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Wang Dufeng OUT OF THE BOX

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CONTENTS Featured Projects

Busycle

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Robockey

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04

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Team Project

Team Project

Team Project

Team Project

Individual Project

Individual Project

3 Months

4 Months

3 Months

4 Months

1 Month

1 Month

Responsible for: Concept Research 3D Modelling Rendering APP Design

Responsible for: Mechanical Design Part of Programming & Circuit Design

Responsible for: Concept Research 3D Modelling Rendering Circuit Design Programming

Responsible for: Research Circuit Design Programming (Visualization Frame Construction)

Responsible for: Concept Research 3D Modelling Rendering UI Design

Responsible for: Concept Research 3D Modelling Rendering

P4

P16

P 22

P 30

P 34

P 44

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Hiccup

3D Modelling Data Gloves

Interactive Dining System

Easy Pump


A n

A u to n o m o u s

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H o cke y

Te a m


Introduction

The Stars

Competition Requirements

11.655

The Rink 10.563

14.500

8.741 2.483

14.500

To estimate your robot's position within the rink, we will provide each robot with a custom mWii sensor capable of detecting a constellation of infrared stars mounted approximately 5 meters above the rink. The star pattern dimensions (relative to the rink center) can be seen left.

Robots

The Robockey rink will take the shape shown above, and will be surrounded by a clear plastic border at least 4 centimeters tall.

The Puck

Robockey is a project that I made with 2 teammates in my Mechatronics class during my first year in IPD program. We were asked to design and build a hockey team that fell into the competition requirements, I was solely responsible for mechanical design and jointly responsible for circuit design & coding.

The puck is 3.0 inches in diameter by AT LEAST 1.125 inches tall, with a ring of eight equally-spaced 940nm IR LEDs situated 0.75 inches above the ground.

Dimensions - At all times, the robot (and any appendages) must fit within a 15-cm diameter cylinder and be no taller than 13 cm. Puck Interactions - At no time may your robot independently constrain the puck’s motion (no holding, no adhesives, no features to capture the puck, etc. - if in doubt, ask for clarification before building something!). You robot cannot encapsulate more than 20% of the puck (when viewed from above, we will measure the percentage by connecting a line between the furthest-out points which enclose the puck). Your robot may, however, include a mechanism or actuator to “kick” the puck. Rink/Goal Interactions - At no time may your robot attach itself to any part of the rink or the goal. Control - The team of robots must be fully autonomous, and each robot must carry it’s own power source. Contact & Damage - Your robot must not intentionally damage the rink, the puck, or any other robots. Positioning LED - Each robot must include a single upward-facing bicolor red/blue LED. When your robot receives the Comm Test signal, it should flash the color corresponding to the goal which is defended in the first period, and whenever the Play command is issued, the LED should turn on and remain illuminated in that color throughout the match. Other Restrictions - Your team must not interfere with the wireless communications of another team or the game-play system. To avoid confusion with the puck, your robots must not emit nor intentionally reflect IR light. Your robots are not allowed to intentionally link together in any way.


Explosive View

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ERW Structural Steel Pipe (5.563 OD x 0.258 wall) mRF Module (Nordic nRF24LE1 2.4GHz wireless tranceiver) M2 Microcontroller (ATmega32U4 processor) mWii IR Blob Tracker (CMOS IR camera) Purf Board x 2 30:1 37D mm Metal Gearmotor (including hub & L bracket) x 2 Lasercut ABS Motor Gear x 2 Pololu Wheel 70x8mm (including hub) x 2 4mm Black-oxide Steel Collars x 4 Lasercut Shaft Mount Board (1/4’’ board x 2, 1/8’’ board x 4) Lasercut ABS Wheel Gear x 2 3.7V 4500mAh x 3 Phototransistor & Lasercut Phototransistor Mount Board x 9 Lasercut Layers x 11 Bottom Layer with 2 LEDs underneath as ball bearings

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Panorama

Mechanical Design Front View

Right View

Top View

14.13 CM

Each robot is equipped with 9 IR sensors, mounted by 0.75 inch from the ground.


Circuit Diagram

Circuit Components Selection

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Items listed below are just a demonstration of some key components, other components including resistors and capacitors are not listed. 06 01

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02 Voltage Regulator LM7805

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LTR 4206 Phototransitor

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Wireless Tranceiver

10A 5-25V Dual Channel DC Motor Driver

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9V Battery

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03 01 CMOS IR Camera

37D mm Metal Gearmotor

Polymer Li-Ion Cell 3.7V 4500mAh

M2 Microcontroller

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10K Ohms Potentiometer

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Localization Simulation in Matlab

Coding General Concept

Wireless Command

Find the Puck

Chase the Puck

Puck Captured

Once received an play command from the mRF module, the robot will be activated

Extract analog values from IR sensors’ input and compare those values for the hightest one

Control motors’ speed and direction based on which phototransistor senses the highest intensity

Based on the values given from the two phototransistors upfront, the robot would switch to ‘go to the goal’ mode after it captures the puck

We loaded three .mat files obtained as the mWii was moved in a pattern under the constellation. Each .mat file contains an array, "rawStarData", that represents the values obtained from the sensor (without size data, so they are Nx8 arrays, arranged as [ x_1 x_2 x_3 x_4 y_1 y_2 y_3 y_4 ] ). We plotted the pixel-space position and an orientation vector for the mWii relative to the stationary constellation centered above the rink.

Coding with C Variables Declaration

Motor Initialization

Wireless Command Head to the Goal The robot will receive a pause command once it scores the goal, and it will be ready to reset.

Based on robot’s real time location and orientation, the robot will create an optimal trajectory to take the puck to the goal

Data Conversion

Read mWii

Convert data to robots’ real time location and orientation

Data extraction based on the pixel image provided by the mWii camera

Main Loop

Motor Control with PWM

Global Initialization

Data Extraction from mWii

Phototransitor’s ADC Conversion

Data Conversion to Real Time Units

Create Trajectory for the Robot


Dufeng Wang 2016 Portfolio  

Hi, there! This is a portfolio for some of the selected projects that I have done. Also, there is an introductory video link embedded on pag...

Dufeng Wang 2016 Portfolio  

Hi, there! This is a portfolio for some of the selected projects that I have done. Also, there is an introductory video link embedded on pag...

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