’s ascetic drive, all the small perfumeries and many pharmacies – mainly in Lisbon – that made their own eau de colognes, had no choice but to close, and during those 40 years of dictatorship, the tradition of perfume making simply disappeared.

The Home Stories Collection was a natural evolution for the brand because many clients asked us to create olfactory sensations for the home. The brand’s aim isn’t so much to create 20 new perfumes but rather, to take some of the brand's special or iconic aromas, and reinventing them in another style of perfumery: in powder or oil. And to explore different areas of perfume use, including hair care products, and the wellness sector.

How would you define Comporta Perfumes in a sentence? Comporta Perfumes is an olfactory experience that evokes memories of this idyllic place in Portugal, always with the objective of creating very complex, very coherent perfumes that can be loved by everyone.

Any other projects for the future that you can tell us about? Where would you like your brand to be in five and ten years’ time?

Some of the initial perfumes are being redesigned. Why?

Comporta Perfumes is a recent brand, so there’s a whole world ahead. We are building, step by step, solid bases for a consistent, successful and growing brand. What I would like to have, in five years’ time, is a structure that enables us to be recognised internationally, a brand that in the medium and long term will be attractive to investors who believe in the concept, and in our work, and may even take it into a new dimension.

All of the products in our portfolio may undergo minor reformulations over time, even though we know that

Shop the collection at comportaperfumes.com


Avenida José da Costa Mealha nº43 | 8100-500 Loulé

Group exhibition in the Loulé gallery of our 2021 unique artists

+351 289 419 447

www.artcatto.com

info@artcatto.com


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“Wonderful food matched by wonderful service!“ Source: Trip Advisor

A M O R T he archit ectural project BUILDING FOUND, CHECK. PROPERTY PURCHASED, CHECK. D E E P B R E AT H TA K E N , C H E C K . ARCHITECT PICKED, CHECK. PL ANS AGREED, CHECK . PROJECT APPROVED, CHECK . AND NOW S TA R T S T H E D I F F I C U LT PA R T. CHECK THIS OUT

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T Amara 5.0

www.amararestaurant.pt Reservas: T +351 289 357 579 @amarafairways Four Seasons Fairways | Avenida André Jordan 37 Quinta do Lago

O FIND THE ideal and big enough place to create a boutique hotel in the historic centre of Olhão was not easy, but the development of the architectural project was not easy either! Firstly, to begin the project, you have to find and choose the architect. Secondly, the project must be approved by the city’s architecture department taking in mind the budget constraints. The architect is the keystone of a project like Casa Amor, especially for new owners who do not have any experience of construction, despite having overseen the renovations of small properties in France in the past. But Casa Amor is no small property and it calls for complete redevelopment, rather than renovation. This is a big, big project and demands true professionals with experience working on large-scale ventures. Jack and Walter chose a local architect, despite the temptation to seek out Lisbon ‘stars’ of the design circuit. Her proximity, her knowledge of the city, its heritage, its history and her own, well-earned track record of excellence, led them to choose Tatiana Bento of Sena Architects. “Forming a relationship right from the start is vital,” says Jack. “We barely knew each other and had to trust each other, have conviction in our beliefs, and share the same vision. Everyone comes to the table with their own ideas and desires, but also constraints. Sometimes tensions rise – the difference between dream and reality can be strong, and generate frustrations. You then have to work to ease any tensions, to find compromises, to accept that the taste of


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some is simply not the taste of others.” Jack and Walter were lucky. Their exchanges and confrontations, discussions and debates, led to an architectural project that best respects the historical character of the ancient Pensão Helena, built in 1870 and originally the home of Dr Pádua, while moving it into a new century and a new life.

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With plans formally agreed, now it is the nail-biting time to select the builder who is able to deliver that dream

Accepting spiralling costs And now, with the project approved, it is time for Jack and Walter to choose the builder and accept his budget. In this post-Covid period and the exponential resumption of growth, especially in China and the US, the demand for materials is exploding and the prices of iron, wood and even cement are experiencing incredible inflation: this is the harsh law of supply and demand. Will the guys have sufficient funds to bring this architectural project to life? Will they have to give up their dream of the pretty patio and amazing pool? Will they have to go back to the municipality with a revised downward architectural project? The next chapter in the story will be in our December issue.

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Once agreed between the major players, the project had to be approved by Olhão’s architectural department. Obviously, an investor – individual or professional, Portuguese or international – can voice an opinion and where necessary complain, but it must always be remembered that questions, and even objections, raised by officialdom, are supported by the need to protect the architectural capital of the town. “You can’t do anything you want, that’s the clear and reinforceable message,” says Walter. “The municipality seeks to protect its historic centre, which belongs to everyone and makes Olhão unique. The guidelines are there for a reason. No garish colours, no aluminum or plastic doors, only wooden windows, alignments that restore the facade to its nobility, balcony railings that respect tradition, no new construction visible from the street, conservation of the azulejos when they have a historical value, protection of the vaults and interior warheads. There are also environmental and service requirements for future guests, which include the installation of TV sockets in the rooms.” “Like municipal architects, we also want to protect and save the heritage of the town and its inhabitants,” says Jack. “Obviously, this has a cost: wood is more expensive than plastic and needs a greater level of maintenance with sea air, but it is the price that must be paid if we are to preserve buildings of importance to the community.”


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something to cel ebrat e WH E N YO U S E E TH E WO R DS ' VI N H O D E TA L H A' O N A W I N E L A B E L , YO U C A N B E S U R E T H AT T H E W I N E WA S P R O D U C E D I N A C L AY P O T. A N D THIS MONTH IS THE TIME TO HEAD TO THE ALENTEJO TO WITNESS THE S E A S O N A L O P E N I N G PA R T Y

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OU CAN hardly avoid the ancient Roman influences in the Alentejo region. But it’s not just the presence of ruins, it is also the rows of massive amphoras, or wine pots. Called talha, they are more than decoration and may well contain up to 1,000 litres of the famous house-made wine, vinho de talha. The clay amphora is one of the oldest vessels for preserving and transporting liquids. In Portugal, historical data suggest that they have been used in wine-making for more than 2,000 years. The talha is a pot that varies in its porosity, depending on its intended use and the type of clay it is made from. It is used for fermenting grape juice, and storing various liquids, especially wine and olive oil. Talhas come in a range of sizes and shapes, according to the potter’s working style, and the local traditions where it is made. Since they are made of clay, the inside has to be coated with an impermeable surface, such as pine resin. Talhas are basically similar in shape but no two are the same. The biggest difference is found in the preferred curvature made by the potter. In the Alentejo, each


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When the time is right, a spout is inserted on the side of the pot, near the base, and the filtered wine comes out clear. Then it is the task of a thin worker to climb into the pot to clean out the must!

town tends to have a distinctive style of its own that is evocative of an object or a vegetable. There are talhas that are turnip shaped, larger and with more bulges than those elsewhere. Other are noticeably smaller. There are elegant talhas with smooth, broad curves, and still more, famous for being made with the best quality clay, which are more compact and less porous due to their lower limestone content. The talhas often carry decorative elements: the signature, so to speak, of their craftsman maker, or a particular brand. These huge clay vessels are typically made and used locally. The reason for this is that the largest measure over two metres in height, and can hold close to 2,000 litres. They are also fragile, and it is not uncommon for some to explode due to pressure during fermentation.

The wine-making process There is more than one way to make wine in a talha. Basically, the procedures have changed little in the past 2,000 years. The grapes are crushed and then placed inside the clay pot, where fermentation spontaneously takes place. During this period, the grape pulp and skins rise to the

Wine-making in clay amphoras, or talhas, is a specialist method dating back for thousands of years. Modern wine-makers are taking notice and developing a style of their own based on old practices

surface and form a solid mass, which is punched with a wooden plunger, and then pushed back down into the must to transmit more colour, aroma and flavour to the wine. When fermentation is complete, the mass settles to the bottom of the talha where it serves as a filter. When the time is right, a spout is inserted on the side of the pot, near the base, and the filtered wine comes out clear. Then it is the task of a thin worker to climb into the pot to clean out the must! The process of wine-making in an amphora is the same for both red and white wine and blending of the two types of grapes is also common, resulting in a rosé wine, called petroleiro. And the method has now caught on with a new wave of Portuguese wine-makers. One of them allows his talha wine to ferment naturally with wild yeasts because he likes the texture and structure that comes with the continuous movement of the lees in the rounded talhas. Other wine-makers are attracted to the minerality that the clay imparts, and the freshness engendered by micro-oxygenation through the clay’s pores. Still more paint the insides of their pots with a traditional mix of


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pine resin, beeswax and herbs to help prevent seepage and impart complexity to the wine’s aroma. The contents of a full 1,400 litre vat will eventually produce about 1,000 litres of wine. Generally, the wine is drunk very young, but longevity can be increased by floating olive oil on top, in order to block air from oxidising the wine. Talha wines are intrinsically linked to the history, culture and social life of the Alentejo. They are commonly found in private and commercial wineries, where centuries old talhas are still in use. That said, vinho de talha wines account for less than 0.002% of the region’s wines, but their production in Portugal has grown continuously since 2011, when the DOC regulation was established, and wine aged in clay amphoras is becoming increasing popular across the globe. In Portugal, the Alentejo has long been the guardian of the tradition, and the process that been handed down from generation to generation throughout history, almost without change. Today, growing interest in this form of winemaking has prompted some modern wineries to experiment with clay vessels and introduce new techniques and equipment to the equation.

Opening the talha The ’opening of the talha’ ceremony, traditionally on St Martin’s Day, Feira de São Martinho, 11 November, is a

What to expect

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Amphoras can often be seen in fashionable garden centres, carrying a huge price tag. But their intended purpose was never decoration

real celebration as it is then that the wine is traditionally declared ready to drink. The talhas have a hole about 30cm from the bottom, which is closed with a cork, known as a batoque. A tap then replaces the cork and there are two options: either the wine is served directly from the amphora or drained out, which takes one to two days, and then transferred to another clay pot, where it winters until it is consumed or bottled at the beginning of the following year, by March at the latest. At the ceremony, the talha wine goes very quickly, to meet the demand of the many bars and wineries who offer it with seasonal dishes including quince, walnuts, chestnuts, and a wide range of local delicacies, especially the famous Alentejo black pig. What doesn’t run out will end up in smaller baskets or stainless steel tanks, or bottled after the addition of a small amount of sulphur dioxide. In some places in the Alentejo, a few raisins or rice grains are also often thrown into each bottle to trigger a second fermentation, which gives the wine a slight sparkle when it is sampled the following spring or summer. At the celebration parties, you are made to feel wonderfully welcome by the locals, and as a part of the great watching and tasting talha experience, you get to hear and join in with the singing that accompanies the party mood.

Talha wines are matchless, overflowing with all the character and identity of the Alentejo. Whether the result of classic procedures or more contemporary variations, talha wine is the epitome of the ancient wine culture of the Alentejo. It is a light-bodied wine, presenting a blend of bright, fruity and nutty aromas. But each vintage is unique, and the wine is meant to be drunk very young. Talha wine is so popular that it rarely lasts from one year to the next, and in fact it normally runs out between November and December, so you’d be hard pressed to find it as summer approaches. But right now the time is right. There are many amphora wineries in Alentejo, mostly between Beja and Évora, who welcome the tourists for a visit, especially at the festival in November when they open the talhas. Herdade de Rocim in Cuba will open its talhas on 13 November. Book at ticketline.sapo.pt/evento/amphora-wine-day-57743



S H I N Y VA S E Lightweight metal, 44cm tall, €39

Shades of

AUTUMN R I G H T N OW, T H I N K S U BT L E S E A S O N A L TO N E S . M IX TO G E TH ER R E- LOV ED A N D N E W – WO O D S W I T H A PA I N T WO R K F I N I S H , D E C O R AT I V E B O W L S A N D S H I N Y P L AT T E R S , T E X T U R E D U P H O L S T E R Y, FA B R I C S I N M U T E D CO LO U RS . PUT IT ALL I N PL AC E , LIG HT A

P h ot og ra phy:

G A R R E T T WA L S H

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TEXTURED P L AT T E R Burnished gold glass, 23cm d i a m e te r, € 8

D E C O R AT I V E C A R V E D W O O D B OX To d r e s s y o u r s h e l v e s o r hide your secrets, 21x17x14cm €15

D R E S S I N G TA B L E Or the perfect little desk in wo o d a n d p a i n te d l e a t h e r, 74 c m H x 1 0 8 c mW x 5 3 c m D €179

PAIR OF CHAIRS Polished wood, new geometric pattern upholstery €155 and €175


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S I D E TA B L E Handpainted wood 6 8cmH x 70cmW x 40cmD, €99

T WO -TO N E VA S E Ceramic, l30cm high.€18 . O rchid sp ray, f ro m a ra ng e

H A N G I N G C H I N A P L AT E St. George and the dragon, 3 2c m d i a m e te r, € 1 6

VIEW OF THE VINES Painted in acrylics, wood framed, 62cm x 50cm, €49

GOLDEN BUDDHA Bejewelled and beautiful, painted wood, 36cm high, €44

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TH E PE R FEC T PAIR Clay Aztec-design vases, 32cm high, €39 the pair

KIT & CABOODLE : C aminho do Cerro do Galo Armazém 3 , 8135 - 028 Almancil T: 2 8 9 3 9 4 2 5 7 / W : k i t a n d c a b o o d l e . p t / E : s a l e s @ k i t a n d c a b o o d l e . p t



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Dhal with Griddled Pumpkin Wedges FA N C Y A B IT O F CO M FO R T FO O D? T H I S S P I C Y D H A L I S E C O N O M I C A L , H E A LT H Y A N D D E L I C I O U S , A N D T H E G R I D D L E D PUMPKIN ADDS A TOUCH OF CONTRASTING COLOUR AND SWEETNESS. FOR A CHANGE, SPRINKLE WITH CHOPPED C O R I A N D E R . S E R V E W I T H P L A I N YO G H U R T O R R A I TA , O R USE BUTTERNUT SQUASH INSTEAD OF PUMPKIN

RECIPE

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2tbsp sunflower oil 2 garlic cloves, crushed  2.5cm piece of fresh root ginger, peeled and diced  1 red chilli, diced  1tsp black mustard seeds  1tsp ground turmeric  1tsp garam masala  250g (1¼ cups) red lentils (dry weight)  480ml (2 cups) hot vegetable stock  400ml (scant 1¾ cups) canned coconut milk  4 ripe tomatoes, roughly chopped  400g pumpkin, peeled, deseeded and cut into thin wedges  100g baby spinach  juice of 1 lime  sea salt and freshly ground black pepper  naan bread or chapatis, to serve

1 Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large saucepan set over a low to medium heat. Add the garlic, ginger and chilli and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in the mustard seeds and ground spices When the seeds start to pop, add the lentils, stock and coconut milk. Increase the heat to bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer gently for 15 minutes. 2 Stir in the tomatoes and simmer for 15 minutes, or until the dhal is thick and creamy. If it’s too liquid, simmer for another 5–10 minutes; if it’s too thick, add more stock. Check the seasoning. 3 Meanwhile, make the tarka topping. Heat the oil in a frying pan set over a low heat and cook the onion, stirring occasionally, for 12–15 minutes, or until it starts to caramelise and turn golden brown. Add the cumin seeds, chilli and curry leaves and cook for a further 2 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. 4 When the dhal is nearly ready, brush the pumpkin wedges with the remaining oil and cook in a large griddle pan set over a medium to high heat for 5 minutes on each side, or until tender and slightly charred. 5 Stir the spinach and lime juice into the dhal to wilt the spinach. Divide between four shallow bowls and top with the tarka mixture and griddled pumpkin wedges. Serve with warm naan or chapatis.

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For the tarka topping:  2tbsp sunflower oil  1 large red onion, thinly sliced  1tsp cumin seeds  1 red chilli, shredded  8 fresh curry leaves

THE SQUASH & PUMPKIN COOKBOOK BY HEATHER THOMAS (EBURY PRESS, €12.45, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOFF LEE) SERVES UP MORE THAN 50 GORGEOUSLY COLOURFUL RECIPES THAT PACK A FLAVOUR PUNCH. CHECK OUT OUR FAVOURITE PUMPKIN PIE!

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of th e month ...

SERVES 4 | PREP 15 MINS | COOK 40 MINS


The Campus complex in Quinta do Lago is all about high performance and high polish, with the very best of everything – from the quality of the state-of-the-art equipment, to the expertise and track record of the trainers


PROMOTION PLUS

STAYING IN GREAT SHAPE

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HAT MORE can those in search of the sporting life want? The Campus complex in Quinta do Lago is all about high performance and high polish, with the very best of everything – from the quality of the state-of-the-art equipment, to the expertise and track record of the trainers, to the programming of key competitive events that attract an international audience of sports enthusiasts. The €10 million training and fitness facility has hosted training camps for top national and regional sports teams from Sunderland FC, Millwall FC, Sporting Portugal, the Glasgow Rangers and the Croatian national team, with several returning more than once – a testament to the calibre of the facilities. But The Campus is there to be enjoyed by all ages, and all levels of sporting ability, not just those in the top league of fitness. There are Junior Academies offering coaching for four- to 18-year-olds who want to get ahead in tennis, swimming and triathlon; there are group classes hosted by highly-experienced leaders who will get your mind and body aligned and performing to the absolute best; there

are tennis challenges, an annual padel league competition, and a 25m outdoor heated pool where the best compete. Add to that the constantly developing programme of activities, which include yoga classes, tabata, boxfit and meditation, and you have the broadest possible menu of options. Quinta do Lago understands the difficulty top sporting professionals face in finding a familyfriendly destination that doesn’t hinder their carefully planned training programme. The ‘Pro-Athlete Training Break Package’ has been curated to incorporate The Campus’ elite facilities, along with the resort’s high-end family-orientated offering, creating the perfect break that suits everyone’s needs. Unsurprisingly, it is the ultimate destination for any athlete looking to keep up the hard work in a relaxing and exclusive environment. And those wanting to unwind after a tough season also have access to the recovery suite, which includes a sauna, steam room and one hot and one cold plunge pool.

The Campus complex in Quinta do Lago has the very best of everything – from the quality of the stateof-the-art equipment, to the expertise and track record of the trainers.

To f i n d o u t m o r e , v i s i t t h e c a m p u s q d l . c o m

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R I G H T O N T H E A LG A R V E C OA S T, I N T H E S T U N N I N G Q U I N TA D O L A G O R E S O R T, I S A TO P - N OTC H FAC I L I T Y W H E R E T H E FO C U S I S O N S P O RTS . YO U C A N C YC LE , SWI M , P O LI S H U P YO U R TEN N I S A N D PA D E L , G E T E N E R G I S E D I N T H E GYM, AND TRAIN WITH THE PROFESSIONALS. IT’S ALL H A P P E N I N G AT T H E C A M P U S


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OU DON’T HAVE to be a yogi, or a monk, or a deeply spiritual person to see the benefits that can be gained through meditation. Some people say that it’s too hard, or it takes years to master. Not true… anyone can meditate if they want to. Meditation can be described as being in the present moment, or in the here-and-now, or momentto-moment living; they are all similar. The phrases may differ, but what happens inside is the same. Any form of spiritual practice helps us to learn the great lesson of letting go. True meditation is not an action; it is an intense longing of the heart to be at one with the self. In that process, the deeper we go, the less ego we have and the lighter and calmer we feel. Research has shown that just ten minutes practice a day can change how the brain functions: concentration and memory improve, anxiety reduces, and the mood is lifted. People have reported that their quality of life has improved when they meditate regularly.

Best for you People often ask me which are the best ways to meditate. I believe that the finest form for any individual is the one that they resonate with. Whether it be mantra, insight,

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mindfulness, or focused techniques, they all ultimately have the same goal – balance, clarity, and peace of mind. Here’s my selection of the most popular types of meditation practices I usually recommend to my clients, associated with their needs. Mindfulness Meditation originates from Buddhist teachings. You pay attention to your thoughts as they pass through your mind. You don’t judge or dwell on them: you simply observe and let them drift in and drift away. The objective is to focus on your breath while you observe any bodily sensations, thoughts, or feelings. This type of meditation is perfect for developing concentration and awareness. Focused Meditation involves concentration using any of your five senses. You can focus on something internal, like your breath, or you can bring in external influences to help focus your attention. Such as counting mala beads, listening to a gong, or staring at a candle. If your mind does wander, it’s important to come back to the practice and refocus. This practice is great for concentration, and calming the nervous system. Mantra Meditation uses a repetitive sound to clear the mind. It can be a word or phrase, such as the Sanskrit word Om. Or a phrase “Peace begins with me”. It doesn’t matter if your mantra is spoken loudly, quietly, or silently in your head. After chanting the mantra for some time,

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M E D I TAT I O N I S G O O D F O R T H E C A R E E R - D R I V E N , A N D F O R PA R TT I M E R S . I T ’ S G O O D F O R S TAY - AT - H O M E P A R E N T S A N D T H E W I L D LY S O C I A B L E . F O R G R O W N - U P S , F O R K I D S . I T D O E S N ’ T M AT T E R W H O YO U A R E O R W H AT YO U ’ R E I N T O , S AY S A N N I E M O O R E


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ANNIE MOORE

E: moorwellbeing@gmail.comn /

Annie Moore is registered with BSY, Yoga Alliance, Centre Of Excellence in Mindfulness and Tibetan Buddhist Meditation. She teaches courses and classes online and from her home in the Algarve.

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acceptance toward oneself and others. It typically involves opening the mind to receive love and then sending a series of well wishes to loved ones, friends, acquaintances, and all living beings. This is an ideal practice for those who are holding feelings of anger or resentment. Guided Meditation is a practice where you are either guided by a teacher or you listen to a meditation or visualisation. This is perfect for beginners who need guidance to help them switch off their chattering mind. Some of us find it extremely challenging to sit in silence and totally let go of our thoughts. Guided meditations quiet the mind and train the brain to settle, relax and let go. The benefits of meditation can be life changing. When you settle into a regular practice, every day, you’ll notice you have more energy, better sleep, control stress more effectively, your wellbeing will improve, and you’ll find it easier to get on with your life.

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you’ll be more alert and in tune with your environment. This allows you to experience deeper levels of awareness. Some people enjoy this practice because they find it easier to focus on a word than on their breath. This is a good practice for people who don’t like silence and enjoy repetition. Transcendental Meditation has a main objective to transcend thought itself, in order to experience a state of ‘pure awareness’, but without an object of thought. The meditation is customised for the client, using a mantra or series of words that are specific to each person. This practice is for those who like structure in their meditation. Body Scan Meditation aims at reducing tension in the body and promoting relaxation. The practice involves slowly tightening and relaxing one muscle group at a time throughout the body. In some cases, you may also be encouraged to imagine a gentle wave flowing through your body to help release any tension. This type of meditation is often used to relieve stress and anxiety. Loving Kindness Meditation is used to strengthen feelings of compassion, kindness, and

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Research has shown that just ten minutes practice a day can change how the brain functions: concentration and memory improve, anxiety reduces, and the mood is lifted.


T he pearl of the

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PROMOTION PLUS

H A L F A C E N T U RY AG O, T H E P I C T U R E S Q U E V I L L AG E O F LUA B O WA S L O C AT E D O N T H E B A N K S O F O N E O F A F R I C A’ S M O S T M I G H T Y R I V E R S , A N D K N O W N L O C A L LY A S ‘ T H E P E A R L O F T H E Z A M B E Z I ’ . A G A R D E N O F E D E N , S H A D E D BY T R E E S A N D P L A N T E D W I T H L AW N S A N D F LOW E R S , I T WA S T H E H O M E O F P E D RO CÔ RTE - R E A L WH O LE D A S I M P LE B U T I DY LLI C LI FE S T Y LE T H AT T O D AY H E R E C R E AT E S I N H I S N A Ï V E PA I N T I N G S

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EDRO ATTENDED school in Luabo with

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the local children, the only Portuguese boy in the class. He has random recollections of his classmates, village life and voyages on the great paddle steamers that transported sugar, coconuts and cashews from the plantations. Bound for railway depots, sea ports and far distant destinations, to a little boy these places were incomprehensible. Instead, he marvelled at submerged crocodiles as they made eyes at him across the water, and the birds and insects attracted to the village gardens. Most vividly, he recalls holidays when he and his family explored the endless grasslands and tropical rainforests of Mozambique. Frequently heading to the coast, far downriver from Luabo, they crossed the Zambezi on a primitive barge. He listened to the ferrymen singing traditional songs, as they hauled the Land Rover and the family to a basic landing stage. He can picture an image of his mother praying to heaven, as his father manoeuvred the wheels of their vehicle onto two rickety planks of wood. A sigh of relief followed once they were back on dry land.

Finally – before reaching the beach at Chinde – there were rough tracks to negotiate, winding a route through the dense coastal forest. Unexpectedly on the wayside, women with huge baskets were selling fruit, the kind he’d never seen before. In the gloom of overhanging vegetation, shafts of daylight penetrated the fronds of palm trees and then at last, the excitement of arriving at their wooden bungalow. Standing aloft on Chinde’s rolling sand dunes, the amenities were rudimentary, with water pumped from a well, cooking on an open fire, and windows with mosquito grills instead of glass. Located at the point where the estuary of the Zambezi reaches the Indian Ocean, it was his family’s paradise. The few fishermen and their huts that shared the golden shoreline and the azure sea were delighted to have visitors ready to buy their catch. Memories of those holidays dominate Pedro’s paintings: “I try to bring them, and Luabo, back to life,” he says. Luabo is the subject of a book entitled Bitter Sweetness. The bitterness, as recounted by its author, Paul Lapperre, is due to the demise of Luabo, now


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sadly abandoned and vandalised. Like many places in Mozambique, it has suffered from human conflict. When Pedro and his family left hurriedly in 1973, they took little with them apart from happy memories. He readily acknowledges that the process of re-creation through his paintings is an enjoyable and emotional experience. The straightforward simplicity of his previous life complements his naive style. Adopting an art genre that favours the strong use of pattern, accuracy of detail, and a curious use of perspective, Pedro uses acrylic paint and iridescent colours. Straw houses, palm fringed beaches and exotic vegetation start to materialise. Historic pigments created by Golden Paint add quality to each picture so that the atmosphere of Africa, and Pedro’s warm feelings for Mozambique, are evident in each and every painting. He often collaborates with his longtime partner who firstly primes the canvas with hazy colour washes. Once Pedro has completed the painting, he is then involved again, imaginatively framing the picture with recycled wood and bamboo, which he paints in harmonizing colours. Combing the Algarve beaches for suitable drift wood, the combination of painting and frame results in a finished artwork that is a successful joint enterprise. In recent years, looking to extend their creative work together, the pair took a road trip through Bahia in Brazil. Driving many hundreds of kilometres from the state capital of Salvador through remote forests, past rivers and waterfalls, they arrived at a beachside destination near Ilheus. There, a wooden house built on stilts overlooked white sands and an ocean washed with waves. If Luabo was a pearl, then Pedro had found another! In Bahia the palm-fringed beaches reminded him of Chinde, as well as the people with their sunny dispositions, speaking Portuguese. The gorgeous palaces and mansions in the historic old town of Ilheus are poignant remnants of the past, as are the banana and cocoa plantations introduced by the Portuguese. Nature sanctuaries, mineral springs and mangroves form part of the surroundings and the ocean at Itacarezinho hosts the world’s EcoSurf championships. Swells and breakers cover the sea and endlessly ride ashore. It is hardly surprising that such a place was to become the stimulation for more paintings, more rustic frames and more teamwork. Promoting a high degree of motivation and capturing memorable images on canvas, Galeria Côrte-Real is launching an exhibition of these paintings. Reflecting the loveliness and ecological environments of Mozambique and Bahia, the exhibition is a pleasure to enjoy.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

When did you first start painting? Around the age of ten. Your favourite medium? Mixed media. What brought you to Portugal and why? We escaped from the war in Mozambique, arriving in Lisbon in 1973. I was 12. Is all your work based on memories? Absolutely. If you were painting a portrait, who would you want as your subject? Half of the world. Is the sea a big part of your life? Totally. Your favourite Algarvean dish? Arroz de lingueirão.

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ALAMEDA WH EN YO U R FO O D I E FR I EN DS AR E TALK I N G ABO UT O N E PARTI C U L AR R E S TAU R ANT, IT IS TI M E YO U WENT TO E XPER I EN C E IT YO U RS ELF

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OU MIGHT think that Alameda in Faro is a special-occasion restaurant. Well let me tell you, you’d be wrong. There are countless regulars who return frequently to experience more and more again of Rui Sequeira’s artistic approach to cooking. And it is artistic in every respect. The blend of flavours and textures and colours create a painting on the plate that tease and tempt at the same time. This is not for those who want a juicy steak or spicy chicken or bowl of pasta; there are plenty of other excellent places that will satisfy those wants. Alameda is different, as

are many of the ingredients Rui and his team choose. Their main goal is to work with local produce, through small suppliers, respecting the best that the season offers. The building itself is special, too. Tall and elegant, more than 100 years old and with a classical tiled frontage, it was a famous bakery, but laid empty for a lengthy period, until Rui and his design team from Black is Black, rescued it, rebuilt it, and dressed it in style. There are four menus, all designed to make fine dining fun. Origami is a tasting menu – customers have access to the list of ingredients used, but the final dishes are always

FOOD A completely unexpected joining of unusual fine ingredients

DECOR Glass-encased patio, reminiscent of Parisienne bistros

€ PRICE Four menus, from €39.90. Wine pairing from €30

R E S TA U R A N T E A L A M E D A , R u a d a P o l í c i a d a S e g u r a n ç a P ú b l i c a , 8 0 0 0 - 1 5 1 F a r o T: 2 8 9 8 2 4 8 3 1 / W : r e s t a u r a n t e a l a m e d a f a r o . c o m

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a surprise. Alameda includes snacks, a starter, a main course and a dessert. Umami is composed of eight ‘moments’, and explores the distinction of salty, sweet, bitter and sour. Finally, there’s Vegetal, which features dishes such as seaweed carbonara with cured egg yolk. Origami, with wine pairing, is the first choice, taking ingredients to a new dimension of both taste and presentation. The 10-course menu starts with an oyster from Ria Formosa, its shell set in small bowl of black pebbles. The single mouthful ‘cataplana’ is served in a miniature version of thetradition dish; there’s octopus, and eel, shellfish and veal, and a broth of Monchique’s smoked ham and wasabi. Every dish, just a mouthful or so in size, is a veritable explosion of tastes. The staff at Alameda spend time with clients explaining the composition of each dish and the special nature of the ingredients, and that adds to the total experience. The restaurant seats 30, half on the glassed-in patio, half inside around the cooking station. It is open Thursday to Monday for dinner, 19:00 to 22:30, and on Sunday for lunch. Rui is also the man behind Monky, which we reviewed previously. With two successes on his hands, he’s surely forward planning now.

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‘There are four menus, each designed to make fine dining fun’


I N C R E A S I N G LY , P E O P L E A R E L O O K I N G F O R T H E W O R D S ‘ E T H I C A L LY S O U R C E D ’ , ‘ O N E - O F F ’ , A N D ‘ S K I L F U L LY C U R AT E D ’ W H E N P U R C H A S I N G P I E C E S F O R T H E I R H O M E . A N D T H AT ’ S P R E C I S E LY W H A T A N E W B U S I N E S S I N S Ã O B R Á S I S F O C U S E D O N , G AT H E R I N G CR AFTWORKS FROM INDIA AND AFRICA

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SUSI ROGOL-GOODKIND

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OST OF US harbour a dream about our ideal working world – a vision of how we’d like our future to pan out. Few of us, however, have the opportunity, the dedication, or the ability, to make it happen. So it remains a dream, filed away with others, and brought up from time to time as dinner table conversation and what-ifs. Then there are those who are so positive, so determined, so supremely confident, that they grab every opportunity to reach that goal. Meet Paula Pinto. Born in Luanda, raised in Lisbon, Paula has a degree in tourism, and worked in various jobs, her first ‘real’ one, as she describes it, at age 23, as a butler at the Sheraton Park Tower in London. Five years later, she returned to Lisbon and at the Ritz Four Seasons Hotel worked her way up from housekeeper to the capital’s first woman concierge.

Fast-forward 20 years. Paula has opened a showroom, Alamaya, that is an expression of her love of travel, and her special passion for the arts and crafts of Africa and India. Tucked away in an unprepossessing side street in São Brás, a small single-storey building houses a wealth of treasures. Open the door from the dusty street and you gasp. Polished wooden platters, painted and jewelled wedding chests, outsized carvings, richly embroidered cushions, weirdly wonderful sculptures, and soft woven baskets like you have never seen, or even imagined – vast in size, intricate in workmanship, curved and curled and sprouting feathers of plaited palm leaves. How, why, what, when? So many questions to ask, and stories to uncover. “I always dreamed of travelling, and could not wait for my degree to finish to start that adventure,” explains Paula. “With London came independence, and I could


fulfil that dream. Asia was on my priorities list, and India was one of the first countries I visited. Travelling with a group of friends, I stayed for almost a month, and while my perspective of poverty and hardship in life changed, so did my capacity for resilience and appreciation of small simple things in life. The beauty of India’s people and its cultural monuments and sites are incredible. “My passion for Africa came out of my love for animals. I discovered The Sheldrick Foundation in Kenya and ended up adopting Alamaya, a baby orphan elephant. Naturally, I had to go there and meet him! I was captivated and fell totally in love with Kenya – the savannah, the coast, the animals, the smiling children and the Swahili architecture and the handicraft pieces that I had first seen among my mother’s possessions in Angola.

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The collection meant for home “On that trip, I ordered each of my friends to buy another suitcase to help me carry my souvenirs through customs – baskets and bowls, fabrics and jewellery (made for me by a beach artisan who collected used things and recycled them into beautiful pieces). What we couldn’t pack we wore… we looked like we were going to a fancy dress party!” So, Paula arrived back in Portugal with a wealth of individually handmade works, artisan pieces each with their own story. What happened next? “I had planned to decorate my house with my finds,” explains Paula. “I wanted to be surrounded with pieces that I had loved at first sight. It was only then that I considered sharing my personal taste on a professional level. I have named my company Alamaya, since my pieces are mostly from Africa

Ethnic is not a trend, it is a necessity. People are eager to rediscover ancestral and more organic techniques that will harm the planet less


FINDS PLUS

PHOTOGRAPHY: RUBEN GUEREIRO | BRAND CREATIVE DIRECTION AND STYLING: ANTONELLA ANTONUCCI

and India, home to elephants and special animals.” Finding the right suppliers is a priority for any business, especially one that is focused on individual craft workers, some on the other side of the world. But Paula was lucky. “I had met some Indian suppliers on my last visit to India, just prior to the pandemic, when I went for two weeks, by myself. Others came by recommendation, and a lot through sourcing on the internet. I also rely on one photographer who travels through India and sends me pictures.”

Finding the craftspeople “My original goal, thwarted by Covid, was to travel to all these regions and talk to the artisans and small family businesses who specialise in the sort of pieces I was most interested in. But because of circumstance, I had no option but to go online, and to work at distance. “I would receive photographs and information almost on a daily basis, study them, and over a period of months make my choices one by one. It is a challenging way to work and there are risks involved. You need to have a good and trusting relationship with your suppliers, and importantly, an idea of the region and the style of their handicrafts. “I had already gathered together a number of specialist suppliers in Africa, some I had got to know through my travels, others who have come via the friends who live there and send me information about any interesting crafts they find.” Ask Paula about those special pieces and what she had learned about them that add to their appeal, and she says: “The ancestral techniques and local customs are key;

there is a long tradition behind them that is evidenced in the skills needed to produce consistently fine results. I also found that, contrary to my beliefs, a lot of men are involved in basket weaving. In many cases, craftsmanship is the only surviving source of independence for women in many of these regions. By buying these pieces I am helping families in rural communities, and knowing that is a real reward.” Behind the walls of the Alamaya showroom there are high ceilings and traditional features, the perfect backdrop for Paula’s esoteric collections. Colours are muted, details intricate, the finish of every piece – be it furniture or decoration – in keeping with tradition. The most valuable piece, currently, is a one-of-a-kind damchyia from Bhuj, in the Gujarat district, which was passed through the daughters of a family as a wedding dowry box. It is colourful, with intricate woodwork, and priced at €3,250. Paula sees her typical client as one who is welltravelled, has their own sense of style and demands individuality. And for them, as well as their chosen interior decorators, and the galleries they shop in, she will search for specific pieces. “Society is going back to the basics,” she says. “Ethnic is not a trend, it is a necessity. People are eager to rediscover ancestral and more organic techniques that will harm our planet less.” And what about those baskets? “They are handmade, in remote regions of Zimbabwe, Ghana and South Africa, by communities of male and female weaving artisans. Theirs is a time-honoured method with unique spiralling features, combined with a contemporary twist. They take up to two months to complete. And every one is beautiful.

A L A M AYA , b y a p p o i n t m e n t / T: a l a m a y a . d e c o @ g m a i l . c o m / i n s t a : a l a m a y a . d e c o

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Make an appointment to see the ever-changing collection at Alamaya, as more pieces arrive every month. To appreciate the work in each is not hard – the complexity of shape, the intricacies of carving, the intrigue of detail – all of these contribute to the charm and individuality of Paula's special choices


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life in the mid-19th century, especially during the American Civil War when photographers documented battlefields for the first time. While photography had taken 40,000 years to appear after the earliest pictures – cave paintings – movies followed on more quickly; inventors came up with a simple toy that made it possible for a series of pictures to be viewed in rapid succession, creating the illusion of motion. Zoetrope first appeared in 1833, and took the world by storm. However, it took until the early 1890s for inventors like Thomas Edison, Etienne-Jules Marey, and Muybridge to come up with a device that had more in common with today’s video cameras. While only shooting up to 12 frames per second (a fraction of the latest iPhone’s 60 frames per second), this was ground-breaking at the time. In 1895, Auguste and Louis Lumière made a further advance when they introduced the Cinématographe, a projector that could show 16 frames per second. Audiences were spellbound by the films of simple movement and action: images of a baby eating, a hose squirting water, and the workers pouring out of the Lumière factory.

All happening While the first films were of commonplace occurrences –


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trains approaching, people dancing, and animals playing – filmmakers soon started to incorporate storylines and music into their works. Between the years of 1890 and 1927, thousands of silent films were produced, with the ever-increasing sophistication of storyline and technical craftsmanship. A new art form was born. By the late 1920s, television stations started to appear in America, with the world’s first electronic TV being invented in 1927 by a 21-year-old inventor named Philo Taylor Farnsworth. It was also the year that The Jazz Singer, the first feature-length movie with synchronised sound appeared. By 1971, some 20 years after US engineer Charles Ginsburg led the team responsible for the video recorder, our good friends Sony stepped into the consumer market and introduced video cassette recorder (VCR) decks and tapes allowing us to make our own movies. Then in 2000, things became even more personal with the advent of the first mobile phone incorporating a video camera, the Samsung SCH-V200.

The birth of the internet Developing in parallel was a medium that would give video the platform it needed to become fully integrated into our daily lives: 1 January 1983 is considered the

official birthday of the internet, with the first social media platform appearing in 1997. Six Degrees, created by Andrew Weinreich, was popular with users until 2003, when Tom Anderson came up with MySpace. This new site let users make profiles that played their favourite music, and they could even design their own backgrounds. MySpace quickly became the most used social media site in the world. However, in this brave new world, changes were happening fast, including the advent of Facebook in 2004. It was only a year later that YouTube launched its video-sharing app, which allowed users to experiment with self-produced content, while also creating the blessing – or is it blight? – of self-appointed influencers. From makeup tutorials to viral ‘Gangnam style’ dance crazes, YouTube proves that just about anyone or anything can go viral on the internet. Now, the channel sees more than four billion daily views and has more than one billion users worldwide. It wasn’t long before pretty much every other social media channel incorporated video into their platforms. If you’ve logged into any social media platform recently, you might have noticed video content within the first ten seconds. Why? Because it grabs our attention far more effectively than words or still images ever can. This explains why videos on Instagram and Facebook generate


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If you’ve logged into any social media platform recently, you might have noticed video content within the first ten seconds. Why? Because it grabs our attention far more effectively than words or still images ever can. more engagement than any other content type, and tweets including videos see ten times more engagement. Social media platforms know this, and therefore give an extra boost to new video-related features. Instagram, for example, is still heavily promoting Instagram Reels, making it one of the best growth-hacks a business can use on the app right now. In 2019, users spent an incredible weekly average of six hours and 48 minutes watching online videos, a 59% increase from 2016. And that’s before we consider the impact of the pandemic on our video consumption habits. Today, consumers expect brands to deliver ever-more engaging, entertaining content, and video is one of the most effective formats to do so. And it doesn’t just stop at social media. Let’s look at website content. If you’re a small business owner, you’ve likely heard the motto “content is king” to describe the importance of content marketing. And while written content is effective for many audiences, visual marketing is an even more powerful tool to increase interactions and actions. Remember the phrase “a picture is worth a thousand words” – go one step further by adding that “a one-minute video is worth 1.8 million words” (Dr James McQuivey of Forrester Research). Considering that 46 percent of people who watch a video ad on a business website act after viewing it, it is criminal for you not to include video in your marketing strategy.

So how can you use video help boost your website? Rank better in Google One of the key factors that Google uses to rank your website is the amount of time people spend on your site. So sites providing a short, compelling video will generally see higher engagement rates, higher click-through rates, and higher

conversion rates. In fact, 80 percent of people who watch a video ad will still recall it a month later. You therefore not only get the benefits that come with using video, as discussed above, you get Google turbocharging this by driving more people to your site. Showcase your brand’s personality In today’s digital world, more and more people shop, work and communicate online. While this is convenient, it means that we aren’t putting faces to names as often. To humanise your brand, use video to connect to your audience with as close to a face-to-face interaction as possible – people love doing business with those they like. Provide video testimonials Credibility is a crucial element for any business, no matter whether you’re a start-up, or an established brand. A great way to impart credibility is straight from the mouths of real people who have purchased your product or service and are genuinely happy with it. Include mobile users If you’ve ever tried reading a long article on a relatively small smartphone screen, you know how slow-going it can be, even on websites with responsive design. Receiving the same information via video can make the process much easier for the average person.

Demonstrate your product Your product may come across at first sight as complex and off-putting – remember the first time you learnt to drive? However, a video can Next month I will explain how make apparently difficult concepts far easy it is to create video simpler, and therefore more appealing content for no or very little to your target audience. If they ‘get’ it, cost. If you can’t wait or don’t they’re far more likely to buy it. have the time, get in touch and I will help you to find a solution that is a The opportunities for video are better fit right now. immense, and it’s an ever-growing phenomenon!

JASON GR ANVILLE East Algar ve Digital T: 9 1 6 9 8 4 6 6 8 / E : j a s o n @ e a s t a l g a r v e d i g i t a l . c o m / W : e a s t a l g a r v e d i g i t a l . c o m


WE LOOK FORWARD TO CELEBRATING A NEW YOU.

Jim

H A I R A RT I S TS

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T he senior S O L O T R AV E L L E R S E A R C H I N G F O R W I N T E R S U N . S O U N D F A M I L I A R ? J U N E M A D E LY N J O R G E N S E N , A R T I S T A N D A U T H O R , W H O F E AT U R E S I N A LY S O N S H ELD R A K E’ S A NTH O LO LO GY A N E W LI FE I N T H E A LG A RV E, P O RT U GA L , TELL S H ER STORY OF DISCOVERING H ER N E W HOM EL AN D

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T WAS A CHANCE encounter that brought me to the Algarve. I thought of returning to Majorca, Spain, where I’d spent three sun-soaked weeks a few years back, drinking margaritas, but a conversation with a friend changed all that. We were enjoying a drink in an outdoor café in Winterthur, Switzerland, my son Marc’s home city, on a warm August day. I had just finished a month-long tour of Italy and was contemplating my next step for the winter. “What sort of place are you looking for?” my friend asked. “Somewhere warm, sunny, close to the ocean, and inexpensive,” I said. “And with a good flight connection to Switzerland so I can see Marc and my grandson, Rafael, often.” “Why don’t you try Portugal?” he suggested. I was surprised and curious as I knew little about the country, even though I was a seasoned traveller to most of Europe. Asking him why Portugal, he said: “Because the people are friendly, the food and wine are superb, the climate, especially in the Algarve, is sunny and warm in

the winter months, and it’s affordable to live there.” Now in my mid-sixties, it was becoming a little harder and more daunting having to start all over again in a foreign country that I knew almost nothing about. I wasn’t sure I was ready to take that big step, especially being on my own. But, after mulling it over, I decided to give it a chance. If it didn’t work out, I could stay somewhere in Europe that I was familiar with, or go back to Mexico for the winter.

The first step Two weeks later, I was on a plane from Zurich to Faro, with no real plan, not knowing anyone, and going solo. Flying over Faro and descending towards the airport, I thought we were going to land on the beach! All I could see was water and coastline. Soon I was heading west on a bus towards Porches, a village I picked because I liked the look of the hacienda-style hotel I had booked into. The sun was setting on a warm mid-September evening, sinking into

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Apart from the charm of the town itself, the beaches of Alvor and their famous rock formations never fail to dazzle. At sunset, when the skies go red, you are transported to a world of wonder

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the Atlantic Ocean, and as we drove towards it, I thought it was the most beautiful red sunset that I had ever seen. I was in the Algarve, but at the time, I had no idea what that meant. After a few days, I searched the internet for a smaller village closer to the ocean, and Alvor came up. So I hopped on a local bus, and an hour later I wheeled my suitcase to the entrance of Camping Alvor, just as music began playing in the local bar. Settling into an apartment with a glass of wine, I was serenaded to sleep, with Portuguese music ringing in my ears. The next day, as I wandered through the quintessentially Algarvean village of Alvor, I savoured the scenes of everyday life in Portugal – locals drinking coffee in the little cafés dotting the cobblestone streets, or sipping wine in the flower-decked restaurants down by the harbour, fishermen hauling and gutting their catch and selling it to the local restaurants. I enjoyed buying local fruit and vegetables at the nearby market, taking in the natural beauty of the beaches, and swimming in the frothy ocean while witnessing the most amazing red sunsets. It just felt right. It was all that my friend had said and more. I stayed the winter in the apartment at the camp, and loved being able to walk into town and to the harbour and beaches nearby. Growing up on a ranch, and living mainly in small towns in Canada and Switzerland, the fit was perfect for me with this fishing village lifestyle. I bought a caravan in the spring and settled into camp life. It reminded me of living in Baja, Mexico, so the adjustment should have been easy for me. At first, however, I felt a little lost and timid not knowing anyone and on my own. For some strange reason, my childhood shyness resurfaced, and I found it hard to go out and talk to people or walk alone into a restaurant. In retrospect, I think there were a few things that affected my self-confidence. I knew very little about Portugal, the country I wanted to spend my winters in. I think this was the key factor for


me to acknowledge: I was here to ‘spend the winter’, which is a long time – it wasn’t two weeks or a month then return home. Not knowing anything about Portugal before I came made me apprehensive. Would I like it? What were the crime rates like? What about the people, the accommodation? Of course, I could go back to Switzerland or Canada, but I wanted to make it work. When I walked around the town and saw the friendliness of the people and found that English was spoken in the stores and restaurants, I started to relax. Slowly, I integrated with the people living in the camp, and although there were expats from many different European countries there, plus Brazil and China, the US, and my home country, English was the common language. Once I realised everyone was more or less here for the same reasons – retired or semi-retired and looking for a warmer climate, and around the same age as me – I began to open up and make friends. I have to admit there are ‘cliquey’ groups and even though it’s not openly acknowledged, ‘couples’ groups’ – but I learned not to let this bother me, and instead sought out other like-minded individuals.

written for the class, and to socialise. As with everything, the pandemic has put restrictions on most activities, and I look forward to getting back to some form of normality soon. I have found if you make the effort to meet people and are willing to try different things and have an open mind, you can make friends easily and life becomes much better. I do cherish my solitude though, and often meditate by the ocean, listening to the sound of the waves with the clear blue water lapping at my feet. My fears subside and my spirit soars and I marvel at the beauty that surrounds me. June Madelyn Jorgensen ’s newly-released memoir I Heard The Alps Call His Name is available from Amazon.

FIND OUT MORE A New Life in the Algar ve,

Signing up I joined lots of classes, which were not hard to find. One day I saw an advert for a fitness group at the local community centre and that’s where I met other ladies who were friendly and supportive. A wonderful teacher named Marie led the class. We not only broke sweat together, but everyone was encouraged to go for a coffee afterwards in the downstairs café. We often socialised together, and I have made some lasting friendships through this group. By word of mouth I heard about other activities and before I knew it, I was show dancing on Mondays, line dancing on Thursdays, tap dancing on Fridays, and swimming at the camp pool and fitness classes in between. I also joined the Algarve Writers Group: we get together or meet virtually once a month to talk about the stories we’ve

Portugal is a collection of life stories from people who have made the Algar ve their home. Curated by Alyson Sheldrake – a l ys o n s h e l d r a ke . c o m – it is available to purchase on Amazon w o r l d w i d e . Te n p e r c e n t o f t h e revenue from sales of this book will be donated to the Aler ta C h a r i t y, r a i s i n g f u n d s to s u p p o r t the Bombeiros.

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Before I knew it, I was show dancing on Mondays, line dancing on Thursdays, tap dancing on Fridays, and swimming at the camp pool and fitness classes in between. I also joined the Algarve Writers Group.

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COCKTAIL MAKING is something of an art form and take years to fully master. From the theatrics through to creating balanced and innovative new options, mixology needs to be learnt. It is something that anyone can try though, and you can have fun experimenting. For novices and those who just want to impress their friends with their latest concoction, there are numerous online tutorials showing you how to make some of your favourite cocktails quickly and easily. You will need a basic cocktail-making set with a shaker, strainer and some nice glasses, as well as a selection of alcohol (or non-alcoholic alternatives) and mixers. Embarking on a journey to learn to make cocktails, I have rated the tools I used out of ten for how easy they are to follow, the success of the finished result and also how entertaining I found the process.

1. 10 easy cocktails in 10 minutes

2. Cocktail skewer garnish tutorial

Hosted by Australian, Steve the Barman, this relaxed video highlights ten classic cocktails that are quick and easy to make with relatively few ingredients and only basic cocktail-making equipment. I chose to make one that is a favourite of mine, Espresso Martini which, in its simplest form, has three ingredients – coffee liqueur, vodka and coffee. One of the greatest things about cocktails is the ability to change them according to your personal preference. This one can be sweetened with sugar syrup, chilli can be added, flavoured vodkas used, and more to add your own spin on it. www.youtube.com/ watch?v=IRkM8jsG-hY

One obvious way to make your cocktails look professional is with a good garnish. This mesmerising video demonstrates how to make some impressive looking garnishes with a variety of fruit and vegetables and skewers. Making a rose out of the skin of a plum is a skill I did not know I needed, but the finished skewers are impressive and really help to take your cocktails to the next level. youtube.com/ watch?v=cVHGgUxyFTo

My score: 6/10

3. Non-alcoholic Mojito cocktails Cocktails do not necessarily have to contain alcohol to taste good, and this video with no presenter or narration demonstrates how to make six different virgin mojitos. The finished drinks are all variations on fresh fruit, sparkling water or other non-alcoholic fizzy drinks, with the addition of mint, ice and some simple ingredients. The finished drinks resemble mojitos because they serve them in jars. They are suitable for the whole family, refreshing, summery and fun to make. youtube.com/ watch?v=sZbTObGG_L4

My score: 5/10

My score: 6/10

C O C K T A I L FA N C Y A C O C K TA I L?

T I M E

O B V I O U S LY, N O T H I N G B E AT S H AV I N G A

P R O F E S S I O N A L D O I T F O R Y O U , E S P E C I A L LY I F T H E Y P U T O N A B I T O F A S H O W AT T H E S A M E T I M E , B U T D I Y - I N G I T I S H U G E LY G O O D F U N

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At the beginning of this tutorial, the presenter explains that there is a theory that all cocktails originate from just six iconic drinks that incorporate all of the techniques and styles. In order to make all six cocktails, you will need a wide variety of alcohol, mixers, bitters, syrup and fruit. While I am familiar with most of the six, the Sidecar and Brandy Flip were new to me. The Brandy Flip was particularly interesting, having been around since the 1800s, and it gets its name from the process of inverting or flipping the sugar within a drink. There are some useful tips included, for example that cocktails with ingredients such as egg and cream should be shaken with one large block of ice rather than multiple ice cubes, to give them a more silky texture. This video included information about the history of cocktails and some useful tips to ensure that what you produce is as professional-tasting as possible. youtube.com/ watch?v=cvQzoQ-L08g

With the Algarve full of citrus trees, it seemed like a good idea to learn how to make sour cocktails that require the juice of lemons and limes. In this video, the first sour is a Daiquiri, and it is surprisingly simple to make with just rum, sugar syrup, and fresh lime juice. Explaining that sour drinks should be shaken and not stirred, the mixologist demonstrates the measures of ingredients and the equipment required. It is easy to make, and served in the right glass, it looks pretty impressive, too! youtube.com/ watch?v=xjPmf3eRA5g

I love to use this website when I’m looking to get creative with cocktails but only have a few ingredients and no idea what I can make with them. It’s very simple to use, all you have to do is input the ingredients you have into the site (including any mixers and store cupboard items such as coffee) and it will tell you the cocktails that you can make. It is because of this site that I discovered a Baibay, which is a cocktail made from a shot of gin and a shot of Bailey’s mixed together! Not necessarily something I would drink again in a hurry, but an interesting option for when I only had a few ingredients. makemeacocktail.com/mybar/

My score: 5 /10

My score: 6/10

6. Make me a Cocktail

7. 10 threeingredient cocktails every bartender needs to know This video is aimed at bartenders rather than home cocktail makers. The mixologist says that all professionals should know at least 50 cocktails by heart. This video is designed to teach ten that contain only three ingredients each, making them ideal as part of a mixologist’s repertoire. There are traditional cocktails and others that I was less familiar with, such as Paloma and Gimlet, the latter made with gin, lime juice and sugar syrup. Requiring some slightly more complicated equipment and a wide selection of glasses, this video is a bit dull in comparison to others. It is probably most suited to those who need to know how to make these particular drinks for professional reasons rather than just for entertainment purposes. youtube.com/ watch?v=C0n4Fmnht7c

My score: 4 /10

My score: 7 /10

Making cocktails is fun. You can experiment with ingredients, flavours, quantities and garnishes and tailor them to your own taste.

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5. Mixology for Beginners: Citrus / Sours

ALGARVE P L U S

4. The Six most famous cocktails


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READS PLUS

FULLY

booked

THE THERAPIST

By Andrew Taylor Publisher: Harper Collins Genre: Historical fiction

By BA Paris Publisher: Harper Collins Genre: Psychological thriller

This is the first in a series of five books (so far) set in London during the reign of Charles II. The opening scenes describe St Paul’s Cathedral burning during the Great Fire of 1666. This is one of those books that mixes fact with fictional characters and works incredibly well. There are two main protagonists, Cat and James, whose lives are intertwined through the history of their fathers and the political intrigue of the day. I had to stop frequently to google – always need to know things like the value of a shilling in today’s money and if an event actually occurred. The historical accuracy is first-class and thorough, down to the descriptions of the disposal of the waste from the privy through complicated pipework! The characters are brilliantly described with depth and history, so a greater understanding of the delicate balance of power held by individuals is achieved. It really was a desperate time to be alive, what with the plague, then the fire, the restoration of the monarchy and the hunt for those still sympathetic to the deposed Cromwell. Those of you who enjoyed the Dissolution stories by C J Sansom will love this series, which picks up approx 100 years after the Shardlake books end.

Creepy and scary and OMG, I’m going to have nightmares! Blooming marvellous if you like being tied in riddles and frightened out of your mind! Alice and Leo are finally moving in together and it’s not just into any old house – it’s a gated community of exclusive homes in a posh part of London. It’s everything they could want, but as Alice gets to know her new neighbours, she discovers that a grisly crime took place there and she can’t leave it alone. She needs to know more, and begins to feel a connection to Nina, the murdered woman who lived in her home before her. But no-one will tell her what she wants to know, and she’s quite sure that they know more than they’re letting on. That’s it – can’t tell you any more because it’s brilliant and I don’t want to spoil it. I read this in one sitting late into the night – well, early hours of the morning – because it was so thrilling. I really did have to know who did it because every time I thought I’d worked it all out along with the whys and the wherefores, the plot just thickened! Definitely worth all five sparkling stars and the very highest recommendation.

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THE ASHES OF LONDON

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S H O R T E R D AY S M E A N M O R E C U R L I N G U P O N T H E S O FA W I T H A G O O D B O O K , A N D DAW N A N N A N D A L E H A S G AT H E R E D T O G E T H E R A M I X O F M U LT I - B O O K S E R I E S ( T H O S E W I L L S EE YO U TH RO U G H TH E AU T U M N A N D WI NTER M O N T H S ) A N D N E W LY - P U B L I S H E D G O O D R E A D S . P LU S A N I N D I S P E N S I B L E T R AV E L G U I D E


THE WHEEL OF TIME SERIES

THE SWITCH

By Robert Jordan Publisher: Orbit Books Genre: Fantasy

By Beth O’Leary Publisher: Quercus Genre: Chick Lit

At first glance, this is standard fantasy fare. Rand, a farm boy, stumbles onto an ancient power and is drawn into a titanic struggle to save the world from the “Dark One, the Great Lord of the Dark, The Father of Lies”. Every fantasy epic is inevitably compared to The Lord of the Rings, rarely favourably, but this one makes notable departures from the framework set by Tolkien’s masterpiece, which sets it above other series. Rand and his companions, Mat and Perrin, Egwene and Nynaeve, are refreshingly flawed. They are naive and error-prone, as farmers dragged into the wider world should be. They are taken by the scruffs of their necks by Moiraine, a magic-wielding Aes Sedai who has been fighting the darkness for 20 years, and Lan, her Warder, a bodyguard with his own buried past. The party finds themselves pulled apart by factions with their own designs on Rand, almost none of which see him as more than a tool to be used and discarded. Jordan takes the reader through 14 books (The Eye of the World is one of them), written over 22 years, culminating in a confrontation that eclipses anything you’ve previously read.

Absolutely charming and just lovely. This book is all of those splendid, terribly English adjectives that describe a delightful story full of little ups and downs, perfect to read for the sheer optimism, escapism and enchanting happiness of it all. Granny Eileen and grand-daughter Leena are both struggling with the after-effects of difficult events in their lives. Eileen lives in a tiny Yorkshire village, while Leena has a flat in London. The ladies decide to switch homes for a two-month ‘holiday’ to refresh their lives, take stock and live a little. Such a sweet story, but also with a serious side – there but for the grace… well, you know it’s all too easy to crash and burn or to live in complacency and then pooooff! It’s time to turn up your toes and question what you really did with life. Warms your cockles and leaves you feeling cosy and motivated. Smashing.

THE GREATEST BEER RUN EVER By John Donohue and JT Molloy Publisher: Harper Collins Genre: War biography

TOP 10 ALGARVE By DK Eyewitness Publisher: Dorling Kindersley Genre: Travel This is the best Algarve guide I have come across as far as planning for days out are concerned. It is regularly updated, and breaks down the best of the Algarve into helpful lists, from selected highlights to the worth-seeing castles and forts, museums, clubs and latenight bars, restaurants and wineries. Best bits are the six easy-to-follow itineraries, perfect for a day trip, a weekend, or a week, with detailed Top 10 lists of the Algarve’s must-sees, including comprehensive descriptions of Faro, Tavira, Silves, Monchique, Loulé, Lagos, Parque Natural da Ria Formosa, Sagres, Albufeira and Portimão. Included are the most interesting areas with the best places for shopping, going out and sampling authentic local food and inspiration for different things to enjoy during your trip including family activities, outdoor pursuits and coastal and river cruises. There is also a laminated pull-out map of the Algarve, plus four full-colour area maps, which help in the planning.

Book of the month

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Wow! What a story! This is definitely up there with the best of them. I loved this book and have bought it twice as a gift, too. The Greatest Beer Run Ever is the astonishing true story of a young man’s fantastic journey. Chick Donohue takes us on an amazing voyage from the streets of Manhattan, via the high seas, to the jungles and cities of Vietnam at the height of a war sadly often forgotten. This book is both a testament to the fading notions of loyalty and brotherhood, and an elegy for the working class enclaves that once formed the backbone of a city and nation. Donohue bore witness to some of the most ground-shaking events of the era while still managing to honour his friends. His tale is an unforgettable, brilliantly written wild ride from start to finish, filled with humor, action, poignancy and wrenching moments. When you read this book, remember, it’s all true and that alone will break your heart.



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PERFORMANCE PLUS

THE

d i r e c t o r ’s

P O S T P O N E D T H R E E T I M E S , A S WA S T H E O P E N I N G O F A N E W P L AY, T H E G R E AT P R E T E N D E R S , O R I G I N A L LY P L A N N E D T O D E B U T I N S Ã O B R Á S I N D E C E M B E R 2 0 2 0 . W E L L , N O T I M E T O D I E I S N OW O N T H E C I N E M A C I R C U I T, A N D YO U C A N F I N A L LY B O O K Y O U R S E AT S F O R A B R I L L I A N T B I T O F T H E AT R E

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HE SHOW MUST go on, and at last

The Great Pretenders will. Due to the pandemic, our rehearsals have started, faltered, started again, been put on hold, then recommenced. But now that the Covid cloud has lifted, our first performance will take place in six weeks' time. For almost two years, we have been in emotional troughs, lows and very occasional highs. Thankfully, none of the cast or crew got Covid, but during lockdown several of them came close to slitting their own throats in an amateur dramatic sort of way! Let me go back: 15 December 2019, São Brás Museum: We completed our final performance of The Windsors In Portugal, and even if I say so myself, it was a rip-roaring success. As often happens during the week before a show is ending, I get an idea for writing another play. On this occasion it was The Great Pretenders and Britain’s part in bringing the Portuguese monarchy to an end. During our end-of-show party, when I knew the thespian egos of the cast were at their height, I sounded out a few of them to hear their thoughts on my idea.

As usual the theme of this new play is factual, combining Portuguese and English history together. “Go ahead,” the actors chorused with gin and tonic smiles. “We’d love to be in it!” 25 February 2020, Carnival in Alte: Being a sociable bunch of people, we found an excuse to get together for lunch on Shrove Tuesday. Sitting at a big table in the sunshine – maybe it was the elaborate costumes and room sets around us – we started talking theatre. “The new play is partly written,” I said, making a few suggestions about who might play whom. The Duchess of Windsor might be good as Princess Alexandra, and how about the Duke being Cecil Rhodes? Enthusiasm was spilling over, and no one was more committed than our lookalike Queen Victoria. She took the lead in 2018 in Quarrelsome Cousins and was keen to play the part of the truculent queen again. What’s more, she still had the crinoline dress and the crocheted hat. When working to a limited budget, an amateur company must be financially In The Great Pretenders, Queen Victoria (Sue Ward), is the one who plays herself

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Photography by Peter Kain. Left to right: The Windsors (Natalie Galland and Simon Tubb) play Princess Alexandra and Cecil Rhodes. Mrs Pepys (Barbara Mountford) plays the Spanish Infanta. The mistress of Ernst II (Cheryl Gilmore) plays the mistress of King Carlos of Portugal; the wife of King Ferdinand (Denise Raines) plays the opera singer, Nellie Melba, and another bawdy mistress (Els Dietz) plays the Countess of Paris

prudent. This was the seventh time in succession that I’ve written a play in the early part of the year that we’ve performed in December. There was every reason to anticipate that on this occasion it would be no different. Whispers of a pandemic were increasing, but then they were only murmurs that didn’t seem quite real. 13 March 2020, Cheltenham & Liverpool: By now, our anxiety about Covid was reaching heightened levels. On television we saw large crowds meeting in the UK at the Cheltenham Festival, and in Anfield at the football stadium, Liverpool playing in the Champion’s League. What was the government thinking of to allow these events to go ahead while in Portugal a high level of alert had already been declared. Five days later, the UK was locked down – we were safer here – and now I had a couple of weeks to finish writing my play. Never in my wildest dreams did I think the predicted two weeks would turn into six! 2 May 2020, Terrace of a bar in Almancil: Lockdown finally over, I was giddy at the prospect of sitting down with the potential cast. I had a list of possible performance dates and a rehearsal schedule ready. We bumped elbows and rejoiced. Trying to coordinate calendars for more than a dozen people is the nitty gritty of all amateur shows, and for us it is more difficult because we have families living abroad – Brazil, Britain, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands and the USA. Understandably, most people were concerned about problems with international travel. Trying to take this into account, I drew up a revised timetable for

when weekly outdoor rehearsals could begin. Favouring a cautious approach, King Carlos and Queen Amelia of Portugal, Queen Victoria, her royal court, her Bishops and everyone else were wearing face masks; it didn’t seem fair for me as their director to insist on method acting! 12 September 2020, My garden, Loulé: The cast and I had serious discussion about recent Government announcements. Some new rules seemed almost laughable – that’s to say there was now a ban on selling alcohol in gas stations – but other decrees had more serious implications for us. No more than ten people were allowed to meet together. For the time being at least, we were going to have to put the play on hold.

pandemic would be over by the end of the year. Naturally, the subject of our December play came into focus again, but many of the cast anticipated they wouldn’t be here for Christmas of this year. It was clear I would have to revise the performance dates, write up a new rehearsal schedule and find suitable replacement actors. Writing the play had been a doddle compared to this.

Getting there Luckily, the woman who played the mistress of Ernst II of Saxe-Coburg was going to be around and she was still keen to be the mistress of King Carlos of Portugal. Samuel Pepys said he could no longer be the Bishop of Madrid but Mrs Pepys and Catherine of Bragança retained their parts as the Spanish Infanta and Nellie Melba. 14 October 2020, Via Zoom: A State of Most inconveniently, Henry the Navigator Calamity was declared, calamity being the and the medieval sorcerer from The operative word. Auditoriums and other large Passionate Pilgrim planned to be in England spaces were closed. The end of the pandemic in December. This meant that we were short was nowhere in sight. Whatever of King Carlos, his wife Amelia and optimism remained dwindled to a Bishop. We advertised the the size of a failing spotlight, missing parts on social media and then it flickered out. and received several BE THERE The show was called off. responses including a newly-arrived misSão Brás Museum 15 January 2021, guided Russian woman To book: 966 329 073 at home in another who was willing to admin@amigos-museu-sbras.pt 10 December, evening performance nationwide ride her bike from 11 and 12 December, matinees lockdown: On and Monchique to São Tickets €10 (Amigos, €8) off, until 4 May, we Brás for rehearsals! Money raised will be stayed at home while Somehow, and don’t ask donated to charity. the rules were slowly me how, it all worked out, lifted. Vaccinations were well and with my glass half-full I’m underway and it was predicted confident our historic comedy that in Portugal the worst of the will proceed without another blip!



ANTÓNIO PIRES ‘ A C L O U D Y D AY AT TH E B E ACH ’ W H E R E Faro beach W H E N November 2018 W H AT ’ S S P E C I A L The melancholy atmosphere of a deserted beach in winter. A DV I C E TO OT H E R S This is one of a small set I did and that makes for interesting comparisons. C A M E R A Canon EOS R

LARS’S VIEW “A strong vignette effect and elevated contrast settings underline the drama of this scene.”

Lars Hinsenhofen, portugal-location.com, studied submissions in the A l g a r v e P h o t o g r a p h e r s G r o u p ’s e x c i t i n g n e w s h o w, B l a c k a n d W h i t e a n d c h o s e h i s f i v e f a v o u r i t e s . S e e t h e m a l l a t t h e M u s e u d o Tr a j e , o r o n l i n e a t algar vephotographersgroup.org

I N T E R P R E TAT I O N S ERNST NEIDHARDT

‘A R T G A L L E R Y ’ W H E R E Bilbao, Spain. W H E N October 2020 W H AT ’ S S P E C I A L The shadow on the aluminium. A DV I C E TO OT H E R S Dealing with light and reflection always leads to great results. C A M E R A Nikon D810

LARS’S VIEW “Gehry’s iconic building is always rewarding in terms of black and white shades concerning architecture.”


PHOTOGRAPHY PLUS

LUDI STIEBNER

‘ONE CARE FUL OWNE R ’ W H E R E Near Mesquita in the Alentejo W H E N September 2021 W H AT ’ S S P E C I A L The fact it was so unexpected in such a remote location. A DV I C E TO OT H E R S Don't be afraid; go off the beaten track even if, sometimes, you come to a dead end. C A M E R A My old (but trusted) Samsung Galaxy J5 mobile phone

LARS’S VIEW

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“Colour would have been distracting in this composition. In black and white it becomes a mysterious find.”

NIGEL MOORE

DARYL GABIN

‘BALCONY’

‘ TR ACK E R ’

W H E R E São Brás museum grounds W H E N September 2021 W H AT ’ S S P E C I A L The image is all about the lighting. The angles and contrasts made this shot special. A DV I C E TO OT H E R S Always be aware of your surroundings, no matter how harsh the lighting. And remember to look up! C A M E R A Fuji X100V

W H E R E Algarve beach W H E N March 2020 W H AT ’ S S P E C I A L The cleanliness, and near perfection of the imprint in the sand. A DV I C E TO OT H E R S Shots like this are not difficult to reproduce. Other substances will also provide nice results. C A M E R A Canon R6

LARS’S VIEW “This presents the full scale of black and white graduation, with perfect contrasts and line management.”

LARS’S VIEW “Although the image has little white proportion, the pattern of the sneaker sole creates a strong shadow.”


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IN CHARGE KEEPING ALL OUR KIT CHARGED UP IS A MAJOR MISSION THESE D AY S , W H AT W I T H A L L T H E CORDLESS STUFF WE CARRY AROUND. THINGS ARE IMPROVING , H O W E V E R , W I T H B AT T E R Y L I F E GET TING LONGER AND CHARGERS G E T T I N G FA S T E R CH R I S PAR TR I DG E

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HE DAYS when each device came with its own charger that was incompatible with all your other chargers are long gone, leaving only two systems – USB-C and Apple Lightning. Apple has already adopted USB-C for some of its products and it may have to use it for everything if the EU carries through its threat to ban tech companies from putting a charger in every box, in the interest of reducing the flood of non-recyclable waste that goes to landfill every year. USB-C will then be truly universal. This is a good thing, because the manufacturers tend to economise on chargers. Most have a weedy output of 5W to 10W, while the latest phones and tablets support much faster charging. The new Xiaomi 11T Pro can go from zero to 100 per cent charged in just over a quarter of an hour with its 120W charger, though there are some concerns over the heat generated, and its effect on the battery’s longevity. The advent of USB chargers has another benefit – there is no need to provide a mains socket for every device, eliminating the familiar multi-socket extension cord in favour of a single power unit with an array of USB ports, all of which support fast charging. You can safely attach any device to a fast charging port because the power is automatically adjusted to suit the device concerned. A power block still needs a wire for each device, but the rat’s-nest can be tidied up using a wireless charging pad. Wireless charging uses electromagnetic induction to transfer the charge, so all you have to do is lay your wireless compatible device on the pad and it will begin to fill. In theory that is – in practice you need

to position the unit on the pad with millimeter precision for the charging to start, and wireless chargers are significantly slower than wired. Apple’s new MagSafe wireless charger uses magnets to position an iPhone on the charge pad instantly, but speeds are still glacial. Travellers can keep their devices going with battery packs, which come in a variety of sizes from credit card size up. The larger sizes have an array of USB ports to enable several devices to be charged at once. Rapid advances in technology have made solar panels a practical proposition these days. A foldable charger with three or four panels can easily provide 20 or 30W but current is limited so charging can be slow, but if you plan to spend the day by the pool it will keep your phone and tablet topped up nicely. Some solar panels include a battery so you can charge your device and then leave the panel in the sun to recover some of the power.

BEST WIRELESS CHARGER Belkin Boost Charge Pro A neat charger that will look good on any bedside table, the Boost Charge Pro takes care of all your Apple stuff – iPhone, Watch and AirPods. MagSafe makes attaching the phone and watch easy, and the QI pad on the base is for the AirPods. €149.99 gms-store.com

Read carefully and then rethink your kit: the future is charged with a sense of freedom

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TECHNO PLUS

BEST SOLAR PANEL BigBlue 28W Solar Charger Four panels deliver 28W, enough to charge two devices simultaneously, if slowly. The devices can be zipped away in a pocket for security, and the panels can be folded away for transport. €68.99 amazon.de

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Mophie Powerstation XXL A huge 20,000mAh battery supplies a USB-C port with Power Delivery and two USB ports, and its stylish fabric finish prevents scuffs and scratches. €49.99 worten.pt

Anker PowerPort Atom III Slim Three USB ports share 20W for charging mobile devices and a USB-C port delivers a massive 45W for laptops. €56.60 mytrendyphone.pt

gadget of the month

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NOKIA T20 TABLET

Resurgent mobile brand Nokia has launched an Android tablet, the T20, responding to rebounding demand for tablets driven by the pandemic and the move to working from home. The T20 is a quality 10" tablet at a budget price. Stand-out features are a bright 2K screen, a beefy (8200mAh) battery giving about 15 hours of surfing or seven hours of binge video watching, and a stylish body in sandblasted aluminium. Built-in memory is a less-thangenerous 64GB but there is a card slot supporting up to 512GB which should

be enough for anyone. It comes it two versions, one intended for home or office use with wifi only, the other with 4G data and GPS for travellers. The T20’s forwardfacing camera is a very

basic 8MP unit, but the only real use for a camera in a tablet is to scan documents and QR codes, and it is perfectly fine for that. The selfie camera has a resolution of 5MP, which is okay for video calls and Zoom meetings. The charger in the box delivers a decent 10W but the tablet supports 15W charging for a faster fill. A somewhat surprising omission is a fingerprint sensor, which means you either have to use a PIN or pattern to unlock, which is fiddly, or facial recognition, which is so

hit and miss it is more trouble than it is worth (at least that is my experience. Perhaps I have a face that is too unattractive to recognise properly.) Of course, for tablets that never leave the house, you can leave the screen lock off completely (which is what I do). Some of the most attractive features are intangible, however. Nokia promises to upgrade the OS for two years, which should take you up to Android 13, and to update the security systems monthly for three years. Nokia uses a ‘pure’ version of Android so new versions can come through quickly – the current Android 11 should be updated to Android 12 in the next few months. And all of this for a mere €185 (€202 for the 4G version). That is excellent value for money.


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GET CLUED IN. If you think design work involves a clever headline, well taken pictures and some pretty graphics, think again. Most of the time our clients know what they want to promote but have no idea how to get it out there. It’s like starting a job with a blindfold. So our job begins with the strategy behind the objective, we drill down into the heart of what you want to achieve and find the best way to get there. And then we craft the clever stuff around that! If you want to remove the blindfold and get a clear idea of how to make your promotions succeed call us on 917 203 850 and we’ll start by getting clued in.

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PAST PLUS

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Hank Marvin was Britain’s first home-grown genuine guitar hero. Most of the big names in British rock music owe a debt of gratitude to the bespectacled Geordie. Hank first found fame backing Cliff Richard in a four-piece originally known as The Drifters but later to achieve musical immortality as The Shadows. Born Brian Rankin in Newcastle, ‘Hank’ was a childhood nickname and he added ‘Marvin’ after rockabilly legend Marvin Rainwater. Alongside his friend and fellow guitarist Bruce Welch, Hank headed for London in the late 1950s. He met Cliff’s manager in the famous Two I’s coffee bar and on hearing that Cliff needed a backing band, they didn’t think twice and along with Jet Harris and Tony Meehan, soon became hit-makers in their own right. Hits like Apache, FBI and Wonderful Land also introduced British youth to the Fender Stratocaster guitar, played by Hank's idol, Buddy Holly. The Shadows’ personnel changed over the years but they continued to have success with and without Cliff, including coming second in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1975. Hank and Bruce later worked as Marvin, Welch and Farrar, and also with Roger Daltrey and Olivia Newton-John, as well as appearing in Cliff’s movies. Hank has been married twice and has six children. He moved to Perth, Australia in 1986, where he often appears onstage with visiting musician friends as well as his current group, Hank Marvin’s Gypsy Jazz.

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HANK MARVIN

Hank still often appears on stage with his current group, Hank Marvin’s Gypsy Jazz.

W H AT E V E R H A P P E N E D T O … S TA R S O F T H E S C R E E N – L A R G E A N D S M A L L – M U S I C G E N R E S A N D M U S I C I A N S , A L L F E AT U R E I N T H I S M O N T H ' S S E A R C H F O R T H O S E W H O H AV E C H A N G E D C O U R S E

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SKIFFLE Skiffle, in Britain at least, belongs to the late 1950s alongside winklepickers, drape jackets and pony-tailed girls. For a very few years it was hugely popular, not least because it could be played on the simplest and cheapest of homemade instruments such as tea-chest basses and washboards, alongside acoustic guitars and banjos. However, skiffle had its roots in the American folk and blues of the 1920s to 1940s , and was later popularised in Britain by acts like Chas McDevitt and Shirley Douglas, The Vipers, and above all, Lonnie Donegan. Songs like Freight Train and Rock Island Line (trains featured frequently in skiffle!) were huge hits and skiffle groups sprang up everywhere. Lonnie (who died in 2002) had previously played with Ken Colyer’s Jazz Band, and used to play skiffle in the intervals when his bandmates took a break. One of the BBC’s first teen programmes, 6.5 Special, had a skiffle theme tune and many of the country’s skiffle groups got their first TV exposure there.


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PENELOPE KEITH

She appeared in school plays but was rejected by one drama college for being too tall.

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JIM CARREY “One of the best actors never to have received an Oscar nomination”, was quite a tribute to the Canadian actor and comedian who is best known for the Ace Ventura movies and The Grinch. His road to success was never an easy one; money was tight in his family. His first job was as a janitor in the factory where his father worked. He started trying to get work in local comedy clubs as a teenager, having already written, aged ten, to Carol Burnett telling her he was an impressionist and asking for a job. Eventually, his brand of high-energy visual comedy was noticed by Johnny Carson, host of the US TV Tonight show. He managed to obtain a work permit for the States and moved to California in the early 1980s. He became a regular on US TV, doing impressions of everyone from Elvis and Humphrey Bogart to Kermit and Miss Piggy. He took small parts in films until Ace Ventura made him a star, reinforced by roles in The Mask, Batman Forever and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. By contrast, one of his most recent roles was in the family favourite, Sonic the Hedgehog, in 2020. He became a dual US/Canadian citizen in 2004 and had several high-profile relationships with celebrities like Renee Zellweger and Linda Ronstadt. Twice married , he has one daughter. In addition to his film career he is a keen painter, has written children's books and a semiautobiographical novel Memoirs and Misinformation that was published in 2020.

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In 2014, actress Penelope Keith became Dame Penelope, in recognition of her services to the arts and charity. Many of her admirers probably thought she had a title already, after her unforgettable TV performances as Margo Ledbetter in The Good Life, and Audrey fforbes-Hamilton in To the Manor Born. In real life, her background was much more modest. She was born in South London and when she was six she was sent to boarding school after her parents separated. She appeared in school plays but was rejected by one drama college for being too tall, before being accepted at the Webber Douglas Academy. Her first jobs were in repertory and she joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1963. Her role as Margo in The Good Life won her a BAFTA and she has continued to both act and present TV programmes well into the new century. While performing at Chichester Festival Theatre, she met her husband, a police officer who was on security duty there, and the couple have two children. They live in Surrey where Penelope, who is passionate about the countryside, became the High Sheriff of the County in 2002, only the third woman to hold the post. She is also a supporter of the National Trust and charities helping the homeless, including Transform, which offers supported housing to those in need. She is also the President of the Actors Benevolent Fund.


“Where is the men’s section?” – I was asked so many times in the last few weeks. Apologies to all the men who have visited my new shop and after looking in every corner asked this question. Most of the time, my product range of straw hats, leather bracelets, sunglasses or socks was not enough for them. So I have been scouting around to discover menswear which is not only stylish but also sustainable and made in Portugal. The most essential item to a man’s wardrobe is a shirt. The one I have introduced comes in six discreet colours, is collar or collarless, short or long sleeved, and in environmentally friendly certified linen, which is wonderfully cool - essential in our hot summers. The shirts are made by hand in small numbers and under fair working conditions, which add to their appeal. For the cooler season I found two very Portuguese accessories. The Herringbone flat cap is made of 100% lambswool and the perfect balance of the traditional Portuguese cap with a minimal contemporary design. Different sizes and colours makes it actually a gender- neutral item which can be worn by him and her.

which are carefully cut and overlapped until reaching the perfect thickness. The slippers can easily adapt to any foot and after just a couple of days use you will feel that their shape is definitely yours and no one else’s! A linen shirt, a flat cap, a pair of slippers and some socks might not yet be an enormous menswear section, but for my male customers I now have an answer, and it is a good one.

HOMES: Rua das Lojas, Rua 5 de Outubro nº 68 . FaSHiOn and accESSOriES: Rua José Fernandes Guerreiro, nº39 OPEn: Monday - Friday 10.00-13.00; 15.00-18.00; Saturday: 10.00- 14.00

Another very Portuguese accessory is the ‘pantufa’. A slipper made of leftover fabrics,

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EXPAT INFO PLUS

IMPORTANT C0NSIDERATIONS Don’t outlive your money C A R E F U L P L A N N I N G C A N H E L P Y O U M A I N TA I N T H E L I F E S T Y L E YO U D E S ERV E W IT H O U T T H E WO R RY O F S P EN D I N G A L L YO U H AV E S E T A S I D E F O R YO U R R E T I R E M E N T Y E A R S . A D R I A N H O O K , PA R T N E R , B L E V I N S F R A N K S , E X P L A I N S

2 . Consider t he amount you want to l e a v e b e h i n d For many of us, life’s financial successes come with a sense of responsibility for our loved ones. Being able to leave our closest family and friends the means to have the best opportunities and less struggle can afford a deep sense of comfort. Having independent expert advice can prove invaluable in helping you with planning your estate, wealth management, tax efficiency, and investment structures. This holistic approach provided by the strategic vision of your financial adviser can help to ensure you have something to leave behind without sacrificing the comfort of your retirement. 3. Consider how to get the most from y o u r p e n s i o n s Pensions are key to financial security in retirement, so careful planning is very important. Expert advice can help you avoid any unnecessary taxation of your pensions, as well as flagging certain risks and scams that may be presented as ‘opportunities’. Retired expatriates can benefit from transferring UK pensions to an EU/EEA-based Qualifying Recognised Overseas Pension Scheme (QROPS) or reinvesting a lump sum into Portuguese-compliant

4 . Co n s i d e r ways t o m a ke yo u r s av i n g s a n d i n v e s t m e n t s l a s t Having an expert review from a locally-based adviser and assessing whether your savings, investments and assets are working as hard as they can for you and are protected from unnecessary taxation would be beneficial. This will help you make the most of the tax-efficient opportunities available in Portugal and avoid holding onto UK assets that attract higher taxation with less growth. There are also currency considerations. Taking income in sterling while spending euros makes your money susceptible to conversion fees and exchange rates. Explore arrangements that offer the flexibility to hold investments in more than one currency and convert when it suits you, such as a Portuguese life assurance bond. Do not underestimate inflation here too. While it may be tempting to opt for low-risk investments in your later years, your capital needs to keep pace with the cost of living, and cash in the bank is unlikely to do this. Your financial adviser can recommend a diversified investment strategy. 5. Consider ways to limit the effect of t a x a t i o n One of the most difficult obstacles that comes with a longer life is the general trend for rising taxes. These tax hikes have the potential to cause even greater concern as governments take steps to recover from the economic strain caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. Higher taxation can be a serious threat to your financial security in retirement. Look for compliant arrangements available to expatriates in Portugal that can significantly minimise taxation, allowing your money to go further. For the best results, take personalised, cross-border advice.

This article should not be construed as providing any personalised investment advice. You should take advice for your unique financial circumstances. Blevins Franks accepts no liability for any loss resulting from any action or inaction or omission as a result of reading this article, which is general in nature and not specific to your circumstances.

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1 . Consider the income you will need The amount of income needed depends on the lifestyle you plan on having. If you want to live comfortably, even afford a few luxuries now and then, would the income you have be enough? If you are yet to retire, you need to assess whether your pensions and savings will be sufficient to cover your lifestyle to the end of your days. The effect of inflation is also an important factor that is easily overlooked. To give an example, let’s say you spend €5,000 per month. With an inflation rate of 3% each year, you would need €6,720 per month to maintain the same level of spending in ten years’ time and €9,030 per month in 20 years, which is almost double the figure you started with.

arrangements. As well as tax efficiency, this can provide estate planning advantages and flexibility to take income in sterling or euros. However, there are many variations in products and jurisdictions that can affect the benefits. Take personalised, UKregulated advice to establish your most suitable approach.

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live longer than any generation that came before, and while this is fantastic news, it will put more strain on your finances. Here are five key considerations that will help you assess whether your resources are on track to last your lifetime.

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ODAY, PEOPLE can generally expect to


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authorised by the Financial Conduct Authority as an Electronic Money Institution under the Electronic Money Regulations 2011. Our FCA Firm Reference number is 900669. Our EU services are provided by Currencies Direct Spain. © Currencies Direct Spain, E.D.E., S.L., Avenida del Mediterráneo, 341, 04638 Mojácar, Almería, Spain. Registered in the Commercial Registry of Almería under the Spanish tax ID number B04897930. Currencies Direct Spain, E.D.E., S.L. is authorised by the Bank of Spain as an Electronic Money Institution under Law 21/2011 of 26 July and Royal Decree 778/2012 of 4 May. Our registration number with the Bank of Spain is 6716.

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ADVICE PLUS

YOUR money

Increasingly, shops – including supermarkets – are asking if I want my contribuinte number on a till receipt. Seems silly to me, when I am buying groceries, but is there a reason for this and should I comply? When you request an invoice with your tax number, you may be contributing to a more balanced economy. Some people think that an invoice with their NIF may give too much information to the tax office but the idea is not to ‘control’ taxpayers, but to fight tax evasion. In fact the tax authorities offer several tax deductions, if you ask for an invoice with your fiscal number. Linking your NIF to your purchases has several advantages. For instance, each taxpayer can deduct up to €250 from general family expenses. In single parent families, the deduction is now €335. It is essential that each taxpayer asks for the NIF on their invoices and later validates them on the tax portal. Tax benefits include a refund of 15% of the VAT on

What is the correct percentage tip here for services in, say a restaurant or bar, and also the hairdresser or beauty therapist? Although in some countries it is almost obligatory to leave a tip, Portugal is not one of them. If you don’t tip, normally no one will be offended. The most common places where people expect a tip are restaurants. Here you may leave a few euros, depending on the amount you pay (5% to 10%). In other services, such as taxis or when you leave your car to be valeted, you can round up the bill, for instance leaving a €20 note for the payment of €19. Although it is stipulated that tips are liable for the payment of income tax, in most cases this income is never reported. If it was, the employer should manage and distribute the tips, retaining 10% at source. But the standard practice is for the tip to be given directly to the employee who will keep it, or share it with the other employees at the end of the day.

Email your finance questions for Ricardo to martin@algar veplusmagazine.com for inclusion in the f ir st available is sue of A lgar ve P LU S . To c o n s u l t d i r e c t l y w i t h R i c a r d o C h a v e s , e m a i l r i c a r d o @ a l l f i n a n c e m a t t e r s . p t

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each invoice, including accommodation, restaurants, car and motorcycle repair shops, as well as hairdressers, beauty therapists and veterinarians. Medical expenses attract up to 15% deductions in the IRS, to a maximum amount of €1,000 and include consultations, surgical interventions, hospital admissions, treatments, medications, prostheses, orthodontic appliances, glasses and frames and health insurance. Health expenses with VAT at 23% must be accompanied by a medical prescription. You must also associate this prescription with the respective invoice on the personal page on the Finance Portal. IRS deductions for education expenses are capped at €800 and are 30% deductible. These expenses include tuition fees at schools, crèches and kindergartens, school books, school meals, transport and even rent payable for students boarding. In addition to all these tax benefits, asking for an invoice with your NIF can make your life much easier and save you money in case of exchanges or returns of items in the event that you have lost your proof of purchase receipt.

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What is the situation here regarding pensions if you are NHR and working at your own business and therefore paying Portuguese tax? Do you automatically get a Portuguese State Pension, and at what age, and also will you receive one if you are entitled to a UK State Pension? I am 58 years old and a freelance personal trainer visiting clients at home. The retirement age in Portugal is currently 66 years and six months. If you have made social security contributions in Portugal, for at least 15 years as an employee or self-employed, you will be entitled to a pension. If you have worked in several EU countries, you may have accumulated pension rights in each and will have to apply to the pension authority in the country where you’re living or last worked. If you’ve never worked in the country where you are living, your host country will be responsible for gathering together records of your contributions from elsewhere. In some countries, the pension authority will send your application form to you before you reach retirement age. Check to see whether they will automatically do this.

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R I C A R D O C H AV E S O F A L L F I N A N C E M AT T E R S I S O N T H E P L U S T E A M A N D A N S W E R S Y O U R Q U E S T I O N S O N T H E I S S U E S T H AT A FFEC T YO U R LI FEST Y LE I N TH E A LGA RV E . H ER E H E E XPL AI N S T H E VA LU E O F I N VO I C E S W I T H YO U R N I F


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EXC HANGE PLUS

G BP/EUR: W HAT LIES AHE AD?

The German election at the end of September was a major event for the euro. During her 16 years as Chancellor, Angela Merkel has been a stable source of certainty for EUR investors. Now, it looks as though Germany could be in for weeks, maybe months, of coalition negotiations, effectively leaving the country in limbo during a critical time in its post-pandemic recovery. After the knife-edge election, a three-party coalition seems the most likely outcome. The Social Democratic Party (SDP) and Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU), which co-governed for 16 years, have ruled out working together again. That means one will need to share power with at least two other parties, most likely the Greens and the Free Democratic Party (FDP). However, in order to form a coalition – and govern effectively – the allied parties will need to navigate significant differences in policy and ideology. The uncertainty during coalition talks, and the eventual outcome, will likely have a big impact on GBP/EUR.

E co n o m i c h e a d w i n d s 2021 has been a tumultuous year economically. Although many economies are now emerging from the pandemic, the knock-on effects are still being felt. And they can be unpredictable at times. It will likely be a while before the global economy normalises. In the meantime, there are bound to be bumps in the road to recovery. The UK’s supply chain crisis, including the shortage of HGV drivers, could intensify in the run-up to Christmas. Likewise, the European energy crisis may get worse as we head into the colder months and energy demand grows. Another concern is that increasing inflationary pressures could lead to overheating or even stagflation, with rising prices and slowing growth. Whatever happens, any economic headwinds are definitely going to affect GBP/EUR.

Covid -19 developments The pandemic has had a seismic impact on the world, and the currency market is no exception. From mid-February to mid-April 2020, GBP/EUR plummeted from €1.20 down to €1.06 before bouncing back up again to €1.15. That is a huge amount of movement in a very short space of time. While fluctuations on that scale are unlikely to happen again soon, GBP/EUR could still be affected by the coronavirus: if new variants emerge or cases rise over winter, we could see that reflected in the currency market.

How to protect against volatility If you’re exchanging pounds and euros, it pays to protect yourself against volatility. By using a specialist currency provider, like Currencies Direct, you’ll have access to a range of services and tools that can help mitigate uncertainty and maximise returns. For instance, with Currencies Direct you can use a forward contract to lock in an exchange rate for up to a year, protecting your money should the market move against you. A limit order is another useful tool, especially if you have a particular exchange rate in mind. With the uncertainty of 2021 set to remain through the last few months, GBP/EUR could experience big, unpredictable movements. If you expect to change currencies during that time, speak to a specialist for free about protecting your transfers. Currency Direct has helped over 325,000 individuals and businesses move money abroad since 1996. It has an ‘Excellent’ Trustscore on Trust Pilot, over 20 global offices, and a team of more than 500 currency experts.

For more detailed information , please contact the loc al of fice T: 2 8 9 3 9 5 7 3 9 or register at c u r r e n c i e s d i r e c t . c o m / p o r t u g a l to get regular updates on the currency markets , (u s e A l g a r v e P L U S m a g a z i n e a s t h e r e f e r e n c e) .

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Political uncertainty

A key driver of GBP/EUR movement is how respective central banks approach monetary policy. In recent months, the Bank of England (BoE) has taken a more hawkish stance than the European Central Bank (ECB), with the former expected to hike rates in early 2022, two years ahead of the ECB. This divergence in policy has so far favoured the pound, with GBP/EUR surging half a cent following the BoE’s last policy announcement. As such, the upcoming policy decisions (16 December for the ECB; 4 November and 16 December for the BoE) could boost GBP and dent EUR.

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I N TH E FI N A L Q UA RTER O F 202 1 , J O S É A L M E I D A S AY S T H AT I T PAY S TO B E AWA R E O F W H AT M I G H T A F F E C T E X C H A N G E R AT E S – T H E R E ARE SOME KE Y EVENTS COMING UP T H AT C O U L D H AV E A N E F F E C T O N T H E G B P/ E U R C U R R E N C Y PA I R I N G



DATELINE PLUS

THE agenda T H I S M O N T H ’ S S P E C I A L S E L E C T I O N O F T H I N G S WO R T H S E E I N G

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A R T

A R T

Bota Filipe, the pioneer C O N V E N TO D E S A N TO A N TÓ N I O, LO U L É ULI SCHAARSCHMIDT MUNICH

O N U N T I L 2 0 N OV E M B E R , T U E S DAY TO S AT U R DAY

This special exhibition celebrates the life and work of the late António Bota Filipe, the founder of Zefa Contemporary Art in Almancil, where he created an extraordinary eccentric space for art and the artists he inspired. The exhibition brings together different aspects of his work, which give an insight into the visionary nature of his thoughts and visual art application. Artist Charlie Holt was one who worked with Filipe over the years – as a team they were famed for their project in Salir. JEAN MARIE DROUET

KAREN WRIDE

First Class Art, Guia 917 081 893

LOTTI KLINK

Tavira d’Artes, Tavira 962 012 111 The Swiss abstract artist, living in the Algarve, uses mixed media to create texture and striking colours. 100x80cm

Inspired by a trip to Japan, Seven Geishas depicts the young ladies of Kyoto in traditional dress. Oil on canvas. 100x100cm

Côrte Real Gallery, Paderne 961 528 679 Plonger dans les Reflets, oil on canvas. 81x116cm

MARIO HENRIQUE Art Catto, Loulé 289 419 447

Marilyn No. 3, Series III, acrylic and oil on canvas. 190x150cm

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THE agenda S P O R T I N G

ANTOINE DE GROLÉE

E V E M N T US S I C

ASSOCIAÇÃO CULTURAL RE-CRIATIVA Republica 14, Olhao 289 147 308

CORO DOS AMIGOS Museu de Traje São Brás, 966 329 073 6 November, 18:30

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Two recitals by pianist de Grolée – full details at amigos-de-musica.org – promise to be popular with Amigos members and guests alike. Booking is vital as capacity at Os Agostos is limited – email reservasconcertos@gmail. com for information

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There’s a really active programme here that includes art exhibitions, and some splendid eating opportunities at the Association’s Ficus Cafe Concerto – 919 669 953 to book

Amigos de Musica Os Agostos Santa Bárbara de Nexe 9 and 11 November

In its first concert since the start of the pandemic, the Museum’s own choral group will be singing with real passion, accompanied on the piano by Joana Shumova. The programme includes Dvorak, A. Caldara, C. Franck, Mendelssohn, Buxtehude, and Haydn, among others. Tickets are €7 (€5 for Amigos)

AL’MARAFADO ENSEMBLE

HELENA MADEIRA

19 November

The talented harpist in a solo concert of Arab and Sephardic songs.

Timeless music from this exceptional foursome.

27 November

T H E A T R E

A WOMAN OF PARIS Teatro Lethes, Faro, 28 November, 16:00, Tickets €10 A Woman of Paris is a silent film, directed in 1923 by Charlie Chaplin, in the dramatic genre, addressing moral and social issues as diverse as love, betrayal, revenge, jealousy, and more. Pianist and composer, Luís Conceição, has adapted Chaplin's original work in this cine-concert, adding a component of improvisation linked to what takes place on the screen.

SVETLANA BAKUSHINA Museu de Traje São Brás, 966 329 073 27 November, 18:30 Piano recital – the programme includes Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Liszt, Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky. Tickets are €12 (€10 for Amigos)


''Near & Far''

www.fresco.gallery art@fresco.gallery @frescogallery

E X P E R I E N C E S

PAINT A POT WORKSHOPS

VILA VITA BIERGARTEN

Ben and Nadrali Different locations

Porches 282 381 177 Until 15 November

Perfect for small groups and kiddies’ parties, learn to paint a pot, or bowl, or tile, to your own design. All materials are supplied; Ben and Nadrali will glaze and fire your finished piece and return it to you, ready to use. Contact benandnadraliceramics@ outlook.com for details.

It’s game season. A series of special dishes will be served at the Biergarten, paired with a selection of German and artisanal beers, such as Porches Craft beer.

COMERES D'AQUI (FOOD FROM HERE)

Art Exhibition runs 14th Oct - Mid Dec

Loulé restaurants 12 and 28 November Loule’s Vitalizar project is launching gastronomic weeks in which restaurants of the municipality will create dishes – starters, mains and desserts – that use local produce such as legumes, olives, almonds, carobs, figs, acorns, grapes, pomegranates, medronho berries, honey, citrus fruits and aromatics. For more info, email comerciolocal@cm-loule.pt, call 289 400 829, or visit facebook.com/loulelocal

Oil Paintings by Fi Katzler

PORTUGUESE COOKING EXPERIENCE Casa de Mondo, Boliqueime Every Thursday Learn how to prepare Portuguese dishes with fresh local ingredients in a safe, relaxed atmosphere with free local wines. Either group bookings or private lessons, with a pro chef.

info@casademondo.com

Sculptures by Evelyne Brader-Frank

UNVEILING THE FARO MONUMENT The vast monument, created by sculptor Toin Adams and team, a tribute to the fishermen of Faro who rescued survivors of the US Liberator Bomber that crashed into the sea in 1943, is due to be inaugurated at the end of the month. It promises to be a spectacular event with music, video – the works. Visit the Imaginary Beings Facebook page for exact details.

Visit us: Fresco Gallery, Estrada das Escanxinas, Almancil, Algarve +(351) 911 765 566


LAST WORD PLUS

AND finally SHOULD ONE COMPLAIN ABOUT POOR SERVICE OR SECONDR AT E F O O D A N D W I L L T H AT A C T U A L LY C H A N G E T H I N G S ? A N T H O N Y M A R T I N R E C K O N S I T I S E A S I E R T O S TAY Q U I E T A N D S I M P LY C H A N G E S U P P L I E R S O R E AT E L S E W H E R E

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ERY OFTEN, at the end of a meal in a restaurant, the owner/head waiter will come up to you and ask whether you enjoyed it, and because I can’t be bothered to enter into the conversation, I normally say “yes fine, thank you”, even when thinking, “that was terrible, and I shan’t return”. This saves the to-ing and fro-ing of the “no one else has complained”, or “well that is the way our chef cooks it, and you don’t understand our ethos”. But then I’m a Brit and as a rule of thumb, we don’t complain. Although it is quite possible that my refusal to speak up stems from an incident many years ago, when I managed to get a table at a new restaurant that had garnered rave press reviews. It was an artyfarty restaurant that had a sign inside that quoted the chef, saying “Jacques only cooks in mineral water”. That alone should have warned me that Jacques was a chef who was firmly inserted up his own backside. However, the restaurant was packed with the local literati and glitterati and the hum of conversation suggested that the patrons were enjoying themselves. When our pretty waitress duly delivered the pretty food to our table of four, I asked my wife if hers was hot, because mine wasn’t. I called pretty waitress over, requesting a bit of heat. She shivered slightly, paled, and meekly took the dish to the kitchen from where, after a few seconds, came a shriek and a crash. The entire restaurant went deathly silent. Pretty waitress arrived back at our table and, with approximately two hundred eyes on her, said in a trembling voice: “Jacques said it was hot when he cooked it, and if you don’t like it, get out”. We left, and unsurprisingly, a month or so later the restaurant closed down. So never ask me whether everything is to my satisfaction as it is highly unlikely that you will receive a negative answer, regardless of what I think. I’ll just turn up again, or I won’t. Which, after that preamble, brings me to what I

wanted to say regarding questions about service. In the past, I used Amazon UK frequently and for many things. Since Brexit, however, for obvious reasons I have switched to Amazon Germany. But whereas Mr Bezos asked only once, and sounded genuinely concerned as to whether I was enjoying using my Blocmen Derma Pre Shave Powder Stick and if it had been delivered on time and to my satisfaction, Herr Bezos is a totally different fischkessel; much more insistent regarding the intricacies of my nervous system and the effect on my psyche after the delivery of a set of windscreen wipers. The emails come rolling in on a daily basis. Were they delivered on time? No, a week late. Were they delivered to my satisfaction? No, they were thrown over the wall. Are my windscreen wipers ergonomically correct, as well as being the correct model? And the final question that had me choking over my morning coffee. Am I getting satisfaction from my windscreen wipers? Satisfaction! What does he think I’m using them for, they’re bloody windscreen wipers. And this is a problem, I am constantly bombarded with emails asking if I’m a happy consumer. The restaurants and hotels booking services: how did I sleep or how was my meal? The printer’s ink supplier: am I getting clear images? The jet washer repair company: how’s the pressure now? And God help me if I go online to ask anything of anyone: the following day I receive a five-page survey to fill out, including rows of stars to tick off, rating my satisfaction, from ‘extremely’ to ‘my representative was a moronic idiot’. Perhaps I’m not being fair on the latter, as it’s not their fault that they are in a job that involves speaking in what is not their mother tongue, through a Covid mask, and over a poor internet connection. So, in order to make myself feel better, I give them a five-star rating. I’m happy, their company is happy, and the only people who suffer are the consumers who have to put up with his lack of knowledge and unintelligible instructions. But at least I’m being consistent.

Mr Bezos asked once about my satisfaction, but Herr Bezos is a totally different fischkessel