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WA 355 Ad4b 1891-92 c.2


BIENNIAL REPORT

A-W-VTNNT GENERAL OF THE

STATE OF WASHINGTON.

/

FOR THE YEARS 1891 AND 1892.

OLYMPIA, WASH.: STATE PRINTER

o. C. WHITE,

1893.


ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, September 1, 1892.

To his Ercellency E. P. FERRY, Governor State of Washington, Olympia, Washington. SIR-1 have the honor to transmit herewith my fourth biennial eport as adjutant general of this state for the years 1891-92. I am, sir, with respect, Your obedient servant, R. G. 0' BRIEN,

Adjutant General.


REPORT OF ADJUTANT GENERAL. GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, WASH.,

September 1, 1892.

HISTORY OF THE NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON. A reference to section 1856 of the Revised Statutes of the United States will disclose the provision of congress relative to the election of general officers of the militia in the several territories, which is as follows: "SEc. 1856. Justices of the peace, and all general officers of the militia in the several territories, shall be elected by the people in such manner as the respective legislatures may provide by law." This act was approved January 23, 1813. Under the provisions of the foregoing recited section of the act of congress, all general officers of the militia of the Territory of Washington were nominated in general convention, and the names of the nominees submitted at the general election with the other candidates presented for the suffrage of the people. So little attention was paid to the several offices of adjutant, quartermaster, and commissary general of militia, that they were peddled out by the conventions to whomsoever could be induced to accept the nomination, regardless of the fact that the offices were of sufficient importance to demand the attention of the incumbents. At the territorial republican convention held at the city of Vancouver, in 1880, of which the Hon. E. P. Ferry was chairman, and R. G. O'Brien secretary, the same rule was followed as previously, and, under the vigorous protests of the several gentlemen, Mr. M. R. Hathaway, of Clarke county, was nominated for adjutant general, Mr. R. G. O'Brien, of Thurston county, was nominated for quartermaster general, and Mr. D. K. Bush, of Pacific county, for Commissary general, upon the republican ticket.


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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

The gentlemen nominated were elected to the several offices by large majorities, Mr. O'Brien receiving the largest majority ever received by a candidate upon either ticket up to that time, aggregating about ten thousand. Upon taking office as quartermaster general, Mr. OBrien gathered, from different quarters, territorial military property to the value of about ten thousand dollars; and, at the request of Gen. M. R. Hathaway, the adjutant general, discharged the duties of that office in connection with that of quartermaster general during his entire term. At this time there were no military organizations in the state with any standing under the law, which of itself was so inadequate in its provisions as to bar encouragement in the organization of the militia of the territory. At the expiration of his term of office as quartermaster general, General O'Brien was nominated and elected adjutant general; and, thereafter, in 1883, organized the first military company, known as company A, of the first regiment, of the present national guard of the state, at the city of Olympia, and assumed command of the same until such time as he secured a competent commander. This organization was followed by that of the Seattle Rifles, now company B, of the first regiment, with Joseph Greene as captain; the Tacoma Guard, now company C, of the same regiment, with Albert Whyte as captain; and company D, of Seattle, with John C. Haines as captain. These companies were kept together solely through the military ardor of the members, and the martial spirit of their friends; there being at that time no provision of law whereby the territory could be charged with any expense incident to the organization of the militia. A futile effort was made by the adjutant general to secure the passage by the legislature of the law providing for organization, maintenance and discipline of the militia, which failed of the legislative recognition it so richly deserved, and caused the company organized at Olympia to disband, and turn in the property in their possession to the adjutant general. At a subsequent session of the legislature, a similar effort was made by the adjutant general; and, through the efforts of its friends, a bill passed the house, but was reconsidered before being submitted to the council, and was defeated. Meantime, in February, 1886, the Chinese riots broke out at Seattle, whereupon, corn-

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

7

panies B and D did heroic service in maintaining order, and preserving the peace, lives and property of the citizens until relieved by the regulars under orders from the president of the United States. From the organization of deputy sheriffs, on that occasion, sprang the present company E, of the first regiment, Captain George Kinnear commanding, followed subsequently by Captain E. M. Carr, now assistant adjutant general, which company had as its members many of the oldest residents of the city of Seattle and solid men of the community. These companies were followed by the organization of company A, second regiment, at Walla Walla, captain, Paul D'Heirry; company B, at Goldendale, captain, E. W. Pike; company C, at Centerville, captain, J. B. Eshenberg; company D, at Waitsburg, captain, Henry D. Shuham; company E, Walla Walla, captain, Joseph D. Conry; company F, at Dayton, captain, J. T. Burns; company G, at Spokane, captain, G. W. Greene. Companies A and E, at Walla Walla, were subsequently disbanded, and replaced by the organization of a new company A, at Ellensburgh, Captain J. E. Frost commanding, and a company E, at North Yakima, Captain J. C. MacCrimmon commanding; which companies, with company H, at Pomeroy, were organized and mustered in October, 1891, and were followed subsequently by the organization and muster of company K, at Tekoa, Captain E. H. Fox commanding, and company I, at Clyde, Captain W. B. Buff um commanding. The first regimental organization was completed by the muster of company F, at Whatcom, captain, J. J. Weisenberger; company G, at Port Blakeley, captain, J. W. Phillips; subsequently mustered out, and a new company G organized and mustered at Tacoma, with Fred. A. Gans (now major) captain. Company H, at Vancouver, captain, T. E. Glover; company I, at Port Townsend, captain, George H. Jones; company K, at Aberdeen, captain, A. E. Morton; company A, at Olympia, captain, C. S. Reinhart, formerly captain of company B, second infantry, at Goldendale. Companies B, C, D and E, were first formed in battalion organization March 9, 1886, with Captain George D. Hill, U. S. A. (retired), afterwards elected brigadier general, as lieutenant colonel commanding; and, thereafter, upon the muster of a sufficient number of companies for a regimental organization, Captain J. C


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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

Haines, commanding D company, was elected colonel; S. W. Scott, lieutenant colonel, and Charles Evans, major, with rank from April 28, 1887. On March 26, 1887, the second regimental organization was completed by the election of Captain C. M. Anderson, assistant adjutant general, as colonel, Captain E. W. Pike as lieutenant colonel, Captain J. T. Burns as major; with rank from that date. On the first day of May, 1888, the first troop of the present cavalry battalion, designated troop A, was organized, with Charles B. Johnston, now major, commanding the battalion as captain, B. B. Glasscock as first lieutenant, and T. F. Smith as second lieutenant, with headquarters at Sprague, Lincoln county; and was followed on June 27, 1890, by the organization and muster of the second company of cavalry, designated as troop B, with James M. Ashton as captain, James H. Barry as first lieutenant, and James M. Dougan, second lieutenant, with headquarters at Tacoma. On the 28th day of the same month a battalion organization was effected, with the election of Charles B. Johnston as major commanding. The duty devolving upon the adjutant general's department in effecting the organization of the national guard, as it at present exists, was laborious and often trying; and the services gratuitously rendered from 1883 to March 27, 1890, at which time the legislature, by enactment, placed the salary of the adjutant general at 1,500 per year. The service rendered by the first regiment during the great fires in Seattle and Vancouver, in June, 1891, in suppressing the lawless element, protecting the property of the citizens from incendiaryism and preventing the spread of the fiery elements, and of company G of the second regiment, at Spokane Falls, during the terrible holocaust at that place, at once established in the minds of the people the wisdom of the legislature in making provision for the substantial organization and support of the national guard. During this period the guard was not without its casualties. Some of the brightest and most efficient members at various times paid the great debt of nature and answered the roll call of the "great commander." Col. G. Morris Hailer, assistant adjutant general, and Lieutenant Colonel T. T. Minor, M.D., brigade surgeon, were drowned between Utsalady and La Conner while crossing the Sound in canoes.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

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Brigadier General George D. Hill met the same fate near the same place. Colonel J. C. Haines and First Lieutenant B. C. Dorr also are among the officers whose light went out at the sound of the "taps" of life. HISTORY OF THE NATIONAL MILITIA. A very able article published a few months since discloses the fact that a hundred years has passed since congress, in the spring of 1792, passed its first general militia law. This act remains to-day on the statute books with all its ancient phraseology, and its mandates impossible to execute. upon any able-bodied Still nominally in force is its injunction male citizen between eighteen and forty-five years of age, enrolled by his captain, to keep himself provided with a "good musket or fire-lock of a bore sufficient for balls of one-eighteenth part of a pound," two spare flints and twenty-four cartridges, or else with a "good rifle, shot pouch, powder horn, twenty halls and a quarter of a pound of powder." The quaint instructions for grenadiers and bombardiers are still to be perused, and also the directions to commissioned officers to provide themselves with "a sword and hanger and spontoOfl" or, if mounted, to have their "holsters covered with bear skin caps." From time to time efforts have been made to remove this venerable. chapter from the statute hooks, or at least to modernize it, until now, at least, it seems to derive a sort of protection from its age. But the fact is, that the law was never carried out. No sooner was it enacted than efforts were made to repeal some provisions and amend others. Under the plan of General Knox, which had been drawn up in 1790, young men between eighteen and twenty-one a camp of instruction duryears of age were to serve thirty days in 4 ing each of the first two years, and ten days of the third year; citizens between twenty-one and forty-five years were to drill four days annually; those between forty-five and sixty were to be enrolled in the reserve, which was to assemble semi-annually for a similar inspection of arms. This was a very striking, and, under the circumstances of the country at that time, not a very onerous system, while its seriousness was shown by a provision that no person reaching the age of twenty-one should exercise the rights of a citizen unless he could show a certificate of the required service in the militia. But the act of May 8, 1792, widely departed from


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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

Knox's plan, and the very next year after it was put in operation Washington asked congress "whether your own experience in the several states has not detected some imperfections in the scheme." The story of the way in which numerous and fruitless attempts to amend this system resulted at length in 'its practical abandonment is instructive and interesting. Two years after its adoption a bill was reported for organizing select corps of militia, to be armed and equipped by the general government, and to be paid while serving in annual camps of instruction. This, of course, would have been a radical departure from the general law, which required the citizens to arm and equip themselves and put them on the same footing. It is not unlikely that, had this measure prevailed, it would have been in force to the present day, and might have made a vast difference in the history of the country. It would, in fact, have founded a national militia of an effective character. However, years passed without securing the modifications desired. The chief step gained was the enactment of the law of April 23, 1808, making an appropriation of two hundred thousand dollars annually to provide arms and equipments for the militia. It is noted as a curious fact that even when this new appropriation had been made, the old requirement that each citizen should arm and equip himself was not repealed. Even then the reluctance to remove the old law was manifest. Jefferson and Madison followed Washington in urging year after year a modification of the militia system; the latter, in 1805, desired "such a separation of the more active part from that which less so, that we may draw from it, when necessary, an efficient corps fit for real and active service, and to be called to it in regular rotation." He thought it was quite enough to subject the population between the age of eighteen and twenty-six years to military duty in time of peace. Madison's most noticeable contribution to the subject was a proposal of annual camps of instruction for the commissioned and non-commissioned officers. In 1816 Secretary Graham, by the direction of congress, prepared a new plan. It divided the militia into three classes, according to ages, of which the two younger were to assemble in annual camps of instruction. Congressman Harrison, of Ohio, afterwards president, proposed as a substitute military drill for all the classes, and revived Madison's plan of annually instructing the officers and non-

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

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commissioned officers in camp. He estimated that the cost to the government would be $1,500,000 a year. In 1825 a board, on which Scott and Zachary Taylor were prominent, reported that the great defect in the law was the excess of numbers it held to service. They suggested as a substitute that a brigade of militia in each congressional district be instructed in camps for ten days each year and paid for their time and expenses. A drift toward a select body instead of a general organization had thus been clearly manifest through all these years; yet two additional elements, volunteering and state organizations, were needed before the desired reforms could be secured. Jackson recommended the former, while Secretary Poignsett, in 1840, made an approach to the latter by a proposal of one hundred thousand active militia apportioned among the states, each of which could keep its quota filled either by volunteer enlistment or by draft. One-fourth to go out of service annually into the reserve, while the president could put them in camps, under pay, for a month annually. In 1846, still another plan was reported, that of maintaining in each state an active militia between eighteen and twenty-one years of age, whose officers should be instructed annually in camp by the general government. All that time the new ideas of volunteers and state organizations had not only become rooted, but had borne fruit. Such militia bodies were springing up all over the union, and in fact the basis of that body of volunteers who achieved distinction in the Mexican war. After that war, greater interest than ever was taken in the state volunteer system, and its growth put an end to the long series of abortive efforts to form a national militia, congress practically accepting it as a substitute. In 1861 the outbreak of the civil war gave a new opportunity for this modern system to show its value, and the lesson has never been forgotten. For a while, during the quarter of a century which hs succeeded the war, many efforts have been made to revive the old idea of a federal militia. They have all failed. Meanwhile, even the value of such a militia has become less and less obvious, because the state forces have greatly improved, rifle practice and camps of instruc tion having done the great work for them. The particular service rendered by congress during the past twenty-five years has been its comparatively recent increase of the annual militia appropriation of $400,000. Even that has been of little importance to some states, so small is their share of it in comparison


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ADJUTANT GENERAL

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

to their own appropriations, but it is of real value to states that otherwise would neglect their militia, and it is really the best argument for the still further increase of the annual appropriation.

ming, on account of a lack of a suitable force of state troops, and it suggests an examination of the services performed by the national guard of other states under similar circumstances. It happens that the adjutants general of the several states and territories have recently furnished statistics on this subject brought up to the present year without connecting the cases in which the organized militia have been called out during the past twenty-five years. Naturally, there are great differences between the states in this respect; Virginia, for example, calling out her troops thirty-three times from the period of 1881 to 11891. Texas nearly equals this record, calling out her troops twenty-nine times in not quite sixteen

GOVERNMENT AID FOR THE NATIONAL GUARD. Very serious inconsistencies still exist in the present provisions made by congress for the support of the national guard of the several states. In his annual report for 1891, Mr. Secretary Proctor remarked: "The present method of allotment of the annual appropriation of $400,000, for arming and equipping the militia which is prescribed by the act of February 11, 1887, and which gives to each state an amount proportionate to its congressional representation, is not such as to produce good results. "The aid given different states is very disproportionate, the amount of government aid received by some states being not more than half that received by others maintaining double the number of men in their national guard. The allotment, as it is now made, is not based upon what the states do in return for the appropriation, but what they ought to do. It would be better to help those who help themselves." It is not just to give Tennessee, with less than six hundred troops, *11,575, and Missouri, with three hundred and fifty men, $14,742, as was done in 1890, while Connecticut, with over three thousand men, received but $5,528, and New Hampshire, with three fine regiments, aggregating thirty two hundred men, received only $3,785. Why should Arkansas, where the inspecting officer in 1891 could not find a single organization, receive $3,550, while Rhode Island, with fifteen hundred splendidly disciplined troops, was forced to be content with $6,485.27, and Washington, with 1,388 men, only apportioned $2,794.98? These comparisons might be continued indefinitely, but the further we follow them, the more startling the inequalities, and more prominent the inconsistencies. The system is wrong and unjust, and it is to be hoped that congress will increase the appropriation to the amount asked in the bill presented by Representative Cutting, of California, one million dollars at least. USE OF THE NATIONAL GUARD IN RIOTS. From official sources we have reports of the recent resort to the regulars of Fort McKinley to put down local disturbances in Wyo-

13

years. Last year they were employed on three occasions -to assist at an execution, to disperse a mob, and to guard a jail. Other duties in previous years had been to serve against hostile Indians, to suppress a convict uprising, and to guard against race troubles, etc. At one time there were as many as two hundred and seventy-five men out. Still another high record is that of Iowa, which has had her troops out twenty times ince 1876. The railroad riots, the mining troubles, the ousting of liquor sellers, and arrest of murderers, were a portion of the occasions that required their services. As a contrast Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Wyoming have not called out their troops at all for riot duty for the last quarter of a century. In the case of Wyoming, however, it was not for the lack of occasion, as has just been seen. Vermont, Georgia, Maryland and South Dakota, called out their militia but once each on such duty in the period under review. A creditable fact in the Vermont case is that at a miners' riot in 1883, out of five companies called upon, ninety per cent. of the men reported at only two hours' notice. Maryland's only experience was costly, since three regiments and a battery were on duty for a month, in the labor riots of 1877, at an expense to the state of over $80,000. But Pennsylvania far surpasses all other states reported upon in the magnitude of the riot duty imposed upon her militia as far as the return reported goes to show, New York not having reported that service. In the mining troubles of 1867, she had out one thousand men from April 7 to May 24, at a cost of *38,000. In the lumber


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ADJUTANT GENERAL,

troubles of 1872, four hundred and fifty men, from July 22 to August 1, at a cost of $15,000. In the railroad troubles of 1873, eight hundred men for about six days, at a cost of *25,000. In the mining troubles of 1875, eighteen hundred men from April 4 to May 18, and June 3 to June 23, at a cost of $110,000. In the riots of 1877, no fewer than nine thousand four hundred and fifty-three men, more or less, from July 19 to November is, at a cost of $710,000. In the mining troubles one year ago, nine hundred men from April 2 to May 26, at cost of $35,030. In the Homestead troubles of this year, a division of men for ninety-five days, at a cost of $428,378.93. Total cost in suppressing riots alone in twenty-five years, $1,326,378.93 The railroad riots at Buffalo, New York, during the present year, required the services of militiamen, at a cost of *225,000 to state and county. A state which has lately had abundant use for her state militia is Tennessee. Last year the whole national guard were out, at a cost of $1o,000, in consequence of the contract labor troubles, and at the official report one hundred and twenty-five men were still in the service at a cost of $2,000 per month. It seems pretty clear from the developments of last year that the state needed more troops. New Jersey, in the Orange riots of July, 1870, had out two thousand men for one day, and in November of the same year, a regiment for quelling a riot. In January, and again in October, 1876, a regiment was called out. While in the railroad riots of the following July the whole national guard was for a week under arms. In Alabama, during the seven years from January 1, 1883, to January, 1890, the militia was called out repeatedly to quell election riots, to protect jails, prevent lynchings, to assist the sheriff in making arrests, and to suppress mobs, etc. On one occasion, as many as three hundred men were called out. On another, eight companies of infantry, two of artillery, and one of cavalry. California called out her militia five times between 1876 and 1884, for the purpose of guarding prisoners and quelling riots at Sacramento. In one case a whole brigade were out, while in another two companies served over night. Colorado's militia have been out very often, both in riot duty and to furnish protection against Indians, sometimes serving as long as ten days.

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The Connecticut militia have been called upon only four times since 1870, iii enforcing the law and in repressing and preventing riots. On one of these occasions five companies were out. In four of the six occasions when Massachusett's troops were called out they kept order at great fires in Boston, Springfield, Lynn and Lawrence. Wisconsin had her troops out five times from 1881 to 1890, the largest number called upon being eight hundred and thirty-six men, who served ten days in the Milwaukee riots of 1886. The Kansas troops have been out eight times on important occasions. All of these states have supported an organized militia for many, many years. The National Guard of the State of Washington received its first official recognition at the hands of the legislature by an act approved January 28, 1888, not quite five years ago, and during that time havo been called out in the service of the state —First. During the Chinese riots at Seattle, in 1887, when three companies were on duty for five days, at no cost to the state, and until relieved by the regulars. This, however, was before the passage of the act organizing the militia. Second. During the mining troubles at New Castle, in 1888, at a cost to the state of $163.74. Third. At the fire in Seattle, in June, 1889, when five companies served for three weeks, at a cost to the state of $4,000.38. Fourth. At the fire in Spokane, at a cost to the state of $686.54. Fifth. During the mining troubles in King county, in 1891, in which one-half of the entire strength of the Nationhi Guard of the state was called into service for a period of three weeks, being five terms of service in less than five years of legislative recognition, a strong comparison with other states of greater advancement in Commercial interests and greater population. These examples will give a good idea of the extent and variety of the work of the organized state troops in all parts of the union. It is only by collecting such details that an approximate idea can be had of the true value of the militia for these purposes. It performs work that would otherwise fall upon the army under a guaranty which the constitution gives that "each state shall be protected by the United States, if necessary, from domestic violence." Thus, in a double way, including its local preservation of order,


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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

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as well as its readiness to answer the call of the president against a foreign invader, it can well appeal to the states for a liberal support. It is but a short time since the state of Idaho passed through a disastrous experience of internal strife outgrowing the labor troubles in the Cceur d'Alene mines. Not having a sufficient force of its own to cope with the lawless elements, the governor was compelled to appeal to the national government for aid in preserving the peace, lives and properfy of the citizens. It is not safe to presume that these difficulties are at an end. On the contrary, rather, it is but a commencement when considered in the light of the influences exercised by anarchists, socialists and irresponsible demagogues who travel throughout the country preying upon the credulity of the working classes, leaving them in open rupture with the best interests of not only themselves but the com-

This appropriation can only be drawn by the states in arms, ammunition and quartermaster's supplies. BUREAU

OF

MILITARY STATISTICS.

REBELLION RECORDS.

Notwithstanding a provision of the legislature at its last session for the payment of clerical labor necessary to transcribe the records now in the pension bureau of the war department, appertaining to the services of volunteers from the Territory of Washington during the war of the rebellion, I have been unable to procure such copies for the reason alleged in answer to a communication ly myself, of which the following is a copy: WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON CITY, June 12, 1891. Gent. R. G. O'Brien, Adjutant General, State of Washington, Olympia, Washington: SIR—Ref

erring to your letter of the 4th instant renewing your request

to ho furnished with noniog of tho rOc!c,rde nnrtininrc tn fho n1,,fn'.,'

munity at large. REGIMENTAL ORGANIZATION

The regimental organizations of the national guard of Washington are the same as they were at the date of my last report, to wit: The first infantry regiment, located east of the Cascade mountains; the first cavalry battalion, one company located at Sprague, in Lincoin county, and one at Tacoma, in Pierce county. Since my last report, however, the infantry regiments have been augmented by the addition of one company to the first regiment located at Olympia, and two companies to the second regiment located respectively at Clyde, in Walla Walla county, and Tekoa, in Whitman county, presenting a total of one hundred and twentyone officers and 1,267 enlisted men; aggregating 1,388 officers and men. All, with the exception of the officers, who must provide themselves, are furnished with the regulation uniform of the United States army, and which are in fairly good condition, with few exceptions. The arms and equipments are such as are furnished by the war department to the regular troops, and are drawn from the general government upon requisition made against the annual allowance set apart fQr the equipment of the militia of the several states, epresentation from each which is based upon the congressional r state; and amounting for the state of Washington to $2,764.9 8 annually.

On page 16, under "Regimental Organizations," after the words "to wit," read as follows: The First Infantry Regiment, located west of the Cascade mountains; the Second Infantry Regiment, located east of the same range, with ten companies each; one unattached company at Waterville, Douglas county; the First Cavalry Battalion, one company located at Sprague, in Lincoln county, and one at Tacoma, in Pierce county, with headquarters at Spokane.

For the reasons heretofore stated the secretary regrets that he cannot comply with your request at the present time. F. H. AINswORTH, Very respectfully, Major and Surgeon, U. S. Army.

It is a matter of regret that these documents cannot be obtained, and, in view of the fact that the Territory of Washington furnished but one regiment, I am unable to understand the necessity for such constant handling of these muster rolls, even if every man whose name is drawn upon it should make claim for a pension, as would obliterate them to such a degree as to prevent the department from furnishing the copies asked. I am enabled in this report to present. —2


ADJUTANT GENERAL

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

the list of the officers, and company C, only of that regiment, as certified by the colonel of the same. (Schedule A.) Frequent communications are received by me requesting certificates of service and discharge with which I am unable to comply by reason of the absence of those records.

The evidence of his former freindship for the whites will be found in the record of the Nez Perces Indians engaged in assisting the whites during the war of 1855 and 1856, made a part of this report, wherein Chief Joseph stands as third in command of that gallant band of Indians led by Spotted Eagle, and who served thirty-seven days in aid of the whites in that memorable struggle, furnishing their own horses. Such record as we have does not disclose that they received any compensation therefor. From the report of the commissioners appointed by the war department September 4, 1856, consisting of Captain A. J. Smith, Rufus Ingalls, late quartermaster general of the United States army, and Lafayette Grover, afterward representative in congress from Oregon, governor of the state and United States senator, who were charged to ascertain and report upon the expenses incurred by the territories of Oregon and Washington, I glean the following: The muster rolls of Washington Territory have been perfected under the direction of the commissioners, and are in character and detail like those of Oregon. The aggregate number of troops borne upon the rolls of this territory is 1,896. Approximate number of troops in service at any one period, 1,000. In taking action upon the pay of the volunteers of Washington Territory, the commission, in the absence of any law of the territory on the subject, deem it proper and just to recommend the same pay and allowances as have been reported in the case of the volunteer troops of Oregon. The payrolls embrace like action of the commission and have been carried out in detail in the same form with the following results: Troops in service of Washington, exclusive of the field and staff, 476,951.88; staff department, and field and staff, and employĂŠs enrolled, Âś42,641.18; total pay, 519,593.06. I find further that the total amount of expenses ascertained and allowed for the maintenance of volunteers in the Territory of Washington, not including pay of volunteers, is *961,882.39, making a total of pay and expenses in the Territory of Washington of $1 ,481,475.45 The following letter from the third auditor of the treasury relative to the manner of presenting claims for said service is self explanatory:

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RECORDS OF THE INDIAN WAR OF 1855-56. I present herewith copies of the muster-in and muster-out rolls of the pioneers of the territory who served in suppressing the Indian uprising in the wars of 1855 and 1856, in accordance with an act of the legislature requiring the same to be recorded in my biennial report. (Schedule B. This record is as complete as I am able to make it from the papers on file in my office, and, I believe, state generally and in full the statistics of the volunteers from the Territory of Washington at that time. I am led to believe that many, if not all of these men, have never been compensated for that service by the general government, there being no record in this office of any payment to them for the service thus rendered, either personally, or for property furnished and lost during that war. An inspection of these rolls will disclose the names of many of the leading men of the State of Washington to-day, and others who have made their mark in the world's affairs, recognized as being among the most active pioneers of that date, and substantial men of this, now in the peaceful enjoyment of those homes which they so sturdily defended against the barbarous encroachment Of the say.age foe. Many also have paid the great debt of nature and gone to that "undiscovered country." Such men as Hon. A. A. Denny, Hon. Harvey W. Scott, editor of the Oregonian, Thomas Prather, Esq., Hon. Elwood Evans, Wm. Packwood, Col. B. F. Shaw, state senator from Clarke county, and many more whom I might name are still with us, bearing an important part in the affairs of this young state. • During the years of 1877 and 1878, Eastern Oregon was the scene of a violent Indian uprising which threatened, likewise, to engulf the eastern portion of this state. The Indians concerned were the Nez Perces, who had always been friendly to the "white man," and the campaign against the whites in this instance was conducted by Chief Joseph, one of the ablest leaders among the red men.

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ADJUTANT GENERAL. TREASURY DEPARTMENT, OFFICE OF THE THIRD AUDITOR, WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 11, 1893.

Hon. B. G. O'Brien, Adjutant General, Olympia, Washington: SIR —In reply to your request of the 31st ultimo, for information relative to the rules of practice for the settlement of claims growing out of the Oregon and Washington Indian war of 1855 and 1856, I herewith enclose a copy of the rules and a loyalty circular to aid in preparing said claims. You are also informed that this office does not use a special blank for said claims. Applications should be in writing, giving dates, company and regiment, and accompanied by his discharge and evidence of his loyalty during the late rebellion. A. D. SHAW, Acting Auditor. Respectfully yours, In making claims for services during the war of 1855 and 1856, the claims must in all cases be accompanied by the following information and evidence: 1. The name and place of residence of the owner or holder thereof, and directions as to the disposition of the draft when issued. 2. The evidence of ownership, if held by assignment or purchase. The original certificates of service or of purchase must in all cases be presented. 3. Claimants should state, on filing the claims, whether they desire action according to the allowances heretofore made by the third auditor in his report of 7th of February, 1860, or whether they desire to furnish additional evidence with a view to a reconsideration of the former allowance. In cases where the claimants state they intend to furnish additional evidence, action thereon will be suspended until such evidence is received. Such claimants as desire specific information of the amount allowed by the third auditor, in his report aforesaid, with a view of determining whether or not to take additional testimony, on filing their claims and so requesting, will bd informed of the respective amounts allowed, and action suspended until heard from as above. 4. All evidence must be sworn to before some judge, justice of the peace, or other officer legally authorized to administer oaths. Where affidavits are sworn to before either a justice of the peace or a notary public, they must be accompanied by a certificate of a clerk of a court of record under a seal of such court, to the effect that the officer administering the oath was, at the time, a duly qualified justice of the peace or notary public, and that his signature is genuine. Each witness must state his means of knowledge

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

21

of the facts sworn to, and whether he has any interest, directly or in directly, in the claim concerning which he.testifies. In addition to the foregoing, the evidence of loyalty referred to in the auditor's letter is fully set forth in section 3480 of the revised statutes, which reads as follows: "SEC. 3480. It shall be unlawful for any officer to pay any account, claim or demand against the United States, which accrued or existed prior to the thirteenth day of April, A. D. eighteen hundred and sixtyone, in favor of any person who promoted, encouraged or in any manner sustained the late rebellion; or in favor of any person who, during said rebellion, was not known to be opposed thereto and distinctly in favor of its suppression; and no pardon heretofore granted, or hereafter to be granted, shall authorize the payment of such account, claim, or demand, until this resolution is modified or repealed. But this section shall not be construed to prohibit the payment of claims founded upon contracts made by any of the departments, where such claims were assigned or contracted to be assigned prior to April first, eighteen hundred and sixtyone, to creditors of said contractors, loyal citizens of loyal states, in payment of debts incurred prior to March 1st, eighteen hundred and sixty-one." SERVICES RENDERED BY THE NATIONAL GUARD. The National Guard are not carpet knights for street parades and armory balls. They are protectors of all law abiding citizens. They are organized under wise provisions made by the legislature for the purpose of assisting the civil authorities in maintaining the supremacy of the law, and protecting the lives and property of the citizens of the state. They are called upon only when the civil authorities fail in the preservation of the peace. They have rendered arduous services, self-sacrificing labors, in this state many times. Without the guard, law and order could scarcely be maintained. The day has gone by when any person, with proper instincts, thinks of ridiculing them as "amateur soldiers." The National Guard has a double duty to perform —First, As a citizen in a strict observance of the law of the land, and by every moral force in his power upholding the supremacy of the same. ,Second When the constituted authorities have failed in the preservation of peace, and the protection of life and property with the civil power, then, as a soldier of the state, he is adding his physical Power to the maintenance of the laws which as a citizen he has endeavored to support. Every good citizen is bound to acknowledge


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

his obligations to a well disciplined body of national guardsmen whose prestige and moral force overawe law-bieakers. The recent labor troubles which have agitated the public mind to so great a degree, have demonstrated that a military force isessential to the preservation of society from disintegration. In three of the great states of the union, as well as our own, the law has been compelled to call in the assistance of the state troops for the purpose of quelling anarchistic insurrections. Even the right to labor—the inalienable right of every human being—has been assailed by violence, and the attacks have been so fierce that they were too strong for the civil authorities alone. Troops were never brought out for a cause more worthy—summoned to defend liberty assailed in its most vital point. Without them, these states would have been given over to mobs of insurrectionists and the most overwhelming terrorism. The exhibition of military force, and the determination to use it, was an absolute necessity. Physical force is requisite in keeping down the savage elements of society. We have learned the lesson that we must strengthen the guard as a terror to the anarchistic spirit which has been stimulated by the vile demagogues who are preaching to the people that property is plutocracy, and that labor has no rights apart from those granted by a minority organized for the purpose of dominating it. Many of the labor unions passed resolutions advising their members not to join the guard, and also even making it unpleasant for those who were members. They have also gone so far as to have their legislative representatives agitate the question of removing some, or all, of the exemptions for those who are in the guard. The State of Washington is not free from the necessity for a perfect organization, and the past has demonstrated the wisdom of the legislature in making provision therefor. On the 24th day of June, 1891, large bodies of armed men riotously assembled at Gilman, in King county, took possession of the mines and mining property of the Oregon Improvement Company and other mining corporations, aggregating in value hundreds of thousands of dollars, depriving the lawful owners of the possession of property which belonged to them and them alone. Refusing not only to labor for the companies themselves, but to permit others to do so. A number of men lost their lives in an effort to protect their

property and discharge their duty as citizens, and others were wounded in endeavoring to defend their rights and maintaining the supremacy of the law. On the 28th day of June, 1891, the National Guard was called into the service of the state to suppress these riots and deliver the property in jeopardy to its rightful owners. These rioters not only assemble unlawfully for the purpose stated, but organized companies at the several places named, and armed them with Winchester rifles and shotguns, and supplied them with the necessary ammunition. They were drilled daily and paraded under arms for the purpose of overawing the lawfully disposed and preventing the operation of the mines except upon such conditions as might be named by themselves. Such organizations were entirely unauthorized and unlawful, and called for the most stringent measures in overcoming the same. The civil authorities were unable to cope with the difficulty, and, therefore, all King county called for the assistance of the state's extraordinary police force—the National Guard. In response thereto, troops were sent to Franklin, New Castle, Gilman, Black Diamond and elsewhere, with instructions to assist the civil authorities in maintaining the law. Colonel J. C. Haines, commanding the first regiment, was in immediate command of the troops. The total cost of said service during the three weeks the troops were engaged, was $13,108.33. No report of this service was made by Colonel Haines prior to his decease, but a very full and concise report was made by Lieutenant-Colonel Greene, subsequently commanding the first regiment, hereto attached, marked "Exhibit A." The troops engaged in this service were companies B, D and E, of Seattle, C and G of Tacoma, and troop B of the first cavalry battalion, Captain James M. Ashton commanding. For full information as to the services of troop B in this campaign, I respectfully refer you to the report of Captain Ashton herewith, marked "Exhibit B." No state troops have ever rendered more valuable services than those of the State of Washington in the King county mining riots. Every officer and man performed his whole duty; and, as on former occasions, were not found wanting in any particular.

22

23

COURTS MARTIAL.

The matter of the court martial of Second Lieutenant W. H. Gorham, company D, first infantry, who was tried upon charges


24

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

of "conduetto the prejudice of good order and military discipline," and dismissed the service for creating dissension and strife in his company against his superior officer, and which finding was approved by your excellency, took a phase which was a surprise by reason of a concerted action on the part of Mr. Gorham and his successor elect. Mr. Gorham, without notice of any kind to proper authority in the national guard, as I am informed and led to believe, entered into collusion with his successor- elect whereby he commenced proceedings in the superior court of King county, without notice to this office or to any other constituted authority of the national guard, to declare the election held to fill the vacancy created in the office by his dismissal, and the election of his successor, void, and to restore him to the position vacated by his dismissal from the service under the findings of the court martial. The question of the jurisdiction of the civil court is one which I am satisfied was not fully considered by the learned judge who tried the case. The state was not properly represented, and, in consequence, every advantage was taken of the situation in behalf of the petitioner. Upon general headquarters questioning the reliability of the course taken in the case, an order was issued by your excellency, commanding an appeal to be taken to the supreme court in behalf of the state. Before, however, the appeal was perfected, the time allowed by law in such cases expired, and an order was subsequently issued restoring Mr. Gorham to his former rank, in accordance with the judgment of the court below. The regularity of the proceedings had, prior to that time, can properly be questioned; and, had the state been afforded an opportunity of contesting the matter before the supreme court, I am satisfied that it would have resulted in a reversal of the judgment of the court below. Pursuant to the charges and specifications filed by Major C. H. Ayer, assistant adjutant general, against Colonel John C. Haines, commanding the first infantry, upon the charge of (1) conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, in violation of the sixtyfirst article of war, and the charge of (2) conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline, in violation of the sixtysecond article of war, with sundry specifications to said charge, a general court martial was convened, under special order No. 7,

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

25

dated October 19, 1891, consisting of Brigadier General A. P. Curry, Colonel E. W. Pike, second infantry; Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general; Colonel John D. McIntyre, chief of ordnance; Colonel J. K. Stout, chief signal officer; Colonel Wellington Clark, assistant inspector general; with Captain Charles H. Merriam, as judge advocate. The court met in Olympia, at the Olympia Hotel, on the day designated, and, after organization, proceeded to consider the charges, specifications and the plea of the accused, who appeared in person and by his counsel, W. H. Gorham, to the jurisdiction of the court. The proceedings and findings of which court are herewith submitted, and marked "Exhibit C." The three first points of the plea s*ere overruled by the court. The fourth plea, which went directly to the validity of the regulations promulgated by the military board and approved by your excellency under the act of the legislature approved January 28, 1888, in which it was urged by the accused that the act of the legislative assembly, approved March 27, 1890, amending the militia law repealed the former act and all regulations promulgated under it. • That was a question of law which to my mind this court had no power to consider. The only question presented for their consideration was, "Is the offense charged such an one as would come within the jurisdiction of a court martial?" That being determined in the affirmative, the duty of the court was to proceed with the trial upon its merits. The majority of the court sustained the plea as to the validity of the regulations, and submitted their findings to your excellency. It is a noticeable fact that the supreme court of the state subsequently (in a case decided against the doctrine claimed by the accused and his counsel, and passed upon by a majority of the court) in the case of Graetz v. MeRinzie, 3 Wash. 194, held that where the language of the succeeding statute was identical with that of the preceding, with the exception of the amendment contained in the latter law, the provisions of the preceding statute were continued and not repealed; hence, this case being directly in point, the court martial erred in the finding made. Deeming it for the best interests of the service, and to eliminate all possible ambiguity and uncertainty in the future, your excellency approved the finding, and issued an order for the military board to at once formulate a code of the regulations for the gov-


26

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ernment of the national guard, which was done in accordance with the instructions given in as thorough a manner as it was possible to do, and they were duly approved by you in orders.

disregard by citizens in ignoring operation by courts in county cannot be tolerated at expense of state. CHAS. E. LAUGHTON, Acting Governor. (Signed)

INDIAN TROUBLES IN OKANOGAN COUNTY. In the month of January, 1891, prior to the adjournment of the legislature for that year, great fear was entertained by the citizens of Okanogan county of an Indian uprising, which promised to be of a very serious nature, outgrowing the lynching by a band of lawless men whose identity could not be established, of an Indian boy who had been concerned with other Indians in the murder of one of the deputy sheriffs of said county; and to allay the fears of the people and prevent the difficulty anticipated, it was necessary to take prompt action in the matter, and the following correspondence was had relative thereto with acting governor Chas. E. Laughton and the several parties below named: Telegram from the county commissioners of Okanogan county: To his excellency CHARLES E. LATJGHTON, governor: An Indian who was implicated in the murder of Cole in Octobet was last night taken from jail and hanged. Owing to the fact that he had given himself up to the sheriff, and the bitter feeling existing between the citizens and Indians at this time, serious trouble is feared. The priest says that the Indians have held four meetings lately and the young bucks are anxious for an outbreak. They have manifested in different ways that they are angered. The citizens of the county are comparatively unarmed, and the situation at this time demands that we ask of you to do all in your power to have five hundred rifles, with sufficient ammunition, sent at once to Coulee City. This, that our citizens may be armed and be prepared as well as possible for an outbreak. Please telegraph at once if we may expect arms. Our messenger rode all night to deliver message. To which telegram the following reply was at once transmitted: OLYMPIA, Jan. 10, 1891. The County Commissioners and Sheriff of Okanogan County: Care of messenger, Coulee City, Okanogan County, Washington. Two hundred rifles ordered shipped express immediately. Six thousand round ball cartridges same. Officer detailed to accompany and deliver. County commissioners will be held responsible for this ordnance. Sheriffs must use every effort to maintain the peace. Arms must be used only in the case of actual necessity occasioned by attack from Indians. Advise me fully of condition of affairs daily. If absolute necessity exists, more rifles and cartridges will be sent as soon as obtained. I urge that every means known to the law be used to avoid tiny conflict with Indians. Wanton

27

Not having a sufficient number of arms in the armory for immediate transmission to the aid of the citizens of this county, I at once wired to Captain E. W. Young, camp of Sons of Veterans at Seattle; Captain S. E. Harbox, at North Yakima; Dr. E. L. Hills, at Tacoma; Colonel B. W. Coiner, at Tacoma, Captain J. W. Fife, at Tacoma; Colonel J. C. Haines, at Seattle, to at once ship to General A. P. Curry, at Spokane Falls, all the fifty caliber rifles in their possession. The emergency being very great, and realizing that if these goods were shipped as freight it would be from a week to ten days before they reached the city of Spokane Falls, I ordered that they be sent by express. I also telegraphed Captain C. S. Reinhart, commanding B company, second regiment, at Goldendale, to ship all the fifty caliber guns in his possession immediately to General Curry. I followed this with a dispatch to General Curry informing him of the situation, and instructing him to make a detail of officers to convey these arms to Conconully; to go himself and investigate fully the state of affairs and report by telegraph. At the same time I wired the general agent of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company at Tacoma for transportation for General Curry and staff from Spokane Falls to Coulee City and return. It was cordially extended. Likewise the manager of the Northern Pacific Express Company, asking that they at once deliver the arms and ammunition expressed over their line to General Curry, and present their claim for freight to the state for settlement. The accommodation asked was at once extended by the managers of the respective lines. Pending these negotiations the following dispatch was received from Alma, by Coulee City, dated January 10th: To Hon. Governor LAUGHTON, Olympia: We, the citizens of Okanogan county, ask and demand that troops be sent to protect against the Indians who are preparing for an outbreak, and we demand that troops be sent immediately, as there is imminent danger of trouble. There will probably be fighting ere you get this, as the Indians are being reinforced every hour from British Columbia and elsewhere, all equipped and armed for war. We are arming for protec-


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

tion, but find we have not sufficient arms, and we ask that arms and ammunition be forwarded to us immediately. (Signed) Nathan Smye. F. Cole McClure. F. J. Cummings. G. Crystal. A. C. Johns. P. Carpenter. A. G. Hedges. J. W. Hanger. J. S. Pague. J. M. Armstrong. Chas. Astenberg. Ralph Gemerg. Chas. Guthen. J. Campbell. Ted Maloney. James Riley. Walter Moody. Ed. Cole. J. J. Plum. George Weston. J. H. Kahiow. T. Hedges. George Rushton. Jas. L. Carpenter. Peter Riley. Thomas Smye. Philip George. Peter Conigan. John N. Pague. Mike Maloney. That dispatch was followed by one dated January 12th, from Almira, addressed: Governor LAUGHTON, Olympia: We, the citizens of Almira, having met to discuss the Indian situation, conclude we are in danger in our unprotected state, and ask for fifty guns and ammunition to defend ourselves and other settlers. We will be responsible for the fire arms. Would refer you to our representative, Hutchinson. (Signed) HARTLINE & MINGLE, FRANK IRWIN, J. C. KELLER, Merchants, Committee. To which I wired the following:

tion at the earliest moment. Have shipped four thousand rounds of cartridges from here. There are one thousand "fifties" with G company; send them. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. (Signed)

28

To HARTLINE & MINGLE, J. C. KELLER and FRANK IRWIN, Merchants, Committee: General Curry will start for Coulee City to-morrow with guns and ammunition for Okanogan county. Have wired him to give you fifty guns and one thousand cartridges. Send some of your county officers to receive and receipt for same. (Signed) R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. The same day the following dispatch was received from Coulee City, dated January 12th: Governor LAUGHTON: At the citizens' meeting of this date we are authorized to advise you that in our unprotected position to state that a feeling of alarm exists, and we ask for seventy-five guns and ammunition, and we do that to protect ourselves, and for which we will be responsible. (Signed) HUNTER, ROBERTS & JOHNSON, Merchants, Com. In the meantime I had sent the following dispatch to General Curry: Brigadier General A. P. CURRY, Spokane Falls: OLYMPIA, Jan. 11, 1891. Have the officers detailed to take guns to commissioners of Okanogan county; go through to Conconully. Go there yourself and wire the situa-

29

On the 13th I wired General Curry as follows: General A. P...CURRY, Spokane Falls: Three hundred and four guns and five thousand cartridges with the one thousand in G company sent you. Distribute as follows: Conconully, two hundred guns, three thousand cartridges; Coulee city, fifty guns, one thousand cartridges; Almira, fifty-four guns, one thousand cartridges. Take receipt of proper authorities. R. U. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. (Signed) Meantime I sent, in your name, the following dispatch to General John Gibbon, commanding department of the Pacific at San Francisco:

*

OLYMPIA, Jan. 11, 1891. Brigadier General JOHN GIBBON, San Francisco, Cal.: Telegram received from the county commissioners and citizens of Okanogan county in this state, asking for immediate presence of troops to protect the citizens against Indians preparing for an outbreak, and are being joined by Indians from British Columbia. Telegram says fighting will probably take place before it is received. I have sent two hundred rifles and ammunition to the county commissioners of Okanogan county for distribution among the citizens in case of need. I deem the situation as of such importance as to ask you to send troops to Conconully and to ether places in the county, over the most convenient route without delay, as scene of action is ninety miles from telegraph office at Coulee city, terminus of Washington Central Railroad. Messenger rode all night to deliver message. CHARLES E. LAUGHTON, Acting Governor. (Signed) To which was received the following reply: SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 12, 1891. CHAS. E. LAUGHTON, Acting Governor of Washington, Olympia: Your dispatch regarding reports of Indian troubles in the Okanogan country is received. When and by what route did you send the arms, and when will they probably reach there? I have telegraphed to Fort Spokane for information. JOHN GIBBON, Brigadier General. (Signed) Replying to which I gave the necessary information. On the 14th of January I received the following dispatch from General Curry, at Spokane Falls: General R. G. O'BRIEN, Olympia: Leave to-day with 175 guns and ammunition. Will take these directly to Conconully, supplying other points later. All communications in


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

future hereto Colonel Booge. Staff officer at Coulee reports situation threatening. Will detail six men from here. Express on guns paid here. Nothing from home office regarding express. Must have funds sent to Booge at once. (Signed) A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General.

National Guard at Coulee City, on his way to Conconully with orders to

30

Upon receipt of the above dispatch, I at once wired B. G. Hall, superintendent Northern Pacific Express Company, at Portland, as follows: OLYMPIA, Jan. 13, 1891. B. G. HALL, superintendent Northern Pacific Express Company, Portland: I have ordered shipped to General A. P. Curry, at Spokane Falls, three hundred stands of arms to be delivered to the people of Okanogan county. The charges are about one hundred and fifty dollars. Will you please authorize your agent at Spokane Falls to deliver the arms to General Curry and sign vouchers to the state for said transportation, and it will be paid on arrival here. Have your agent send them to me at once. Answer. (Signed) H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. On the same day I sent the following telegram to General Curry: OLYMPIA, Jan. 13, 1891. Have telegraphed for transportation for yourself and two men over the Washington Central to Coulee City and return. Ammunition should reach you to-morrow morning. Have railroad agent sign vouchers. Look into the situation and use your best judgment about issuing guns. (Signed) R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. On the 15th of January I received the following dispatch from General Curry: COULEE CITY, Jan. 15, 1891. Adjutant General O'BRIEN: The latest reports from scene of trouble are no abatement of existing excitement among settlers. Conconully is being guarded at night by citizens. At the burial of Indian Stephen Indians swore revenge. Squaws who are living withwhite men have warned them to leave the reservation, telling them there was danger ahead. Traders have sold considerable ammunition to Indians in the past few days. Whites who have gone to the reservation have found the Indians very surly, and have been ordered not to return. Lincoln and Douglas counties have each been furnished fifty arms and five hundred rounds of ammunition, leaving two hundred arms for Okanogan county, which are being hurried forward under a strong escort. Moses and Joseph Indians are dancing the Messiah dance, and refuse to have anything to do with the whites. (Signed) A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General. The full text of the above dispatch I wired to General Gibbon at San Francisco, for his information, again urging that he send troops to the scene of action fpr an emergency, as follows: Brigadier General JOHN GIBBON, San Francisco, Cal.: Have just received the following telegram from General Curry of our

31

investigate COULEE CITY, Jan. 15, 1891. Brigadier General R. G. O'BRIEN, Olympia: Latest reports from scene of trouble are no abatement of existing excitement among settlers. Conconully is being guarded at night by citizens. At the burial of Indian Stephen who was lynched, Indians swore revenge. Squaws who are living with white men have warned them to leave the reservation, telling them there is danger ahead. Traders have sold considerable ammunition to Indians for the past few days. Whites who have gone to the reservation have found the Indians very surly, and have been ordered not to return. Lincoln and Douglas counties have each been furnished fifty arms and five hundred rounds of ammunition, leaving two hundred arms for Okanogan county, which are being hurried forward under strong escort. Moses' and Joseph's people are dancing the Messiah dance, and refuse to have anything to do with the whites. (Signed) A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General. I send the above for your information, which portends a serious state of affairs. I again urge that you send troops to the scene of action for an emergency. CHAS. E. LAUGHTON, Acting Governor. (Signed) On the same day the following was received from Brigadier General John Gibbon, commanding the department of the Pacific, from San Francisco: SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 15, 1891. Acting Governor LAUGHTON of Washington, Olympia: Can you send me any information regarding the lynching of an Indian by white men after he had surrendered himself for trial on a charge for having murdered a white man? This is reported as having taken place in the Okanogan country. JOHN GIBBON, Brigadier General Commanding. (Signed) To which I replied in your name as follows: OLYMPIA, Jan. 15, 1891. Brigadier General JOHN GIBBON, San Francisco: Discontent among the Okanogan Indians has been growing for several months. In October last two Indians murdered a man narnel Cole. One of the Indians was killed by the sheriff's posse shortly after in endeavoring to escape. The other escaped, but gave himself up about the 7th of this month. On the night of the 8th a lawless set of men took him from his custodian and hanged him, thereby precipitating this trouble. General A. P. Curry has been sent to Conconully and instructed to at once report the situation. His dispatch from Coulee City I have wired you. (Signed) CHAS. E. LAUGHT0N, Acting Governor. On the 16th ult. was received the following from General Gibbon: CHAS. E. LAUGHTON, Acting Governor, Olympia: Your two dispatches of yesterday are received. I am awaiting some definite information from Spokane. Troops should not be sent on such vague reports that have reached me up to this time. Meanwhile, I trust the whole power of the state authorities will be brought to bear to hold to account the citizens who took the law into their own hands, and hung


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

an Indian who surrendered himself, expecting of course to be fairly tried, and who may have been innocent. A show of justice will do more to quiet the revengeful spirit among the Indians than anything else. I do not credit the reports that Moses' and Joseph's people are showing a hostile spirit, but shall know soon. JOHN GIBBON, Brigadier General. (Signed)

General H. G. O'BRIEN, Olympia: Arrived here Saturday night safe and delivered the arms. Young atening and dominant. Older Indians urging peace. Think bucks th re there will be no trouble at present. Have sent Sub-agent Thomas to gather in the leading Indians. Will meet them Tuesday on reservation onsultation. Think I can with his help stop further trouble. Will for c start for home Wednesday. A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General. (Signed)

32

To which I replied in your name as follows: January 16, 1891. Brigadier General JOHN GIBBON, San Francisco, Cal.: The state authorities are fully alive to the situation here, and are putting forth every effort to secure the masked marauders who committed the outrage in Okanogan county; and meanwhile, the citizens are exposed to great danger from the expected attacks of the unrestrained wards of the government. All the assurance we can give now by an endeavor to apprehend the guilty parties can avail nothing at this time. The people must be protected from the Indians in the meantime, and the state will put forth its full power to punish the guilty lynchers. CHAS. E. LAUGHTON, Acting Governor. (Signed)

33

On the 20th ult. I received from General Curry the following: ALMA, Wash., Jan. 25, 1891. General R. G. O'BRIEN: Arrived here last night and met Sub-agent Thomas and Father Derouge, who have been very active in assisting me in gathering the different chiefs and rulers for the purpose of the conference. It will take place to-day. We expect Chiefs Switkin and Antoine, and Captains Acmes, Gabriel, Marcio and Klapellaton, with from seventy-five to one hundred of the people. Indians much excited on account of arrival of guns, but think with the aid of the priests and the sub-agent, E. T. Thomas, can avoid further trouble for the present. A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General. (Signed)

On the 17th of January the following dispatch was received, dated Conconully, by Coulee City, January 17, 1891:

The above dispatch was followed by one from Coulee City, dated January 22, 1891, as follows: General H. G. O'BRIEN: I had a council on the reservation with about seventy Indians, including all the chiefs in the locality. Have exacted from them promises to stop their dancing or carrying arms except when hunting, and to stop making threats against whites, whom they suppose took part in hanging their comrade Stephen. Also promises to assist in ferreting out parties which is the prime cause of all this trouble. who sold whiskey to In I am satisfied that this conference has done much good, and think that there will be no more trouble at present. I have been assisted by Father Derouge and Indian Farmer Thomas, who have been very active in this matter, and whose services were of great value. Leave for home in the morning. A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General. (Signed)

CHAS. E. LAUGHTON, Acting Governor: Situation not so alarming at present. Settlers on Okanogan river organized and seem confident. Towns have organized rifle companies. Indian Farmer Thomas has had runners out bringing Indians in for a general council at Omak church to-day, from which good results are anticipated. Renegades may possibly act independently of council and cause trouble. Your consignment of arms and ammunition expected tomorrow. Will advise you of any change. FRANK M. BAUM, (Signed) Auditor and Clerk, County Commissioners. On the 19th of January I received the following dispatch from Colonel John I. Booge, assistant adjutant general, Spokane Falls: SPOKANE FALLS, January 15, 1891. General R. G. O'BRIEN, Olympia: Just received following dispatch: "Ship by to-day's express one hundred stand arms with sufficient ammunition. Settlers along the Columbia in danger. '(Signed) M. E. HAY, Mayor of Wilbur, Wash." No arms except those taken by General Curry have been received here. Have you any orders? No instructions have been sent to agent Pacific Express Company, and I must pay the charges there. Do not confound Pacific with Northern Pacific Express. JOHN I. BO0GE. (Signed)

I have the honor to append herewith the report of General Curry, in extenso, together with copies of dispatches Sent relative to this trouble, and memorandum of the cost attaching thereto, aggregating $722.00. The following will exhibit the expenses incurred in carrying out the instructions received in telegraphic orders relative to the Okanogan county Indian troubles, to wit: For transportation of arms and ammunition via Northern Pacific Express Co Pacific Express Co...................... Transportation furnished General A. P. Curry and escort from Spokane Falls to CouleeCity over N. P. B. B ........................................................................... 11

On the 21st ult. the following dispatch from General Curry was received, dated Conconully, January 20, 1891:

3-

im, I

11

$92 80 26 60 71 25


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

34

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

Amount paid by General Curry en route from Spokane Falls to Conconully and return, as follows, to wit: Cartageon guns, etc $1 25 Telegrams 6 35 Hotel bill at Coulee City 9 00 Team from Coulee City to Conconully and return 40 00 Meals and stable bill for escort and team from Coulee City to Conconully and return for self and escort 63 50 Meals of escort returning to Coulee City, being sent back in advance.... 1500 To amount paid Louis Broder as courier by General A. P. Curry 1000

present year which it deserves, having up to this writing made no report upon the duty of small arms practice.

................................................................................. ................................................................................................ ............................................................................ ...................................

THE ANNUAL ENCAMPMENT OF 1892.

....................................................

...........

$144 45 To 12 days' pay for services of General A. P. Curry at $10.00 per day To 12 days' pay for services of Lieutenant Colonel Water, assistant, at $5.00 per day To 12 days' pay for services of Lieutenant J. J. White, aide-de-camp, at$5.00 To 10 days' pay for services of Frank B. Howard, as escort, $3.00 To 10 days' pay for services of Byron M. Swingler, as escort, $3.00 To 10 days' pay for services of Elsworth F. Weston, as escort, $3.00

$120 00

....................................................................................

6000

............................................................................................. ...........

5000 30 00 30 00 30 00 330 00

Telegrams by adjutant general to General Curry and elsewhere, ordering shipment of guns to Spokane Falls for Okanogan county, as follows: WesternUnion Pacific Postal Telegraph Co

......................................................................................... .....................................................................

35

$26 50 41 52 6802

............................................................................................................... $733 42 Much credit is due Brigadier General A. P. Curry, N. G. W., for the able manner in which he discharged the duties imposed in him, to allay the fears of the whites and prevent hostilities on the part of the Indians, and I respectfully submit for your especial consideration his report, herewith marked "Exhibit D." Total

SMALL ARMS PRACTICE.

The present system of drill and tactics recently adopted for the use of the regular army, has somewhat changed the military system, which in the main, must be conceded to be for the better. Under its provisions, greater attention is paid to the use of small arms, necessitating a greater degree of rifle practice than has heretofore existed, in order to establish a greater proficiency on the part of the soldier in the art of war. During the year 1891, under detail from the war department, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Frederick E. Trotter, instructed the companies of the National Guard of this state in the use of the rifle; and in his report submitted herewith, marked "Exhibit E," expresses the most encouraging outcome for our state troops in that particular. It is to her regretted, however, that the captains of companies have not given that attention to this duty during the

Pursuant to general orders No. 10, c. s., the National Guard of Washington went into camp of instruction at Murray, on the line of the Tacoma, Olympia & Gray's Harbor Railroad, a distance of fourteen miles from Tacoma, and twenty-two miles from Olympia. The location was favorably adapted to the purposes for which it was used, the soil being of a gravel and sand composition, covered with a close growth of wild grass, surrounded on the north and west by heavy fir timber, and on the south and east by groves of scrub oak scattered over the undulating prairie. Through the camp grounds flows a stream of pure, clear and cold spring water emptying into American Lake, whose placid waters lie a half mile to the north of the camp grounds. The transportation facilities afforded by the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, whose road runs directly through the camp ground, were in every way adequate, comfortable and timely. The routine of duties laid down in orders followed closely, so far as circumstances would permit, under the able superintendence of Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Frederick E. Trotter, major twentyfourth United States infantry, and First Lieutenant William A. Kimball, fourteenth United States infantry, were performed with a degree of alacrity and interest which added greatly to the success of the tour, of duty, and the pleasure of the inspecting officers. During the five days of the encampment, the weather was ettremely hot, necessitating to a certain degree a suspension of the routine established in orders; and, to the extreme heat, perhaps, more than anything else connected with the camp, may be attributed one of the saddest events that has been my sorrowful duty to witness in many years. On the 28th day of June, about 10:30 A. 11., Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Frederick E. Trotter, U. S. A., who, upon my application, had been detailed by the secretary of war as military instructor of the National Guard of Washington, at a moment when about to enter upon the duties of the day was stricken with cerebral apoplexy. He was at once taken to General Curry's tent, and received the most careful medical attention at the hands of Surgeon General Smith and the entire medical staff of the guard.


FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

343

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

Shortly afterward, while yet conscious, he was removed to the shaded awning of my tent, where every effort of the highest medical skill was put forth to secure his recovery, but, at 4:55 o'clock in the afternoon, he passed away as in the peaceful slumber of a child into the field of the great eternity. Colonel Trotter was born in New York in 1838. He had a long and honorable military record. On April 26, 1861, he entered the volunteer service as a private in company G of the Seventh regiment, New York state militia; was discharged 011 June 3 of that year, and became a captain in the One Hundred and Second New York infantry on December 18, 1861. He was promoted to a majority on July 16, 1862, and on March 18, 1863, was honorably mustered out, having been severely wounded in the lungs. Although he never fully recovered from this wound, he did not abandon military service, for, on June 18, 1863, he became a captain in the veteran reserve corps, made up of wounded soldiers. On October 15, 1863, he became a major in that corps; on March 30, 1864, a lieutenant colonel, and on October 11, 1866, was honorably mustered out. He was appointed major in the forty-fourth regiment of the regular army by President Johnson, July 28, 1866, but that appointment was canceled on December 8, 1866, because it had been discovered that New York State had been given more than her apportionment of appointments to the grade of field officers in the reorganization of the army. He was then appointed captain of the forty-fifth infantry to date from July 28, 1866, and was transferred as captain to the fourteenth infantry on July 22 7 1869, when that regiment was consolidated with the forty-fifth. He served continuously from that time with the fourteenth until his promotion to a majority in the twenty-fourth, which occurred last April, incident to a promotion following the retirement of Brigadier General Kautz. Colonel Trotter was with the army of the Potomac in all the important engagements during the period of his service in the civil war. He was brevetted major and lieutenant colonel in the regular service on March 2, 1867, "for faithful and meritorious service during the war," and colonel and brigadier general of volunteers on March 13, 1865, "for gallant and meritorious service during the war." His first service in the army was in the defense of Washington

37

City. He was in the battles of Bolivar and Maryland Heights; he served in Banks' Shenandoah valley campaign, and at Cedar Mountain he was wounded in his foot and arm. In 1864 he was in the provost marshal's bureau, and he was also superintendent of the war department building at Washington City. Colonel Trotter was at the time of his death on the staff of the commanding general of the department of the Columbia as department inspector of small arms practice. He made his home at Vancouver barracks, having been stationed there with his regiment continuously, with the exception of three years, during which he was on recruiting duty on David's island, in New York harbor. Two years ago he was detailed as instructor of the state militia at the American lake encampment. Last fall he was detailed by the secretary of war to instruct the National Guard of this state in target practice, and visited every militia company on that service. This year he was again detailed as instructor at the state encampment. The deepest gloom was cast over the camp, the officers and men realizing that this was a most fitting occasion to show their respect to their dead comrade and sympathy with the living, and, as a consequence, silence reigned. Every soldier's heart was turned with the most tearful sympathy to the daughter of our stricken comrade, who was an honored guest at the camp, and who, during the trying hours of affliction, bore with a fortitude which characterized a soldier's daughter the bereavement she was so suddenly called upon to endure. Colonel Trotter's remains were prepared for interment by the medical corps, and at 10:30 in the morning of June 29th all the commissioned officers of the brigade, led by the second regiment band, with company H, of Vancouver, following as a guard of honor, formed an escort of honor from the hospital tent to the train which was to convey the remains to the home of his family at Vancouver. Attended by Lieutenant Colonel Boyd, A. D. C., and Captain Conner, A. D. C., with company H, of Vancouver, as a guard of honor, I escorted the daughter of our deceased comrade to her mourning family and the remains of her beloved father to his brother officers of the regular army, who loved him so well. The shock experienced by the death of Colonel Trotter was so great, that nothwithstanding the untiring efforts of Lieutenant


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

Kimball and the officers generally, the amount of work anticipated was not accomplished although it was generally fruitful of good results. Calculations and preparations had been made in anticipation of a regimental encampment, but a change of programme from that to a lrigade encampment only a few 'days prior to the date fixed, necessitated a doubling up all along the line, and the purchase of sufficient tentage to cover the entire brigade together with stabling for two troops of cavalry, sufficient lumber and other necessaries for mess sheds, floors for tents for the troops, etc.; and the increased accommodations required, necessitated the employment of a strong force of carpenters and laborers in getting the ground ready for the opening day of the camp; but notwithstanding every effort was put forth to accomplish this, the encampment was nearly half over before the requisite accommodations were completed. Much trouble was experienced during the first three or four days of the encampment in securing proper attendants for supplying the troops from the commissary department. Men who had been hired as waiters, helpers and cooks, were found deficient in the knowledge necessary to economically administer to the wants of the troops in that behalf, and who likewise took advantage of the situation to endeavor to extort more pay for the services to be performed. They were at once dismissed and others employed; in doing which much delay and inconvenience was caused as well as expense. My own convictions, based upon experience, is that better results can be obtained both from a practical knowledge to the troops as well as from an economical standpoint, to hold regimental eticampments two years, and a brigade encampment the third year.

represented by material already stored for future use, and indispensable for the use of troops in the field.

38

COST OF THE ENCAMPMENT FOR THE YEAR 1892. ft The following is a correct statement of the cost of the encampment for the year 1892: Payof troops................ ......................................................................................... $16,187 92 6,197 70 Transportation...................................................................................................... Expenses of the quartermaster's department, including forage, lumber, labor andsupplies for camp................................................................................. Subsistence............................................................................................................

4,698 05 8,073 07

Total................................................................................................... $35,156 69

Considerable of the above expense could be saved by the establishment of a permanent state camp ground. Much of it is

39

PERMANENT STATE CAMP GROUND. I cannot too strongly urge the necessity of securing a permanent place at which the National Guard of the state can annually be instructed in the duties of a soldier. The expense consequent upon a temporary camp established at one place one year, another place another year, is manifestly so much greater than that which would accrue by the establishment of a permanent location, from the fact that the material purchased of a permanent nature necessary for the accommodation of troops would not be lost, but, when once set up, would answer for all time and until worn out in the service. Much expense could likewise be saved in the transportation of supplies and camp equipage, in having proper storehouses on the ground, in which the same could be preserved from year to year. This fact was probably never more forcibly demonstrated than by the encampment held this year; and I earnestly recommend that the legislature be asked to authorize the military board to purchase a suitable place at which to establish a permanent camp for the use of the National Guard of this state. TROOPS IN CAMP. The state troops performing the tour of duty from June 22d to July 2d were the first infantry regiment, Colonel Greene commanding; the second infantry regiment, Colonel Pike commanding; the first cavalry battalion, Major Charles B. Johnston commanding; the camp being immediately under the command of Brigadier General A. P. Curry, who, with his entire staff discharged the duties incumbent upon him under the able supervision Of Colonel TrottN- and"Lieutenant Kimball of the regular army, the latter of whom made an exhaustive report to the secretary of war, a copy of which is herewith attached, marked "Exhibit F." It was a noticeable and commendable fact that the deportment of the troops while in camp was of a character to command the highest praise. The most sensitive ear could pass along the' line of companies without being shocked by the use of vulgar or obscene language at any time. This as much as anything else establishes the character of the men who make up the National Guard of this state.


40

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

CAMP EQUIPAGE.

of cavalry being able to attend the opening of the World's Coluinbiali exhibition at Chicago, or an assembly of the national guardsmen of the United States during the present year. As much as I should like to see the accomplishment of such a epresentation, without the assistance expected from the general r government or at least a sufficient appropriation from the hands of the legislature to meet the expense of transportation, it can not be attained. In the event, however, of congress appropriating the $1,500,000 asked by the Mitchell bill, now pending, I would suggest that a regiment of infantry and one troop of cavalry be sent as a representation of the citizen-soldier of the State of Washington; and the selection to be made upon order of merit from among the companies of the state guard, choosing five companies from each infantry regiment displaying the highest order of soldierly merit, and all to be under the immediate command of the senior colonel. In my opinion such a selection wciuld be the best in every respect. The state generally would derive much benefit from such a representation, as each national guardsman would be in attendance in a representative capacity, charged with a knowledge of the state's products, resources and general advantages over other states, ready at all times to relate from his own experience as well as from otherwise acquired knowledge, and answer the numerous questions that must be propounded to him from the great concourse of people who will be present on that occasion. What the state needs in that direction is a setting forth of the facts to intelligent people by intelligent people; and, as a medium for the dissemination of knowledge concerning our state from a financial point of view, an appropriation by the legislature to pay the transportation expenses of these men would be a profitable investment to the state at large. Much interest is felt in the State of Washington by the people of the east. It was manifested to a marked degree during the dedicatory ceremonies of the World's Fair building in October last to your representative, the Hon. Allen Weir, secretary of state, and the members of your staff who attended on that occasion. All along the line of march in that great parade the name of Washington was talismanic, and its representatives were received by the assembled multitude with a degree of acclaim that was unexpected, but no less deserved, by the state.

The lumber purchased for the use of the camp was mostly used in the construction of floors for tents, packing boxes for company supplies, etc., and was conveyed to Olympia and is now in store for future use. The other lumber was sold upon the ground to persons who had worked in and about the camp, or who lived near. The tents and ranges and cooking utensils, tableware and cutlery which were not distributed to the various companies were all brought to Olympia and likewise carefully stored for future use. NEW DRILL REGULATIONS.

Under the new drill regulations, adopted by the United States army, provision is made for twelve companies of infantry, formed in three battalions of four companies each, each battalion commanded by a major, thus necessitating a reorganization of the regiments in the regular service as well as in the National Guard of the several states. Our present organization provides for ten companies in each regiment, with one major. Under our present law it is necessary, in order to make the service effective under the regulations, that an enlargement be made to the complement of companies for regiments, and I urge that the legislature be requested to make such provision as will increase the number of companies in regiments to that required by the United States drill regulations. BOARD OF SURVEY

The oft repeated calls upon the National Guard to perform duty in the suppression of riots, maintenance of the peace and the protection of property at the great fires of the past few years have had their effect upon the uniforms furnished the force to such a degree as to necessitate a renewal in many cases, preceding which proper application for boards of survey to pass upon the same, with a view to condemnation, has been duly made and hoards convened and inspection was had upon the said property, which will more fully appear in the reports of said boards and inspectors, herewith submitted, marked "Exhibits G and H." THE WORLD'S FAIR.

A great interest is manifested by the guardsmen of this state in the matter of the possibility of a regiment of infantry and a troop

41


42

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

RETIRED LIST.

cipline, thus enabling them to present that efficiency which is expected of the military arm of the state in an emergency, and on all occasions being attacked to defray the expense of troops performing a public service for the public good. The National Guard is never called into the service of the state except in an emergency, and it has been the instrument in saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in property from destruction, as well as the lives of the citizens of our state. It is deserving of the full benefit of the funds set apart by law for its maintenance, without any diminution for extraordinary service; and I recommend that the legislature be asked to make provision for the pay of the National Guard from the general fund, when called into the service of the state in the suppression of riots and disturbances, and maintaining the supremacy of the law.

Under a provision of our statute, an officer giving service to the state for a period of seven years is exempt from farther military duty except in case of war. If they so elect to retire from further service, they can do so, thus severing all connection with the National Guard, and depriving the guard of the knowledge and experience of men possessing an element of worth which cannot well be spared. Frequently such persons would like to continue in close relationship with the service, but business engagements often prevent, and I would recommend that we follow the example of many states in this respect by making provision for a retired list on which officers of meritorious service and exempt from further duty, can be placed with the full rank to which they have attained during their service, subject, however, to the call of the commander in chief for special duty, such as courts martial, boards of survey, courts of inquiry and boards of inspection. It will be no expense to the state. PAY WHEN IN THE SERVICE OF THE STATE. I deem it of the greatest importance to the welfare of the National Guard, in the matter of its support, to present for your consideration and the consideration of the legislature the question of its pay when called into the service of the state. The legislature has provided that the special fund provided for in the act shall be set apart for the organization, maintenance and discipline of the National Guard. Whenever a disturbance occurs in any part of the state of such character as to require the services of the state troops to assist the civil authorities in suppressing the same and maintaining the peace and dignity of the commonwealth, no matter for what duration of time, be it long or short, the expense incident thereto in the past has been drawn entirely from the fund set apart for the support of the National Guard, thus reducing very largely the means of keeping up the organizations and supplying them with the necessary provisions for their maintenance and discipline. I take it to be just that when the state troops are called into the service of the state, instead of the expense thereof attaching to the military fund, it should be paid from the general fund of the state. I can see no justice in the fund set apart for the support of the militia in encouraging them to perfect themselves in drill and dis-

43

QUESTIONS OF DISCIPLINE. A tour of duty such as the state guard has been through is not without results of a questionable character, and which militate adversely to the discipline and efficiency of the force generally. They are brought about chiefly from a lack of knowledge on the part of the persons responsible therefor, partly from a spirit of insubordination and often from an absolute disregard of the first duty of a soldier. A soldier never m-akes such mistakes. When a commanding officer assembles his subordinate officers, and, without stating to them the reasons for such assembly, martials them before his superior officer and vigorously protests against his command being required to furnish details to do a soldier's duty, it is mutiny. When he presents as his ultimatum that if his command is not relieved from the performance of a duty clearly within the line of a soldier's duty that he will march his command home, it is "conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline," and "conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman." When he violates the express order of his commanding officer, issued and delivered, prohibiting the presence of proscribed intoxicants into and about the camp grounds, it is willful disobedience of orders, and only the greatest forbearance, or a recognition of the fact that such a person does not possess the elements of a soldier and is ignorant of the first duty of a soldier, "obedience," would suffer escape from merited discipline.

I'


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

RECOMMENDATIONS. In closing this report, I desire to present a summary of changes to the military law, which I deeri necessary for the greater efficiency of the service. First: That the military board be authorized to purchase a permanent state camp ground, and that an appropriation of *30,000 be asked therefor. Second: That the act be so amended as to the number of companies which shall compose a regiment of infantry as will conform to the requirements of the United States drill regulations. Third: That the cavalry battalion be increased to four troops. Fourth: That when the National Guard is called into the service of the state for the suppression of riots, etc., etc., the expense of said service shall be paid from the general fund of the state. Fifth: That an amendment be asked to the militia law which shall provide, that when an officer has discharged his full seven years of service and desires to be retired, he may be placed upon the retired list with the full rank held at the time of his retirement, and be subject to call for any special service in the interest of the state.

important office, but in ministering in every way possible to the welfare of their respective regiments. I have the honor to be, with profound respect, Your obedient servant, R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

44

In conclusion I wish to express my grateful acknowledgments first to your excellency for the uniform kindness and consideration which, in the manifold duties that surround you. you have always extended to me personally and the National Guard generally. To Lieutenant William A. Kimball, fourteenth United States infantry, for the valuable and instructive service rendered the state, and courtesies extended to myself while in the discharge of duty as military instructor at camp Murray. To Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, assistant commissary general, Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general, Lieutenant Colonel J. A. Hatfield, assistant commissary general, for the indefatigable attention to duty in their several departments during the annual encampment of 1892; and I wish to especially mention the untiring efforts put forth by Lieutenant F. J. Elsensohn, commissary of the second infantry, and Lieutenant H. D. Allison, commissary of the first infantry, to not only perfect themselves in a knowledge of their duties in that

45


EXHIBIT A. REPORT OF COLONEL JOSEPH GREENE. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, FIRST BRIGADE, NATIONAL GUARD 8F WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, January 23, 1892. To His Evcellency Governor ELISHA P. FERRY, Commander-inChif, Hational Guard of Washington, Olympia: SIR—I have the honor to submit the following report of the movements of the several companies of the first infantry regiment, National Guard of Washington, in service during the mining troubles in King county in the months of June and July, 1891. Delay in making this report was caused— First: By the refusal until recently of the commander-in-chief to recognize these companies as being in the service of the state. Second: The death of Colonel J. C. Haines, who commanded the troops at that time. On the 24th day of June, 1891, there was a large body of armed men riotously assembled at Gilman, in King county, and threatened to destroy the buildings and machinery connected with the operation of the coal mines there. The sheriff of the county being absent, the manager of the mine applied to the deputy sheriff for a sufficient force to protect it from injury and destruction, but the deputy declined to act in the absence of the sheriff. The manager requested Colonel Haines to order out troops from his regiment for that purpose. This he refused to do. The manager then requested Colonel Haines whether, if the sheriff should call upon him for the troops to act as a posse comitatus, he would furnish them. Colonel Haines declined to act without orders from you, but at the request of the manager of the mine sent you the following telegram: SEATTLE, June 24, 1891. Governor E. P. FERRY, Olympia Hotel: I am informed that a riot has occurred at Gilman, and the destruction Of mine property is threatened now by armed men. The sheriff is at (47)


48

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

Walla Walla. His deputy here declines to act for want of authority. The owners of the mine have appealed to me for protection. I have refused until properly ordered. If the sheriff requests me to send troops to use as a posse, can I do it without orders from you? See section 860 of the code, and Ela vs. Smith. 5 Gray, 121. I am informed that the situation is critical, and that loss of life and property are likely unless Colonel J. C. HAINES. prompt action is taken. And received in reply the following:

OLYMPIA, June 25, 1891. Colonel J. C. HAINES, Commanding First Regiment, N. G. W., Seattle: If any officer mentioned in section 860 of the code of Washington calls for an armed force to suppress a riot, or to enforce the execution of the laws at Gilman, in King county, you will immediately repair to that place with one or more companies of the N. G. W., as you may deem advisable, and render such aid to the civil authorities as may be necesELISHA P. FERRY, Governor. sary. On the evening of Sunday, the 27th day of June, 1891, a riot occurred at the town of Franklin, in King county, which resulted in a battle between the striking miners and the negroes who had been brought in to take their places, and in which two men were killed and several wounded. The deputy at that point was unable to quell the riot, or disperse the mob, and the conflict ceased only on account of the approach of darkness, and it was evidently their intention to resume the conflict on the following day. The deputy sheriff telegraphed Colonel Haines, at Seattle, requesting him to order immediately to Franklin one or more companies of his regiment to assist the civil authorities in preserving the peace. This telegram was received by Colonel Haines at about half-past ten in the evening, of June 98th. He immediately issued the follo'iving order: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, N. G. W., SEATTLE, June 28, 1891. Special Order No. 12: Captain Green, commanding B company, of this regiment, and 1. Captain Allen, commanding D company, will proceed immediately to Franklin, having companies in heavy marching order, with forty rounds of ammunition per man. 2. Transportation will be furnished. 3. Commissary J. A. Hatfield will furnish subsistence. 4. The surgeon of the regiment will accompany the command and report immediately at these headquarters. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. CHARLES E5PLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT. And sent you the following telegram:

49

SEATTLE, June 27, 1891. ELISIL P. FERRY: I have received a request from a deputy sheriff to send a company of the National Guard to Franklin immediately, he expecting a riot at any moment. Several persons have been shot. I have ordered a company there and will accompany them, I have no specified orders from you except for Gilman. If my action is not approved, wire me at Franklin. J. C. HAINES. To which he never received -a reply. The members of these companies were scattered throughout the city, and it was only by the exercise of the utmost diligence that they were assembled at the armory before midnight. As soon as a sufficient number of these companies were assembled to constitute one company available for duty, he proceeded with them at once to Franklin, arriving there at daybreak. The arrival and presence of the troops at Franklin, prevented any further outbreak at that point, it being necessary, however, to keep a force there until July 15th. On July 30th, the threatened riot at Gilman occurred, and the sheriff after endeavoring in vain to quell it, requested Colonel Haines to send two companies of his regiment to that place, for the purpose of assisting the civil authorities in preserving peace, maintaining order and preventing the destruction of life and property. This he immediately did, transferring company D from Franklin, and ordering company E of Seattle to that point. They arrived at Gilman on the morning of July 1st, and reported to the sheriff's deputy, and remained on duty until the 13th day of July, preventing by their presence any further riotous demonstrations. At the towns of Franklin, New Castle, Black Diamond and Gilman, in King county, there are large and valuable coal mines, the operation of which constitutes one of the principal industries of the state; strikes had occurred at these points and work in consequence was suspended. The miners refused to work, except on their own terms, and refused to allow any one else to work them at all, while the owners of the mines would not accept the terms insisted upon by the miners, and were endeavoring at Franklin, Newcastle and Gilman to work the mines with other laborers. The miners in order to prevent the operation of the mines, except on their own terms, organized military companies at these places, and armed them with rifles and shotguns, and supplied them with ammunition. These companies were daily drilled and paraded under 4-


50

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

arms, and were used as a constant menace for the purpose of preventing the operation of the mines in any way, except upon the terms insisted upon by the miners. In consequence of the employment of these methods by the miners the owners of the coal mines at Gilman and -Black Diamond were unable to work their mines at all, and at New Castle and Franklin were able to work them only by the maintenance of a large body of armed men, employed and paid by them. These military organizations, which were entirely unauthorized by law, were a constant menace to the public peace, and caused great terror and alarm among the people in those towns who were not sympathizers with the striking miners, and on July 2d, 1891, Colonel Haines received the following telegram from you: OLYMPIA, July 2, 1891. Col. J. C. HAINES, Franklin: The civil authorities should disarm all unauthorized armed bodies at Franklin, Gilman and elsewhere in King county where there is danger of a riot or breach of the peace. You will render all necessary assistance to the civil authorities in this direction. After disarmament the sheriff and deputies will probably be able to preserve the peace, and the presence of the militia will no longer be required. A request for voluntary disarmament by all the parties should be made before active measures are taken. ELISHA P. FERRY, Governor. He, not deeming the force at his disposal sufficient to carry out your orders, in reply sent you the following telegram: GILMAN, July 2, 1891. Hon. ELISHA P. FERRY: Does your order of to-day, relative to disarming armed bodies, allow me to use, if necessary for its enforcement without breach of the peace, any companies of this regiment other than those now in the field? J. C. HAINES. To which he received the following answer: OLYMPIA, July 2, 1891. Colonel J. C. HAINES, Franklin: You can use all the first regiment for the purposes indicated in my dispatch of this morning, if necessary. ELISHA P. FERRY, Governor. The sheriff of the county, for the purpose of carrying out your order contained in your first telegram, on July 2d, requested Colonel Haines to send a company to New Castle, one to Black Diamond and one to Franklin; there being but 'One company at the latter place, company D having been transferred to Gilman. On July 2d Colonel Haines accordingly telegraphed Captain Fife, commanding company C at Tacoma, as follo*s, sending also

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

51

a copy of the same message to Captain Shank, commanding company G:

SEATTLE, July 2, 1891. Captain W. J. FIFE, commanding C company, first regiment, N. G. W., Tacoma: Proceed immediately with your company to Black Diamond, King county, via Seattle, and there go into camp and await orders. Your command will be in heavy marching order, with all ammunition you have. Make requisition on adjutant general for such tents as you require, also for ammunition required,, not exceeding fifteen hundred rounds with what you have. Wire answer at Gilman, wire adjutant here and report to him at armory. Colonel J. C. HAINES. These companies arrived in Seattle at daybreak on the morning of the 3d. Company I, of Port Townsend, happened to be in Seattle for the purpose of attending a drill, and Colonel Haines issued the following order: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, Special Order No. 13: ' SEATTLE, July 3, 1891. 1. Company C, in command of Captain Fife, will proceed to Black Diamond; company G, in command of Captain Shank, to New Castle, establishing camp at these points, and await further orders. 2. Company I, in command of Captain Jones, will proceed at once to Franklin, and there report to Captain Green for orders. 3. Major Gans will accompany company I to Franklin, and then proceed to New Castle, thence returning on the same train to Gilman and report to the commanding officer at that point. 4. Sergeant Major Younkin, stationed at Franklin, may at once report at Gilman. 5. Captain C. L. F. Kellogg will immediately report at the armory for duty as quartermaster. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. Colonel Haines sent the following telegram to the adjutant general: July 2, 1891. Brigadier General R. G. O'BRIEN, Olympia: In pursuance of orders of governor and at request of sheriff have ordered companies C and G into service. I have no tents for them. Have requested them to make requisition on you for such as they require; also for ammunition Send to Gilman, King county, fifty blankets and one thousand rounds ammunition. Imperatively needed for service. Colonel J. C. HAINES. And received the following reply: Seattle, 7-3-91. Colonel J. C. HAINES, Gilman: Telegram received. Why do you ask for tents when you have enough in your armory for your whole regiment? Supply the troops from your


52

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

stock. For whom do you want blankets? Your companies have been supplied heretofore and the state cannot furnish blankets to other persons except to-relieve dire distress. Have sent one thousand cartridges H. G. O'BRIEN. to Gilman. To which Colonel Haines replied as follows: January 3, 1891. General R. G. O'BRIEN, Olympia: No tents have ever been issued to me by the state. Those now in use were borrowed by me and the government holds my personal receipt for them. They are entirely insufficient to accommodate the troops now in the field, and a portion of the command must be ordered out of service unless the state supplies tents. I want blankets for the first regiment, the supply is insufficient, and if you cannot furnish them, and the governor cannot do so, I will be obliged to dismiss from service many of the Colonel J. C. HAINES. soldiers now on duty. Upon the same matter the following telegrams passed between yourself and Colonel Haines: July 3, 1891. Governor E. P. FERRY, Olympia: General O'Brien refuses to honor my requisition for tents and blankets. Troops in the field will suffer for want of them. What shall I do? Colonel J. C. HAINES. And in reply received the following: OLYMPIA, 7-3,1891. Colonel J. C. HAINES, Gilman: General O'Brien states you have blankets and tents at Seattle, if he is ELISHA P. FERRY. mistaken they will be sent from here. July 3, 1891. Governor ELISHA P. FERRY, Olympia: State has never issued this regiment tents; I have some borrowed from government for which I am personally responsible, these not sufficient to properly accommodate troops in the field; state has tents for one regiment at Olympia; company E has but ten blankets, thirty-three men on duty. Cannot now state exact amount lacking in other companies, will Colonel J. C. HAINES. ascertain and report. OLYMPIA, 7-3, 1891. Colonel J. C. HAINES, Gilman: General O'Brien will send tents and blankets.

ELISHA P. FERRY.

July 3, 1891. Brigadier General R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General, Olympia: Ship tents to Seattle immediately as troops will need them badly; ship also two thousand rounds of ammunition in addition to previous requisiColonel J. C. HAINES. tion. Troop B, first cavalry battalion, arrived in Seattle on the evening of the 3d of July, intending to participate in a parade on the

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following day, and the following order was issued by General Curry to Captain Ashton, commanding the troop: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON. SEATTLE, July 4, 1891. Special Order No. 3: Captain J. M. Ashton, of troop B, will report to Colonel J. C. Haines, at Seattle, with such of his command and officers as may be required for A. P. CURRY, picket and scouting duty. Brigadier General Commanding N. G. W. Immediately upon the receipt of which Colonel Haines issued the following order:

HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON. SEATTLE, July 4th, 1891. Special Order No. 14; Captain Ashton commanding troop B will immediately proceed 1. with twelve men of his command, mounted and equipped for service in the field for New Castle, he will there station three enlisted men and one non-commissioned officer, and will then proceed with the balance of his detail to Gilman, and report to Major Gans for further orders. 2. Captain C. L. F. Kellogg, quartermaster, will accompany Captain Ashton to New Castle and furnish transportation. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. The subsequent movements of troop B are, together with all orders issued by Colonel Haines relative to them, fully described in the report of Captain Ashton, a copy of which is hereto attached. In compliance with your instructions contained in your telegram of July 2d, to render assistance to the civil authorities in disarming all unauthorized armed bodies in King county. Colonel Haines issued a circular letter to the owners of the mines at Franklin, Black Diamond, New Castle and Gilman, of which the following is a copy: SEATTLE, July 4th, 1891. he OREGON IMPROVEMENT COMPANY, Franklin: s the officer in immediate command of the state troops now in the I, I am instructed by the sheriff of this county to notify you that there force of state troops now stationed at Gilman sufficient to protect property of your company located there, and to insure the safety of r employes. I am assured by the governor and the brigadier general imanding this brigade, that such force will be maintained until the 1 authorities are able to afford the same protection now given by the tary arm of the state. I therefore request you to remove from Gilon or before twelve o'clock noon of the 6th day of July, 1891, all rds and armed men stationed or maintained at that place by you or


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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

under your authority, on the ground that it is prejudicial to good order that while the responsibility is cast upon the civil authorities and the National Guard, their duties should be shared by any body of men not acting under authority of the law. Very respectfully yours, J. C. HAINES, Colonel Commanding First Regiment National Guard of Washington.

these instructions, they will communicate by telegraph to the commandBy order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. ing officer of the regiment. Official: CHAS ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant.

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And also issued the following order: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, Special Order No. 17: SEATTLE, July 9, 1891. 1. Inasmuch as the owners of the coal mines at the several stations of the troops of this command now in the field have been requested at twelve o'clock noon on the 6th day of July, 1891, to remove from their property all guards and armed men now maintained by them or under their authority, and inasmuch as it is probable that this request will be complied with, and inasmuch as this request has been made upon the ground that the force of the state troops now at such points as is sufficient to insure the safety of the property and persons at such mines, the post commanders at Franklin, Black Diamond, New Castle and Gilman, will obey carefully the following instructions: First: They will keep in mind the elementary maxim that the military is always subordinate to the civil power of the state. Second: They will never act unless it be in self defense except upon the request or with the approval of the sheriff or deputy sheriff stationed at the posts at which such post commander may be, but will always act promptly upon receiving a request to do so from such authority. Third: They will dispose their guards in such a manner as to afford protection to the property, lives and liberty of all persons within the limit of their pot, and will to the extent of their ability preserve peace and good order at all times within such limits; they will allow no interference by violence, intimidation or manifestations of force of persons lawfully employed either upon their own property or the property of their employers. Fourth: In the use of the National Guard for the protection of property, post commanders must remember that the troops under their command are not to take the place of private watchmen such as are ordinarily employed for the protection of property from fire or other injury incident to the ordinary condition of affairs, but that any persons within the limits of their post has the right to maintain such watchmen in the usual and ordinary way. These instructions, however, must not be construed so as to allow the employment or maintenance of any body of armed men, or to allow the carrying or display of arms or the use of the same in such manner as to create public disturbance or tend to a breach of the peace. 2. In case of any doubt in their minds as to the question of their authority or powers, or any uncertainty as to the meaning and import of

The following orders were then issued: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 5, 1891. Special Order No. 18: i. Captain C. L. F. Kellogg is hereby detailed to act as quartermaster, and will report forthwith to commanding officer for duty. By order of Colonel J. C. HATERS. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 6, 1891. Special Order No. 19: Surgeon Bebee of B troop is hereby detailed as surgeon for the battalion stationed at Camp Gilman, and will report at once to the By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. commanding officer for duty. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, CAMP GILMAN, GILMAN, July 7, 1891. Special Order No. 20: 1. Any officer or enlisted man of this command, except in the course of duty and in obedience to orders, will not be allowed to frequent or enter any drinking saloon within the limits of the town of Gilman. 2.. Any one violating this order will be subject to arrest and punishBy order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. ment by a court martial. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. On July 6 Colonel Haines received a request from Captain Shank for more assistance, who thought that the situation at New Castle was critical, and that at least another company was necessary to properly guard the mines and preserve the peace. On the 7th the following order was issued: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, CAMP GILMAN, GILMAN, July 7,1891.' Special Order No. 21: 1. Major F. A. Gans will proceed by the most direct route to Camp New Castle, and there assume command. 2. He will report in writing to these headquarters, as often as in his judgment is necessary, the situation of affairs at his post. By order of Colonel J. C HAINES. Official: GRAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, CAMP GILMAN, July 7, 1891. Special Order No. 22: Lieutenant Ross, of C company, will report forthwith to Major Gaas By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. for orders. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant.


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FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

Captain Fife was directed to send ten men and sergeant from Black Diamond and New Castle to strengthen the force at that point, On this date Captain Fife reported that the Black Diamond miners had met and consented to disband and turn over their arms to the sheriff. Later he wired that the miners' committee had reported to him that they could not get any satisfaction from their men until they ascertained that the Oregon Improvement Company has turned over all their arms first. On the same day Captain J. Green, commanding the company at Franklin, wired that the Oregon Improvement Company had turned in thirty-eight carbines, sixteen revolvers and five rifles; strikers and citizens twenty-eight guns and rifles. On July 10, everything being quiet at Black Diamond, and in order to relieve companies D and E from duty at Gilman, Colonel flames issued the following order transferring company C from Black Diamond to that point, the same order also relieving cornpany B from duty at Franklin: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, Special Order No. 24: SEATTLE, July 10, 1891. 1. Captain Fife, now stationed at Black Diamond, will proceed with his command by the 12:50 p M. train, on July 11th, 1891, and all baggage except tents and commissary equipments and supplies, to Gilman byway of Seattle. Upon his arrival at Seattle he will report to Lieutenant J. A. Hatfield at the armory. 2. Upon his arrival at Gilman he will report to the commanding officer of the regiment, and await orders. 3. Company B of this regiment, now stationed at Franklin, will, on Sunday, July 12th, be relieved from duty until further orders, and will on that date proceed to Seattle. 4. Company D and E of this regiment, now stationed at Gilman, will, on Sunday, July 12th, 1891, at 3:55 o'clock p M., be relieved from duty until further orders, and will on that date proceed to Seattle. 5. Captain Joseph Green will remain on duty at Franklin as cornmander of that post until further orders. 6. The quartermaster will furnish necessary transportation. 7. The commissary will furnish necessary subsistence. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr.. First Lieutenant and Adjutant. On the same date the following telegram was received: BLACK DIAMOND, 7-10,1891. Col. J. C. HAINES, Gilman: The powder house at Clay mine was broken open last night and four kegs of powder and a large quantity of dynamite taken therefrom. W. J. FIFE.

57

He immediately wired the commanding officers at Franklin, New Castle and Gilman to carefully guard explosives at their posts, and notifying them of the fact that the Clay mine had been broken into, and to be prepared to meet any attempt to wreck the mines. Then followed the following orders: HEADQUARTERS Fiasv REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD or WASHINGTON, CAMP GILMAN, GILMAN, July 12, 1891. Special Order No. 25: i. Captain W. J. Fife with his command will go into camp at Camp Gilman upon their arrival there, and will remain at that post until further orders. 2. During the absence of the regimental commander from Camp Gilman, Captain W. J Fife will act as commander for the post. 3. Captain Ashton, commanding troop B, will have the managemerit of his command in all matters connected with camp routine, and the details of the scouting and picket duty, to which he has been assigned, All orders heretofore issued from these headquarters regarding him and his command will remain in full force, but his command will be subject to the orders of the post commander for tactical purposes and field duty. 4. The post commander will, until further orders, during the day maintain the sentries at the upper and lower gate of the coal mines, and will, at guard mount on the evening of each day, detail six men and one corporal for sergeant, and will report to Captain Ashton for sentry duty until relieved on the morning of the following day. All sentries, when stationed at the coal mines, to be subject to Captain Ashton's orders. 5. No passes will be issued to any one to pass through the lines at the coal mines, but all members of this command will be allowed to pass the sentries after six o'clock in the morning, and before eight o'clock in the evening, without passes or countersign. 6. The post commander will honor any requisition that Captain Ashton may make for additional guards or sentries, in case of necessity, such detail to be subject to Captain Ashton's orders. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: GRAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON. SEATTLE, July 13th, 1891. Special Order No. 26: 1. Company I, Captain George H. Jones commanding, stationed at Franklin, will on July 14th, 1891, break camp and proceed to Fort Townsend, by way of Seattle, on the 12:50 p M. train, with all baggage including tents. 2. Captain Jones, with his command, will report to Lieutenant Hatfield at the armory at Seattle upon his arrival. 3. Captain Joseph Green, post commander at Franklin, will turn over to the sheriff or deputy sheriff in charge at Franklin, all arms and ammuflition delivered to him for safe keeping, taking a receipt for the same ________

AI


58

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

from the officer to whom they may be delivered; he will then be relieved from further duty as post commander. 4. The quartermaster will furnish necessary transportation. 5. The commissary will furnish necessary subsistence. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON. SEATTLE, July 14th, 1891. Special Order No. 27: 1. Lieutenant Bamber with his command, stationed at Coal Creek, will report forthwith to Captain Ashton, at Gilman, for orders. 2. Before.leaving Coal Creek, they will strike their tents and pack the same ready fortransportation. S. Major Gaus will furnish a sufficient detail to take charge of the tents, and will hold the same subject to the order of the quartermaster. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 14th, 1891. Special Order No. 28: 1. Captain Ashton with his command, at Gilman, will on the 15th day of July, 1891, proceed with all baggage, except tents, to Tacoma, by the most practical road or trail, and upon arriving at that point, will be relieved from further duty. 2. Captain Ashton will deliver to the deputy sheriff in charge, at Gilman, all arms and ammunition entrusted to him for safe keeping, taking a receipt of such officer for the same. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 13, 1891. Special Order No. 29: 1. On July 15, 1891, as soon as Captain Ashton and his command shall have vacated the camp at the Gilman coal mines, Captain Ingraham, with the members of companies D and E now on duty, will occupy the same, and will remain there until further orders, charged with the same duties discharged by Captain Ashton under previous orders from these headquarters, directed to him and his command. 2. If the number of men belonging to companies Dand E thus detailed do not equal fifteen, Captain Fife will detail sufficient from his command to make that number. 3. Captain Fife will also detail one bugler and one drummer to act as musicians for Captain Ingraham's command. 4. Captain Ingraham and his command will be at all times and in every respect subject to the orders of the post commander at Gilman. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 14, 1891.

Special Order No. 30: i. Company G, Captain William S. Shank commanding, stationed at New Castle, will, onJuly 15, break camp and proceed to Tacoma, by way of Seattle, on the 1:30 P. M. train, with all baggage. 2. Tents will be securely packed mnd delivered to the quartermaster at New Castle. 3. Captain Shank, with his command, will report to Captain C. L. F. Kellogg at the Columbia & Puget Sound depot upon his arrival. 4. Quartermaster will furnish necessary transportation. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 26, 1891.

Special Order No. 31: 1. Lieutenant Ross, with detail of C company, now stationed at New Castle, will march forthwith, in heavy marching order, to Gilman by the shortest practicable route. 2. Lieutenant Ross, with his command, will, upon his arrival at Gilman, report to Captain Fife. 3. Lieutenant Ross will then report at these headquarters for orders. 4. Major F. A. Gnus, post commander at New Castle, will report at By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. these headquarters for orders. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 16, 1891.

Special Order No. 32: 1. Captain W. J. Fife, post commander at Gilman, will, on Saturday, the 18th of July, 1891, cause his command to break camp, pack tents and other baggage for transportation and proceed on the 3:55 P. m. train to Seattle with all baggage. 2. Upon his arrival at Seattle he will report with his command to Lieutenant Hatfield, regimental commissary, at the armory. 3. Captain Ingraham and his command, upon their arrival at Seattle, will be relieved from further duty. 4. Captain Fife, with C company, will proceed on the 8:20 P. H. train to Tacoma, and upon reaching that point, will be relieved from further duty. 5. The commissary will furnish necessary subsistence. 6. The quartermaster will furnish necessary transportation. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. In reply to instructions contained in special order No. 31, Major Gans, under date of July 11th, telegraphed that he did not think it advisable for the detail to leave New Castle until the


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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

deputy sheriffs were relieved at that point, and reported that a dynamite explosion had taken place on the previous evening. He also reported the detachment could not reach Gilman in time for the train which left there for Seattle at 3 o'clock, and in reply to all of which Colonel Haines wired him to report with detachment direct to Seattle. On the following day subsequently Colonel Haines wired him to remain at New Castle until further orders, and to wire him if re-enforcements were needed. Under date of July 18th, everything being quiet at New Castle, Major Gans was ordered to report at once at the armory in Seattle. The reports show that the several companies served as follows: Company B, from June 28th to July 12th, inclusive, and two men to July 14th, inclusive; company C, from July 2d to July 19th, inclusive; company D, from June 28th to July 12th, inclusive, six men remainin'g on duty till July 18th; company E, from July 1st to July 13th, one officer and eight men remaining on duty until July 19th; company G, from July 2d to July 16th, one man remaining on duty until July 18th; company I, from July 3d to July 15th, inclusive. Too much cannot be said regarding the manner in which the officers and men of the several companies, and of troop B, performed the duties which were assigned to them, at different times, no matter how arduous; which, however, was not at all surpri&ng considering the example set them by our late commander, Colonel J. C. Haines, whose whole mind was set upon the solving of the difficulties as presented and who in the critical moments showed that rare judgment which characterized him at all times during his life, and which in these troubles on several occasions prevented loss of life and property. Very respectfully your obedient servant, JOSEPH GREEN,

Lieutenant Colonel Commanding First Regiment Infantry, N G. W

EXHIBIT B. REPORT OF CAPTAIN J. M. ASHTON. HEADQUARTERS TRoor' B, FIRST CAVALRY BATTALION, N. G. W., TACOMA, WASH., July -, 1891.

Colonel J. C. Haines, Commanding First Regiment, Y. Seattle: Sin—Pursuant to your instructions of the 13th inst., I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my command, and the services performed during the recent campaign. In compliance with the law and orders from Major Johnson, commanding the cavalry battalion, I ordered my command to ppear in fatigue dress for parade on the day of our national indelendence, July 4th. As there was no celebration this year in acoma, it was the unanimous wish of the troop to participate in e Seattle celebration pursuant to your very kind invitation. Accordingly the troop proceeded to Seattle on steamer Olympian a the evening of the 3d of July, and reached Seattle at 9 o'clock. orses were stabled at Seattle Transfer Co.'s stables, and the mmaiid reported at once at the armory, where supper was served. uarters were secured for the men at "The Abbott," and the troop was then dismissed with orders to report at the armory at I A. M. July 4th. Reported as ordered, and after breakfast marched to stables to prepare for parade at 10 A. M., in which this command participated. After parade company was invited to lunch by the chamber of commerce, after which it was dismissed with orders to report at stables at 5:30 P. M., at which time we marched directly to the armory for dinner. Subsequently the following order was received, authorizing the Placing of my command at your disposal for active duty in the field: (61)


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, Special Order No. 3: SEATTLE, July 4, 1891. Captain J. M. Ashton, of Troop B, will report to Colonel J. C. Haines, at Seattle, with such of his command and officers as may be required for picket and scouting duty. A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General Commanding National Guard of Washington.

mine. You will find tentage provided by Captain Shank, commanding G cOnPany of this regiment stationed at New Castle. You will instruct this portion of your detail to patrol the road running from New Castle to Gilman nightly as follows: Two men equipped for service without sabers will ride towards Gilman until they meet a similar detachment riding from Gilman towards New Castle; they will then return to New Castle. This patrol duty should be kept up each night from 7 o'clock P. m. until 5 o'clock A. M. 11 this detachment should meet a large body of men coming towards New Castle in such manner as to indicate hostile intentions or should be satisfied that there was immediate danger of an attack upon the mine, they will immediately ride to Coal Creek and request the engineer in charge of the pumps to blow the mine whistle; this will be a signal to Captain Shank to move with his command immediately to the mine. Should the engineer for any reason be unable -to give this signal, one man should immediately ride down the road to New Castle and notify Captain Shank. The balance of your detail you will station at Gilman, and from it you will assign men to perform the same duty as regards patroliug the Gilman road as has heretofore been assigned to men stationed at Coal Creek; the batallion stationed at Gilman will respond to any call indicating danger from parties of men going along the Gilman road towards Gilman. After the private guards now employed by the mine owners at Gilman are removed, you will station all but four of your detachment at the Gilman mine and along the road between the mine and Camp Gilman; they will do picket duty and act as mounted sentries for the protection of the mines and property connected therewith. For interpretation of these orders or for a specification of more minute details, you will inquire of the commanding officer at Camp Gilman. J. C. HAINES, Respectfully yours, Colonel Commanding First Regiment, National Guard of Washington.

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I then issued the following company order and dismissed my command for the night: IN QUARTERS AT SEATTLE, July 4, 1891. Company Order No. 27: Unless further orders are published throughout the night, all men are relieved from duty until to-morrow morning at 6 A. M. sharp, at which time every man must report to the first sergeant in the office of the Abbott, at this place, where the men will be provided with quarters as last night, sleeping together as before. Colonel Haines has requested that all men now in readiness, which is the present condition of this entire command, shall keep away from the main floor of this building, excepting such as desire to dance as guests at the ball. I caution all men, however, to retire early, keeping themselves in good condition, as your rest may be disturbed through the night. At any event, you will have to arise not later than 5:30 sharp in the morning. By order of J. M. ASHTON, Captain Commanding. P. M. BOERINGER, First Sergeant. Pursuant to following special order No. 14 and instructions in reference thereto: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, Special Order No. 14: SEATTLE, July 4, 1891. Captain J. M. Ashton, commanding Troop B, will immediately proceed with twelve men of his command, mounted and equipped for service in the field, to New Castle. He will there station three enlisted men and one non-commissioned officer, and will then proceed with the balance of this detail to Gilman, and report to Major Gans for further orders. 2. Captain C. L. F. Kellogg, quartermaster, will accompany Captain Ashton to New Castle and furnish transportation. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INF\ RY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTOI Captain J. M. ASBTON, commanding Troop B, First Cavalry Battalio\ In carrying out special order No. 14 you will obey the following instructions: Upon reaching New Castle you will there station three enlisted men and one non-commissioned officer at Coal Creek near New Castle mine, and also near the point where the Gilman road strikes the

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I issued the following order: FIRST CAVALRY BATTALION, TROOP B, N. G. W., IN QUARTERS AT SEATTLE, July 5, 1891. Company Order No. 25: The following officers and members of this command, namely: Lieutenant Dougan, Sargeants Best, Griggs, Clothier, Quartermaster Sergeant Box, Corporals Brown, Garrett and Le Fevre, and Privates Oakes, Wandell, Truedson, Cassell and Taylor, Trumpeter Bowen and Corporal Arthur Bowen will forthwith proceed under my command to New Castle, where three enlisted men and one non-commissioned officer will be stationed and given full instructions; the balance proceed with me to Gunman, where they will receive further orders. Until further orders all men so detailed will be assigned to picket and scouting duty. The following named men under command of Lieutenants Barry and Bamber will remain in Seattle, holding themselves in readiness to proceed to the front at a moment's notice, unless further orders are received. The above named lieutenants, together with first Sergeant Boeringer, will report to Colonel Haines at the armory, Seattle, to-night, on his return from the front. They will also report this afternoon or early in


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

the evening to Captain Hatfield, regimental commissary at the armory, Seattle, who will make arrangements to provide men with rations. Forage for horses remaining in Seattle and belonging to this detail will be had at the stables where they now are, reporting that fact to Captain Hatfield to-morrow night at the armory, who will make suitable provisions for forage for horses until this detail is ordered to the front or relieved from duty. A full complement of ammunition on hand will be issued forthwith to the first detail above named, and a full complement of ammunition issued to the second detail as soon as they receive orders to take the field and not before. No sabers are to be worn; men are to carry only pistols and carbines. Two blankets to the man, and heavy marching order throughout, with the exception of the saber. All remaining members of the troop will proceed under command of the ranking non-commissioned officer (remaining with them), to Tacoma by the steamer Olympic, leaving here to-day at three o'clock P. i. These men should be mounted and ready to go on board not later than two o'clock P. at. If any difficulty is experienced in transporting this remainder of the troop to Tacoma, advance funds as best you can to the Union Pacific Company, taking receipt therefor, and deliver same to the quartermaster sergeant on his arrival at Tacoma, when the matter will be adjusted and any amount so advanced refunded on arrival in Tacoma. You will resume your civilian dress and pursue your ordinary vocations as citizens, but hold yourselves in readiness to take the field if JAMES M. ASHTON, further orders should be issued. Captain Troop B, First Cavalry Battalion, N. G. W.

directed to establish headquarters here, where Captain Shank, commandmpany, stationed at New Castle, will provide tentage. Captain ing G co Ke llogg, acting quartermaster, has arranged forage and stable for five horses here. This detail will be under your command. You should confer, however, with Captain Shank, acting with him, subject, however, to the following special instructions: You will patrol the road from New Castle to Gilman nightly as follows: Two men, fully equipped, will ride toward Gilmanstarting at the hour of seven P. i's. sharp (at that hour a similar detail will start from Gilman to meet you). When you have met, return to camp, where you will rest your horses one hour. Promptly on returning, if anything to report, you should send fresh horse and detail a man to report same to Captain Shank at New Castle. Should you meet a large body of men coming toward New Castle indicating hostile intentions or you believe therefrom there is danger of an attack on the mine, detail will ride immediately to Coal Creek, quickly as possible, and direct engineer in charge of pumps to blow mine whistle which will be a signal for Captain Shank to move immediately to mine. If for any reason whistle cannot be sounded one man should immediately ride at the run to New Castle to notify Captain Shank. Details will as near as possible leave Coal Creek at the hours of seven, nine, eleven, one, three o'clock. Patrols from Gilman will have similar orders. You will exercise your own judgment about reliefs. By order, J. M. ASHTON, Captain Troop B. W. E. BEST, Acting First Sergeant.

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Squad composed of the following: acting First Sergeant Best, Quartermaster Sergeant Box, Sergeants Clothier and Griggs, Corporals Brown, Le Fevre, Garrett and Bowen, and privates Cassells, Oakes, Taylor, Truedson and Wandell, and trumpeter Bowen, commanded by myself, immediately after breakfast, 5 A. at., started for Coal Creek and Gilman. We were accompanied by Captain Kellogg, acting regimental quartermaster. Proceeded to foot of Yesler avenue, from which point we took steamer across Lake Washington, landing on New Castle road about 10 A. at. Shortly afterward we rode through New Castle, meeting there a detail for G company, first regiment. Did not stop at New Castle but pushed on to Coal Creek, at which point Sergeant Grigg< -as left in command of squad composed of Sergeant Ciothier, crals Brown and Garrett and privates Truedson, with the folloig special orders: COAL CREEK, July 5, 1891. Special Order No. 1: Sergeant GRIGGS â&#x20AC;&#x201D;YOU are hereby detailed together with Sergeant Clothier, Corporals Garrett and Brown and Private Truedson, and

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Company G, Captain Shank commanding, was in camp at Coal Creek when we arrived. The balance of the command proceeded at once to Gilman, where quarters for horses and men were provided by Captain Kellogg. Having ridden over the road between Coal Creek and Gilman, I saw at once that it would be impracticable to attempt, with the limited number of men at my command, to ride patrols as planned in my special order No. 1. I therefore sent the following, by my order, to Sergeant Griggs, at Coal Creek, and published special order No. 3 in camp. HEADQUARTERS TROOP B, N. G. W., Special Order No. 2: AT GILMAN, July 9, 1891. Sergeant GRIGGS, Coal Creek: After riding the road between New Castle and this point I am satisfied that the present patrol arrangement cannot, in justice to the limited number of men at my command and their horses, be maintained. Patrols, therefore, will move as follows: They Start from each point at 8 P. M. sharp, each patrol marching to the meeting point, and returning promptly to their respective camps, which they should not make until 10 P. M., thereby taking two hours each to ride to the meeting point and return to camp. They should then return â&#x20AC;&#x201D;5


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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

immediately over the same ground, and after again meeting, return to their respective camps, which should place them in camp for relief at 12 o'clock midnight. The patrol should then be relieved by a fresh detail, who start from their respective camps at 12 midnight; at 2 A. M. again riding to meeting point and returning at 5 A. M. The details should ride at a slow gait, thereby consuming two hours on each trip, excepting the last, which must consume three hours, the object being to always have some one on the road. All parts of the order now held by you not inconsistent with this order are in force. By order of JAMES M. ASHTON, Captain Commanding. W. E. BEST, Acting First Sergeant.

I have delivered this afternoon to Superintendent Dickson of the 0. I. Co.. the communication entrusted to me. While at New Castle I learned that about thirty men not in sympathy with the strikers will go to work in the mines to-morrow morning. Captain Shank anticipated that the strikers may make some trouble during the night, as these men must all come up the track from New Castle to Coal Creek in the morning. I will therefore ride to New Castle (to-night) at 12 midnight, interviewing Captain Shank and returning at 1:30. If anything in the wind will notify you by my two o'clock patrol. Sergeant GIIIGGS.

66

HEADQUARTERS TROOP B, N. G. W., GILMAN, July 5, 1891.

Special Order No. 3: The following details will report for patrol duty to-night, mounted: Privates Oakes and Taylor at 8 o'clock sharp; Corporal Le Fevre and Private Cassels at midnight. The first patrol will start at 8 o'clock, riding along the road to New Castle until they meet the patrol from that place. After meeting, the patrols will return at once to camp, arriving at 10 P. M. They will then start again and go over the same ground, returning at 12 midnight, when the second patrol will start over the route, returning at 2 o'clock; again starting, they will ride over the road, returning at 5 o'clock. Should the patrol meet an armed force of men or any body of men of hostile appearance they will ride as quickly as possible to camp and report. The Thll time of two hours must be spent on each trip, except the last, which will take three hours, as it is desired to have the road patrolled at all hours. By order of JAMES M. ASHTON, Captain Commanding. W. E. BEST, Acting First Sergeant. I sent also to Sergeant Griggs the communication to Captain J.

L. Dickson in re the disarming of guards which wai delivered to him by Sergeant Griggs, as per his letter following: COAL CREEK, July 5, 1891. Capt. JAMES M. ASHTON: According to instructions received through your orderly, I append the following report: I delivered to Supt. Dickson this P. M. at 3:15 the communication delivered to me by your orderly. He read the same in my presence and also Captain Shank's. Made no remarks concerning its contents, simply asserting that the strikers would not molest the works orK 'n so long as they knew there was an armed body of men on hand. \ E. G. GS, Sergeant, Tthp B. COAL CREEK, July 5, 1891. Capt. JAMES M. ASHTON: I have completed arrangements to comply with your special order No. 2. Patrols will leave accordingly.

Pursuant to your orders, the -following members of my troop, First Sergeant Boeringer, Seageant Strouthers, Privates Anderson, Briggs, Fransioli, LaFarge, Morse, Mills, Pollock, Potter, Rhodes, Tait and Thompson, under command of Lieutenant Barry, left Seattle at 2 P. M. for Black Diamond and Franklin; on reaching Renton, Privates Morse, Mills, Pollock and Tait, Morse in command, were ordered to report to me at Gilman, which place they reached at 8:30 safely, but used up from their long and dusty ride. The balance of Lieutenant Barry's detachment proceeded to Black Diamond, at which point he stationed Privates Anderson, 'ransioli and Potter, in command of Sergeant Strouthers. Cornmy C, Captain Fife commanding, was stationed at this point and provided quarters for the men. Lieutenant Barry, with the rest of 'his detachment, pushed on to ranklin, reporting to Lieutenant Colonel Green, post commander. Patrols were ridden from Coal Creek and Gilman, as ordered, cmii 8 P. M. until 5 A. M. Sergeant - Clothier, having been sent by Sergeant Griggs with iessages to Major Gaus from Captain Shank, was detained by me id Private Mills sent to Coal Creek to take his place. On July 6th, pursuant to the following orders: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 5, 1891.

pecial Order No. 16: 1. Captain Ashton, commanding Troop B,will at once remove his camp urn Gilman to the Gilman coal mines, and there select a suitable locaon as convenient as practicable to the stables. 2. He will remain in camp at that point until further orders, and while ere will employ big force in accordance with the following instructions: First: He will continue the mounted patrol as provided in special rder No. 15.

I- I


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

Second: He will guard, by mounted patrol and otherwise as may be necessary, the Gilman coal mines and the lives and property of all persons residing at and about the same. This guard must be particularly strong and vigilant at night. Third: No persons must be admitted, either by night or day, within the enclosure now established about the Gilman coal mines, except the same be persons lawfully employed in the working of said mines, or there with the consent of the owners of the property within the enclosure. Fourth: He will carefully reconnoitre the roads leading to the mines, and upon the approach of any body of men in such manner as to indicate an attack upon either the property or the persons at or about the mines, will communicate that fact at once to the commanding officer at Camp Gilman. Fifth: He will transmit daily to the commanding officer at Camp Gilman a brief report of the condition of affairs at his camp during the previous twenty-four hours, and will also, before eleven o'clock of each day, cause a regular morning report to be transmitted to the post adjutant at Camp Gilman. Sixth: Quartermaster will furnish the necessary transportation, tentage and forage. Seventh: Commissary will furnish necessary subsistence. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. EsPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant.

HEADQUARTERS TROOP B, GILMAN MINE, July 6, 1891. Special Order No. 5: Sergeant GRIGGS, Coal Creek: Patrols to-night and until further orders will be as follows: Patrols of two men each will start from here and Coal Creek at 9 P. as. arriving at meeting point at 11 P. M., and returning to their respective camps at 1 P. as., when, if practicable, another patrol of two men should leave, arriving at meeting point at 3 A. as., returning to their respective camps at 5 A. M. This saves horses and men and accomplishes the object quite as well, which is to have patrols at all hours of the night on the road to comply with special order No. 1, delivered to you at Coal Creek. The horses should be walked, and, if at their natural gait they walk one way in less than two hours, the time can be consumed in resting on the road. Caution your men, if they dismount when. resting, not to leave their arms and horses so as to make them powerless in the event of an ambushed enemy. By order of JAS. M. ASHTON, Captain Commanding. W. E. BEST, Acting First Sergeant.

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I moved my command with tents and all baggage to the Gilman coal mine, and there camped on the bank of the Issaquah river. Outside of the fene which had been constructed about the property, but close to the stables located there, Captain Kellogg superintended the making of camp and arranged for the subsistence of the troop. Lieutenant Bamber, inspector of rifle practice, and Captain Bebee, surgeon of the first cavalry battalion, reported for duty on this day. Captain Bebee was assigned quarters at Camp Issaquah, and at once raised the flag of the surgeon and prepared to handle cases that might be reported to him. During his stay at the camp Captain Bebee was of infinite assistance, both at this camp and at Camp Gilman, in remedying the ailments sure to arise among men unused to camp life, and in one case doubtless saving the life of one of the men injured with a knife during a friendly scuffle. His services during the first few days of ca( I consider invaluable. By your verbal directions upon the field Lieutenant l\ber was ordered to report at Coal Creek, assuming command of detachment there. In this connection and in reference to changes in time of starting night patrols, the following orders were sent to Sergeant Griggs, at Coal Creek:

69

HEADQUARTERS Tnoov B, GILMAN MINES, July 6, 1891. Special Order No. 6: Sergeant Gnmos, Coal Creek: Lieutenant Bamber, the bearer hereof, will assist you at Coal Creek in carrying out orders heretofore delivered Le order delivered herewith. uten ant Bamber will necessarily rank you, but you should confer t together on all matters of importance. n highly pleased with your command, and my sole object in directeutenant Bamber to report at New Castle is that I am satisfied the are too great for the limited number of men at your command. By order of JAS. M. ASHTON, Captain Commanding. E. BEST, Acting First Sergeant. removal of the Sullivan guards necessitated the guarding of )proaches to the mines by soldiers. A detail of nine (9) men sergeant was sent from Camp Gilman to be stationed at inside the company lines. The usual mounted patrols were ri, also mounted patrols on all trails and roads or other means ress or egress along and over the mountains back of the The riding of these patrols taxed my command to the utowing to the limited number of men at my disposal and the Irawal of the infantry guards at 8 A. as., which was done in it every case, necessitated my putting on guard at the gates who had just come in from duty as mounted patrols. men on guard were carefully instructed as per your order ring:


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FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 5, 1891.

Special Order No. 17: 1. Inasmuch as the owners of the coal mines at the several stations of the troops of this commami now in the field have been requested at 12 o'clock noon on the 6th day of July, 1891, to remove from their property all guards and armed men now maintained by them, or under their authority, and inasmuch as it is probable that this request will be complied with, and inasmuch as this request has been made upon the ground that the forces of the state troops now at such points is sufficient to insure the safety of the property and persons at such mines, the post commanders at Franklin, Black Diamond, New Castle and Gilman will obey carefully the following instructions: First: They will keep in mind the elementary maxim that the military is always subordinate to the civil power of the state. Second: They will never act unless it be in self defense, except upon the request, or with the approval of, the sheriff or deputy sheriff stationed at posts at which such post commander may be, but will always act promptly upon receiving a request to do so from such authority. Third: They will dispose their guards in such a manner as to afford protection to the property, lives and liberty of all persons within the limits of their post, and will, to the extent of their ability, preserve peace and good order at all times within such limits. They will allow no interference by violence, intimidation or manifestations of force with persons lawfully employed either upon their own property or the property of their employers. Fourth: In the use of the National Guard for the protection of property, post commanders must remember that the troops under their command are not to take the place of private watchmen, such as are ordinarily employed for the protection of property from fire or other injury incident to the ordinary condition of affairs, but that any person within the limits of their posts has the right to maintain such watchmen in the usual and ordinary way. These instructions, however, must not be construed so as to allow the carrying or display of arms or use of the same in such manner as to create public disturbance or tend to a breach of the peace. 2. In case of any doubt in their minds as to the question of their authority or powers, or any uncertainty as to the meaning and import of these instructions, they will communicate by telegraph to the commandBy order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. ing officer of the regiment. Official: GaAs. E5PLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. t FrankThe following telegram was sent to Lieutenant Bar' lin: GILMAN, July 6,\91. Lieutenant BARRY, Cavalry, Franklin: Your orders are conform to Colonel Haines' instructions, exercising your judgment on all other matters until further orders. Preserve carefully horses and men as they are too limited. J. M. ASIITON.

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The detail reported for sentry duty brought to me the following letter: SEATTLE, July 6, 1891. Captain JAMES M. A5HTON, commanding B troop, Gilman: Sir—I send you, in charge of this detail, H. L. Bebee, who has been arrested by the sheriff for an assault committed with an axe upon a party of men who were taunting him and using abusive language towards him for having to return to work in the mine. He lives in town and has a family here. I am charged by the sheriff with his custody until the morning. They have friends at the mines, and as I have no proper accommodation for his wife here, I desire you to take charge of the prisoner and allow him to remain with his family in one of the houses at the mine and hold him subject to my order. Mr. Parker gives the man an excellent character, and I have no fear that he will attempt to escape. The people here in Gilman claim he is a dangerous man, but I am inclined to Parker's view of the case. J. C. HAINES, Respectfully yours, Colonel Commanding Camp Gilman. In view of this letter and of Mr. Parker's representations, the prisoner, H. L. Bebee, was permitted to spend the night in a house at the mine. Herewith letter of Superintendent Parker: GILMAN, July 6, 1891. Captain ASHT0N: Dear Sir—As desired by you, the following information will give you the locations of the places being watched, viz., the bunkers; the slope and machinery; the two forts; the No. 4 tunnel, and superintendent's house. There will be only one man at each place. I would suggest that you give your countersign, or if not that some word or phrase, etc., to the bearer who will see that all the watchmen have it, and they will be required to answer to a challenge from your patrol. You would therefore be able to detect any night prowlers. In having only these men out, I think I am showing to you my confidence in your ability to protect the lives of the new men who are on the property of the S. C. & I. Co. and working for themselves and the interests of the company, and also your ability to protect the property from wanton destruction. I am obliged to have a watchman at the entrance to No. 4 tunnel, or I would not have anyone round my house at all under other circumstances— thus showing my confidence in the ability of the law to maintain its protective power and its dignity. I would point out that unless both gates are guarded day and night it will be almost impossible to keep out the Gilman hotheads. I understand you are patrolling at night around these points, but I am not quite clear if you meant to guard the gate or not during the day, and if you do not, would I be legally right and have your approval in so doing? The one instance which has occurred to-day where one of our quickest


73

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

men was incited by a worthless drunkard and a striker to boot, and which caused him to protect himself, and as far as I can understand the case, to endeavor to "get even," shows very plainly the necessity of keeping our men apart from the strikers, and no better plan appears to me to be than that of keeping the strikers and the Gilman residents strictly apart, the latter outside of the dead line. Hoping to hear your views. Yours truly, J. H. PARKER, Supt. S. C. & I. Co.

which he will show you. I understand there is a judgment against him req uiring his eviction, but the writ has not yet been executed. Until it is, make such arrangement as you can for his passing and repassing, provided it be consistent with the proper management and security of your J. C. HAINES, Yours truly, post. Colonel Commanding Camp Gilman.

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Some little trouble was found in getting sentries and patrols working smoothly owing to slight misunderstanding with Supt. Parker—sentries at the gates having positive orders to admit no one without a pass from you. Supt. Parker or myself very properly refused to admit any other person -several persons being stopped that had a right to admittance within the lines, called forth the following letter from you: NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, SEATTLE, July 7, 1891. Captain J. M. ASHTON, Commanding B Troop, Camp Gilman: Sir—It has been reported to me that the patrol between here and New Castle was not properly maintained last night, and that the reliefs were not sent out promptly. Please investigate the matter and report to me the result of such investigation. I wish also to call your attention to the fact that the patrolman who was instructed to report at my headquarters such information as he could derive from the patrol from New Castle concerning the situation of affairs failed to do so. I wish to call your attention to the fact that travel within the limits of the enclosure at the mines is blockaded by the fact that no one can be admitted without the countersign. I did not understand that the countersign was to be used at your station after the relief of the night guards, and would suggest that the same rule regarding admission of persons during the day time as prevailed prior to the location of your camp there, be continued by you. Yours truly, J. C. HAINES, Colonel Commanding Camp Gilman. Everything was straightened out, however, and patrolmen on Gilman road instructed to report at your camp, and thereafter all went suilothly. The following letters were acted upon and arranget vith Superintendent Parker: 'N NATIONAL GUARD OF WAS EI \TON. FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, CAMP GILMAN, July 7, 1891. Captain J. M. ASHTON, Commanding B Troop, Camp Gilman: Sir—i send you tinder escort Peter Weiskir, who resides at the house within the enclosure near its entrance. Heretofore he has had a pass,

NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, CAMP GILMAN, July 7, 1891. J. M. ASHTON, Commanding Troop B, Camp Gilman: Sir—Mr. Begley, who accompanies the bearer of this message, states that he desires to remove from the property within the enclosure at your station certain articles belonging to him, being principally household goods and desires to use a team and three men to assist him. Satisfy yourself that this application is made in good faith, if it is, allow him to enter the lines, keeping him under guard both while going and coming and while loading his goods. The superintendent of the mine may be able to give you some information concerning the facts. J. C. HAINES, Yours truly, Colonel Commanding Camp Gilman. NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, CAMP GILMAN, July 7, 1891. Captain J. M. ASHTON, Commanding B Troop, Camp Gilman: Sir—This will introduce to you deputy sheriff McDonald, who represents the sheriff at this post. Please arrange so that he may be admitted through your line without challenge during the day, and issue the J. C. HAINES, Yours truly, countersign to him at night. Colonel Commanding Camp Gilman. The following order having been issued by you: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, CAMP GILMAN, July 7, 1891. Special Order No. 21: 1. Major F. A. Gans will proceed by the most direct route to Camp New Castle, and there assume command. 2. He will report in writing to these headquarters, as often as in his judgment is necessary, the situation of affairs at his post. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHARLES ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. I at once sent the following order to Lieutenant Bamber: HEADQUARTERS TROOP B, CAMP GILMAN, July 7, 1891. Special Order No. 7: To Lieutenant BAMBER, Coal Creek: Major Gans has received orders to proceed by most direct route to New Castle, and assume command.


75

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

You will confer with Major Gans, and act under his orders in all matters, except that pertaining to a patrol upon the road between your camp and Gilman. That patrol you will maintain pursuant to orders heretofore issued. J. M. ASHTON, Captain Troop B. W. E. BEST, Acting First Sergeant.

The following order was issued by you: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, CAMP GILMAN, July 8, 1891. Special Order No. 23: - 1. Captain J. M. Ashton, commanding Troop B. is instructed to notify the superintendent of the Gilman coal mine that he is at liberty to employ his watchmen at and about the mining property, not to exceed six persons, to be stationed at such points as Captain Ashton may direct. Such persons not to be selected from the guards, commonly known as the Sullivan guards, or from any other body of armed men, or any other private organization for the maintenance of armed men. 2. Such watchmen will be posted from sunset to sunrise and be subject at all times to the immediate orders of Captain Ashton, and will be allowed to carry such arms as in his judgment may be necessary to properly discharge their duties. 3. The duties of such watchmen shall be those only as are ordinarily discharged by watchmen over property at times when no great public disorder prevails. 4. Captain Ashton will have authority to discontinue the use of these watchmen or any of them at any time. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant.

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The following letter of July 8th, from Lieutenant Bamber acknowledging the receipt of order above written: COAL CREEK, July 8, 1891. Captain ASHTON, Commanding Troop B: Dear Sir—In accordance with your orders of the 7th, I this day reported to Major Gans, who has assumed command of this district. Major Gans visited our camp this afternoon, accompanied by Captain Shank, with a view of examining the situation. Everything is quiet to-day. I am informed that the negroes who went to New Castle last night did so at the invitation of Mr. Corey, who, I am also informed, supplied them with a keg of beer; a proceeding, in my opinion, injudicious, and one I think it would be wise not to allow to be repeated. The miners complain that whilst they are not allowed to bring beer even, the coons have it given to them. All of which is respectfully submitted. IRA R. BAMBER, Lieutenant Commanding Detachment at Coal Creek. Mounted patrols were ridden as usual on the night of July 7. The usual infantry guard was sent to our camp, but was recalled early in the evening and guards put on at the gates as per the following order: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, Special Order No. -: CAMP GILMAN, July 7, 1891. 1. Captain Ashton will relieve the sentries now on duty at the mines and order them to report at once to the officer of the day. 2. The superintendent of the Gilman mines will be allowed for this night to place such number of armed guards at or about the mines as Captain Ashton may approve of, and such guard, when so posted, shall be respected as such by the other sentries and the officers and members of this command. By order of Colonel HAINES. CHAS. ESPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. Following our consultation as per the following letter: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, CAMP GILMAN, GILMAN, July 8, 1891. Captain J. M. ASHTON, Commanding B Troop: Sir—If not too much trouble, I would like to have you come down to my quarters about 1 o'clock, or as soon after that time as your convenience will allow, to consult with me regarding the withdrawal of the balance of the Sullivan guards. Yours truly, J. C. HAINES, Colonel Commanding Camp Gilman

A copy of this order was sent by me to superintendent Parker with this letter: CAMP GILMAN, July 3, 1891. J. L. PARKER, Esq., Superintendent Seattle Coal & Iron Co.: Dear Sir—Herewith copy of order from Colonel Haines, which explains itself. I furnish you with this copy that there may be no possibility of misunderstanding between you and myself. I must have the right to select your watchmen (if you wish to employ same), and to absolutely control at all times their actions and conduct. J. M. ASHTON, Captain Troop B. Yours truly, Superintendent Parker in reply called upon me at my camp and made satisfactory arrangements with me as to posting of private watchmen. On the evening of July 8th, Captain Herrick, commanding the Sullivan guards, turned over to me all the arms and ammunition used by his men. These guns, revolvers and cartridges were carefully stowed away in our camp. I took the following receipt from Captain Herrick (indorsed on back is receipt from Sheriff Woolery for the same property, turned over to him July 15th, on breaking camp): GILMAN MINES, July 8, 1891. Received from Captain G. F. Herrick the following arms and ammunition:


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

Winchester repeating rifles Nos. 204,639, 208,923, 247,419, 238,731, 247,435, 192,400, 346,936, 238,554, 73,609, 192,503, 51,331, 86,199, 149,652, 258,151, 118,280; 1 Moulton & Co. shotgun, No. 4,149; 1 revolver (S. & W.), No. 4,249, caliber 42; 1 revolver (Colt), No. 703,271, caliber 45; 1 revolver (U. S.). No. 111,630, caliber 45; 1 revolver (U. S.), No. 8,580, caliber 45; 1 revolver (U. S.), No. 1,086,191, caliber 44; 1 revolver (U. S.), No. 94,558, caliber 44; 1 revolver (U. S.), No. 112,048, caliber 45; 3 revolvers (Remington), Nos. 506, 2,937, 634, calibers 44; 1 revolver (Hopkins & Allen), No. 22,532, caliber 44; 7 belts; 5 scabbards; 3,300 rounds of cartridges (E. &. D. E.). JAMES M. ASHTON, Captain Commanding Troop B. N. G. W. I hereby certify that the within are all arms in my possession or control or in that of any of my men at Gilman mine, July 8, 1891, 7:30 P. M. GEORGE HERRICK. To-Captain J. M. ASHTON, Commanding Troop B: Received from Captain Ashton the within arms and cartridges July 15, 1891. J. H. WOOLERY, Sheriff. Per J. F. MCDONALD, Deputy.

coma, and leave with armorer the address where they can be found by day or night within at least one hour's time. J. M. ASHTON, Captain.

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Having been annoyed by telegrams received from employers of members of my command, threatening to discharge such members unless they returned at once to work, I prepared the following statement, which was published in all the Tacoma papers. I ant glad to be able to say that no member of my command lost his position by reason of his being out on duty: To the editors of the Tacoma Press: In the interest of the public, and particularly of those concerned with the subject-matter of this communication, I wish you would do me the favor of publishing same. Employers of men in the field are seriously interfering with the service by calling for their employds, members of this troop and now in the field under orders. The limited number of men in the field are covering a large section of country, and if the relations and friends of such men desire to prevent injury, both from opposing forces and excessive exposure and overwork, some steps should be taken to interfere with employers stating to their employes that their positions will be lost unless they return. Their presence in the field is a public necessity or they would not be here. The actions I refer to on the part of employers is a breach of the law and may become a very serious one. J. M. ASHTON, Captain. Recognizing the fact that at any moment my entire command might be called for, I issued the following order so that no time need be lost in assembling the men, if necessary: HEADQUARTERS Tioop B, Special Order No. 8: CAMP ISSAQUAH, July, 1891. All men not in the field must report immediately at the Armory, Ta-

77

The following telegram was sent to Lieutenant Barry, at Franklin:

GILMAN, July 8, 1891. Lieutenant BARRY, Black Diamond or Franklin: Mail me report condition your detail and their duties. J. M. ASHTON, Captain. In reply to the same the following was received: To Captain JAMES M. ASHTON, Commanding Troop B, N. G. W. Sirâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Pursuant to telegram received yesterday, I am instructed by Lieutenant Barry to report to you the condition of this detail. We arrived here on Monday morning at about 9 o'clock after a very hard ride. Men and horses in good condition. Have been scouting ever since; have located and mapped all the trails between this point and Black Diamond. We have also located and mapped out the trails from this point to Palmer by this route and making use of Northern Pacthc Railroad Company, infantry or cavalry could be landed here in about five or six hours from Tacoma. You seethe immense strategic advantage. We have also blazed out a new trail between Black Diamond and this point which is known to only four cavalry men and one infantry private. The whole available military force could be brought here from Black Diamond, or vice versa, without the knowledge of anyone in either town, and an attack could be made in both instances from unexpected quarters. I will hereafter transmit you a daily report of proceedings here. Everything appears quiet on the surface here, but there is no telling how soon this may change as these people, both the coons and white, are unreliable. P. N. BOERINGEE, Very respectfully, First Sergeant Troop B, First Cavalry N. G. W. FRANKLIN, July 9, 1891. Lieutenant Barry's detachment at Black Diamond and Franklin did splendid work, as may be seen from the report of Sergeant Boeringer. In addition to the .riding of patrols they out new trails, cleaned up the old trails, and put everything in shape for the rapid concentrating of all the men at either pointâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a most important work in my estimation. Camp Issaquah was visited by Brigadier General Curry on the afternoon of July 7th. On July 8th Private Sears was sent by me to Tacoma, with orders to bring, by most direct route, seven (7) men. Privates Gattle, Esperson, Webb, Bryer, Bowen, Plass and Trumpeter Smyser, under command of Sears, left Tacoma July 10, at 8 A. M., reaching Gil-


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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

man July 11, at 4:30 P. M., with the exception of Private Gattel, whose horse went lame and who was on that account left at Coal Creek. The arrival of these men very materially aided in the proper execution of orders in reference to mounted patrols. Wishing to look after that portion of my comm'ind stationed at Coal Creek, I rode the first patrol on the night of the 9th inst. with Quartermaster Sergeant Box. On meeting the patrol from Coal Creek I sent them on to Camp Issaquah, proceeding myself to Coal Creek. Sergeant Best was left in command of the camp. About 3 A. 'i., July 10th, a shot was fired on the hill above the camp and near to the fort; an investigation as to who had fired the shot was unsuccessful. On the morning of July 11, about 6:15 o'clock, six or seven shots were fired by the infantry sentry at post No. 1, the gate across railroad track between our camp and camp Gilman. The reason given by this man for the firing was that he wished to attract the attention of the corporal of the guard as he should have been relieved at 5 A. M. The failing to relieve him was caused by our having no corporal of the guard—all our non-commissioned officers and privates were or had been on guard with the exception of the first sergeant, who acted as sergeant of the guard every night—the sergeant was up until 3 o'clock, at which time he turned in, instructing the sentry on duty at the camp to call him at 5 A. M., so that he might post the new sentries, and the sentry forgot to do this and the man on post No. 1 ran an hour over; while regretting the fact that we had no corporals to put on as corporals of the guard, I do not think this man was at all justified in firing as he did and alarming the camp. On July 12th the following order was issued by you: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, CAMP Gn.MAN, July 12, 1891. Special Order No. 24: Captain W. J. Fife with his command will go into camp at Camp 1. Gilman upon there arrival there, and will remain at that post until further orders. 2. During the absence of the regimental commander from Camp Gilman, Captain W. J. Fife will act as commander of the post. 3. Captain Ashton, commanding Troop B, will have the management of his command in all matters connected with camp routine, and the details of the scouting and picket duty to which he has been assigned. All orders heretofore issued from these headquarters regarding him and his

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niniand will remain in full force, but his command will be subject to orders of the post commander for tactical purposes and field duty. 4. The post commander will, until further orders, during the day mintain the sentries at the upper and lower gates of the coal mines, and 11 at guard mount on the evening of each day, detail six men and one rporal for sergeant, and will report to Captain Ashton for sentry duty, [fit relieved on the morning of the following day. All sentries, when ioned at the coal mines, to be subject to Captain Ashton's orders. 5. No passes will be issued to any one to pass through the lines at the at mines, but all members of this command will be allowed to pass the ntries after six o'clock in the morning, and before eight o'clock in the ening without passes or countersign. 6. The post commander will honor any requisition that Captain Ashton ay make for additional guards or sentries in case of necessity, such deits to be subject to Captain Ashton's orders. By order of Col. J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. E5PLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. Pursuant to the above order company C, Captain Fife command! ing, reached Gilman at 11 o'clock in the morning, July 12th, and at once took possession of the camp, companies D and E returning to Seattle. Captain Fife sent a detail to our camp each night, and also relieved the men on guard at the gates in the morning, also guarding the gates with his command throughout the day. This made it much easier for my men as the relieving of the sentries at the gates at 5 A. M. by my men, and the guarding of the gates through the day by them was a hardship in view of the fact that mounted patrols had to be maintained day and night. On the 13th inst. a man named Weiskir was evicted by the sheriff. Several of the men, said to be strikers, gathered at the gates to watèh the proceedings, but there was no disorder. On the 14th inst. I received your special order No. 28, directing that I return with my command to Tacoma. HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, SEATTLE, July 14, 1891. Special Order No. 28: 1. Captain Ashton with his command at Gilman, will, on the fifteenth day of July, -1891, proceed with all baggage, except tents, to Tacoma by the most practical road or trail, and upon arriving at that point will be relieved from further duty. 2. Captain Ashton will deliver to the deputy sheriff in charge at Gil- - - man all arms and ammunition intrusted to him for safe keeping, taking the receipt of such officer 'for the same. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. Official: CHAS. ESPLIN, jr.. First Lieutenant and Adjutant.


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Also letter of instruction pertaining to said order: SEATTLE, July 13, 1891. Instructions to Captain ASHTON, Commanding Troop B, First Cavalry N. G. W.: Sir—Upon executing special order No. 28, you will proceed to Tacoma by the most practical route, and as rapidly as is consistent with the efficient state of your command. Upon arriving there, you will report to me fully your operations in the field. You will forward to the military board vouchers for such expenses as you have incurred during the campain, together with a pay-roll of your command upon the blanks prepared by the state. If you have not these blanks, you can obtain them through your battalion adjutant. Please make your report promptly that I may embody it in the report I am preparing, covering the operations of the whole J. C. HAINES, Yours truly, command in the field. Colonel Commanding First Regiment N. G. W. Following is special order No. 27: HEADQUARTERS FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, NATIONAL GUARD or WASHINGTON. SEATTLE, July 14, 1891. Special order No. 27: 1: Lieutenant Bamber, with his command stationed at Coal Creek, will report forthwith to Captain Ashton at Gilman for orders. 2. Before leaving Coal Creek they will strike their tents and pack the same ready for transportation. 3. Major Gans will furnish a sufficient detail to take charge of the tents, and will hold the same subject to the order of the quartermaster. By order of Colonel J. C. HAINES. EsPLIN, jr., First Lieutenant and Adjutant. Official: CR45. Acting on this order, Lieutenant Bamber's command at Coal Creek struck tents, prepared same for transportation, and were about to proceed to Gilman. I rode to Coal Creek and New Castle with Captain Fife and Lieutenant Howell and found that trouble was threatened there. The following letter from Lieutenant Bamber explains the difficulty: CAMP COAL CREEK, July 13, 1891. Captain ASHTON, Commanding Troop B: Sir—I have to report that all the colored men down the mine at this place came out on strike this morning, in consequence, as I understand, of certain white miners having been put to work. Mr. Corey has been up here, and I am informed that the matter has been arranged, and thet the colored men will go to work again in the morning. Should the strike of the negroes continue, the stupidity of supplying them with arms, and of allowing them to retain them, will be apparent. All quiet otherwise. IRA R. BAMBER, Respectfully, Lieutenant Commanding Detachment Troop B

In view of the outlook, I received orders from you to hold both detachments and to ride patrols as before. The following telegram from Sergeant Boeringer, in command of detachment at Franklin, was received: FRANKLIN, 7-12, 1891. Captain J. M. ASHTON, Gilman: Nine men here destitute of funds; send some money; all are no use here. Can you not send us home? Barry sick in Tacoma. Let me hear BOERINGER. from you. The sergeant was directed by telegram to obtain what money he needed from the company store at Franklin. He did so, and, according to my orders, left for Slaughter On July 13th, as per the following telegram: FRANKLIN, 7-13,1891. J. M. ASHTON, Gilman: Telegraph received. Leave for Slaughter at five o'clock to-morrow morning. When you leave get Struthers' arms equipment from Fife. BOERINGER. The detachment proceeded to Slaughter, where they spent the night, leaving for Tacoma next day. Reached there in good condition. The following telegram from you: SEATTLE, 7-14, 1891. aptain J. M. ASHTON, Gilman: Do not hold your patrol at New Castle longer, but proceed to Tacoma Col. J. C. HAINES. LS heretofore ordered. Was received just before our first detail started for Coal Creek. Instructions were sent by them to Lieutenant Bamber to start for my camp at 1 o'clock A. M., riding through with his entire command and reaching here at 5 A. M. In compliance, the detachment reported at camp at 5 A. M. Preparations were made for breaking camp. It was decided not to move until after dinner, and, therefore, at 1 P. M. the command to march was given and the whole detachment started for Tacoma. All baggage and supplies were packed on the extra horses which followed the troop, in charge of a detachment under command of Quartermaster Sergeant Box. Captain Ingraham, with a detachment from D and E companies, was left in possession of the cavalry camp. Before leaving Gilman I sent to you the following letter: HEADQUARTERS TROOP B, CAMP GILMAN, JULY 15, 1891. Colonel J. C. HAINES, Seattle: Sir—Pursuant to special order No. 28 and your telegram last evening, all equipment and baggage has been packed and my command —6


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is now ready to move to Tacoma. The detachment at Coal Creek reported to me at 5 o'clock this morning. I shall leave and be on the march in one hour's time. The route so far as I can now indicate same, is from here to Renton, via the Cedar mountain road, Renton to Slaughter Slaughter direct to Tacoma, reaching Tacoma by riding across Puyallup Indian reservation, coming in by the bridge at the mouth of the Puyallup river. I hope to reach Tacoma to-morrow afternoon or evening. Captain Ingraham has relieved me here. All is quiet. I am now of the opinion there will be no outbreak even when all the militia are removed, at least not for a month or six weeks hereafter, if not longer. Can give you my reasons in full for this conclusion if you so desire. I will report to you all operations in the field of my command as soon as possible after reaching Tacoma. JAMES M. ASIITON, Captain Troop B. Respectfully, The command reacjled Renton at 7:30 P. M. and spent the night there. The march was resumed early next morning and no stop was made until Slaughter was reached, about 1 P. M. Although my intention had been to push through to Tacomathat day, I found it to be impracticable on account of the condition of some of the horses. I therefore ordered the horses stabled and remained in Slaughter until 2:30 A. M., July 17th, when the march was again taken up and continued to Tacoma, which we reached at 10:30 A. M. After putting all arms and equipments in the armory, the command was relieved from duty. In summing up I would say, that while this is the first time my command has been called into active service, I have every reason to feel proud of them and of the services they rendered. Though greatly handicapped by overwork and loss of sleep, every duty was performed cheerfully and well. In many cases the men showed rare judgment in the handling of the disturbances when the firing of a single shot might have caused endless trouble and bloodshed. During the first few days many men were reported by the surgeon as unfit for duty, but refused to allow them to be sent in on the sick list, as by so doing they would have increased the already arduous duties of the others. I think I am justified in saying that I have a troop of men who can be counted upon in any emergency. JAMES M. ASHTON, Very respectfully, Captain Commanding Troop B.

EXHIBIT C.

.

COURT MARTIAL OF COLONEL J. C. HAINES.

Following are the proceedings of a general court martial which convened at Olympia, Wash., on the 5th day of November, 1891, at the hour of 2:30 P. M., pursuant to the following order:

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, October 19, 1891. Special Order No. 7: A general court martial is hereby appointed to meet at the city of Olympia on the 5th day of November, 1891, or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the trial of Colonel J. C. Haines, commanding first infantry regiment, National Guard of Washington, and such other parties as may be brought before it. DETAIL FOR THE COURT. 1. Brigadier General A. P. Curry. 2. Colonel E. W. Pike, second infantry regiment. 3. Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general. 4. Colonel John D. McIntyre, chief of engineers. 5. Colonel J. Kennedy Stout, chief signal officer. 6. Colonel Frank T. Gilbert, assistant quartermaster general on staff W commander-in-chief. 7. Colonel Wellington Clarke, assistant inspector general on staff of commander-in-chief. Judge advocate, First Lieutenant Chas. R. Dorr. The court will sit without regard to hours. No other officers than those named can be assembled without manifest injury to the service. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. U. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General. GENERAL HEADQUARTERS NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, November 2, 1891. Special Order No. 10: For good and sufficient reasons, First Lieutenant C. H. Dorr is excused from service as judge advocate of the general court martial called in (83)


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special order No. 7, c. s., and Captain Charles H. Merriam, second infantry regiment, is hereby detailed instead. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General. The court met pursuant to the foregoing order at Olympia, Wash., on the 5th day of November, 1891, at 2:30 P. M. PRESENT. I . Brigadier General A. P. Curry. 2. Colonel E. W. Pike, second infantry regiment. 3. Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general. 4. Colonel John D. McIntyre, chief of engineers. 5. Colonel J. Kennedy Stout, chief signal officer. 6. Colonel Frank T. Gilbert, assistant quartermaster general on staff of commander-inchief. 7. Colonel Wellington Clarke, assistant inspector general on staff of commander-in-chief. Judge advocate, Captain Chas. H. Merriam, second infantry regiment. The accused also present. The members of the court were then severally duly, sworn, on oath prescribed in the eighty-fourth article of war, and the judge advocate was then duly sworn by the president of the court, on oath prescribed in the eighty-fifth article of war; all of which oaths were administered in the presence of the accused. W. G. Johnson, the official stenographer of the court was then sworn by the judge advocate. alâ&#x20AC;˘ Upon the request of the accused that Mr. W. H. Gorham be allowed to appear as his counsel, such request was granted by the court. For the following reasons the judge advocate ake4or a contin1891, which request uance until 9 o'clock A. M. of November 6, was granted by the court 1. For that the prosecution is not ready, on account of witnesses not having been summoned. 2. For that this judge advocate not having been appointed sufficiently early to issue said summons. On motion of Colonel J. Kennedy Stout, William Bedford was appointed officer of this court.

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The court then, at 4 o'clock P. M., adjourned to meet on the 6th day of November, 1891, at 9 o'clock A. M. Olympia, November 7, 1891. Captain CHAS. H. MERRIAM, Judge Advocate. The following from the accused, by his counsel, W. H. Gorham: We desire to have exception noted in the minutes; that the reading of the order convening the court, and the reading of the order appointing Captain Charles H. Merriam as judge advocate were not read as recited in the minutes; further, that the members of the court were not sworn under the oath prescribed by the rules and regulations, and that the judge advocate was not sworn by the president under the oath prescribed by the rules and regulations, and that there is no record of form of oath administered to the reporter. To all of which exceptions the judge advocate agrees and allows upon this days' minutes. The minutes of November 5, 1891, are hereby approved by the board, this 7th day of November, 1891. Captain CHARLES H. MERRIAM, Judge Advocate. A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General N. G. W., President. GENERAL HEADQUARTERS NATIONAL GUARD or WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, Oct. 19, 1891. Special Order No. 7: A general court martial is hereby appointed to meet at the city of Olympia on the fifth day of November, 1891, or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the trial of Colonel John C. Haines, commanding first infantry regiment, National Guard of Washington, and such other parties as may be brought before it. DETAIL FOR THE COURT. 1. Brigadier General A. P. Curry. 2. Colonel E. W. Pike, second infantry regiment. 3. Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general. 4. Colonel John D. McIntyre, chief of engineers. 5. Colonel J. Kennedy Stout, chief signal officer. 6. Colonel Frank T. Gilbert, assistant quartermaster general, on staff Of commander-in-chief. 7. Colonel Wellington Clarke, assistant inspector general, on staff of commander-in-chief. Judge Advocate: First Lieutenant Charles R. Dorr. The court will sit without regard for hours.


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

No other officers than those named can be assembled without manifest injury to the service. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

objections ,( see exhibits Nos. 1 and 2) to Colonel B. W. Pike, second infantry regiment. The following motion was made by Col. Frank T. Gilbert and prevailed: I move that the final deliberations of the court upon any proposition requiring a vote, that the stenographer be excused the same as the accused. The court was thereupon closed, the challenged member, the accused and the stenographer retiring, and after due deliberation, the court having reopened, the challenged member, the accused and the stenographer resumed their seats, and the decision of the court was announced by the judge advocate that the objection of the accused is overruled, to which ruling of the court the accused takes exception, and such exception is allowed. Time members of the court were then severally duly sworn by the judge advocate, and the judge advocate was then duly sworn by the president of the court. All of which oaths were administered in the presence of the accused. At the hour of 12 o'clock (noon), on motion, recess was taken until 1:30 P. M. The accused was then duly arraigned upon the following charges and specifications (see exhibit No. 3): W. H. Gorham, counsel for the accused, objects to the charges and specifications as read by the judge advocate on the ground that they are not the original of the copy which was served upon the accused and certified to by the commander-in-chief. The judge advocate withdrew the objectionable portion of said charges and specifications, and by stipulation it was agreed that the accused should go to trial upon the copy of said charges and specifications as served upon him. The accused, in lieu of pleading to its merits, puts in a plea of bar in trial to the jurisdiction (see exhibit No. 4). On motion, the court, at 4 o'clock P. M., adjourned to meet on November 7, 1891, at 9:30 A. M. Olympia, November 6, 1891. Captain CHAS. H. MERRIAM, Judge Advocate.

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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON. ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, Nov. 2, 1891. Special Order No. 10:

For good and sufficient reasons First Lieutenant C. It. Dorr is excused from service as judge advocate of the general court martial called in special order No. 7, c. s., and Captain Charles H. Merriam, second infantry regiment, is hereby detailed instead. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

SECOND DAY. OLYMPIA, November 6, 1891.

The court met pursuant to the foregoing order and adjournment at 9 A. M. PRESENT.

1. Brigadier General A. P. Curry, 2. Colonel E. W. Pike, second infantry regiment. 3. Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general. 4. Colonel John D. McIntyre, chief of engineers. 5. Colonel J. Kennedy Stout, chief signal officer. 6. Colonel Frank T. Gilbert, assistant quartermaster general, on staff of commander-in-chief. 7. Colonel Wellington Clarke, assistant inspector general, on staff of commander-in-chief. Judge Advocate: Captain Charles H. Merriam, second infantry regiment. The accused and W. H. Gorham, his counsel, also present. The proceedings of the 5th instant were postponed by stipulation to some adjourned meeting. The court then proceeded to the trial of John C. Haines, who thereupon came before the court, and having heard the order convening it read, was asked if he had any objection to any member present, named in the order, to which he submitted the following

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EXHIBIT No. 1. Before a court martial convened pursuant to Special Order No. 7, datec General Headquarters, N. G. W., A. G. 0., Olympia, October 19, 1891 In the Matter of the Charges Preferred Against JOHN C. HAINES, I Colonel First Regiment Infantry, First Brigade, N. G. W. And now comes John C. Haines, by his counsel, and challenges Colonel E. W. Pike, and objects to his participation in the trial of this accused, and assigns as grounds for such challenge and objection that said Colonel Pike is an officer of the National Guard inferior in rank to the accused. and thus interested in his conviction; and further, that said Colonel Pike has expressed feelings of hostility and prejudice against accused, which disqualify him from trying impartially the issues in this case. This challenge is based upon the affidavit of said J. C. Haines, hereto attached. W. 11. GORHAM, Counsel for Accused.

EXHIBIT No. 2. Before a court martial convened pursuant to Special Order No. 7, dated General Headquarters, N. G. W., A. G. 0., Olympia, October 19, 1891. In the Matter of the Charges Preferred Against JOHN C. HAINES, 'Colonel First Regiment Infantry, First Brigade, N. G. W. j J. C. Haines being first duly sworn, on oath deposes and says: That he is the respondent in the above entitled cause; that Colonel E. W. Pike is a member of the above entitled court; that said Pike has expressed feelings of hostility and prejudice against accused since the publication of said Special Order No. 7 convening said court, which disqualifies him J. C. HAINES. from trying impartially the issues in this case. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 5th day of November, 1891. W. H. GORHAM, Notary Public.

EXHIBIT No. 3. CHARGES AND SPECIFICATIONS. Preferred against John C. Haines, colonel, commanding the first infantry regiment, first brigade, National Guard of Washington, by Major Chas. H. Ayer, assistant adjutant general. CHARGE 1.—Conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, in violation of the 61st article of war. Specifitation 1: That he, John C. Haines, colonel, commanding the first infantry regiment, first brigade, National Guard of Washington, did, on the evening of Saturday, September 19, 1891, use foul and abusive lan-

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guage to his superior officer, to wit: Brigadier General R. G. O'Brien, adjutant general of the State of Washington, by then and there calling the said superior officer "a ruffian" and "a coward," and other scurrilous names, without just cause or provocation. This at Olympia, Washington, on or about the 19th day of September, 1891, while in said city and while conversing with said superior officer upon military subjects, and in the presence of Captain J. M. Ashton, commanding troop B, first cavalry battalion, first brigade, N. G. W., Theodore Hailer and C. L. Ford. Specification 2: That John C. Haines, colonel, commanding first infantry regiment, first brigade, N. G. W., did, in addition to the said abusive language then and there used against said superior officer, alleged in the first specification hereof, strike said superior officer, and further continued the use of opprobrious epithets. This at Olympia, Washington, on the 19th day of September, 1891, said Colonel John C. Haines being then and there in conversation with said superior officer upon military topics and in the presence of the persons above named. CHARGE 2.—Conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline. • Specification 1: In this, that he, John C. Haines, colonel, commanding the first infantry regiment, first brigade, National Guard of Washington, did, on the evening of Saturday, September 19, 1891, in a public place, in the presence of divers persons, conduct himself in an insubordinate manner toward his superior officer, to wit, Brigadier General R. G. O'Brien, adjutant general of the State of Washington, by then and there using the language set out in the first specification to the first charge of these charges and specifications; and did then and there strike said superior officer, as charged in the second specification of the first charge herein, and continued the further use of opprobrious epithets. This at Olympia, Washington, on the 19th day Of September, 1891, said Colonel John C. Haines being then and there in conversation with said superior officer upon military topics and in the presence of the persons above named and other persons. CHAS. H. AvER, By order of the adjutant general. Major and Assistant Adjutant General. The above charges and specifications are hereby- approved. ELISHA P. FERRY, Governor and Commander-in-chief, National Guard of Washington. Witnesses: Captain J. M. ASHTON, THEODORE HALLER, C. L. FORD, Brigadier General R. G. O'BRIEN. STATE OF WASHINGTON, COUNTY OF THURSTON, SS. Charles A. Burr being duly sworn on oath says: That he is a citizen of the United States of America, and the State of Washington, over the age Of twenty-one years; that he served a true copy of the annexed charges and specifications on Colonel John C. Haines, named therein, on the 23d


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day of October, A. D. 1891, by delivering to the said Colonel Haines, personally, a copy thereof, duly certified to be such by the governor of the State of Washington and commander-in-chief of the National Guard of Washington, at the city of Seattle, King county and state aforesaid, said Colonel Haines being then and there in his office in said city and county aforesaid. CHAS. A. BURR. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 24th day of October, 1891. S. C. WOODRUFF, [SEAL.] Notary Public for the State of Washington, residing at Olympia.

EXHIBIT No. 4. Before a court martial convened pursuant to Special Order No. 7, dated General Headquarters, N. G. W., A. G. 0., Olympia, October 19, 1891. In the Matter of the Charges Preferred Against JOHN C. HAINES, Colonel First Regiment Infantry, First Brigade, N. G. W. PLEA TO THE JURISDICTION Comes now John C. Haines, colonel first regiment infantry, first brigade, National Guard of Washington, by his counsel, W. H. Gorham, appearing specially and solely for the purpose of entering a plea to the jurisdiction of the court martial convened pursuant to special order No. 7, c. s., dated general headquarters, National Guard of Washington, adjutant general's office, Olympia, Wash., October 19, 1891, and respectfully maintains that said court martial cannot legally proceed with the trial of said John C. Haines upon the charges and specificatiol4s submitted to it, for the following reasons: 1. That the accused, neither as colonel of the first regiment infantry, first brigade, National Guard of Washington, nor as a citizen of the State of Washington engaged in the practice of his profession as an attorney at law, is subject to or governed by the sixty-first article of war, the articles of war not having been adopted by congress as a law governing the militia, except when in the actual service of the United States, and not having been adopted by the constitution of the State of Washington, or embodied in any of the statutes of said state, or adopted by any authority under the statute as a law governing the National Guard of Washington. 2. That the accused was not amenable to military law at the time and place te acts in said specifications complained of are alleged to have been committed by himâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and no allegation is made in said specifications that the accused was under military orders or in the performance or execution of any military duty whatsoever, at said time and place. 3. That the acts alleged in said charges and specifications to have been committed by said accused do not constitute an offense against the military statute of the State of Washington, Or against any provisions, rules

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or regulations prescribed by virtue of or under the authority of the statutes of the State of Washington. 4. That a court martial convened under the authority of section 30 of the act of the legislature, approved March 27, 1890, entitled "An act to provide for the organization, maintenance and discipline of the militia of the State of Washington," cannot proceed with the trial of any officer or enlisted man of the National Guard of Washington until the military board, established under said act, shall provide for such courts a method of procedure conforming to the regulations, articles of war, and practice for the government of the army of the United States, as required by the terms of said section 30. Poiurs AND AUTHORITIES. THE REGULAR ARMY. The constitution of the United States provides for the establishment of an army, of which the president shall be commander-in-chief. (Art. i, sec. 8.) And it authorizes congress "to make rules for the government and regulation of the land forces," and to make all laws which may be necessary and proper for carrying such powers into execution. (Art. i, sec. 8.) army is composed of officers and enlisted men who voluntarily he service, and surrendering all their common law rights of perreedom, become amenable to military law, being that part of the the land relating to the government of the military forces and for its object military discipline. sources of military law are: he articles of war enacted by congress. he statutory enactments relating to the discipline and administrathe army. he order of the president as commander-in-chief. sages and customs of the army. Lary law is that portion of the law of the land designated for the ment of a particular class of persons, and administered by special ils. It is superinduced to the ordinary law for the purpose of regnhe citizen in his character of soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and though military offenses t cognizable under the common law jurisdiction of the United yet the articles of war clearly recognize the superiority of the 'er the military authority. (Bent's Military Law, p. 1.) Lary law proper is that branch of the public law which is enacted aiued for the government exclusively of the military state. irop's Military Law, p. 4.) Lary offenses proper are simply violations of the laws, orders or if discipline governing the military state by a person within the Dr subject to military discipline by statute. (Judge Advocate d's Opinions, p. 334.) discipline necessary to the efficiency of the army required other 'ifter modes of trial than are furnished by the common law courts pursuance of the power conferred by the constitution congress has


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declared the kinds of trial, and the manner in which they shall be conducted for offenses committed while the party is in the military service. Everyone connected with these branches of the service is amenable to the jurisdiction which congress has created for their government, and while thus serving surrenders his right to be tried by the civil courts. (4 Wallace, U. S., p. 123.) To punish military offenses, i. e. violations of military law by those subject to it, "courts martial are authorized under the law for the purpose of administering military justice through military channels." (Winthrop's Military Law, p. 59; 96 U. S., p. 37.) Courts martial derive their jurisdiction from the statutes of congress. Under its constitutional powers "to make rules for the regulation and government of the land forces," congress has established a military discipline, defined military offenses, provided courts for their trial and punishment, prescribed the jurisdiction and practice of these courts and the mode of executing their sentences; in fact has done everything necessary for the proper administration of justice in the army. (Ives on Military Law, p. 34.) Courts martial are strictly criminal courts and their judgment a criminal sentence. (Winthrop's Military Law, p. 59.) There can be no liberal construction of the terms of a statute which gives jurisdiction to courts martial. (Judge Advocate General's Opinions, p. 212.) It was early settled by the supreme court of the United States that the circuit and district courts of the United States have no criminal jurisdiction but what is expressly conferred upon them by statute, and the reasoning in those cases is equally applicable to courts martial. Both derive their jurisdiction from the same sourceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; congress â&#x20AC;&#x201D;but not from the same constitutional grant. Civil courts derive their jurisdiction from those clauses of the constitution referring to judicial power, while courts martial derive theirs from that clause referring to the war power of congressâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and they are entirely independent of each other. (Ives on Military Law. p. 34.) Courts martial are courts of special and limited jurisdiction. (Greenleaf on Evidence, p. 450.) They are called into existence for special and temporary purposes. They are limited to particular offenders and offenses, and to those only. (4 Wallace [U. S.], p. 123; 122 U. S. p. 548; 3 Cranch [U. S.], p. 381; 3 Peters [U. S.], P. 193.) They are bodies of exceptional and restricted powers and jurisdiction their cognizance being confined to distinctive classes of offenses recogp. 206, nized by the military law. (Judge Advocate General's Opinions, and cases cited.) A court martial is a court of special and limited jurisdiction. It is called into existence by force of express statute law for a special purpose and to perform a particular duty, and when the object of its creation is accomplished it ceases to exist. (3 Greenleaf on Evidence, S. 470.) It is a principle of military law that a court martial is to be left inde-

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pendent as to matters legally or properly within its own discretion. (Judge Advocate General's Opinions, p. 200.) But it may decline to proceed with the trial of a case manifestly not within its jurisdiction. (Id. p. 200.) And upon being peremptorily ordered to proceed by the convening authority may still refuse to proceed with the trial for want of jurisdiction. (Id. p. 200.) For "if in its proceedings or sentence it transcends the limits of its jurisdiction the members of the court are trespassers and as such are answerable to the party injured in damages in the civil courts." (3 Greenleaf on Evidence, S. 470.) Courts martial must confine themselves strictly to the statutory jurisdiction and prescribed mode of procedure, and any excess will render each member responsible in damages to an aggrieved party. (Ives on Military Law, p. 35.) All the parties to an illegal trial are trespassers upon a party aggrieved by it, and he may recover damages from them upon a proper suit in a civil court. (Dynes vs. Hoover, 20 Howard [U. S.], p. 65.) A military officer can never justify himself for doing an unlawful act by producing the order of his superior. (2 Cranch [U. S.], p. 170.) The orders of the commander-in-chief, if illegal, are no justification to a subordinate who executes them. (Id.) An officer who executes an illegal order, however regular or proper it may appear on its face, is liable to damages to any person injured or aggrieved by the execution of the order. (Id.) THE STATE MILITIA.

rhe constitution of the State of Washington provides that the legislae shall provide for the organizing and disciplining the militia. (Art sec. 2.) And the legislature, under this constitutional power, has established militia of the state, consisting of all able-bodied citizens between the s of eighteen and forty-five years, except such as are exempt by the s of the United States or of this state. (Section 1 of militia act, ap)ved March 27. 1890.) All persons subject to militia duty shall be divided into two classes, to : Those consisting of those enlisted in the active militia, known as the tional Guard of Washington. The other to consist of all those subject militia duty, but not included in the active militia. (Sec. 8 of militia 1890.) As guardsmen, the militia are officers of the peace, the police of the te at large, and when acting as such are vested with powers and subt to restrictions foreign to the character of simple citizenship, and the Lure of their duties radically changed. All military duty must necessarily be performed in the actual service the state, either in a response to a call to arms for the purpose of arding or defending life and property in case of insurrection, riot, re[lion or imminent danger thereof, or in preparatory drills or target


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practice, acquiring the knowledge and practice necessary to bring the militia to a perfect state of discipline, or on detached duty, such as sitting on courts martial, courts of inquiry, boards of examinatiOfl'Or survey. While in the performance of military duty they are subject to such provisions, rules and regulations as the military board may legally prescribe, whether such duty be in the field, in the drill hail, or the council chamber. But before there can be any performance of military duty, there must be an "obedience to the call," an order emanating from superior authority, and an acknowledgment of it by an execution of it; a call to arms (sec. 37 of the act of 1890), a call to the school of the company or regiment (secs. 24 and 25 of the act of 1890), etc. All are in the public service, all required by statute. The military board are authorized by statute to adopt rules and regulations for the government of the National Guard. The most liberal construction that can be put upon the statute would not construe it as delegating any power to the military board to follow our citizen soldiers out of the drill hall, off the field of duty, into the private walks of life at home and abroad, and make laws governing their conduct as private citizens, prescribe punishment for their violation, and there establish the iron rule of subordination to superiors in rank. Such a blow at our personal liberties would bring revolution. a law which provides punishment The power to enact penal laws (i. e. for a violation of prescribed rules) cannot be delegated to a military board. Thelegislature alone can define offenses against the military law and prescribe punishment for a violation of it. One of the settled maxims of constitutional law is, that the power conferred upon the legislature th make laws cannot be delegated by that department to any other body or authority. Where the sovereign power of the state has located the authority, there it must remain; and by the constitutional agency alone the laws must be made until the coiistitution itself is 'changed. The power to whose judgment and patriotism this high prerogative has been intrusted cannot relieve itself of the responsibility by choosing other agencies upon which the power shall be devolved, nor can it substitute the judgment, wisdom and patriotism of any other body for those to which alone the people have seen fit to confide the sovereign trust. (Cooley's Constitutional Limitation, p. 139.) But, though the legislature has provided that the governor, the regimental and battalion commandants may convene courts martial, it has not defined any military offenses of which said courts may take cognizance; nor prescribed any punishment for such offenses; nor any method of executing the sentence. "The presumption against an intention to create a new jurisdiction applies when it would have the effect of depriving the subject of any common law right, such as the right of trial by jury. The words conferring such a jurisdiction must be clear and unambiguous. * * * Where

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e jurisdiction given by the statute is clearly a summary one, it is the iiversal rule in this country as well as in England that the provisions of e statute are to be strictly construed." (Endlich on the Interpretation 'Statutes, p. 221.) In speaking of liability to trial by court martial, Chief Justice Best of tigland says (4 Bing. Rep., p. 189): "Any statute which takes away the ght of trial by jury and abridges the liberty of the subject, must receive e strictest construction so that nothing shall be holden to come under operation that is not expressly within the letter and the spirit of the The decisions of civil courts upon military questions, both in this couny and England, are valuable exponents of the law, and are entitled to eat weight and consideration by military courts. As to English states adopted into our legislation, the supreme court of the United States is held that the known and settled construction of such,statutes by the riglish courts must be held to be incorporated into the acts adopted r us. Section 32 of the act of March 27, 1890, provides a penalty for dis)ethence of orders by a member of the National Guard of Washington, case of invasion, insurrection, riot, etc., in a sum not less than $20, nor ore than $100, and imprisonment in the county jail for a period not exeding six weeks. The civil courts (in distinction from courts martial) would have exnsive jurisdiction for a violation of this section, as in the discretion of e court incarceration in the county jail might follow upon conviction. This provision was made for the purpose of enforcing obedience to "a .11 to arms" in the service of the state, and by inference recognizes the ant of jurisdiction in the military authorities over the private citizen itil he has "obeyed the call," assumed the character of a soldier and come amenable to the military rules and regulations. And until the legislature shall in express terms take away the common w rights of personal liberty, the right of trial by jury now guaranteed 1 citizens of the state, and make the members of the militia at all times oenable to military lawâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;until this shall be done by express statute, a urt martial has no jurisdiction over the conduct of a guardsman while ting in his capacity of a simple citizen; no jurisdiction over him unless has obeyed the call, and is acting under orders from superior authorT, or is in the performance of some duty prescribed by the statute. But let us admit for the sake of argument that the military board has iwer to define offenses, prescribe modes of trial, and the manner of rrying a sentence into execution. Has the board exercised any such power? If it has there is no record of it. General O'Brien, secretary of the military board, is my authority for ying that the board has adopted no such rules or regulations since the th of March, 1890, the date of the-passage of the new act. Every officer of the National Guard is charged with the knowledge that rules and regulations, approved by the commander-in-chief, have been


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promulgated in general orders since the passage of the act of 1890. And this court is charged with that knowledge. To provide for the organization and government of the active militia, the legislature established the military board, and "authorized and empowered" it "to prepare and promulgate the necessary provisions, rules and regulations for the organization and government of the National Guard of Washington, and said provisions, rules and regulations, * * * when approved by the commander-in-chief, shall be in force from the date of their publication in general orders." (Section 19, military act, 1890.) The legislature has not only authorized the military board to prepare rules and regulations, but it was mandatory upon the board to so do. "The military board * * * shall make * * * needful rules and regulations." (Sec. 4, military act, 1890.) The code of regulations prepared by the military board under the provisions of an act entitled "An act for the more efficient organization and discipline of the militia of the Territory of Washington," approved January 28, 1888, which code was approved by the commander-in-chief and published in general orders (G. 0. No. 3+, A. G. 0., April 25, 1888) as provided by said act, was in force from April 25, 1888, the date of publication in general orders, until the repeal of the act of January 28, 1888. The militia act approved March 27, 1890, repealed the act of January by the following clause: "All preceding acts or parts of 28, 1888, in toto or upon any subject acts in conflict with any of the provisions of this act, (Sec. 60 act of March 27, 1890; embraced within it are hereby repealed." decision of Lichtenberg J., Gorham court martial case.) This language is so clear, so simple, so sweeping, as to leave no question of the intent of the legislature to repeal all and every statute upon the subject of militia. No other combination of words could have so precisely and clearly, so directly expressed that intent. As to the articles of war, the constitution authorizes congress "to prdvide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrection, and repel invasion," and also "to provide for gov erning such part of them as may be employed in the service of the United States." Congress has acted under both of these grants. Under the first it has authorized the president to call out the militia in the cases prescribed in the constitution. Under the second it has prescribed that the militia, when called into the actual service of the United States, * * * shall be subject to the same rules and articles of war as the regular troops of the United States." (Sec. 1644, Revised Statutes.) Nowhere in the constitution of the state, or in its statutes, are the articles of war adopted for the government of the National Guard of Washington. There is nothing in the law that makes them a part of the rules and regulations governing the National Guard. (Decision of Lichtenberg, J., Gorman court martial case.)

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Sec. 30 of the militia act provides for convening of courts martial for ie trial of officers—the proceedings of which shall be as provided by the ilitary board. Were the accused guilty of a military offense within the jurisdiction a military court still there could be no trial until the military board wuld provide a procedure conforming to the regulations, articles of war rd practice for the government of the army of the United States. "The governor can only order the trial of officers and enlisted men ner proceedings which must be provided for by the military board rider this very act." (Decision, Lichtenberg, J., Gorham court martial tse.) No such procedure has ever been provided under the law. We find, therefore, that both the legislature, acting under the constituon, and the military board, acting under the authority of the statute, ave absolutely failed— First: To establish military discipline. Second: To define military offenses. Third: To prescribe the jurisdiction and practice of courts martial. Fourth: To prescribe the mode of executing their sentences. Fifth: To do any of the things necessary for a proper administration of istwe in the National Guard. Sections 30 and 31 of the militia law authorize the convening of courts iartial, but do not specify the number of persons to constitute the court, ieir rank or where they are to be drawn from. From the foregoing points and authorities these conclusions can be rawn, viz.: That the accused is not subject to the 61st article of war, either as Dlonel of the first regiment, first brigade, N. G. W., or as a citizen of e state. That the accused is not amenable to military law while acting in the apacity of a private citizen. That there being no military law or code except the militia act aproved March 27, 1890, there are no military offenses except such as are efined in that statute. The military board not having as yet prescribed any procedure for Durts martial, courts convened under section 30 of the militia act for the rial of offenders have no power to try the same. This court, convened by the commander-in-chief, is composed of the ighest ranking officers in the state militia. It is assembled for the pur ose of trying an officer second in rank in the service upon a charge of ie most serious character. In its deliberations it must be governed by e law as it exists on the statute book. It is not in the province of this ourt to make law or provide a method of procedure. And for it to assume a jurisdiction not expressly granted by law, and y the exercise of arbitrary power proceed with the trial of this case and ass sentence, would be an offense against the law of far greater gravity an that charged against the accused—far more reaching in its conseuences. W. H. GORHAM, Counsel for the Accused, John C. Haines. —7


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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS NATIONAL GUARD or WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, Oct. 19, 1891. Special Order No. 7: A general court martial is hereby appointed to meet at the city of Olympia on the fifth day of November, 1891, or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the trial of Colonel John C. Haines, commanding first infantry regiment National Guard of Washington, and such other parties 0 as may be brought before it. DETAIL FOR THE COURT. 1. Brigadier General A. P. Curry. 2. Colonel E. W. Pike, second infantry regiment. 3. Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general. 4. Colonel John D. McIntyre, chief of engineers. 5. Colonel J. Kennedy Stout, chief signal officer. 6. Colonel Frank T. Gilbert, assistant quartermaster general on staff of commander-in-chief. 7. Colonel Willington Clarke, assistant inspector general, on staff of commander-in-chief. Judge advocate: First Lieutenant Chas. R. Dorr. The court will sit without regard to hours. No other officers than those named can be assembled without injury to the service. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General. GENERAL HEADQUARTERS NATIONAL GUARD or WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, Nov. 2, 1891. Special Order No. 10: For good and sufficient reasons, First Lieutenant C. R. Dorr is excused from service as judge advocate of the general court martial called in Special Order No. 7, c. s., and Captain Charles H. Merriam, second infantry regiment, is hereby detailed instead. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

THIRD DAY. OLYMPIA, Nov. 7, 1891. The court met pursuant to the foregoing order and adjournment, at 9:30 o'clock A. M. PRESENT. Brigadier General A. P. Curry. Colonel E. W. Pike, second infantry regiment.

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3. Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general. 4. Colonel John D. McIntyre, chief of engineers. . Colonel J. Kennedy Stout, chief signal officer. 6. Colonel Frank T. Gilbert, assistant quartermaster general on staff of Commander-in-chief. 7. Colonel Wellington Clarke, assistant inspector general on staff of commander-in- chief. Judge advocate, Captain Charles H. Merriam, second infantry regiment. The accused (and W. H. Gorham, his counsel) also present. The proceedings of tbEr 6th instant were then read and approved. Argument as to the jurisdiction of the court was taken up by the prosecution judge advocate, and was replied to by W. H. Gorham, counsel for the accused. On motion of Colonel Henry Landes, at 11:45 A. M., the court took recess until 2 P. M. On motion of Colonel Henry Landes the court went into secret session to consider the question of jurisdiction. The court was thereupon closed, the accused, his counsel and the official stenographer retired, and after due deliberation the court concludes and decides: That the plea of John C. Haines, in the matter of the charges preferred against John C. Haines, colonel first regiment infantry brigade, National Guard of Washington, to the jurisdiction of the court martial convened pursuant to special order No. 7, c. s., dated general headquarters, National Guard of Washington, adjutant general's office, Olympia, Wash., October 19, A. D. 1891, is hereby denied and sustained, as follows, to wit: Said plea is denied as to reason i, assigned therein; said plea is denied as to reason 2, assigned therein; said plea is denied as to reason 3, assigned therein; and said plea is allowed and sustained as to reason 4, assigned therein, which said allowed and sustained reason is in the words and figures following, to wit: "That a court martial, convened under the authority of section 30 of an act of the legislature, approved March 27, 1890, entitled 'An act to provide for the organization, maintenance and discipline of the militia of the State of Washington,' cannot proceed with the trial of any officer or enlisted man of the National Guard of Washington until the military board, established under said act, shall provide for such courts a method DI procedure conforming to the regulations, articles of war, and


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practice for the government of the army of the United States, as required by the terms of said section 30." Upon motion of Colonel J. Kennedy Stout this court now take recess subject to the call of the president, for the purpose of submitting the proceedings of the court martial to the commander-inA. P. Cuiuy, chief, convening the same. Brigadier General, N. G. W., President Court. CHAS. H. MERRIAM,

Captain, Second Regiment, N. G. W., fudge Advocate Court Martial. OLYMPIA, November 13, 1891. the findings of the court as stated Let an order issue approving ELISHA P. FERRY. therein. Governor and Commander-in- Chief.

EXHIBIT D. REPORT OF GENERAL CURRY ON THE INDIAN TROUBLES IN OKANOGAN COUNTY. HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, N. G. W., SPOKANE FALLS, Jan 24, 1891.

To General 1?. G. O'Brien, Adjutant General, N. G. W., Olympia: DEAR SIR â&#x20AC;&#x201D;In pursuance to telegrams received from you I sent Lieutenant Colonel Waters to Coulee city to arrange for transportation to Conconully, a distance of ninety miles from railroad. I left here with Lieutenant J. J. White, Wednesday, January 14th, with the arms and ammunition and an escort of four men. We arrived at Coulee City on the evening of January 14th and delivered fifty guns and five hundred rounds of ammunition to J. C. Kellner for Almira, Lincoln county, and fifty-two guns and five hundred and thirty-two rounds of ammunition to J. B. Lewis, chairman county commissioners of Douglas county for Coulee City. On Thursday, January 15th, we started for Conconully and arrived there Saturday evening, January 17th, and delivered one hundred and seventy-eight guns and thirty-two hundred and forty rounds of ammunition to D. McGilvera, chairman of county commissioners of Okanogan county. While crossing the Columbia river I learned that the Indian farmer Thomas was in the neighborhood and I dispatched a courier to have him meet me at Conconully, and at Ruby City I engaged the services of Lew Broede and his squaw to gather together all the Indians with a view to holding a consultation. Learning that the Indian farmer Thomas had a good deal of influence with the Indians I proposed to him to go into the upper part of the country and invite the leading men and the young men to meet me for a conference on the reservation on Tuesday. After assisting in forming an independent military company at Conconully, giving them some instructions and advice on military drill, we left for Cumming's Ferry, a distance of twenty miles, on Mon(101)


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day, January 19th, and arrived there that night. On Tuesday, January 20th, we crossed the Okanogan river into the reservation, and there met chief Smitkin, Antwine and captain Ameos, Gabrael, Narcis and Klappellatan with about seventy-five of their men. We held a council "with Father De Rouge as interpreter," and I told them that bringing arms into the country did not mean war, but if the white men were attacked they would defend themselves, but the arms were not brought in to shoot Indians. I told them that I represented the state with a large force of well equipped and drilled men; that the white men became alarmed and asked the governor to send troops and arms, but that the governor, instead of sending troops, had sent me to investigate, and I hoped that on my return I should be able to make a favorable report; that the Indians must not holdall the white men responsible for the acts of a few white men; that two wrongs did not make a right; that I did not uphold the white men in hanging the Indian Steven, but that if the Indians went to war it -would probably be a war of extermination; that I should recommend that, when the court met, that an investigation be made to try and bring to justice all parties concerned in the hanging of their comrade Steven; that I could not promise them that the men would be punished for I knew not whether their guilt could be proven. I told them that it was understood by a few white men that when the Indians dance it meant war, and exacted a promise from them to stop it, because bad white men might take advantage of it and do something rash, which would cause war. I told them above all things to let whisky alone and try and help ferret out all parties concerned in selling them whiskey and report them to the farmer, Thomas, whose heart was in the right place for the Indians. Chief Smitkin then arose and said: I am but a poor man, and not a great chief. I and my men work for the church, and the church teaches us to be good and behave ourselves and give up drinking; that he was glad that we came and sorry at what had for ourselves happened; that now that we were there, we could see and state things in their true light. If we had not come, things would be all in the dark. We could see for ourselves that they were all good; that they came from all over the country to see us; that there was no truth in what had been said; that the Indian farmer two days ago had heard their minds, and there had been no change since; that he was glad we had come and glad to meet us.

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asked him if he knew of any one who had made any threats to 11 white men in order to get even for the hanging of the Indian even, and he answered that he had never heard of any of his )ys making any threats to kill white men; that they were all glad the treatment the boy had had after death; that the white man ho had brought the body to them was very much afraid, but I id him there was no danger. I slept with him myself that night ider my blanket, and in the morning took him to Cummings. I ever heard of anything to be done to the white men. That is all have to say, and am glad to have met you. I asked him if there as any truth in the report that some of the younger boys had mreatened to get even in one, two or three moons, and if he knew iem, and in case of an outbreak if he could control them, and he iswered that he had not heard of any threats being made, and mat now after this conference he thought the young men would sten to the advice of the older men and chiefs. Doe John, the father of the dead boy, then arose and said that s had told all the boys to be of good heart. Of course they were I sorry for what had happened, but they were not mad or angry, id that nobody had any intention of doing anything wrong that ie white people might be ashamed of, and the chiefs of all the Vibes around there had always told them to keep the peace. If e was a great chief he would say more, but would never cease to eak well of the white people; that he was glad we had come to ur own children to know their minds. They did not know themdyes what was the matter with the white people, and that peraps now that we were there, we might be able to make the hearts F all the white people feel glad. That the whisky came to them om the white people and not from the Indians, and that perhaps ie white chief might be able to stop that, and if so, it would do iemn much good. I told him that the white chief could not stop ie manufacture of liquor, but with their help could stop the sale liquor to the Indians; also that the Indians must not go around rmned, unless when hunting, in order not to arouse newcomers; iso that when rumors came to them from British Columbia and he Buffalo country in order to enlist them in warfare, they must port the matter to the officers; that if war was declared against "Other country, they were expected to defend this, their own, ountry. Doc John replied that he would not talk any more; that e had no hard feelings against the white people, and would not


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take his gun with him except when out hunting for something to eat for his family. Puck Miakin, who has heretofore been regarded as the leader of the bad young men, being called upon arose and said: All here are the white men's friends, and that they would always do as their chief told them, and their chief never told them to do anything but what was good, and they did everything told them with a good heart; that he was one of the chief's boys and did not want anyone to think that he or any of the boys wanted to do wrong; that all the boys wished to do right. Thereupon he called upon all the young men present to indorse what he had said, which they all did. I then told them that I was glad to hear them speak as they had, and on my return would make as favorable report as I could, telling the white people that all was quiet, also that the chiefs must report to the agent whenever any of their boys did wrong and have them punished, also report white men or Indians that sell them whisky. Chief Antwine then arose and said: Long ago the soldiers came into the country and the Indians were scattered around on top of the rocks, and the white chief told them it was bad and they took his word and tried to be good and live like white people; from them they learned what was good, and now they were good and not bad. They always remembered the first white chief (Col. Wright) that came there and he told them to be good and try to do what was told them, and from that time till now the Indians had grown up and tried to remember what had been told them. Although white people were living all around them, he thought that not one could say that they were bad, and wanted the white people to understand that they meant no harm; that they were all glad that we had come, for I think that you will put things in their true light and make them feel happy, and hope that you will speak to the white people and tell them what we say and stop all further trouble. I then told them that should trouble arise and even one Indian kill another that they must report the matter to the officers and let the law take its course. Kiappellatan next arose and said: That he had come a long way to meet and to see us, and that he hoped our speaking to the Indiana would put a stop to the drinking and gambling among them, and thanked us from the bottom of his heart for our coming. He, as well as all the rest of the Indians, assured me that they

never gambled except when under the influence of liquor, and I told them I was glad to hear of their assurance and hoped that they would stop drinking and gambling. Chief Suwapkin next spoke as follows: There is no wrong to be feared from the Indians. Who is it from the white people that say the Indians want to fight? Letters have been sent telling that we were going to war, but we knew nothing about it. Long ago the white chiefs came to us and they spoke about war, and after that we put our arms away and have lived in peace ever since. How is it that the question has arisen again about war? Let no one believe the lies spread against us, and stop all further trouble. All the older people tell the Indians to be good, and that advice the boys will always follow. On our return from the reservation we met a committee of ten citizens residing on the Okanogan river who insisted upon troops being sent in, claiming that they did not think their families were safe, but when informed of the result of our conference and the pledges given, not only by the chiefs but old Indians and young bucks, that they would faithfully carry out the promises made to me, they seemed to be satisfied, and they in turn promised to be careful and commit no overt acts which might lead to an outbreak, and that they would also assist in bringing to justice the peddlers of whisky to the Indians. The following is a copy of letters addressed -one to the chairman of the county commissioners of Okanogan county and one addressed to the mayor of Ruby City, for publication: ALMA, Okanogan County, January 20, 1891. D. GILVERY, Esq., Chairman County Commissioners, Okanogan County: DEAR Sinâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;We held a conference to-day on the reservation with about seventy-five Indians, including all the chiefs in this part of the country. They were told through the interpreter by me that bringing guns into the country did not mean war, but to insure peace. That the white people were determined to defend their homes, and if there was any outbreak on the part of the Indians there would be a war of extermination. That the citizens and state troops, and if necessary the regular army, would make short work of them; but if they behaved themselves and controlled their young men, the whites would treat them kindly and no soldiers would be brought in. That they must discontinue their dances and stop carrying guns except when hunting, and do all in their Power to assist in ferreting out white men or Indians who sold liquor to Indians. To all the above a sacred pledge was exacted from chiefs and all young bucks present. They promised to take no further action in

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regard to the hanging of the Indian Steven and made no threats, but let the matter entirely rest for the action of the courts. I am quite satisfied from the thorough and earnest way in which the matter was discussed, pledges exacted and earnestness of the answers, that all of -these promises will be carried out in good faith. So they well understand that if they break these pledges to me that no mercy will be shown them, and the entire tribe will be held responsible for the action of any of its members. I have pledged for the white people kind treatment to the Indians and also their assistance to bring to justice those who may so far forget themselves as to sell liquor to an Indian, and I earnestly request that the citizens of Okanogan county as well as Douglas county will use their best endeavors to carry out these promises. Yours truly, A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General Commanding. Per J. J. WHITE, A. A. G. We then left Cummings and arrived at Coulee City Thursday evening, January 22d, without anything worthy of note, and arrived home Friday, January 23d. In conversing with the white men and Indians regarding this trouble I have come to the following conclusion: That the Indians, maddened by the hanging of their comrade Steven, determined to get even with the whites and made many threats; that they sent runners to the British Columbia Indians, the Kettle River Indians and also to Joseph and Moses' bands asking for assistance in case of an uprising; that the two former bands, Kettle River and British Columbia, promised substantial aid; that Moses and Joseph both declined to take part but failed to denounce and discourage it as they should have done. Those upon whom they depended and who had promised them assistance in case of an outbreak would number from three hundred and fifty to four hundred. This action, however, was confined entirely to the younger class and did not meet the approval of the older ones nor their local chiefs. The prompt action of the state authorities and the best council of the older men and chiefs, aided by the priest and the Indian farmer, prevailed, and I anticipate no more trouble except some trifling white man or Indian should, through the influence of liquor, commit some overt act which might be mistaken as a general uprising. I cannot close this report without urging a more thorough investigation and prosecution of the traffic of liquor on the reservation or to Indians under any circumstances, and the bringing to justice of the parties concerned in the hanging of the Indian boy Steven. Liquor was the cause Of this trouble, and such is the case with nearly every trouble in the country. I cannot speak too highly of the work

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e by the priest Father De Rouge and the Indian farmer Thomas, seem to have great influence with the Indians and helped me Ltly in bringing the Indians together for the conference. Very respectfully yours, A. P. CURRY, Brigadier General, Commander 1V G. TV.


J

EXHIBIT E. REPORT OF COLONEL F. E. TROTTER ON RIFLE PRACTICE. OLYMPIA, Nov. 5, 1891.

Brigadier General R. G. O'Brien, Adjutant General State of Washington, Olympia: Sinâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;In compliance with S. 0. No. 4, September 1, 1891, from general headquarters, National Guard of Washington, I, on that date, left this place for Vancouver, Wash., and on September 4th took seventeen men of company II, first regiment, N. G. W., through the prescribed course of known distance firing â&#x20AC;&#x201D;S shots at 200 yards, 5 shots at 300 yards, and 2 sighting and 10 scoring shots at 500 yards. None of this company made the required percentage at these ranges (80) to entitle them to shoot at 600 yards. I also practiced them in firing at the skirmish figures, as required, and submitted their report to you personally at your office. This company I found prompt and willing; the attendance was small on account of the brief notice given. From this point I took a supply of skirmish targets for each company of the first regiment. The practice at Vancouver was held on the rifle range at Vancouver barracks, through the courtesy of Major C. A. Wikoff, fourteenth infantry, commanding the post. From Vancouver I proceeded to Tacoma on September 7th; arriving there the officers - Captains Ashton, Fife and Shank - reported to me and offered to order out their companies, but stated that they thought the turnout would be slim, as the men had been out over two weeks at the mines and objected to asking their employers for more time and in any event feared refusal, many men having lost their situations on account of their previous long absence. I met the officers of the three companies at the armory of the troop in the evening at 7 P. M., and after a discussion of the situation I exempted the companies from any practice, as I felt authorized to do Under the terms of S. 0. No. 4, c. s. (109)


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From here I proceeded on September 13th to Seattle I there practiced companies B, D and E in the entire course except the skirmishing, which was prevented by the rain falling. Some thirty-five men and officers paraded and much interest was manifested. September 19th I proceeded to Port Townsend. At this poinJ I made use of the rifle range of Fort Townsend, near by, through the courtesy of Captain A. H. Bainbridge, fourteenth infantry, commanding post. The attendance was good and all seemed glad that they were afforded the opportunity of practicing, and Captain Bainbridge requested me to assure the officer in command of his willingness to be of any assistance to them at any time, which assurance I conveyed to Lieutenant C. B. Wood, commanding the company I. On September 21st I proceeded to Whatcom and arrived there on the morning of September 22d. I met Captain Weisenberger, who informed me that he had been unable to procure any place suitable for target practice, as the parties who owned the land objected to the target practice in their vicinity, but that upon the completion in about 30 days of a street railway then under construction, an excellent range at the terminal, 1,000 yards in length, would be available. Under these circumstances I suspended the practice there until some future time. I then on September 24th returned to Seattle and completed the skirmish firing heretofore suspended. On September 29th I proceeded to Aberdeen, and there found company K, a live young organization, full of zeal and vigor, well housed in an excellent armory. The range was on an open street 80 feet wide in front of their armory, terminating in the bay. The company went through the practice as laid down in order, were zealous, efficient and willing. October 14th, under the provisions of special order No. 6, I proceeded to Goldendale and there found company B, second regiment, N. G. W., housed in an excellent armory. That night I gave them a lecture upon the nomenclature and construction of their rifles, and the following day gave them their field practice in a meadow adjoining the town; and the following day the company from Centerville (C) had its practice at the same place. This last company was small in numbers, having had but 24 hours' notice of my arrival, but here as throughout my entire intercourse with the second regiment, N. G. W., I found soldierly zeal and prompt obedience to orders.

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October 20th, in company with Colonel E. W. Pike, second regiment, N. G. W., I proceeded to Waitsburg and there found company D of this regiment, Captain H. G. Sheehan, with pits dug, target, flags and pasters ready. This company of 26 men was taken through the course, and some excellent shots were developed. The following day I practiced company F at Dayton. Here as at Waitsburg I found everything in readiness, but the weather was not favorable, and closed on our skirmish practice with a rain storm, which will account for some of the low scores made. The following day, Sunday, we crossed the mountains in a stage, accompanied by Lieutenant Colonel McCarthy, second regiment, N. G. W., who had joined us at Dayton, and reached Pomeroy in the afternoon Monday. This company, which was found in excellent condition, was practiced, and one marksman developed, making 123 out of a possible 175, at all ranges. The company owns its own armory, and is in good condition. Wednesday I practiced company G at Spokane, which I had addressed the previous evening upon the construction and peculiarities of the rifle. The day was very disagreeable and cold, rain falling almost continuously. The range is some four miles from the town, and practice closed at dark, the lamps being all burning upon our return to town. The cavalry troop at Sprague was practiced on Friday the 30th inst. Here I foirnd the best shot thus far belonging to the National Guard, Lieutenant Peterson, who made a score of 143 out of a possible 175. I recognized him, however, as a discharged soldier from the infantry of the regular service whom I had with me as a member of the department rifle team in 1889. He was naturally much interested and an efficient instructor for the men of his company. The company is in good condition and well officered. Saturday morning I reached North Yakima to find the company there unprepared, no material having been received. I was compelled to construct the necessary target and procure substitutes for the pasters, which consumed the greater portion of the day. The company had its practice, and was the equal in its enthusiasm of any of the guard, many good scores being made. Wednesday, November 4th, I completed my tour by the practicing of company A at Ellensburg, which turned out well. The weather was cold and stormy and the ground in bad condition for exercise. Rain was falling, but an excellent average of shooting was obtained.


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This company is newly organized, and therefore labors under some difficulties, but is enthusiastic. The instruction imparted has been well received, and when the men have had their armory instruction and become familiar with the different positions at the different ranges and learned to control the pull of their rifles, all of which can be taught them at their gallery target practice, I shall look for some phenomenal scores, and I think we shall have reason to be proud of the National Guard of Washington. I am very respectfully your obedient servant, F. E. TROTTER, Captain, Fourteenth Infantry, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, U. S. A., Military Instructor.

EXHIBIT F. rREPORT OF LIEUTENANT KIMBALL ON THE ANNUAL ENCAMPMENT. FORT TOWNSENn, July 29th, 1892. SIRâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I have the honor to report that, in compliance with telegraphic instructions from the adjutant general's office, dated June 23, 1892, I reported in person (June 24, 1892) to Major F. E. Trotter, Twenty-fourth infantry, brevet lieutenant colonel, U. S. A., as assistant instructor to the National Guard of Washington, during its annual encampment at Murray, near Tacoma, Wash., on the Tacoma, Olympia & Gray's Harbor Railroad, a branch of the Northern Pacific Railroad. In obedience to further instructions from the war department, adjutant general's and inspector general's departments, by letter, I have the honor to submit this report. THE CAMP. The camp was situated on a gently undulating plateau, slightly above the level of American Lake, distance about one-eighth of a mile. The camp was on all sides fringed by a scattering growth of scrub oak -some trees were large enough to afford good shade. The space for drill ground, "natural clearing," was amply large and suitable for drilling a regiment of cavalry or infantry, but not ample for brigade evolutions. The camp was named in honor of the owner of the grounds. There is a good stream of pure, cool water running through the Camp. The subsoil is gravel covered with a light growth of turf, and the camp is, therefore, naturally well drained. The stream furnished water for all purposes, it being taken out in barrels and hauled to troops more distant from it. Ice was furnished by the (113) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;8


I

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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

quartermaster department. American Lake furnished facilities for bathing, and was thus used frequently by the men of the command. Upon reporting, I found the brigade already in camp. The tents were pitched by regiments, and as nearly according to United States army regulations as the formation of the ground would permit, by a detachment of two infantry companies sent ahead of main body of troops, one or two days before. I believe Colonel Trotter made some slight changes after he arrived, but this was before I reported. A copy of the act providing for the organization, maintenance and discipline of the state militia of Washington will follow this report as soon as I can procure it, also a copy of general order No. 10, general headquarters, National Guard of Washington, June 9, 1892, directing the holding of a camp of instruction of the first brigade, National Guard of Washington, for the period of ten (10) days, commencing June 22, 1892, and closing July 1, proximo, and fixing the hours of service and roll calls, and prescribing certain forms for ceremonies. Roster of troops assembled at Camp Murray, in compliance with general order No. 10, is as follows: THE ROSTER. GOVERNOR'S STAFF.

Brigadier General R G. O'Brien, adjutant general and chief of staff. Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general. Colonel E. M. Carr, assistant adjutant general. Colonel E. L. Smith, surgeon general. Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, assistant commissary general. Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general. Lieutenant Colonel F. L. Boyd, aid-de-camp. Lieutenant Colonel Will L. Visscher, aid-de-camp. Lieutenant Colonel C. Reichenbach, aid-de-camp. Lieutenant Colonel C. M. Atkins, aid-de-camp. Major C. H. Ayer, assistant adjutant general. Captain B. W. Coiner, aid-de-camp. BRIGADE COMMANDER AND STAFF.

Brigadier General A. P. Curry, commanding. Lieutenant Colonel S. W. Scott, assistant inspector general, acting assistant adjutant general. Lieutenant Colonel J. A. Hatfield, assistant commissary general. Lieutenant Colonel M. K. Snell, assistant quartermaster general. Captain Wallace Mount, brigade paymaster. First Lieutenant E. P. Gillette, aid-de-camp. First Lieutenant C. F. Lake, aid-de-camp. First Lieutenant W. E. Cromwell, aid-de-camp.

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FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY, N. G. W., FIELD AND STAFF.

Colonel Joseph Green, commanding; headquarters, Seattle. Lieutenant colonel, W. S. Shank. Major, F. A. Gans. First Lieutenant Charles Esplin, jr., adjutant. Major L. R. Dawson, surgeon. Captain H. E. Henderson, assistant surgeon. First Lieutenant H. Chapin. quartermaster. First Lieutenant H. D. Allison, commissary. First Lieutenant James Ross, inspector small arms practice. NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF.

4t It

Sergeant major, W. B. Younkin. Quartermaster sergeant, A. Bryan. Commissary sergeant, A. Olsen. Hospital steward, T. T. Allen. Color sergeants, J. A. Caughey and J. A. Henderson. Principal musician, L. H. Wagner. Chief trumpeter, W. F. Lindsey. Drum major, P. Finney. COMPANY OFFICERS, FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY.

Company A, Olympia—Captain, C. S. Reinhart; first lieutenant, M. E. Reed; second lieutenant, W. J. Milroy. Company B, Seattle—Captain, L. S. Booth; first lieutenant, W. M. Calhoun; second lieutenant, G. H. Fortson. Company C, Tacoma—Captain, I. M. Howell; first lieutenant, W. F. Clark; second lieutenant, J. G. Jolly. Company D, Seattle—Captain, F. L. Hilton; first lieutenant, William Crist; second lieutenant, G. W. Saum. Company E, Seattle—Captain, E. S. Ingraham; first lieutenant, F. L. Stinson; second lieutenant, H. H. Smith. Company F, New Whateom—Captain, J. J. Wiesenberger; first lieutenant, W. C. Gregory; second lieutenant, Wm. M. Leach. Company G, Tacoma—Captain, C. W. Billings; first lieutenant, E. F. Stafford; second lieutenant, M. M. Bartlett. Company H, Vancouver—Second lieutenant, M. S. Wintler. Company I, Port Townsend—Captain, George H. Jones; first lieutenant, C. Barton Wood; second lieutenant, N. S. Snyder. Company K, Aberdeen—First lieutenant, George D. Allen. SECOND REGIMENT INFANTRY, FIELD AND STAFF.

Colonel E. W. Pike, commanding; headquarters Goldendale. Lieutenant colonel, M. McCarthy. Major, E. H. Fox. First Lieutenant N. B. Brooks, adjutant. Major J. H. Hudgins, surgeon. Captain J. T. Eshelman, chaplain. First Lieutenant E. S. Isaac, quartermaster.


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First Lieutenant F. J. Elsensohn, commissary. First Lieutenant G. B. Bakei, inspector of small arms practice. NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF.

Sergeant major, R. E. Stuart. Quartermaster sergeant, H. N. Pringle. Commissary sergeant, F. Fenton. Hospital steward, E. J. King. Color sergeant, C. C. Alvord. Principal musician, F. W. Pynn. Drum major, J. F. Warren. COMPANY OFFICERS, SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT.

Company A, Ellensburgh—Captain, J. E. Frost; first lieutenant, J. B. Becker; second lieutenant, J. G. Armstrong. Company B, Goldendale—Captain, H. D. McCully; first lieutenant, H. C. Jackson; second lieutenant, H. C. Phillips. Company C, Centerville—Captain, G. W. Billington; first lieutenant, J. Jackel; second lieutenant, C. H. Weld. Company D, Waitsburg—Captain, H. G. Shuhan; first lieutenant, C. F. Smith; second lieutenant, H. W. Fletcher. Company E, North Yakima—Captain, F. D. Eshelman; first lieutenant, R. B. Coombs; second lieutenant, J. C. Liggett. Company F, Dayton—Captain, John Carr; first lieutenant,, C. R. Dorr; second lieutenant, C. A. Booker. Company G, Spokane—Captain, E. W. Lyons; first lieutenant, A. W. McCallum; second lieutenant, A. T. Brown. Company H, Pomeroy—Captain, H. St. George; first lieutenant, E. R. Brady; second lieutenant, J. W. Murphy. Company I, Clyde—Captain, W. B. Buffum; first lieutenant, P. J. Lyons; second lieutenant, S. P. Young. Company K, Tekoa—Captain, J. W. Stearns; first lieutenant, H. D. Kay; second lieutenant, C. F. Kay. FIRST CAVALRY BATTALION.

Major Charles B. Johnson, commanding; headquarters Spokane. STAFF.

First Lieutenant H. B. Schwellenbach, adjutant. Captain J. A. Beebe, surgeon. Captain W. A. Shankland, chaplain. First Lieutenant J. W. Dougan, quartermaster. First Lieutenant Ira R. Bamber, inspector of small arms practice. NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF.

Sergeant major, G. Lindsey. Veterinary surgeon, W. G. Cotter. Hospital steward, D. P. Bonney. Commissary sergeant, Tom Box. Quartermaster, Sergeant Cooler.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

17

OFFICERS.

Troop A, Sprague—Captain, A. W. Lindsay; first lieutenant, E. H. eterson; second lieutenant, F. H. Gehres. Troop B, Tacoma—Captain, J. M. Ashton; first lieutenant, E. J. riggs; second lieutenant, P. M. Boeringer. Some three days seem to have been lost to the command in cornleting grounds and general arrangements of the camp for the acommodation of the troops, such as building kitchens, messing laces, changing tents and constructing sinks and tent floors. uard mounting and parades were had, the first in the morning nd the latter in the afternoon, with indifferent success, at first, light improvement in each was noted from day to day. GOVERNOR'S DAY. June 27th was governor's day. The governor, E. P. Ferry, and members of his staff arrived on this date about noon. Immediately upon his arrival he was given the salute due his rank, and in the afternoon a review of the entire brigade •- Brigadier General Curry, commanding—was received by the governor. The troops seemed to be fully aware of the efforts required of them and presented a very good appearance. The brigade was formed in line, and during the marching, which was quite steady, distances and intervals were fairly well kept. , During the inspection, however, by the governor, some of the companies in the second regiment remained at parade rest and presented arms alternately as he passed in front and rear. Markers for changing directions were not posted until ceremonies began. The staff of the governor was in full uniform, as well as that of Brigadier General Curry, nearly all present were mounted. The governor expressed himself as well pleased with the appearance of the troops and camp; he remained in camp until the following evening when he returned to Olympia. COLONEL TROTTER'S DEATH. On the 28th of June a gloom was cast over the entire encampment by the sudden death of Colonel Trotter. The National Guard, as well as myself, by his death lost a generous, kind and noble friend and brother officer, the army a brave, valuable and dutiful officer, society a true and polished gentleman, and his family an affectionate husband and father. Major F. E. Trotter, 24th infantry (brevet lieutenant colonel,


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U. S. A.), instructor of the National Guard of Washington, died suddenly at Camp Murray, June 28, 1892, at 4:55 o'clock P. M. He was attacked with cerebral apoplexy at 10:30 A. M. It was at first thought that the attack was not severe. He was not rendered wholly unconscious and could swallow with but slight symptoms of paralysis. Hemorrhages set in, seemed to be progressive, and at 12:30 P. M. he became unconscious. The physicians treated him with hypodermic injections, packed ice on his hands and wrists; at 4:55 p M. he received another shock, death followed almost instantly. His remains were placed in a casket the same evening. The next day they were escorted to the railroad station and placed on the train en route to his home. General R. G. O'Brien, adjutant general, and guard of honor (Colonel Boyd and Captain Coiner), and company H, N. G. W., of Vancouver accompanied the remains home. The escort ceremonies were all minutely and correctly carried out according to the drill regulations. During the day of Colonel Trotter's death and the following day, until his remains were sent away, all duties, except the necessary guard and fatigue, were suspended. Every individual man and officer realized his great loss, and perfect stillness reigned night and day, certifying that all were in deepest mourning and sorrow, evincing the esteem and respect in which their dead comrade was held. Appropriate orders were issued and all officers of the Nationa1 Guard of Washington were requested to wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days. Taking the time consumed in preparing camp and the different headquarters, and that occupied during and after Colonel Trotter's death, it amounted practically to five days, without "settling down" to real practical work in the matter of drill, target (skirmish practice) and usual routine duties. TENTAGE.

The tentage all seemed to be in good condition. Hospital tents of large size were furnished at general headquarters and brigade headquarters. Wall tents, with flies, were used at each regimental headquarters and for company officers. The men used common A tents and A wall tents. There were on an average four men in a tent. The guard used a large conical tent. There were one or two instances where company officers had to sleep with their men, which should not be. Company officers' tents were not pitched a

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sufficient distance from the flanks of their companies, nor were the headquarter tents far enough away. All this was no doubt due to the lack of space, timber and formation of the ground. MESS.

The troops were subsisted by the state, by contract. Large dining sheds were erected for each regiment, sufficient to seat all at a time. Ranges were used for preparing the meals. There were separate places for the officers of the regiments and general headquarters. Cooks and waiters were hired. Much dissatisfaction existed for two days, because of improper preparation of food and because some of the men were detailed, or ordered, to wait upon their comrades at table, waiters having been discharged for incapacity and trying to extort higher wages. The remarks of many of the officers and men were closely bordering on insubordination and were unsoldierly, yet due reparation was afterwards made, new waiters and cooks hired, and all difficulties of mind and body adjusted. ARMS, ETC.

The troops were generally armed with Springfield rifle, caliber 45, and of different dates of make, from 1878 to 1884, in fair con-

dition and serviceable, except company I, second regiment infantry, which had guns of old and obsolete pattern from caliber 50 to caliber 45, of 1878, of buckhorn sight, poor condition, and which were furnished a few days before going into camp. They have blankets (but not to compare with the army standard either in weight or quality), black belts and McKeever cartridge boxes, some of which are worn out and should show more care. They have haversacks and canteens (U. S. pattern), and knapsacks (black leather backs, Pettibone Company make, not as good as army pattern). They have also, generally, mill woven field belts, triangular bayonet and steel scabbard. The cavalry battalion has carbine (caliber 45, pattern 88), sabres (U. S. pattern), Smith & Wesson revolvers and bolsters -in good condition. Troop A is without pistol holsters. Each troop has regulation saddles and bridles. Horses in troops are mostly owned by members and are in good condition. CLOTHING. The regiments and battalions are uniformed complete, dress and fatigue, U. S. army pattern or regulation. In the majority of


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

cases the uniform looks very neat and well fitting and presents a fine appearance. There are some instances where the blouses of the officers might fit better, and amongst the men some of the blouses and trousers seem worn from long use and from the necessity of re-issuing to men after being worn by others during an enlistment, or part of one, which is discouraging to men to have to wear them under such circumstances, and in such cases should be renewed. Fatigue uniforms and overcoats were worn during encampment, and gloves on ceremonies. Many men appeared without numbers on their caps, and in some instances wore the numbers and letters wrong way. No uniform shoes.

evident desire of the troops to do what was required of them. The company drills were good; there was great and apparent improvement in battalion drills, parades and ceremonies as the encampment progressed. Both officers and men showed that they were being greatly benefited by study and practice. At first there was a noticeable unsteadiness in ranks, chewing tobacco, expectorating, looking around, laughing and talking, smoking in the ranks and in marching, wheeling and touching of elbows instead of turning, and again pivot turning on his ground or in some places stepping backwards instead of describing the are of a circle. Sometimes the step was too short; many times distance was lost, and intervals too small or too great. Guides seemed to be uncertain of their duties. Officers generally flourished and pointed with their swords while dressing, or held it across their bodies while company was turning. Sometimes civilian head dress and partly civilian dress and partly military was worn on drills and parades. All of these faults were rectified when attention was called to them, and were seldom committed a second time. I drilled both regiments in riot or stret drill, which all were very anxious to learn. Much improvement was made, and officers and men showed close attention and quickness in learning these movements.

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GUARD DUTY. The performance of guard duty was only fair. In this most important duty the brigade is less proficient than any other. There had been evidently little attention paid to this duty; some of the sentinels on post seemed to think it all right to sit down in any convenient place near their posts. This kind of neglect is inexcusable. Many of these faults were due to lack of practice and instructions. There were many of the sentinels who seemed to know or try to do their duty; all were courteous and grateful when cautioned or corrected, and were desirous of saluting,. whether it was in the proper manner or not, showing a willingness to learn. A closer study of Keiinon's manual of guard duty would remedy these defects. Each officer and non-commissioned officer of the guard should see that a copy of all orders and instructions is kept at the guard house or tent, and that each sentinel reads over and learns them. Each relief should be visited by the officers and non-commissioned officers of the guard for the purpose of ascertaining the knowledge of the sentinel with his orders. â&#x20AC;˘ The officer of the day- should be held responsible that all orders are carried out, and that his guard is properly instructed. The sentinels were diligent in challenging, and all calls were repeated and answered, and towards the end of the encampment much progress was made in this as well as in other duties.

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INSPECTION. I was ordered to inspect the first regiment on the morning of June 26th. I found men looking neat and clean, and in very fair condition; company streets very clean and tents in good order. In some companies there was a difference in the folding of the blankets, bed sacks and clothing - a lack of uniformity in this respect. Colonel Trotter inspected the second regiment and cavalry battalion. I did not get his notes, but from the conversation I had with him I ascertained that he found matters to exist in these organizations much as I found them in the first regiment.

DRILLS AND CEREMONIES.

BANDS. Each regiment has a fine band, excellently equipped and with good uniforms. Efficient leaders and drum majors; instruments in good order and condition.

The requirements of general order No. 10 from general headquarters were carried out with some slight changes. I observed all drills and ceremonies minutely, and was impressed with the

CAVALRY BATTALION. The cavalry battalion is commanded by Major Charles B. Johnson, a typical soldier, a veteran of the late war. He is by his tact


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

and judgment particularly fitted for a cavalry commander and of volunteer troops. He is firm but just, and thoroughly commands his men. The discipline of the troops was good; the men enter into the spirit of their duties in a soldierly manner, and while there was one or two cases of questioning the orders of superiors, they were remedied when advised upon. The men and officers were anxious to learn military discipline and etiquette, and a single correction was all that was necessary to obtain the desired result. The battalion was drilled in the manual of arms and foot movements and in mounted movements, skirmish drill on foot and mounted, and in sabre drill, also in charging but not in the grand manege. The troops were well equipped and armed; horsemanship was good; no bad riders; but one fault to be found was to move at a gait faster than a walk, when hot necessary.

ADVANCE AND REAR GUARDS; OUTPOSTS AND PICKETS.

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HOSPITAL AND SICK. The hospital arrangements in camp were very good; a large and comfortable hospital tent was used, with cots in it. Dr. J. A. Beebe, surgeon cavalry battalion, had a full set of instruments and supplies with him, the only ones in camp (private property), consisting of stretchers, flags, brassards and field tourniquets. There was no systematic instruction in the hospital corps, owing to the inability to get men for company bearers, litter and ambulance drill. No ambulance in camp and no ambulance corps. The doctor reports the prevalent sickness at camp to be diarrhwa, due probably to (1) ice water in unclean barrels, (2) overeating, especially of food prone to fermentative changes, i. e. corn, beans, sauces, etc. The food was good and the ration about three times too ample. SINKS. Sinks consisted of trenches three or four feet deep, provided with railings to sit on and covered and screened with brush, in some instances they were made of boards covered and provided with seats. Not uniformly distributed nor in proper localities; they were too close to camp. Fresh earth was thrown in them daily. STABLING. A good and comfortable stable was constructed for the use of all horses, and at a convenient distance from the camp and near to water.

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No instructions in these duties. SIGNAL CORPS. No corps organized and no instructions. BOOKS, RECORDS AND ORDERS. The few that I noticed were well kept. Those of Surgeon Beebe and Colonel Scott were complete from beginning of camp to the date of breaking camp. Some orders were signed "By order of Brigadier General A. P. Curry, Commanding;" they should have read "By command of Brigadier General Curry." Colonel S. W. Scott, assistant inspector general, was assigned to duty as assistant adjutant general. He was zealous, prompt and soldierly, courteous to all and capable to perform the duties of any office to which he may be assigned. PAY AND ALLOWANCES. The state pays to each officer for stated drills and parades and while in camp, *2.00 per day, with subsistence, and an allowance of *1.50 to *3.00 for his horse. The men are subsisted and allowed as pay *1.50 per day. PAY DEPARTMENT. At the head of this department is Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general, a man regarded by all who know him as standing in the front rank of the financiers of the country, being a successful banker. He brings with him the experience of many years in the profession. He is soldierly and commanding in appearance, and popular in military as well as civil fife. The brigade paymaster, Captain Wallace Mount, rendered very efficient service in the pay department. He had every company of the brigade paid up before leaving camp, and his accounts all square and closed up to date. QUARTERMASTER DEPARTMENT. Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general, is at its head. He was always ready and willing, earnest and constant in the performance of his duties; prompt, zealous and of soldierly bearing. He is destined to occupy as prominent


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ADJUTANT GENERAL.

7

a part in the National Guard as he does in civil life in the estimation of his friends and fellow citizens. SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, assistant commissary general, in the management of this department was untiring, attentive and constant in striving to please all. Realizing the importance of this department in camp, he was ever on the alert to supply every necessary article of food, and to keep a sufficient amount on hand. He is very popular and an efficient officer, a thorough gentleman and a prominent lawyer. Colonel J. A-. Hatfield, assistant commissary general, was assigned to duty in the subsistence department in the absence of Colonel Whyte, and by his broad experience, faculty of understanding human nature, and with his admirable executive and administrative ability, rendered invaluable service. Tie seems especially fitted for responsible duties, and where it requires leadership. ADJUTANT GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. This department has at its head Brigadier General Rossel G. O'Brien, adjutant general and chief of staff. He is a man of tireless energy, soldierly hearing and thoroughly imbued with a military spirit and ardor, constantly alive to the interests of the National Guard. In time of peace he is ex officio commissary general, quartermaster general, inspector general and chief of ordnance. He has in his own department, as staff, an assistant commissary general, an assistant quartermaster general and an assistant inspector general, with the rank of lieutenant colonel, and two aids-de-camp with rank of captain. The adjutant generals orders and instructions, as a rule, contain throughout wisdom as to important measures and judgment as to details. He superintends the supply of ordnance, clothing, camp equipage, subsistence, transportation and in general all manner of appurtenances used by troops. He is the only bonded officer of the departments, of which he is ex officio chief. DISCIPLINE. â&#x20AC;˘ In some respects the discipline of the organization is very good; in other respects, weak. There is no intentional or willful neglect of duty, but much ignorance and failure to appreciate the value of

U

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

125

things which seem trivial. One or two nights the noise after taps was loud and disturbing. In my observations about camp I noticed, sometimes, too much familiarity between officers and men, and a slackness of military bearing when off dutyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;privates, non-commissioned officers and officers lounging in and around officers' tents, much carelessness in wearing caps, belts and other things, betraying a want of a correct appreciation of the relative duties of different grades and an ignorance of the value of the seemingly trifling formalities embraced in the term "military etiquette." The wearing of part uniform and part civilian dress mars the appearance. All officers, from the chief of staff down, should wear the uniform while on duty. Several instances of officers wearing the dress belt with the fatigue uniform occurred. There was only one instance of "horse play," "bouncing" or "blanketing," which folly terminated when it was seen that serious results might have been. Such practical jokes or mock ceremonies were due to the exuberance of spirit on the part of many from home the first time, and to whom the whole thing was new and uncontrollable, except by measures which would have been repugnant to the amiable nature of the brigadier general commanding, who is a beau ideal soldier, a veteran of the late war, and possessed of that rare tact, policy, judgment, discretion and good nature which combine to make the popular, able and successful commander. It is most gratifying to report that there was not a single case of drunkenness during the encampment, no profanity or obscenity. Objectionable characters brought to camp were promptly ordered away. Every vendor of intoxicating liquors without license was promptly ordered away from the camp and vicinity. Intoxicants were particularly refrained from. We do not look for the discipline of the regular army, quite, in the National Guard. The relation between officers and men is such as naturally results from being soldiers to-day and business associates and neighbors to-morrow, and is common with all volunteers on entering the service. They do not observe the courtesies regarded by military men as essential to discipline, nor show that respect for rank and authority which comes only from long habit and subjection to the stringent and absolute government of the articles of war. The men were prompt, obedient, willing and correct in the performance of the duties which they knew and understood. The officers are all capable, earnest and zealous, and With opportunity and a competent instructor with them to direct


FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

126

their energies in their armories or other stations or in camp, would soon bring the organization to a high standard of excellence. Not one suggestion of mine was passed unheeded, and it was a great pleasure to instruct the officers and men, who, by their earnest endeavors, showed me that my instructions were appreciated. TARGET PRACTICE. I instructed each inspector of small arms practice in the preparation of the targets, attaching canvas and pasting on the silhouettes, and in laying out a skirmish range. The facilities for , skirmish firing were limited, space was contracted, and no good back ground or embankment to shoot against could be found, however, a distance of nearly six hundred yards was measured and eight groups for individual skirmish firing were set up. Targets, kneeling, standing and lying, D, E and F. The firing was conducted after the manner laid down in Blunt. Considering that very few men had ever fired at skirmish targets, and many had never seen a target of that kind, the firing was very good. Officers and men took great interest in the practice, and considerable rivalry was exhibited and great regret experienced that more men could not fire, owing to the shortness of time. The scores are given below: FIRST REGIMENT INFANTRY SKIRMISH.

Company A, 2 kneeling, 13 standing, "

" B, 3 0,10 " D, 5 E, 7 F,

4

" U, 10 I, 9 K, 8 "

11 10 7 13 7 11 5 12

" "

"

" " "

lying, 67 total, 19 total hits. 90 " 23 " 9 " 8 " 110 " 28 71 " 18 6 " 25 92 5 15 57 4 32 128 11 18 4 " 71 33 131 13 4

SECOND REGIMENT INFANTRY SKIRMISH

Company A, three runs averaged 112 points, 60 hits. B, 6 kneeling, 11 standing, 3 lying, 72 total, 20 total hits. 98 " 29 4 " 16 D, 9 19 67 2 11 E, 6 F,

2

G, 2 H, 7 I, 2 K, 8

" " "

13 6 16 7, 7

" " " "

6 1 6 20 7

"

77 31 106 129 88

" " " " "

21 9 29 29 22

127

CAVALRY BATTALION SKIRMISH.

Troop A, 10 kneeling, 11 standing, 1 lying, 78 total, 22 total hits. 112 " 30 " 14 6 11 B, 10 No known distance firing. PRESS. The people of the state showed a great interest in their citizen idiers. The Tacoma Ledger, Seattle Post Intelligencer and attle Telegraph having representatives in camp, who gave daily ports of the encampment. 11

RECOMMENDATIONS. F Having witnessed the encampment of the National Guard of Washington, and having conversed freely with officers and men on their facilities and needs, I have the following recommendations to make, the adoption of which would, in my opinion, add to the efficiency of the soldiery of the state: Permanent camp grounds -The purchase of permanent camp grounds should be made as soon as practicable, looking well towards the site being suitable for all purposes; good drainage; thorough sanitary facilities; good wood and water; facilities for bathing; good target grounds for known distance and skirmish firing; sufficient area for encamping the brigade, and additional area for drills, ceremonies and evolutions. Camp grounds should be thoroughly accessible. One of the useful institutions for the training of the National Guard is the practical duties of soldiership, is the camp of instruction. The brigade is (or should be) required to go in camp every year, the results there obtained are becoming manifest in the better discipline and steadiness of the militia. A certain esprit de corps, that the militia did not once possess, has arisen, in consequence of these summer drills, and these citizen soldiers are now spoken of with respect by those trained after the more arduous and more exacting methods of the regular army. A standing army is out of the question in a republic, and for this reason the reliance of the people on their citizen soldiers for protection against mob violence or sudden invasion must be complete. It is well to be assured that the militiamen are so well trained and 1!1 well disciplined that in a great national or social emergency we would have defenders not only brave, but capableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;men qualified -. physically and mentally. All action should be favorable toward


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

perfecting the militia and its organization. The cost of the camp would not be great, but any cost would be small that would insure the efficiency of the militia and establish a confidence in the minds of the people of the State of Washington of absolute security of life and property in case of insurrection, invasion and riots, which are becoming numerous throughout the land. A brigade encampment is recommended because a military head is always necessary at an encampment to prevent friction between regimental organizations. The work goes on much more satisfactorily. The additional cost would be small, and not to be compared with the advantages. Citizen employers should freely grant privileges to serve and foster and encourage the spirit so to do to every one in their employ. I would also recommend more attention to â&#x20AC;&#x201D;First, setting up drill; second, simulated guard instruction and duties in armories; third, skirmish drill and firing; fourth, gallery practice with reduced charges; fifth, an organization of a signal corps; sixth, for each man such field equipments as blanket, bag or knapsack, haversack, meat-ration can complete, knife, fork, spoon, canteen, tin cup, Mills' field belt, and some sort of entrenching tool. There should be some arrangement by which all old pattern or obsolete pattern and caliber guns could he transferred to the government for the improved army pattern, and all the men be armed alike throughout. Company messes are recommended as necessary; cooks and waiters being hired, in emergencies detailed and paid; rations being drawn by regimental commissaries on requisition from chief commissary officer and issued on requisitions signed and approved by company and regimental commanders. The Buzzacott oven for baking bread, invented in the army and used generally in the army and the militia of several states with satisfaction and success, should accompany the mess kit of the company. At present the adjutant general performs all the duties pertaining to the quartermaster general's, commissary general's, inspector general's and adjutant general's department; that they are performed in a manner that is faultless is known to all, but the work is too much for one man. The adjutant general should receive an adequate salary, and be enabled to devote his whole time to the duties of his own department, which would increase in scope and importance with the growth of the militia. There should be a

separately organized commissary and quartermaster's department, and when a regiment is ordered into active service or camp, the necessary camp equipage, quartermaster's and commissary stores should be regularly transferred to the quartermaster or the commissary of the regiment by the chief of each department, and either regular or memorandum receipts and invoices passed, thus fixing the responsibility for expenditure, preservation and care. Such a system would result not only in a great saving to the state government, but invaluable experience to the officers belonging to these departments and selected for these responsible and important duties. The quartermaster's, commissary, adjutant general's and medical departments should be sent to the place of encampment at least a week beforehand, so as to insure a thorough preparation and readiness for the troops, and not encroach upon the time allowed them for instructions. Each staff officer should be required to perform the functions of his own office, and thus prevented becoming a figure head. Company commanders and company officers and men should be impressed with the absolute necessity of taking proper care of their clothing, arms and accoutrements. I also recommend the continuance of the custom of the officer of the day wearing, while on his tour of duty, a sash across the shoulder, and then around the waist. This is a pretty custom, and thoroughly identifies these officers, and could be well followed in the regular service. First sergeants should not wear swords unless acting sergeant major or some other staff (non-commissionei) officer. I cannot close this report without expressing my thanks to Colonel E. W. Pike, commanding the second regiment, for many courtesies from. himself and officers. Colonel Pike is a veteran soldier and is beloved by all his men and officers, and to obey and serve him is their greatest pleasure. He has efficient field and staff officers. To Colonel Green, commanding first regiment, and who has been a soldier from his boyhood, and is a popular commander. I know that his regiment is composed of excellent material, as I have served with it personally in the anti-Chinese riots at Seattle, during the Seattle fire and elsewhere. Finally, by all from the much esteemed governor and Brigadier General Curry down to the youngest private, I was treated with all due kindness and courtesy, and I return thanks to all. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;9

128

129


130

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

I have no confidential report to make. I would state that my delay with this report was caused by having to collect many items of interest which I had to get through the mails, and then, too, the making of the report devolved upon me by sudden and unex pected circumstances. WM. A. KIMBALL, (Signed) Respectfully submitted. First Lieutenant 14th Infantry, Inspector aud Assistant Instructor.

EXHIBIT G. REPORTS OF BOARDS OF SURVEY. Following are proceedings of a board of survey convened at the first infantry armory, Seattle, pursuant to the following order: GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 2: OLYMPIA, February 4, 1892. A board of survey will convene at Seattle on the 12th day of February, 1892, at 10 o'clock A. iu., or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the purpose of examining and reporting upon the condition of certain arms and equipments in the possession of company D, first infantry regiment, for which Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg, chief of ordnance, late captain of said company D, is responsible. DETAIL FOR BOARD. Colonel E. M. Carr, assistant adjutant general. Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general. Captain E. S. Ingraham, commanding E company, first infantry. Said board will inquire into the condition of the state property to be examined, report upon that lost or missing, if any, and the responsibility therefor. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: .............Assistant Adjutant General. FIRST INFANTRY ARMORY, SEATTLE, Feb. 12, 1892. The board met, pursuant to the foregoing order, at 2 o'clock P. M. Present: Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general; Captain E. S. Ingraham, company E, first infantry regiment. Absent: Colonel E. M. Carr, assistant adjutant general. (No cause assigned.) In the absence of Colonel E. M. Carr, assistant adjutant general, Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, acting president of the board, administered the oath of office to Captain E. S. Ingraham, recorder, and the recorder in turn administered the oath of office to Lieutenant Colonel Garretson. (131)


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg, chief of ordnance (officer responsible), lately commanding D company, first infantry regiment, then came before the board and submitted his testimony together with an inventory of the property, for which he is responsible to the state,

We further find that Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg, chief of ordnance, at the time of his resignation as Captain of company D, first infantry regiment, turned overto Captain Allen, his successor in that office, all the property of the state for which he was charged, without having taken receipts from said Captain Allen therefor; that the following is a list of property missing: 3 helmets, 5 waist belts, 10 gun slings, 1 canteen, 2 shell extractors, 5 main springs, 5 sear springs, 5 ejector springs, 5 tumbler screws, 5 firing pins, 5 firing pin springs, 5 firing pin screws, 5 breech block cap screws, 20 screw drivers, 4 tumbler punches, 9 uniform overcoats.

132

marked A.

FINDINGS.

After a personal and thorough examination of all the facts attainable, and from the evidence adduced upon the inquiry, we find the following property, for which Colonel Kellogg is responsible, in the possession of company D, first infantry regiment, and report its condition as follows: Articles.

Remarks.

I Found. I Condition. I

Springfield rifles (cal. 45) ................ Bayonets.......................................... Bayonet scabbords........................... Cartridge boxes................................ Cartridge belts and plates............... Gunslings ............................

Good ........ 50 63 Good ........ 63 Good ........ 60 Good ........ 10 loaned to Sons of Veterans. Good ........ 5 lost; 40 old belts turned into 46 reg. headquarters. 10 lost since Captain Allen took 60 1 Good ..... charge. I Good .....

S. & W. revolvers................................ Armchests.......................................... Screwdrivers....................................... Tumblerpunches................................ None. 20 Good ...... Wipers................................................. 3 Good ...... Sergeants' swords............................... Poor ....... 3 Sergeants' sword belts........................ Good ...... ........................... 29! Canteens and straps Blanket bags, complete....................... Blankets ............................................ Officers' swords....................... Scabbards................................ Sightcovers............................. No. Is...................................... LetterD................................... Crossguns .............................. Uniform coats.......................... Uniform overcoats .................. Uniformpants ........................ Fatigue caps .......................... Blouses................................... Helmets............................................... Cleaning material box........................ Officer's rifle........................................ Shellextractors................................... Mainsprings....................................... Searsprings........................................ Ejectorsprings.................................... Tumblescrews.................................... Firingpins.......................................... Firingpin springs .............................. Firingpin screws................................ Breech block cap screws.....................

40 38 3 3 42 28 28 31 46 37 37 49 34

4 1

10 broken in service. 1 lost since Captain Allen took charge.

Good ...... Good......

47 issued; 9 lost since Captain Allen took charge. Good ........ Good ....... Good........ Good........ Good ........ Good........ Fair.......... Fair.......... 46 issued; 9 lost under Allen. 9 lostunder Allen.

Fair....

7 lost, report 10, under Captain Allen. 3 lost under Captain Allen.

Lost. Lost. Lost. Lost. None.................Lost. lost. None.. None......................5 lost. None....................5 lost. .... ........5 lost. None..........

None.. None..

The following books charged to the company about which Captain Kellogg knows nothing: One Record of Assemblies, 3 Street Riot Tactics, 1 Blunt's Firing Reg., Q. M. Sgt. Book, 1 Roster.

133

EXHIBIT A. C. L. F. KELLOGG, being first duly sworn, testified as follows: At the time my resignation was forwarded to .general headquarters I also forwarded my quarterly report of the property of the state with which I was charged. At that time the following articles were missing: 1 helmet, 2 shell extractors, 5 main springs, 5 sear springs, 5 ejector springs, 5 tumbler screws. 5 firing pins, 5 firing pin springs, 5 firing pin screws, 5 breech block cap screws, 20 screw drivers, 4 tumbler punches; all of which had been issued and used up in the service at that time. Since then the followlug articles have been used up and worn out in the service: 5 waist belts, 10 gun slings, 1 canteen, 2 helmets. At the time company D attended the dedication services of company U, Armory in Tacoma, one overcoat was lost by private A. B. Stewart, as appears in his testimony. At the time company D was on duty at the mines it was frequently called upon to lend overcoats to some of the other companies of the regiment. Some of the coats loaned were returned, but there were eight coats not returned and are now in the possession of such companies. I was not in command of the company at that time and therefore could not personally look after the property in its possession. A. B. STEWART, being first duly sworn, testified as follows: At the time company D attended the dedication services of the Armory at Tacoma I was a private in said company. On the way back to Seattle my overcoat was taken from my stateroom on the steamer presumably by some member of one of the other companies and has never been found. Also to my personal knowledge, while the company was on duty at the mines, one coat was lost. The board therefore recommends that in view of the testimony and the facts therein adduced, that Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg be released from all obligations under his bonds as captain of company D, first infantry regiment, N. G. W., as to state property placed under his charge as said captain of company D, first infantry, N. U. W.


134

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

We have examined the following property and find that each and every article is unserviceable --. being worn out in the service of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to wit: 46 pairs uniform trousers, 49 fatigue caps, 51 blouses; and are of the opinion that the same should be condemned, and so recommend; and that Captain Kellogg be relieved upon his bond for the value thereof, as charged to him. Colonel and Assistant Adjutant General. H. F. GARRETSON, Lieutenant Colonel and Assistant Quartermaster General. E. S. INGRAHAM, Captain Company E, First Infantry, and Recorder. SEATTLE, April 20, 1892. Received of Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg, 5 overcoats, 3 dresscoats, F. L. HILTON, blankets. First Lieutenant, Commanding D Company, First Regiment.

Following are proceedings of a board of survey convened at armory of company C, first infantry regiment, Tacoma, pursuant to the following order:

135

C, TACOMA, March 26, 1892. The board met pursuant to the foregoing order at 2 o'clock P. si.; .present, Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, assistant commissary general; Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general; Major F. A. Gaus, first infantry regiment. Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, president of the board, administered the oath of office to Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson and Major F. A. Gans, and Lieutenant Colonel Garretson in turn administered the oath of office to Lieutenant Colonel Whyte. Captain W. J. Fife, commanding company C (officer responsible), first infantry regiment, was not present before the board, but was represented by his first lieutenant, I. M. Howell, who came before the board and submitted testimony together with an inventory of the property, for which Captain W. J. Fife is responsible to the state, and the same is hereto attached, marked "Exhibit A." ARMORY, COMPANY

FINDINGS After a personal and thorough examination of the property and all the facts attainable, and from the evidence adduced upon the inquiry, we find the following property, for which Captain W. J. Fife is responsible, in the possession of company C, first infantry regiment, and report its condition as follows:

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA,

March 14, 1892. Special Order No. 3: 1. A board of survey will convene at Tacoma on Wednesday, March 23, 1892, or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the purpose of examining and reporting upon the condition of certain arms, clothing and equipments in the possession of company C, first infantry regiment, for which Captain W. J. Fife is responsible. 2. Captain Fife will make an invoice of all state property issued to him, and which has subsequently come into his possession, and deliver to the board of survey for their consideration. 3.

DETAIL OF BOARD.

Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, assistant commissary general. Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general. Major F. A. Gans, first infantry regiment. Said board will inquire closely into and report the condition of the said state property; also all property reported damaged, lost or missing, if any, and who is responsible for said damage or loss. By order of the commander-in-chief. H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant Genera]. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

Articles,

I Found. I

Bugle................................................... 53 Bayonets............................................. 53 Bayonetscabbards.............................. 53 Cartridgeboxes.................................. 53 Cartridge belts and plates................... 9 Armchests.......................................... 46 Canteens and straps............................ 46 Belts-web ............................................ 4 Overcoats............................................. Box cleaning material ........................ Cartridgeshells................................... 1,00? Officer's rifle ....................................... 42 Straps, overcoat................................... 50 Blouses, fatigue................................... 45 Blanketbags...................................... 10 Tents................................................... Go Coats, dress........................................ 60 Helmets.............................................. Trousers................................................ 50 42 Caps, fatigue ........................................ 50 Blankets............... ........... ................... Officers' swords....................................2 Rifles, Springfield, cal. 45..................... 60 Gunslings ........................................... Non-corn, officer's sword..................... Record of Assemblages....... ................ Street Riot Tactics ............................... Company Roster................. .................

60 1 3 1

Condition.

Remarks.

Worthless Good .......... Good .......... Good .......... Good .......... Good .......... Good .......... Two without straps. Good .......... Good .......... Two unserviceable. Material exhausted. Rounds...... Calibre 45. .......... Good Good .......... Worthless Fair ............ Good .......... Much the worse for wear. 30 unserviceable, others in bad condition, Worthless Worthless Good .......... Good .......... 1 stock broken, 2 out of repair, 10 with old sights. Fair ............ Fair ............ Good .......... Good .......... Good ..........


136

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

The board therefore recommend that Captain W. J. Fife, under his bond and obligation as captain of company C, first infantry regiment, be charged with the following property: 4 belts;web, 7 overcoats, 1 officer's sword, 8 overcoat straps, 10 blouses, 5 blanket bags, 10 trousers, 18 fatigue caps, 57 cartridge belts and plates (claimed to have been turned over to regimental quartermaster, when new ones were issued at Seattle, during fire), 1,000 cartridges caliber 50 (claimed to have been exchanged for 45 caliber and used for target practice, by permission of colonel first regiment, while on duty at mines, from July 4th to 18th, 1891.) We have examined the following property and find that each and every article is unserviceable, being worn out in the service of the state, to wit: 1 bugle, 2 overcoats, 1 box cleaning material, 60 dresscoats, 60 helmets, 50 trousers, 42 fatigue caps, 1 rifle; and are of the opinion that the same should be condemned and so recommend, and that Captain W. J. Fife be relieved on his bond for the value thereof, as charged to him. ALBERT WIIYTE,

Lieutenant Colonel, Assistant Commissary General.

H. F.

GARRETSON,

Lieutenant Colonel, Assistant Quartermaster General.

F. A. GAUS, Major First Infantry Regiment.

-

137

EXHIBIT A. No. 1.

. INVOICE

OLYMPIA, Nov. 7, 1891. Captain W. J. FIFE, Commanding C Company, First Infantry Regiment, First Brigade, N. G. W.: SIR â&#x20AC;&#x201D;You are charged on the books of this office with the following military supplies shipped to you for the use of your command, to wit: No.

4 1 50 50 50 110 50 54) 45 60 60 60 1 1,000 1,000 60 50 60 1 3 50 10 60 60 60 50 60 60

I

Articles.

I

Price.

I

Total.

....... . ......................................................................... $6 00 $35 00 ........................................................................................... ....... ..................3 54) ..................................................................... 1 03 ......... ........................................................................ ...90 45 00 ...............................................................................3 30 165 00 ...........................................................................54 59 40 ..................................................................1 00 50 00 ......................................................... .......1 22 61 00 ..............................................................................83 37 35 ....................................................................... ...................................................................................... ................................................................................. .................................................................. 9 30 ...... .......18 50 ................................................................. .................................................................18 50 ..................................................................................... 36 - 21 60 ................................................................................ ..1 35 67 50 .............................................................13 12 787 20 ................................................ ...........z 00 ............................................................................. 10 00 30 00 ........................................................................38 1900 ...............................................................................................9 57 95 70 .............................................................................3 75 225 00 ............................................................................. .... 60 36 00 ............ ...................................................................... 7 35 441 00 ...................................................................................... 562 50 25 ... ...................................................................... 111 65 99 00 ....................................................................... .3 . 20 192 00

Arms chests Bugle Bayonets with guns Bayonet scabbard Blankets, woolen Belts and plates, waist Belts and plates, webbing Cartridge boxes, McKeever Canteens and straps Cross rifles, for caps with cap Cap letters, with cap Cap numbers, with cap Cleaning material box Cartridges, rifle ball, caliber 45 Cartridges, rifle ball, caliber 50 Gun slings Blanket bags Rifles, Springfield, caliber 45 Rifle, Springfield, officer's model Swords, officers Pairs overcoat straps Tents Blouses, fatigue Caps, fatigue .. Coats, dress Coats, over Helmets, infantry Trousers, infantry

BOOKS.

of Assemblages........................................................................ ..... 2 00 3IRecord Street Riot Tactics ...................................................................................75 2 25 1I Blunt's Small Arms Fir. Meg .......................................................................1 60 Company Roster ............................................................................................. 3 00 Total .................................................................................................... $3,iosoo

WASHINGTON, SS. COUNTY OF PIERCE, TACOMA, March 30, 1892. I, W. J Fife, being first duly sworn, deposes and says: That he is a citizen of the United States, above twenty-one years of age and resident of the city of Tacoma, and being the commanding officer of company C, first infantry regiment, N. G. W., since January 17, 1887, and during all this time has used every possible effort to keep the state property in my pos. session, and on examination find that the following property of the state has been taken from the drill room without my consent or knowledge: Four belts, web; seven coats, over; one sword, officer's; eight straps, overcoat; ten blouses; five blanket bags; ten trousers; eighteen fatigue caps. And further, I have used every effort possible to secure same, without being able to find the missing articles; I therefore deem it but just, right STATE OF


138

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

and proper that I should not be held responsible or accountable for the loss of articles stolen or taken without my knowledge or consent. W. J. FIFE. [Seal.] Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of March, A. D. 1892. W. W. HARTLEY. TACOMA, March 31, 1892. This is to certify that I, I. M. Howell, first lieutenant company C, first infantry regiment, have read the above affidavit and certify that the same I. M. HOWELL. is true to the best of my knowledge and belief. [Seal.] Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of March, A. D. 1892. W. W. HARTLEY. TACOMi, March 31, 1892. This is to certify that I, J. G. Jolly, quartermaster sergeant of company C, first infantry regiment, N. G. W., have read the foregoing affidavit of W. J. Fife, and certify that I believe the same to be true to the J. G. JOLLY. best of my knowledge and belief. [Seal.] Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of March, A. D. 1892. W. W. HARTLEY.

Following are proceedings of a board of survey convened at armory of company G, first infantry regiment, Tacoma, pursuant to the following order: GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, March 21, 1892. Special Oider No. 4: The board of survey, ordered to examine certain property for which Captain W. J. Fife is responsible, will, upon conclusion of said duty, examine and report upon the condition of the following property for which Captain W. S. Shank, commanding G company, first infantry, is responsible, to wit: 1 Springfield breech loading rifle, 31 fatigue caps, 1 pair trousers, 39 fatigue blouses. 10 helmets, 6 blankets. Said board will follow the instructions relative to making the report laid down in special order No. 3. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: C. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General. ARMORY COMPANY G, TACOMA, March 26, 1892. The board met, pursuant to the foregoing order, at 4:30 o'clock P. M. Present: Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, assistant commissary general, Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general, Major F. A. Gans, first infantry regiment.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

139

Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, president of the board, administered the oath of office to Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson and Major F. A. Gans, and Lieutenant Colonel Garretson in turn administered the oath of office to Lieutenant Colonel Whyte. Captain W. S. Shank, commanding company G (officer responsible) first infantry regiment, was not present before the board, but was represented by his first lieutenant, E. F. Stafford, who came before the board and submitted the property mentioned in the foregoing order, for which Captain W. S. Shank is responsible to the state. FINDINGS. We have examined the following property and find that each and every article is unserviceable, being worn out in the service of the state, to wit: 1 Springfield breech loading rifle, 31 fatigue caps, 1 pair trousers, 39 fatigue blouses, 10 helmets, 6 blankets, 1 canteen; and are of the opinion that the same should be condemned and so recommend, and that Captain W. S. Shank be relieved on his bond for the value thereof, as charged to him. ALBERT WHYTE, Lieutenant Colonel, .Assistant Commissary General. H. F. GARRETSON, Lieutenant Colonel, Assistant Quartermaster General. F. A. GAUS, Major First Infantry Regiment.

Following are proceedings of a board of survey convened at first infantry armory, Seattle, pursuant to the following order: GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, April 13, 1892. Special Order No. : A board of survey will convene at Seattle on Friday, April 22, 1892, for the purpose of examining and reporting upon the condition of the following military property, for which Captain E. S. Ingraham. commanding E company, first infantry regiment, is responsible, to wit: 6 uniform dresscoats, 6 overcoats, 26 pairs pants, 28 fatigue caps, 26 blouses. DETAIL FOR BOARD. Colonel E. M. Carr, assistant adjutant general. Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg, chief of ordnance. Captain L. S. Booth, company B, first infantry regiment.


140

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

Said board will inquire closely iflto the condition of said property, and as to loss, damage, serviceableness and responsibility for said loss or damage. By order of the commander-in-chief. B. G. O'BRIEn, Adjutant General. FIRST INFANTRY ARMORY, SEATTLE, May 20, 1892. The board met pursuant to the foregoing order, the said order not having been served upon any member of this board until this date. Present: Colonel E. M. Carr, Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg. Absent: Captain L. S. Booth. The board proceeded to inspect and thoroughly examine the military property named in said order. From their examination and inspection the board are of the opinion that each and every article of said military property is in such a damaged condition as to be unfit for service. The board are further of the opinion from their examination and inspection that the damage to said property has been occasioned wholly by the ordinary wear of service, and that no one is responsible for said damage. The board therefore respectfully recommends that the said property be condemned, and that said Captain E. S. Ingraham be authorized to drop said property from his property return. E. M. CARR, Colonel and Assistant Adjutant General. C. L. F. KELLOGG, Colonel and Chief of Ordnance. -

Following are proceedings of a board of survey convened at armory of company G, first infantry regiment, Tacoma, pursuant to the following order: GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, March 21,1892. Special Order No. 4:

The board of survey ordered to examine certain property for which Captain W. J. Fife is responsible, will, upon conclusion of said duty, examine and report upon the condition of the following property, for which Captain W. S. Shank, commanding G company, first infantry, is responsible, to wit: One Springfield breech loading rifle, 81 fatigue caps, 1 pair trousers, 39 fatigue blouses, 10 helmets, 6 blankets. Said board will follow the instructions relative to making the report laid down in special order No. 3. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: C. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

I

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

141

ARMORY COMPANY G, TACOMA, March 26, 1892. The board met pursuant to the foregoing order at 4:30 o'clock p. i. Present: Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, assistant commissary general; Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general; Major F. A. Gans, first infantry regiment. Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, president of the board, administered the oath of office to Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson and Major F. A. Gans, and Lieutenant Colonel Garretson in turn administered the oath of office to Lieutenant Colonel Whyte. Captain W. S. Shank, commanding company G (officer responsible), first infantry regiment, was not present before the board but was represented by his first lieutenant, E. F. Stafford, who came before the board and submitted the property mentioned in the foregoing order, for which Captain W. S. Shank is responsible to the state. FINDINGS.

We have examined the following property and find that each and every article is unserviceable, being worn out in the service of the state, to wit: One Springfield rifle; 31 fatigue caps, 1 pair trousers, 39 fatigue blouses, 10 helmets, 6 blankets, 1 canteen. And are of the opinion that the same should be condemned and so recommend, and that Captain W. S. Shank be relieved on his bond for the value thereof, as charged to him. ALBERT WHYTE, Lieutenant Colonel, Assistant Commissary General. H. F. GARRETSON, Lieutenant Colonel, Assistant Quartermaster General. F. A. GAUS, Major First Infantry Regiment.


EXHIBIT H. REPORT OF INSPECTOR GENERAL.

SEATTLE, November 20, 1891. Brigadier General B. G. O'Brien, Adjutant General State of Washington: SIR-1 have the honor to report that in obedience to special

order No. 9, from general headquarters, of date October 28,1891, I did, on the 17th day of November, 1891, at the armory of the first regiment, N. G. W., in Seattle, inspect the property covered by said special order No. 9. As a result of said inspection, I have found the following property of said company, covered by said order, unfit for service: Six helmets, 28 blouses, 25 pairs of trousers. In addition to the property covered by said order, I found the following property of said company unfit for service: Ten pairs of trousers, 10 blouses, 43 fatigue caps, 10 gun slings, 2 Springfield rifles, caliber 45, issue of 1884. From the appearance of all of the property above mentioned, found unfit for service, I conclude that it has been damaged in actual use and service. I have the honor to be your most obedient servant, E. M. CARE, Colonel and Assistant Adjutant General.

OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL, N. G. W., OLYMPIA, August 15, 1892. To His Excellency, the Commander-in- Chief, H. G. W., Olympia: SIR â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Pursuant to the requirements of special order No. 10, c. 5., dated adjutant general's office, July 26, 1892, 1 have the honor

to report that at Seattle on the 16th day of August, 1892, I in(143)


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

spected the following property of company D, first infantry regiment, for which Captain C. L. F. Kellogg is responsible, reported as unserviceable by a board of survey duly called to survey the same as per special orders Nos. 2, 3 and 4, c. s., to wit: 3 sergeant's sword belts, 26 pairs uniform trousers, 49 fatigue caps, 39 blouses, 10 helmets. After full inspection as to the condition of said property, I find the same unserviceable and unfit for use, and recommending the condemnation of the same, have condemned the following as unfit for further use: 26 pairs uniform trousers, 49 fatigue caps, 39 blouses, by stamping thereon with indelible ink the word "condemned" on all clothing, and by destroying the following: 3 sergeant's sword belts, 10 helmets; and I recommend that the clothing thus marked condemned. be left in the possession of the said c-ompany, to be used by the members thereof in the discharge of duty of a more or less uncleanly nature. I further recommend that the following be turned into the ordnance department for repairs: 1 Springfield breech loading rifle, caliber 45. I further find that due care has been exercised by the officer responsible therefor since the same came into his possession, to protect the interests of the state, and recommend that he be relieved on his bond from further responsibility therefor, and that the articles be dropped from the returns of the said officer. Respectfully submitted. B. G. O'BRIEN,

After full inspection of said property as to its condition, I find the same unserviceable and unfit for use, and recommending the condemnation thereof, have condemned the same as unfit for service, as follows: 1 overcoat, 39 pairs trousers, 42 fatigue caps, by stamping with indelible ink the word "condemned" on all clothing unfit for use, and by destroying the following: 60 helmets, 1 breech loading Springfield rifle and 1 bugle. I recommend that the clothing thus marked "condemned" be left in the possession of the said company, to be used by the members thereof in the discharge of duty of a more or less uncleanly nature. I further recommend that the following be turned in to the ordnance department for repairs: 1 breech loading Springfield rifle, caliber 45. I further find that due care has been exercised by the officer responsible for the property since the same came into his possession to protect the interests of the state, and recommend that he be relieved on his bond from further responsibility therefor, and that the articles be dropped from the returns of the said officer. Respectfully submitted. B. G. O'BRIEN,

144

Inspector General.

OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL, N. G. W., OLYMPIA, August 15, 1892.

To His Excellency, the Commander-in- Chief, N. G. W., Olympia: SIR —Pursuant to the requirements of special order No. 10, c. s., dated adjutant general's office, July 26, 1892, I have the honor to report that at Tacoma on the 17th day of August, 1892, I inspected the following property of company C, first infantry regiment, for which Captain I. M. Howell is responsible, reported as unserviceable by a board of survey duly called to survey the same, as per special orders Nos. 2, 3 and 4, c. s., to wit: 1 overcoat, 60 helmets, 39 pairs trousers, 42 fatigue caps, 1 breech loading Springfield rifle (caliber 45), 1 bugle.

145

Inspector General.

OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL, N. G. W., OLYMPIA, August 18, 1892.

To His Excellency, the Commander-in- Chief N. G. W.: SIR —I have the honor to report that, pursuant to the requirements special order No. 10, c. s., dated adjutant general's office July 26, 1892, at Tacoma, on the 17th day of August inst., I inspected the following property of company G, first infantry regiment, for which Captain W. S. Shank is responsible, and reported as unserviceable by a board of survey duly called to surveythe same, as per special orders Nos. 2, 3 and 4, c. s., to wit: I Springfield breech loading rifle, caliber 45, 31 fatigue caps, 1 pair trousers, 39 blouses, 10 helmets, 6 blankets (woolen), 1 Canteen; and after full inspection of said property as to its condition, find the following unserviceable and unfit for use, to wit: 31 fatigue caps, 1 pair trousers, 38 fatigue blouses, 10 helmets, 6 single woolen blankets, 1 canteen; and recommending the condemnation thereof, have condemned the same as unfit for service, by stamping on each article with indelible ink the word "condemned," and I —10


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

recommend that the clothing so marked be left in the possession of said company, to be used by the members thereof when called upon to discharge duty of a more or less uncleanly nature. I further recommend that the following be cleaned, as the same with proper cleaning is in a serviceable condition: 1 fatigue blouse. I further recommend that the following be turned in for repair: 1 Springfield rifle (breech loading), caliber 45. I further find that due care has been exercised by the officer responsible for the property since the same came into his possession to protect the interests of the state, and recommend that he be relieved on his bond from further responsibility therefor, and that the articles be dropped from the return of said officer, and he be given credit for the value of same charged against him. R. G. O'BRIEN, Respectfully submitted. Inspector General.

I further find that due care has been exercised by the officer responsible for the property since the same came into his possession to protect the interests of the state, and recommend that he be relieved on his bond from further responsibility therefor, and that the articles be dropped from the returns of said officer, and he be given credit for the value charged against him. Respectfully submitted. B. G. O'BRIEN, Inspector General, N. G. W.

146

OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL, N. G. W., OLYMPIA, August 18, 1892.

To His Excellency, the Commander-in- Chief, N. G. W.: Sixâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I have the honor to report that, pursuant to the requirements of special order No. 10, c. s., dated adjutant general's office July 26, 1892, at Seattle, on the 16th day of August inst., I inspected the following property of company E, first infantry regiment, for which Captain E. S. Ingraham is responsible, reported as unserviceable by a board of survey duly called to survey the same, as per special orders Nos. 2, 3 and 4, c. s., to wit: 1 uniform dresscoat, 6 helmets, 17 fatigue blouses, 28 fatigue cape, 17 pairs trousers. And after full inspection of said property as to its condition, find the same unserviceable and unfit for use, and recommending the condemnation thereof, have condemned the same as unfit for service by stamping on each article with indelible ink the word "condemned," and I recommend that the clothing so marked be left in the possession of the said company, to be used by the members thereof when called upon to discharge duty of a more or less uncleanly character. I further recommend that the following be cleaned, as the same are in a serviceable condition, to wit: 5 uniform dresscoats, 9 pairs trousers and 9 blouses.

147

OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL, N. G. W., OLYMPIA. August 18, 1892.

To His Excellency, the Commander-in- Chief, N. G. W., Olympia: SIR â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Pursuant to the requirements of special order No. 10, c. s., attached hereto, I have the honor to report that on the 16th day of August, 1892, I inspected the following property of company B, first infantry regiment, for which Captain L. S. Booth is responsible, reported as unserviceable by a board of survey duly called to survey the same as per special orders Nos. 2, 3 and 4, c. s., to wit: 8 helmets, 13 pairs trousers, 20 blouses, 32 fatigue caps, 10 gun slings. After full inspection as to the condition of the same, I find the property named unserviceable and unfit for use, and have condemned the same by stamping on the clothing in indelible ink the word "condemned," and I recommend that the clothing thus condemned be left in the possession of the said company, to be used by the members thereof in the discharge of duty of a more or less uncleanly character. I further report that I have destroyed the following unserviceable property, to wit: 10 gun slings; the same being of no value to the state. I further recommend that the following be turned into the ordnance department for repairs, to wit: 5 breech loading Springfield rifles, caliber 45. 1 further find that due care has been exercised by the officer responsible therefor since the same came into his possession, to protect the interests of the state, and recommend that he be relieved on his bond from further responsibility therefor, and that the articles be dropped from the returns of the said officer. Respectfully submitted. R. G. O'BRIEN, Inspector General.


EXHIBIT I.

EXHIBIT J.

LIST OF PERSONS LIABLE TO MILITARY DUTY IN STATE.

GENERAL ORDERS.

COUNTY

NO. OF MEN.

Adams.................... ........................... 507 Asotin................................................. 351 Chehalis............................................. 2,484 Clarke................. . ......... ..................... 1,606 Clallam..... .......................................... 887 Columbia....................... . ................... 991 Cowlitz........................ ...................... 997 Douglas............................................... 827 Franklin............................................. 116 Garfield.............................................. 676 Island................................................. 330 Jefferson............................................ 1,388 King................................................... 22,714 Kitsap................................................ 1,503 Kittitas............................................... 1,889 Klickitat............................................. 889 Lewis................................................. 765 Lincoln............................................... 2,479

COUNTY

NO. OF MEN. 951 994 1,773 5,004 2,575 131 2,676 8,560 1,291 2,220 2,466 4,641 4,410 1,065 COUNTIES NOT REPORTED.

Mason. ................................................ Okanogan.......................... ................. Pacific................................................. Pierce................................................. Skagit........................... ..................... Skamania........................................... Snohomish ......... ................................ Spokane............................................. Stevens............................................... Thurston............... ............................. WallaWalla ....................................... Whatcom............................................ Whitman............................................ Yakima..............................................

SanJuan ........................................... .Wahkiakum ....................................... - Total No. men enrolled and rep'ted, 80,156

(148)

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 1: OLYMPIA, January 5, 1891. It appearing from the returns of an election held by the field and line officers of the National Guard of Washington held at North Yakima on the first Monday in October, 1890, pursuant to the provisions of section 11 of an act providing for the organization, maintenance and discipline of the state militia, approved March 27, 1890, and under special order No. 12, series 1890, that Brigadier General A. P. Curry was reelected brigadier general, and R. G. O'Brien was reelected adjutant general with the rank of brigadier general for the term of four years from the first Monday in January, 1891, they are hereby announced as such, and will he respected and obeyed accordingly. PROMOTIONS. Second Lieutenant L. S. Booth to be first lieutenant of B company, first infantry regiment, vice Dawson, promoted, with rank from November 18, 1890; First Sergeant William M. Calhoun to be second lieutenant of B company, first regiment, vice Booth, promoted, with rank from November 18, 1890; Corporal Frank L. Hilton to be first lieutenant of D company, first regiment, vice Brown, resigned, with rank from November 3, 1890. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge from the service of the National Quard is granted Privates C. L. McGlothlin, J. W. Sindall, W. H. Kershaw and Myron H. Ellis, of company E, second regiment, for reasons approved by company commander, and Private John E. Cooley, of B company, second regiment, upon surgeon's certificate of physical disability. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. (149)


150

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 2: OLYMPIA, March 17, 1891. The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are an nounced for the information of all concerned: RESIGNATIONS. The resignation of Second Lieutenant Herbert K. Reif, company G, first regiment, to date from January 16, 1891. First Lieutenant W. J. Grambs, company E, first regiment, to date from February 3, 1891. Captain E. H. Fox, company F, second regiment, to date from February 10, 1891. First Lieutenant and Paymaster Chester F. Miller, second regiment, to date from Februai-y 25, 1891. Lieutenant Colonel John Carr, second regiment,-to date from February 27, 1891. Captain C. S. Reinhart, company B, second regiment, to date from March 9, 1891. Second Lieutenant John Paulus, company H, first regiment, to date from March 1, 1891. Second Lieutenant J. H. Hill, company C, second regiment, to date from January 19, 1891, are hereby accepted. The commanding officers of the respective regiments will order elections to fill the vacancies thus created. PROMOTIONS. Captain Frederick A. Gans, of G company, first regiment, having been elected Major of said regiment, vice Sharpe, promoted, is announced as such, with rank from January 4, 1891. He will be respected and obeyed accordingly. The commanding officer of the first regiment will order an election to ff11 the vacancies thus occurring in company G. DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge from the service of the N. G. W. is this day granted privates W. J. Welsh and C. A. Bushnell of company A, second regiment, upon surgeon's certificate of physical disability. Privates C. W. Carr, W. H. Cady, F. C. Barrett and W. C. Phrytherch, by reason of removal from the county. Quartermaster Sergeant B. F. Young and Private William Steigler, Company E, second regiment, upon good and sufficient reasons approved by the company commander. Privates W. H. Maxwell, George Haas, and â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Chattam, of company U, second regiment, by reason of removal from county. Privates J. W. Stilp and C. E. Owen, company E, second regiment, upon good and sufficient reasons and the approval of the company commander. Privates 0. W. Bartlett, W. E. Kelly, and W. W. McCully, company H, second regiment, by reason of removal from county.

â&#x20AC;˘-,

:

151

DISCHARGES FOR THE GOOD OF THE SERVICE. Privates 0. B. Cassell, W. E. Crewdson, W. F. unman, J. B. Randall, of company A, second regiment, are hereby discharged from the service of the N. G. W. for the good of the service, to date from March 7, 1891. COMMISSIONED. Charles B. Ames, having been elected Second Lieutenant of company D first infantry regiment N G W vice Gorham dismissed from the service, is announced as such, with rank from December 18, 1890, and will be respected and obeyed accordingly. Leave of absence for the period of six months from this date is granted Colonel Wm. T. Sharp, chief of ordnance. REGULATIONS. The following regulations having been promulgated by the military board, is announced for the information and guidance of all concerned: "No. 981. In any city or town where one or more companies of the National Guard exist, no other companies of the same arm of the service shall be admitted until the companies there existing shall have the maximum number authorized by law." By order of the commander-in-chief. H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 3: OLYMPIA, April 13, 1891. The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the benefit of all concerned: PROMOTIONS. First Lieutenant William F. Shank, G company, first regiment, to be captain of said company, with rank from February 20, 1891, vice Gans, promoted major. Second Sergeant E. F. Safford, to be first lieutenant, vice Shank, promoted. Fifth Sergeant C. W. Billings, to be second lieutenant, vice Reif, resigned, with rank from same date. Second Lieutenant E. S. Ingraham, to be captain of E company, first regiment, vice Thornell, resigned; Private F. L. Stinson, to be first lieutenant, vice Grambs, resigned, and Private H. H. Smith, to be second lieutenant of said company, vice Ingraham, promoted; all with rank from February 18, 1891. Second Lieutenant U. B. Brigham, of G company, second regiment, to be first lieutenant of said company, vice. Leghorne, resigned, with rank from January 22, 1891.


152

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

Private A. W. McCullum, to be second lieutenant of said company, vice Brigham, promoted, with rank from January 22, 1891. And the officers thus announced will be respected and obeyed accordingly. ELECTIONS. Charles H. Merriam, having been elected captain of G company, second regiment, N. G. W., is announced as such, with rank from January - 22, 1891. He will be respected and obeyed accordingly. RESIGNATIONS. The resignation of Lieutenant Colonel S. W. Scott, first regiment infantry, to date from March 18, 1891, is accepted. The commanding officer of said regiment will order an election to fill the vacancy. â&#x20AC;˘ The resignation of Second Lieutenant W. D. Shafer, company D, second regiment, to date from March 18, 1891, is accepted. The commanding officer of said regiment will order an election to fill the vacancy. DISCHARGES. The following honorable discharges from the service of the N. G. W., by reason of removal from the county, are granted, to wit: Privates Charles H. Eckert and Harry Chapman, company E, second regiment; A. D. Wright, M. P. Trask, E. A. Hull and W. E. Sydon, of company K, first regiment; William M. Chandler, of troop A, first cavalry battalion. By reason of business relations, making it impossible to perform duty, and upon recommendation of company commander, P. G. Hussey, W. H. Pierson, Stanley Smith, E. E. Scofield, of company K, first regiment; Herman E. Rodman, company E, second regiment. By reason of removal from the county, Privates C. A. Brigat, J. A. Crandall, J. H. Brown, George Graham, W. H. Orvis, W. B. Young, F. A. Hancock, B. J. Ferris, F. G. Brazee, W. L. Waldron, C. H. Wayland, J. B. Hanson, A. G. Hawley, J. W. Wood and C. E. Taylor, of C company, first regiment. DISCHARGED FOR THE GOOD OF THE SERVICE. Privates D. B. Lee and Ambrose Murray, of C company, first regiment. All quarterly reports required to be made on forms 10, 12 and 13 by captains of companies must be made in triplicate and forwarded by the commanding officer of said companies to the adjutants of the respective regiments. The adjutants will file one copy in their office, and transmit two copies to brigade headquarters. The assistant adjutant general of the brigade will retain one copy and forward the other to general headquarters. These returns must be made promptly at the close of each quarter. The quarterly returns to be made on form 14 will also be made in triplicate, one copy to be retained by adjutants of respective regiments, the others to be forwarded to brigade headquarters, one of which will be retained there, and the other forwarded to general headquarters. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

153

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No.4: OLYMPIA, April 28, 1891. 'T'he following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: RESIGNATIONS. The resignation of Colonel James R. Hayden, assistant inspector general, to date from April 25, 1891, is this day accepted. STAFF APPOINTMENTS. On the Staff of the Adjutant General: Colonel E. M. Carr, Seattle, assistant adjutant general, with rank from May 12, 1890. Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, Steilacoom, assistant commissary general, with rank from January 10, 1888. Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, Tacoma, assistant quartermaster general, with rank from June 12, 1888. Captain E. B. Wise, Goldendale, aid-de-camp, with rank from August 1, 1890. Captain E. T. Powell, Spokane, aid-dc-camp, with rank from August 28, 1888. On the Staff of the Commander-in- Chief: Wellington M. Clark, Walla Walla, assistant inspector general, with rank of colonel from April 28, 1891, vice Hayden, resigned. On the Staff of the Brigade Commander: Lieutenant Colonel John I. Booge, Spokane, assistant adjutant general, with rank from January 7, 1889. Lieutenant Colonel S. W. Scott, Seattle, assistant inspector general, with rank from March 18, 1891. Lieutehant Colonel George A. Bethune, Tacoma, assistant Commissary general, with rank from March 18. 1891. Lieutenant Colonel Marshal K. Such, Tacoma, assistant quartermaster general, with rank from March 18, 1891. E. L. Smith, Seattle, brigade surgeon, with rank of lieutenant colonel from March 18, 1891. 'J. J. White, Spokane, aid-dc-camp, with rank of first lieutenant from February 1, 1890. J. W. Stearns, Tekoa, aid-dc-camp, with rank of first lieutenant from February 1, 1890. W. B. Cromwell, South Bend, aid-dc-camp, with rank of first lieutenant from March 18, 1891. The above appointed officers will be respected and obeyed accordingly. So much of general order No.3 as relates to the discharge for the good Of the service of Privates D. B. Lea and Ambrose Murray, of C company, first regiment, is hereby set aside and said privates will report to their company commander at once for duty.


154

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

CONTINUATION OF COMMISSIONS. Section 46 of the act providing for the organization, maintenance and discipline of the militia, approved March 27, 1890, provides as follows: "The commissions of all field officers now in force shall expire on the first day of June, 1892, when an election will be held in compliance with the provisions of this act, and the commissions of all company officers now in force shall expire on the first day of May, 1892, when an election shall be held in compliance with the provisions of this act." The attorney general of the state having given it as his opinion that the intention of the legislature manifested by this provision is clearly that the commissions of company officers which were in force on the 27th day of March, 1890, should continue in force until the first day of May, 1892, whatever might be the date of expiration otherwise, said opinion is hereby approved and announced for the government of all concerned. HONORABLE DISCHARGES. The application of W. L. Tillman, private, company A, second regiment, for an honorable discharge from the service by reason of removal from the county, is hereby approved. By reason of expiration of term of service, First Sergeant A. B. Brooks; Quartermaster Sergeant W. H. Leaman; Privates W. H. Marwell, Ed. Palmer, Mat. Schoen burg and William Warren, of G company, second regiment, Spokane, to date from March 30, 1891. By reason of removal from the county, W. J. Aurniller, private, company A, second regiment, Ellensburgh; Floyd L. Moore and C. H. Turner, company K, first regiment, Aberdeen. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 5: OLYMPIA, May 13, 1891. The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned:

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

155

PROMOTIONS. First Lieutenant R. B. McCully, to be captain of company B, second regiment, vice Reinhart, resigned. Second Lieutenant H. C. Jackson, to be first lieutenant, vice McCully, promoted. H. C. Phillips, to be second lieutenant of said company, vice Jackson, promoted. All with rank from March 24, 1891. Sergeant C. H. Weld, to be second lieutenant of company C, second regiment, with rank from February 28, 1891. John Carr, Dayton, to be captaifi of company F, second regiment,with rank from May 11, 1887. First Sergeant Henry B. Schwellenbach, of company G, second infantry regiment, to be first lieutenant and adjutant of the first battalion cavalry, with rank from May 11, 1891, vice Smith, resigned. Said officers will be respected and obeyed accordingly. TRANSFERS. So much of general order No. 3, c. s., as relates to the discharge of James H. Brown, company C, first regiment, is hereby set aside. The commanding officer of the first regiment will issue an order transferring said Brown from company C to company B of said'regiment, and said Brown will be entitled to credit for continuous service from the date of his enlistment. This order is based upon the fact that said James H. Brown was recommended for discharge by the commanding officer of company C, first regiment, without his consent and against his wishes, he having requested to be transferred to company B, Captain Joseph Green commanding, with which company he has been ever since doing duty. DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge is granted Privates Ernest C. Smith and Frank N. White, of company E, first regiment, by reason of removal from the state; E. A. Strout and H. C. Hollenbeck, company E, first regiment, by reason of expiration of term of office; to date from April 23, 1891. By order of the commander-in-chief. H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

ELECTIONS.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, June 27, 1891. General Order No. 6: The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the guidance of all concerned:

Captain Michael McCarty, lately commanding company A, second regiment, disbanded, of Walla Walla, having been elected lieutenant colonel of the second regiment, is hereby announced as such, with rank from April 27, 1891, and will be respected and obeyed accordingly.

RESIGNATIONS. The following named officers have tendered their resignations, the same are accepted, to date from July 1, 1891: Captain J. C. Westhoff, company H, first regiment, Vancouver.

RESIGNATION. The resignation of First Lieutenant M. D. Smith, adjutant first cavalry battalion, is accepted, to date from April 27, 1891.


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.

Lieutenant R. C. Washburn, paymaster, first regiment, Seattle. The colonel commanding will order election to fill vacancies.

PROMOTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS.

Captain Joseph Greene, B company, first regiment, to be lieutenant colonel of said regiment, vice Scott, resigned, with rank from May 25, 1891. R. Sims Allen, private, D company, first regiment, to be captain of said company, vice Kellogg. Chas. Esplin, jr., to be adjutant of first regiment, with rank of first lieutenant from May 1, 1891. Ira R. Bamber, of troop B, first cavalry, to be inspector of rifle practice, with rank of first lieutenant from June 5, 1891. Wallace Mount, of troop A, first cavalry, to be first lieutenant and paymaster of first cavalry, with rank from June 1, 1891. Rev. W. A. Shanklin, Spokane, chaplain first cavalry, with rank of captain from June 6, 1891. F. J. Elsensohn, Pomeroy, first lieutenant and paymaster, second regiment, with rank from March 6, 1891, vice Miller, resigned. W. H. Fletcher to be second lieutenant, D company, second regiment, vice Shaffer, resigned.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE.

Second lieutenant Chas. Delosh, K company, first regiment, is granted leave of abence for the period of two months from June 1, 1891.

CORRECTIONS IN TACTICS.

The attention of field and line officers is called to printed reference to paragraph 54, at bottom of page 12, street tactics. The same should be corrected to read paragraph 44. Officers will make the necessary correction in their books.

HONORABLE DISCHARGES.

The following discharges are granted for reason alleged: Name.

Rank.

Bramer, A ................................. Private Burns, John J ........................... Private Campbell, James N .................. Private Carey, Frank ............................ Private Coulee, L. A ...............................Private Cooper, Fred ............................. Private Deucer, Philip ........................... Private Glasscock, H .................. ........... Private Harris, John J ........................... Private Hinshaw. Wilbar ..................... Private

.i ... ..

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

Compazy.

Regiment.

Cause.

Troop A... Troop A... Troop A... Troop A... Troop A... Troop A... Troop A... Troop A... Troop A... Troop A...

let cavalry 1st cavalry 1st cavalry 1st cavalry let cavalry 1st cavalry 1st cavalry 1st cavalry 1st cavalry 1st cavalry

Expiration of sei vice. Expiration of sci vice. Expiration of sd Vice. Expiration of sd vice. Expiration of sd Vice. Expiration of sei Vice. Expiration of sd vice. Expiration of sal vice. Expiration of sal vice. Expiration of sel vice.

Name.

Rank.

Company.

Regiment.

157

Cause.

Troop A... 1st cavalry Expiration of service. Lol g, S. M ................................ ..Private Troop A... 1st cavalry Expiration of service. Lot man, W. B .......................... ..Private Me ghcr, Thos. F ..................... ..Private. .) Troop A... 1st cavalry Expiration of service. Troop A... 1st cavalry Expiration of service. Me ritt, J. W ...............................Private Troop A... 1st cavalry Expiration of service. Mo mt, Wallace ..........................Private Troop A... 1st cavalry Expiration of-service. NY card, Chris ........................... ..Private Troop A... 1st cavalry Expiration of service. Olc W. H ............................... ..Private Troop A... 1st cavalry Expiration of sesvice. fly n, James J ............................Private Troop A... 1st cavalry Expiration of service. Say born, Alonzo ....................... ..Private Cri t, win ...................................1st serg'nt D .............. First ..........Expiration of service. Yo tiikin, W. B ...........................Sergeant D .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Do ruing, E. B .......................... Private ...... E .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Re me, F. A .............................. Private..... E .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Osi orne, E. S ............................ Private..... E .............. First ..........Expiration of service. Ta] [man, Boyd J ....................... Private E .............. .First ......... Expiration of service. Ad liugton, Harvey .................. Private ...... H ...............First ......... Expiration of service. An lerson, John ........................ Private H .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Eli rock, John ............................Private .......H .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Bu ka, Joseph .......................... Private ...... H .............. First ..........Expiration of service. Bu gy, Louis J .......................... Private ...... H .............. First ..........Expiration of service. Bu ness, William ..................... Private ...... H ............... First ..........Expiration of service. Du iins, Francis ........................ Private ...... H .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Fri sch, Jacob............................ Private ..... H ..... ........ First ......... Expiration of service. Ha ris, H .................. . ................ Private ..... H .............. First ..........Expiration of service. Re np, John T .......................... Private ...... H...........1.. First ..........Expiration of service. Ma Irey, Victor .......................... Private ...... H .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Me )onald, C ............................. Private ...... H............... First......... Expiration of service. Ru sell, James W ..................... Private ...... H............... First.......... Expiration of service. Say key, J. C .............................. Private ...... H .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Sec ist, John ...............................Private ...... H .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Sin i, 0. 0 ............................... Private....... H .............. First ......... Expiration of service. Ph mpson, L. L ........................ Private Ii ...............First ......... Expiration of service. Pa linson, Chas. E .................. Private H .............. First ......... Expiration of service. To faoff, n John ........................ Private II .............. First ......... Expiration of service. An es J. A ........... ..................... Private D .............. First ......... Absence from city. Cal Tert, J. H ..............................Private ...... D ...............First ...........Absence from city. Go drich. W. B .........................Private D ...............First ..........Business reasons.


FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

158

Name.

Rank.

.

Company.

Regiment.

Cause.

Haddock, Frank G................... Private..... D .............. First ..........Business reasons. Hyde, D. C................................ . Private D ............... First ..........Business reasons. Ross, Chas. D ............................ Private..... D .............. . First ..........Business reasons. Langston, H. E .......................... Private P .............. . First ..........Absence from city. Moore, W. H.............................. Private..... D ............... First ......... Removal. Wismolek, Albert A .................. . Private P ............ ... First ......... . Removal. Byrne, W. T.............................. . Private G ............... Second ...... Removal from state. Heinzerling, John ......................Private H ............... Second ...... Removal from County Wright, A. D............................. . Private K ............... First .......... Removal from county Trask, M. P...............................Private K .............. . First ..........Removal from county Hull, E. A ..................................Private ...... K .............. . First ..........Removal from county Sydon, W. B ..............................Private K ............... First ..........Removal from County Hussy, P. G............................... Private K ...............First..........Business reasons. Smith, Stanly ............................ Private K .............. . First .......... Business reasons. Schofield, E. E...........................Private ...... K ............... First.......... Business reasons. Pearson, W. H .......................... . Private K .............. . First .......... Business reasons. Miles, Milo N........................... . Private G .............. First ......... Removal from county Price, G. Willis ......................... Private B .............. . First ......... . Expiration of service. Removal from state. Arant, M. R .............................. . Private H ............... Second Brown, Andrew J ......................Private ...... H ............... Second Removal from state. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, Aug. 6, 1891. General Order No. 7: The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: The military board having considered the application df F. M. Baum 'and his associates of Conconully, Okanogan county, and that of Henry S. Haslett and his associates of Tekoa, Whitman county, seeking admission into the National Guard of Washington as a volunteer company, and recommending that said petitions be granted; it is hereby ordered that the said F. M. Baum and his associates at Conconully, and the said Henry S. Haslett and his associates at Tekoa, be and they are hereby admitted

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as volunteer companies into the National Guard of Washington, and shall be attached to the second infantry regiment and designated as follows: Company at Conconully as I company, and the company at Tekoa as K company. General A. P. Curry will inspect and muster the company at Conconully; Lieutenant J. W. Sterns, A. D. C., is hereby ordered to inspect and muster the company at Tekoa; reporting their proceedings thereunder at the earliest day practicable. RESIGNATION. The resignation of Louis E. Brigham, first lieutenant of company G, second regiment: Spokane, to date from August 1, 1891, is accepted. The colonel commanding the regiment will order an election to fill the vacancy. HONORABLE DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge is granted Private Geo. W. Austin, troop B, first cavalry, to date from July 31, 1891, and Private Kelner of G company, second regiment, by reason of removal from the state. Private W. S. Smith, of A company. second regiment, upon surgeon's certificate of disability. First Sergeant F. B. Lippencott, of E company, first regiment, by reason of removal from the county. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRTEN, Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 8: OLYMPIA, Sept. 1, 1891. The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: RESIGNATION. The resignations of First Lieutenant John M. Bell, inspector of rifle practice, first regiment; Second Lieutenant T. Ashley Wickham, troop A, first cavalry battalion, and Captain C. L. F. Kellogg, D company, first regiment, are accepted to date from August 17, 1891. APPOINTMENT. Brevet Lieutenant Colonel F. E. Trotter, fourteenth U. S. infantry, having been detailed by the secretary of war as military instructor of the National Guard of Washington till November 1, 1891, is announced as such, and will be respected and obeyed accordingly. DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge is hereby granted to J. W. Bridger, troop B, first Cavalry battalion, and Joseph Wheelan, C company, first regiment, by reason of removal from the state.


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

A. J. Fisken, Theodore N. Dalton, E. S. Meany, W. A. Peters and William Russell, of E company, first regiment, by reason of expiration of term of enlistment. S. M. Collier, of G company, first regiment, by reason of injury to left leg. C. P. Marshall, of C company, first infantry, by reason of business connections preventing proper attention to military duty. Attention of commanding officers of companies is called to the necessity of making, immediately after each parade, the report required on form 18, and forwarding at once to the adjutant of the respective regiment, as failure of such reports to reach these headquarters delays the approval of claims for the payment of troops for service on stated parades. Too little attention has been paid in the past by commanding officers of companies to forwarding reports called for by these headquarters, and in future, failure of duty in this respect will be made the subject of special proceedings. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

6. The follQwing is the course substituted for the recruit, second season and subsequent courses of preliminary and regular practice as specified in the firing regulations. 7. The preliminary practice at known distance consists of: 5 shots at 100 yards. 5 shots at 300 yards. 5 shots at 500 yards. And for each soldier may be entirely or partially omitted in the discretion of the company commander. 8. The record of regular practice at known distance consists of: 5 shots at 200 yards. 5 shots at 300 yards. 10 shots at 500 yards, = (2 scores). If in this practice any soldier attains a total score of 80 (out of a possible 100) his regular practice should be extended to 600 yards, where one score of 5 shots will be fired. In regular practice the positions assumed and targets employed should be as prescribed in the firing regulations and under the rules there given. (See Par. 183 to 186 and 221 to 251, inclusive.) 9. In individual skirmish firing the preliminary practice should include as much of that specified in Par. 329, firing regulations, as the ammunition available will permit. In any case the men should be exercised in advancing and retreating, estimating distances, adjusting sights, taking positions, going through the motions of loading without cartridges, aiming and pulling trigger, using the group target as an objective, until they become familiar with the principles of skirmishing. 10. The record practice in individual skirmishing should consist of one advance and retreat, conducted as prescribed in Par. 326 and 327, firing regulations, but one shot being fired at each halt, or a total of 10 shots. The group target (D E and F) should be used; the system of scoring and the general methods governing the firing should be as specified in Par. 321 to 335, inclusive. 11. All shots fired for record during the practice season must be fired in the presence and under the general supervision of a commissioned officer, preferable if one belonging to the organization firing. 12. The reduced aggregates for classification (in consequence of the reduced amount of ammunition) will be as follows: (a) FOR A SHARPSHOOTER. — An aggregate in regular practice at known distances, 200, 300, 500 and 600 yards, and in regular skirmish practice, of 125. (b) FOR A MARKSMAN. -An aggregate in regular practice at 200, 30 and 500 yards, and as a skirmisher, of 90. (c) FOR THE FIRST CLASS. —An aggregate of 75. (d) FOR THE SECOND CLASS. - An aggregate of 57. (e) FOR THE THIRD CLASS.—All who have practiced and not made the aggregate qualifying them for the second class. (f) THE FOURTH CLASS—Will consist of all the remaining members of the company who are borne on its rolls at the close of the practice season. —11

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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD o WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, Sept. 1, 1891. General Order No. 9: 1. The following is adopted as the system of small arms practice for the use of the National Guard of Washington: 2. Practice will be supervised and inspected by the brigade inspector of small arms practice, and in each regiment by the regimental inspector of small arms practice, but the details of instruction should be given by commissioned and non-commissioned officers of the company. 3. These instructors should, themselves, be proficient both in the theoretical and practical portions of the subject, and make themselves thoroughly familiar with the system of instruction prescribed for the firing regulations of the regular army and participate in all preliminary instruction and in the target practice of their command. 4. Before the opening of the "practice season" for range firing each year, instruction should be given according to the methods in the firing regulations, in sighting drills, in position and aiming drills, and, when practicable, in gallery practice with reduced charges. These exercises should be had in the company armories and conducted with every possible care and thoroughness, as they afford the surest means of ultimately attaining accuracy on the range. 5. The practice season will extend from May 1st to September 30th of each year. Only such scores as are made within the time, and in accordance with the firing regulations and this order, should be considered in making up the aggregate required to determine the class in which any soldier will be included.

131


162

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

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13. To A SHARPSHOOTER. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;When first qualifying, a sharpshooter's cross and certificate will be issued. To A MARKSMAN. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;For the first year, a pair of marksman's buttons, to be worn on the coat collar one inch from the opening in the front. For a second year, a pair of bronze, with bars for the current and the prior years, to which a bar will be added for each subsequent year of qualification. Sharpshooter's and marksman's insignia will not be issued to the same man for the same years firing. 14. The individual figure of merit (company, regiment and entire guard) will be determined by multiplying the entire number of sharpshooters by 200, the number of marksman by 100, the number of first classman by 60, second classman by 30, third classman by 10, fourth classman by 0, and dividing the sum of the products thus obtained by the total number in the above 6 classes. 15. -Where practicable the known distance firing, both preliminary and for record, should be held on local ranges, when they may be obtainable, leaving only the completion of the known distance firing and the skirmish practice for the time of the general encampment. When this cannot be done the entire record practice will be held on the range at the general camp. 16. All scores made during the practice season must be kept in ink or indelible pencil, by or under the supervision of the company commander, or officer acting as such. Scores for record will be kept separate and distinct from shots in preliminary practice. 17. Scores made at the general encampmentshould, if constituting part of the required record practice, be taken up by the company commander when duly reported and certified to him by the officer in charge of the firing. The entire record practice should then be certified to by the company officers, said certificate being substantially in the form laid down in the firing regulations. 18. On or before October 10th, of each year, company commanders should make out and forward a report in duplicate on the blanks furnished by the adjutant general of the state, corresponding to form 30.b, firing regulations, showing the totals of all record scores made by the members of their respective commands during the preceding practice season, the classification of the company and the resulting figure of merit. These reports should be forwarded as promptly as possible, one copy to the general inspector of small arms practice and the other to regimental headquarters. A copy of the small arms firing regulations in use in the regular army will be supplied each regiment, battalion and company commander, will be carried on returns and kept in the armories for consultation. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General,

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPOIiT.

163

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, September 23, 1891. General Order No. 10: The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the benefit of all concerned: RESIGNATIONS. The resignation of Captain B. B. Glasscock, commanding troop A, first cavalry, is accepted, to date from October 1, 1891. Captain Glasscock will turn over to his successor all state property for which he is accountable, taking receipts therefor in duplicate, one of which will be forwarded to the adjutant general's office. The major commanding battalion will order an election to fill all vacancies existing in his command. PROMOTIONS. Corporal Herman Chapin, of company E, first infantry regiment, to be first lieutenant and paymaster of said regiment, with rank from June 27, 1891, vice Washburn, resigned. Private W. H. Fletcher, of company D, second infantry regiment, to be second lieutenant of said company, with rank from May 27, 1891, vice Schafer, resigned. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. HONORABLE DISCHARGE. Honorable discharge from the National Guard of Washington is granted privates Charles Painter, of company A. second infantry regiment, and James S. Jacks, of troop B, first cavalry battalion, to date from September 1, 1891, by reason of removal from the county. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, September 26, 1891. General Order No. 11: The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: RESIGNATIONS. The resignations of Captain A. E. Morten, company K, and First Lieutenant Frank L. Hilton, of company D, first infantry regiment, are accepted to date from this date. HONORABLE DISCHARGE. Honorable discharge from the National Guard of Washington is this


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

day granted D. W. Bass, company B, and A. J. Weisbach, company C, first infantry regiment, for reasons sufficiently set forth. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

not reviewed by the judge advocate general; and it is further ordered that the proceedings, findings and sentence in the case of First Lieutenant D. E. Dunbar, company K, first infantry regiment, N. U. W., are approved. 4. A general court martial convened by said special order No. 3 is hereby dissolved. By order of the comm ander-in.chief. R. U. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AiEit, Assistant Adjutant General.

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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, September 30, 1891. Genera] Order No. 12: The following changes in the National Guard are announced for the information of all concerned: RESIGNATION. 1. The resignation of Captain R. Sims Allen, commanding D company, first infantry regiment, to date from October 10, 1891, is accepted. Captain Allen will turn over to his successor all state property in his possession, taking receipts therefor in duplicate, one of which he will forward to the office of the adjutant general, retaining the other for his own protection. The commanding officer of the first regiment will order an election to fill the vacancies in his regiment. 2. Before a general court martial, convened by special order No. 3, brigade headquarters, of which Lieutenant Colonel Marshall K. Snell is president, was tried First Lieutenant D. E. Dunbar. company K, first infantry regiment, N. G. W.: Charge 1.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Neglect of duty, with sundry specifications to said charge. Charge 2.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline, with sundry specifications to said charge. To which charges and specifications thereto, the accused, First Lieutenant D. E. Dunbar, company K, first infantry regiment, first brigade, N. G. W., pleads as follows: To the specifications of the first charge, 'Not guilty." To the first charge, "Not guilty." To the specifications of the second charge, "Not guilty." To the second charge, "Not guilty." FINDINGS AND SENTENCE. The court having maturely considered the case finds the accused, First Lieutenant D. E. Dunbar, company K, first infantry regiment, first brigade, N. U. W.: Of the specifications of the first charge, "Not guilty." Of the first charge, "Not guilty." Of the specifications to the second charge, "Not guilty." Of the second charge, "Not guilty." And the court does therefore acquit First Lieutenant D. E. Dunbar, first infantry regiment, first brigade, N. U. W. 3. The commander-in-chief being satisfied with the proceedings, findings and sentence of said court martial, it is ordered that the same be

165

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 13: OLYMPIA, October 1, 1891. The following rules and explanations will be adhered to in making up reports and in the use of the blank forms furnished by the adjutant general's office, as cited below: FORM 1-APPLICATIONS TO ENLIST. To be signed by the recruit applying for enlistment in the National Guard, and in case the applicant is a minor, the consent of the legal guardian of said minor must be had or expressed on the bottom of the application. (Sec. 265, Regulations.) FORM 2-NOTICE OF MUSTERING OFFICER. To be issued to the commanding officer-elect of newly organized companies by the officer detailed to inspect and muster said company into the National Guard of Washington, stating the time and place at which he will be in attendance to complete the muster of the company. (Sec. 306, Regulations.> FORM 3.-OATH OF ALLEGIANCE. This form must be made out in triplicate by the commanding officer of companies at the time of the muster of newly organized companies and presented to the mustering officer with the muster roll on form 4, and must be made likewise in triplicate for each recruit joining the National Guard subsequent to the original muster of the company; one copy to be retained by the company commander, one copy to be forwarded to- the colonel commanding the regiment, and one to be forwarded to the adjutant general: (Sees. 257-260, Regulations.) FORM 4.-MUSTER ROLL. At the original muster of a company, and at each succeeding annual muster, this roll must be made in triplicate by the company commander and given to the mustering and inspecting officer, who will transmit the same, with his report, to the adjutant of the respective regiments to which the company is attached. The adjutant will retain one copy, place the proper indorsement upon the other two and forward with the report


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOUR Til BIENNIAL REPORT.

of the mustering officer to brigade headquarters; the assistant adjutant general at brigade headquarters will retain one copy of the muster roll, and forward the other to the adjutant general with the report of the mustering officer. Where the inspection is made by the adjutant general, he will retain one copy of the muster roll and forward the other two to the adjutants of the respective regiments or battalions, one of which will be forwarded with proper indorsement by the adjutant to brigade headquarters. At the annual muster and inspection by the adjutant general or such officer as may be detailed for that purpose, the company commanders will carefully follow the form of muster roll, filling in the spaces provided therefor the name, age, residence and occupation and changes since last muster, in the order indicated on the muster roll, without resorting to "ditto" marks; muster rolls to be signed by all the members of the company before delivery to the mustering officer. The blanks for stated parades to give the day and date on which the parade or battalion drill was made. The account current of receipts and expenditures of allowances for the preceding year to June 30th, to be carefully made up. The munition account to be carefully made up, showing all the property charged to the company commander, the number on hand, the deficit, if any, and a statement of the stores expended or used up in the service, to be certified to by the commanding officer of.the company, as required by paragraph 427, Regulations N. G. W., the amount of the bond given, with the name of the principal and sureties, and date of bond. The certificate of the commanding officer of the company to be signed and dated before handing to the mustering officer. On the completion of the muster, the mustering officer will append his certificate of muster, and add such remarks and recommendations as the exigencies of the service may require. The company commander should keep a fourth copy of the muster roll for his own information and guidance in making up subsequent rolls.

FORM 8. —BOND. To be given by company commanders and other officers, with two good and sufficient sureties, and forwarded to the adjutant general (Sec. 154, Regulations.)

166

FORM 5.—REPORT OF MUSTERING OFFICER. To be made up by the officer detailed to muster new companies, and forwarded with the muster rolls, through the proper channel, to the adjutant general. (Sec. 308, Regulations.) FORM 6.—REPORT OF EXAMINING BOARD. This report is to be made up by the regimental board of examiners, after due examination as to the qualifications of all officers-elect for positions below that of field officer, and forwarded directly to the adjutant general. It is the basis for the issuance of commissions. (Sees. 328-330, Regulations.) FORM 7 (a and b) .— REQUISITIONS FOR SUPPLIES. To be made up by the commanding officers of regiments, battalions or companies, and forwarded directly to the adjutant general, setting out in detail the number and kind of supplies required for the use of each company or regiment.

167

FORM 9.—RECEIPTS FOR SUPPLIES. These receipts are made up in the adjutant general's office and forwarded to the officer chargeable with the supplies, in duplicate, to be by him signed and returned, one to the adjutant general and one to the regimental quartermaster. FORM 10.—DEMAND FOR ARMORY RENT AND QUARTERLY ACCOUNT CURRENT. (Paragraph 3881, Regulations.) This demand and report must be made immediately after the close of every quarter, giving a statement of the amount required, based upon the actual number of the company, at the rate of $50 per month for a maximum number, together with a statement of the moneys received and expended by the company commander, accompanied by sub-vouchers on form 38, and forwarded through the proper military channel, as provided by sec. 23 of the militia law. Said demand must be sworn to before a notary public or field officer of the regiment. FORM 11.—VOUCHER. This voucher is the proper form upon which to present all claims against the state for purchases of any kind made with authority, and for 4 expenses incurred while in the discharge of duty in the service of the N G. W. It must be made in duplicate, and should be made up substantially as follows: [After the caption,] "To actual expenses incurred while traveling on Y military duty and in attendance upon.................................................................... under .................... ....... ......... .. ... orders No .... ...........----------- at ................................ as follows, to wit:" [Then follow the items:] It must be sworn to by the t person to whom the money is due before any officer of the National Guard or notary public; certified to by the officer incurring the expense in his official capacity; the blanks in the certificates to be filled in writing, not figures, after which they must be forwarded directly to the adjutant general. FORM 12.— QUARTERLY RETURN OF PROPERTY. (Section 3881, Regulations.) This report must be made quarterly in triplicate and forwarded through the proper military channel, and should embrace all the property issued r to the commanding officer of companies, regiments or battalions; the amount on hand from the last statement; received during the quarter, and from whom; the total on hand and received; the amount issued to any other officer upon an order (setting forth the number of the order); the number of articles charged to soldiers, who may have destroyed or lost the same carelessly; number of articles condemned and dropped upon report of board of survey; the amount of ammunition expended during


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

the quarter, and the number of articles lost or destroyed, based upon the provisions of sections 427, 428, regulations, and the amount returned to state, if any. The company commander should keep a fourth copy for his own guidance. FORM 13. -QUARTERLY RETURN OF ASSEMBLAGES.

pay roll must not be signed by the officers or soldiers before being transmitted to the adjutant of the regiment. After payment of the troops, which must' be witnessed by the commanding officer of the company, the paymaster will make proper certificate upon the pay roll, and forward one copy of each pay roll to the adjutant general and one copy to the adjutant of the regiment, to be filed with regimental records. FORM 16. —REPORT OF TARGET PRACTICE. To be made in triplicate by the regimental inspector of small arms practice at the close of the tour of small arms practice of each company; one copy to be retained by him, two copies forwarded to the brigade inspector of small arms practice, and one copy from thence forwarded to the office of the adjutant general.

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(Section 3851, Regulations.)

This return must be made in triplicate at the close of each quarter, containing the names of all the duly enlisted members of companies, and a record of their attendance at drills and stated parades, whether present or absent, and note the causes for absence of members; must be duly certified by the commanding officer of the company, and forwarded through the proper military channel, one copy to be retained by the adjutant, two sent to brigade headquarters, and one forwarded from thence to the adjutant general. FORM 14.—QUARTERLY RETURN OF REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS.

This statement must be made in triplicate by the adjutant of the regiment or battalion, one copy to be retained by said officer, two to be sent to brigade headquarters, and one from thence to the office of the adjutant general. The rule laid down for making up returns on form 12 by company commanders applies to reports on this form, and in, addition a full statement of all moneys received and expended on account of expenses of regimental headquarters, together with a presentation of the estimate of the amounts required to meet the expenses of the quarter, sworn to by the commanding officer of the regiment, before a notary public or field officer. FORM 15. —PAY ROLL. To be made in duplicate by the commanding officers of companies immediately after each stated parade, camp of instruction or tour of duty, when in the service of the state, and forwarded to the adjutant of the respective regiments or battalions, accompanied by three copies of company parade report on form 18. The adjutant will at once check the pay roll with the number of men reported on form 18 as present for duty, and transmit said roll at once to the paymaster of the regiment. The paymaster will, on receipt of all regimental pay rolls, after verifying the figures and footings of the pay roll, make a claim against the state in his own name on form 11, in substantially the following form: "To amount due the following companies of ............(infantry or cavalry) regiment, N. G. W., for stated parade on .............18...., as per pay roll, to wit: company A, $........; company B, $...........etc., etc.; signing and verifying the same before a notary public or commissioned officer of the National Guard, and certifying as required in said form 11 to said amount officially, and transmit the same, in duplicate, with one copy of the pay roll to the adjutant general, for the action of the board of military auditors. Upon the audit and allowance of the account by said board, the pay roll will be returned with draft to the paymaster making the claim, who will at once proceed under orders from the colonel of the regiment to pay off the troops by companies, as provided by sections 117 and 119 of the regulations. The

J,

.

169

FORM 17.— COMMISSIONS.

To be issued by the adjutant general to all officers entitled to receive the same. FORM 18.—PARADE REPORTS. This report must be made in triplicate immediately after each stated parade, by the commanding officers of companies, and forwarded to the adjutants of the respective regiments and battalions, with the company pay roll on form 15. The adjutant will verify the parade report with the pay roll as to the number of officers and men parading, and if incorrect in any form, return it at once to the company commanders for correction. Upon receipt of the corrected report, he will file one copy in his office, and after making the requisite indorsement, forward two copies to brigade headquarters, with the regimental consolidated parade report on form 20. This report is the basis of the pay roll. FORM 19. —REPORT OF GUARDS. To be made each morning by the officer of the guard and forwarded to the adjutant of the regiment, who shall enter in a book, prepared for that purpose, a copy of the same, and forward to brigade headquarters, where a like copy will be entered in a similar book, and the report forwarded, after proper indorsement, to the office of the adjutant general. This report applies to troops when in the service of the state. FORM 20.—REGIMENTAL CONSOLIDATED PARADE REPORT.

This report will be made in duplicate immediately after the receipt of the parade reports made by company commanders on form 18, and with two copies of said parade reports will be forwarded to brigade headquarters for the information of the brigade commander. FORM 21.—BRIGADE CONSOLIDATED PARADE REPORT.

This report will be made up from the regimental consolidated parade report on form 20, and with one copy of the parade reports on forms 18 and 20 will be forwarded directly to the adjutant general. FORM 22.—AMMUNITION RETURN.

To be made by company commanders quarterly, reporting the amount of ammunition received, amount expended in any authorized tour of duty, and amount remaining on hand.


170

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

171

FORM 23.—MoRNING REPORT.

FORM 33.—ROSTER.

To be made every morning in triplicate by commanding officers of companies when in camp of instruction or in the performance of any duty under proper authority, and forwarded to the adjutants of the regiments or battalions, showing correctly the number of men present, off duty, special duty, sick, and in arrest; the number of men absent, with leave, without leave, sick, and in arrest; showing the totals of each, and the aggregate present and absent, with the percentage present; to be signed by the captain commanding and first sergeant.

To be kept by commanders of brigades, regiments, battalions and companies. (Pars. 380, 381, Regulations, N. G. W.)

FORM 24.—CONSOLIDATED MORNING REPORT.

To be made in duplicate by the commanding officer of the regiment or battalion, and with two copies of the morning report on form 23, forwarded to brigade headquarters; one copy to be forwarded by the assistant adjutant general of the brigade to the office of the adjutant general, accompanied by one copy of the report on form 23. FORM 25.—INVOICE OF ORDNANCE.

For the use of the adjutant general in the settlement of accounts with officers. FORM 26.—RECEIPTS FOR WARRANTS OR DRAFTS.

For the use of the adjutant general in forwarding warrants or drafts to persons entitled to moneys from the state. FORM 27.—CERTIFICATE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT.

To be given by the adjutant general to all officers whose term of service has expired, or who may have resigned, upon a final settlement of their accounts with the state. FORM 28.—CHARGEs AND SPECIFICATIONS.

To be used in making charges for any misconduct on the part of officers or men of the National Guard, and forwarded to the proper officer. (Secs. 500, 507, Regulations.) FORM 29. —CITATION.

To be issued by the judge advocate of the court martial, citing the person against whom the charges have been preferred to appear for trial, and to be served by a non-commissioned officer or other fit person. (Sec. 448, Regulations.) FORM 30.—SIJBPENA.

To be issued in summoning all witnesses who may be required to testify before a court martial. FORM 31.—REQUISITION FOR SUBSISTENCE.

To be made upon the commissary general by the commissaries of regiments or battalions. FORM 32.—REQUISITION FOR FORAGE.

To be made upon the quartermaster general by the quartermasters of regiments or battalions.

FORM 34.—NOTIFICATION TO APPEAR BEFORE EXAMINING BOARD.

This notice is issued by the examining board of the regiment to the officers elect of any company to appear before said board for examination as to their qualifications for commissions. FORM 35.—CAMP PASS.

To be issued by commanding officers of regiments or battalions to enlisted men of their command desiring to pass beyond the camp lines. FORM 86.—APPLICATION FOR HONORABLE DISCHARGE.

To be made by members of the National Guard who, for any good cause, desire to be discharged from the service, setting out therein in full the reasons for said discharge, to be indorsed by the commanding officer of the company, and forwarded to the adjutant of the regiment; the date of its receipt to be by him noted, signed by the regimental commander, and forwarded to brigade headquarters, thee to be duly indorsed and forwarded to the office of the adjutant general. FORM 37.—RETURN OF ELECTION OF OFFICERS.

• This form will be used in reporting the election of all officers to vacancies in existing companies and regiments, to be signed by the inspector, presiding officer, and clerk of the meeting, and forwarded through the proper military channel, to the adjutant general. FORM 38. -RECEIPTS FOR DISBURSEMENTS.

To be taken in duplicate by all officers of the National Guard, who, while in the performance of duty under proper authority, incur any expenses, and to be attached to their claims against the state on form 11, as sub-vouchers, and forwarded directly to the adjutant general. FORM 89.—RECEIPTS FOR BLANK FORMS.

For the use of the adjutant general in distributing blank forms to the mmanding officers of regiments and battalions. FORM 39b.—RECEIPTS FOR BLANK REPORTS.

Receipts for blank forms for the use of adjutants of regiments and battalions in the distribution of blank forms to commanding officers of Companies. FORM 40.—ROSTER BOOK, FOR USE AT GENERAL, BRIGADE AND REGIMENTAL HEADQUARTERS.

Commanding officers of regiments, battalions and companies are trictly enjoined to observe the requirements laid down for making reports on the forms above named and issued, and to make the reports 'required immediately after the performance of the duty for which the re'Port is due. The quarterly reports required to be made by commanding fficers of companies if made immediately after the close of the quarter


172

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

should arrive at general headquarters not later than the 20th of the current month, and the officers discharging the duties in the intermediate channel are strictly enjoined to forward reports immediately after their receipt and posting. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, Oct. 19, 1891. General Order No. 14: The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: RESIGNATIONS. The resignation of Colonel William T. Sharp, chief of ordnance on the staff of the commander-in-chief, is accepted to date from October 1, 1891. APPOINTMENTS. Captain Chas. L. F. Kellogg, late commanding D company, first regiment, National Guard of Washington, is hereby appointed chief of ordnances on the staff of the commander-in-chief, with rank of colonel, to date from October 1, 1891. He will be respected and obeyed accordingly. PROMOTIONS. First Lieutenant Laurence S. Booth, to be captain B company, first regiment, vice Green, promoted. Second Lieutenant Wm. M. Calhoun, to be first lieutenant B company, first regiment, vice Booth, promoted. Private Theodore N. Haller, to be second lieutenant B company, vice Calhoun, promoted. With rank from June 27, 1891. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. ELECTIONS. E. H. Fox, to be captain of K company, second infantry regiment at Tekoa, with rank from August 25, 1891. He will be respected and obeyed accordingly. HONORABLE DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge is hereby granted-Private W. H. Cady, A company, second infantry regiment; G. H. Harris, G company, first infantry regiment; by reason of removal from the state. Roland I. Hopper, C company, first infantry regiment; John W. Hutchinson, C company, first infantry regiment; J. P. Baker, G company, first infantry regiment; William Gantz, G company, first infantry reg-

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

173

ent; L. F. O'Driscoll, G company, first infantry regiment; C. C. Warren, company, first infantry regiment; by reason of removal from the George W. Bowen, troop B, first cavalry battalion; by reason of busass relations making it impossible to perform duty. James C. Arnold, commissary sergeant, second infantry regiment; by ason of entrance into the service of the United States. Said discharges to date from October 11 1891. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, neral Order No. 15: OLYMPIA, October 28, 1891. The following changes in the National Guard are announced for the oi-mation of all concerned: HONORABLE DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge is hereby granted Privates John G. Barnes, V. R. Brierry, J. E. Chilberg and Charles B. Grant, of B Company, first regiment, by reason of expiration of term of enlistment. E. N. Requa, of C company, first regiment, by reason of removal from the state; Robert E. Stout, of E Company, second regiment, by reason of removal from the county. Said discharges to date from this date. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G, O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 16: OLYMPIA, November 14, 1891. 1. Before a general court martial convened by special order No. 7, c. s., from these Headquarters, of which Brigadier General A. P. Curry is president, was tried Colonel John C. Haines, commanding first infantry regiment, N. G. W. Charge 1. Conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, in violation of the 61st article of war. With sundry specifications to said charge. Charge 2. Conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline. With sundry specifications to said charge, and to which charges and


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

specifications thereto, the accused, Colonel John C. flames, commanding first infantry regiment, pleads as follows:

which said allowed and sustained reason is in the words and figures following: 'That a court martial convened under the authority of section 30 of an act of the legislature, approved March 27, 1890, entitled 'An act to provide for the organization, maintenance and discipline of the militia of the State of Washington,' cannot proceed with the trial of any officer or enlisted man of the National Guard of Washington until the military board, established under this act, shall provide for such court a method of procedure conforming to the regulations and articles of war and practice for the government of the army of the United States, as required by the terms of said section 30." 2. The proceedings and findings in the case of Colonel John C. Haines, commanding first infantry regiment, N. G. W., is approved. 3. Colonel Haines will return to duty and assume command of his regiment. 4. The-general court martial convened by special order No. 7, e. s., is hereby dissolved. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

174

That as colonel of the first infantry regiment, first brigade, N. G. W., nor as a citizen of the State of Washington engaged in the practice of his profession as an attorney at law, is he subject to or governed by the 61st article of war, the articles of war not having been adopted by congress as a law governing the militia, except when in the actual service of the United States, and not having been adopted by the constitution of the State of Washington, or embodied in any of the statutes of the said state, or adopted by any authority under the statutes as a law governing the National Guard. II. That the accused was not amenable to military law at the time and place the acts in said specifications complained of are alleged to have been committed by him, and no allegation is made in said specifications that the accused was under military orders, or in the performance or execution of any military duty whatsoever at said time and place. III. That the acts alleged in said charges and specifications to have been committed by said accused do not constitute an offense against the military statutes of the State of Washington, or against any provisions, rules or regulations prescribed by virtue of or under the authority of the statutes of the State of Washington. Iv. That a court martial convened under the authority of section 30 of an act of the legislature, approved March 27, 1890, entitled "An act to provide for the organization, maintenance and discipline of the militia of the State of Washington," cannot proceed with the trial of any officer or enlisted man of the National Guard of Washington until the military board, established under said act, shall provide for such court a method of procedure conforming to the regulations and articles of war and practice for the government of the army of the United States, as required by the terms of the said section 30. FINDINGS. The court having maturely considered the plea of the accused, finds and concludes as follows: That the plea of Colonel John C. Haines, commanding first infantry regiment, first brigade, N. G. W., to the jurisdiction of the court Convened pursuant to special order No. 7, c. s., dated general headquarters. National Guard of Washington, October 19, 1891, is hereby denied and sustained as follows, to wit: Said plea is denied as to reason "I" assigned therein. Said plea is denied as to reason "II" assigned therein. Said plea is denied as to reason "III" assigned therein. Said plea is allowed and sustained as to reason "IV" assigned therein,

175

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 17: OLYMPIA, December 2, 1891. The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the observance of all concerned: 1. First Lieutenant Eugene J. Fellows, commissary of the second infantry regiment, to be assistant adjutant general, first brigade, with rank of lieutenant colonel, from October 21, 1891. Second Lieutenant W. H. Gorham, of D company, first infantry regiment, to be first lieutenant of said company, with rank from June 18, 1890, vice Frank L. Hilton, resigned. First Lieutenant Arthur W. Lindsay, to be captain of troop A, first cavalry, vice Glasscock, resigned, with rank from October 12, 1891. Edward H. Peterson, to be first lieutenant of said troop, vice Lindsay, promotedi with rank from October 12, 1891. Frank J. Gehres, to be second lieutenant of said troop, vice T. Ashley Wickham, resigned, with rank from October 12, 1891. Michael Wintler, to be second lieutenant of company H, first infantry, Vice Paulus, resigned, with rank from May 30, 1891. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. PROMOTIONS.


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

176

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

COMMISSIONED. 2. The examining board of the second regiment, having reported favorably upon their qualifications and fitness for the office to which they have been elected, commissions are this day issued to: Henry D. Kay, as first lieutenant, and Charles T. Lake, as second lieutenant, of company K, second infantry regiment, stationed at Tekoa, Washington, with rank from August 25, 1891. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. HONORABLE DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge is granted the following: Name.

Rank.

Collier ................ Private P. P. Lea ...................... . Private F. E. Thompson ........... . Private John 0. Rhoades .......... Private...... L. E. Grimes ................. Private...... Frank H. Adams ........... Private...... J. B. Woodward ............Private.....

H. H.

Co. Regiment. C C C

A A G G

Date.

1st inft....... Nov. 1st inft....... Nov. 1st mit...... . Nov. 2d inft...... Nov. 2d mit...... . Nov. 2d mit...... . Nov. 2d mit....... Nov.

27, 1891 27, 1891 27, 1891 27, 1891 27, 1891 27, 1891 27, 1891

Cause.

Business obligations. Business obligations. Continued absence. Removal from state. Physical disability. Removal from state. Removal from state.

177

3.

ADMISSION TO THE SERVICE. The order and recommendation of the military board heretofore made upon the application of M. O'Conner and his associates, of Olympia, for admission into the National Guard of Washington, as a volunteer company, is hereby approved. Said M. O'Conner and his associates will assemble at Olympia on Friday, December 11, 1891, at 7:30 P. M., for the purpose of inspection and muster. Major Charles H. Ayer, assistant adjutant general, will inspect and muster said company on said date, and report at once, directly to these headquarters. 4. HONORABLE DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge from the service of the National Guard of Washington is this day granted: Name.

Rank.

Bert H. Sweeney .......... Sergeant... Chas. Soderling ............ . Sergeant ... Frank Brogan ............... Private

Co. R E B

Regiment.

Date.

Cause.

1st mit ...... . Sept. 15, '91...... Removal from state. 1st mIt...... . Nov. 27, '91...... Removal from state. 1st inft ...... .Aug. 26, '91...... Term expired.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, December 9, 1891. General Orcjer No. 18: The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information and guidance of all concerned:

TACTICS. The new system of drill regulations prepared by a board of officers of the United States army, having been approved by the president of the United States, and published for the information and government of the army and for the militia of the United States, the same is hereby adopted for the government and observance of the National Guard of Washington, and no exercises, drill or manceuvers other than those embraced in this system will be used or employed in the instruction of the officers and enlisted men in the military service of this state from and after this date. By order of the commander-in-chief. H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

RESIGNATIONS. The following resignations are this day accepted: Captain E. L. Powell, A. D. C., to date from December 7, 1891. First Lieutenant W. H. Gorham, company D, first infantry, to date from December 15, 1891. The commanding officer of the first regiment will order an election to fill the vacancies in company D. PROMOTIONS. 2. Second Lieutenant A. W. McCallum to be first lieutenant, and Corporal A. T. Brown to be second lieutenant of U company, second infantry, with rank from September 22, 1891. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 19: OLYMPIA, December 14, 1891. The following change in the National Guard of Washington is announced for the guidance of all concerned: 1. Colonel E. W. Pike, commanding second infantry regiment, is hereby appointed to fill the vacancy now existing in the military board. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;12

By. order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

5.


ADJUTANT dENERAL.

178

.,

2. The military board will meet at Olympia on Friday, December 18, 1891, for the transaction of such business as may come before it. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, Dec. 24, 1891. General Order No. 20: The following honorable discharges are granted in the National Guard of Washington.

.. . . . . .C Name.

i Rank.

I Co. I

Arthur F. Esperson ................. Private... E. C. Hart ............................... Private... J. W. Adams .......................... .Private... Albert Allen ............................Private... Edward S. Barlow .................. Private... Harry A. Brown ........... .......... Private... John N. Conna........................ Q. M. Sgt S. M. Houser .......................... Private... F. G. Kuhn ............................ Private... J. Leitner ............................... .Private... Ambrose Murry ..................... Private... J C. Poynes ........................... ...Private... S. H. Ronald .......................... .Private... A. A. Swope ............................Private... Charles H. Stetson ................. Private... J. W. Vaughn ..... .................. Private... Robert G. Walker .................. Private... James L. Walsh ......................Private

.. . .. .. .. .

Regiment.

I

Cause.

ooff ooff

B First cavalry ........ Absence from state. B First cavalry ........ Physical disability. C First infantry Removal from county. C First infantry Absence from state. C First infantry term. C First infantry Expiration term. C First infantry ... ...Expiration term. C First infantry ...... Removal from county. C First infantry..... Removal from county. .Removal from state. C First infantry C First infantry .Removal from state. C First infantry .......Expiration term. C First infantry .Removal from state. C First infantry....... Satisfactory reasons. C First infantry ...... .Removal from state. Expiration term. C First infantry Expiration term. First infantry Removal from state. First infantry

By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

179

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 1: OLYMPIA, January 4, 1892. With profound sorrow the commander-in -chief announces the death of Colonel John Charles Haines, commanding first regiment of infantry, N. G. W., which occurred at his home in Seattle on January 2, 1892. Colonel Haines enlisted in company D in 1884; was elected its captain on December 7th of the same year, and as such served with credit to himself and honor to the state until April 27, 1887, at which date he was elected colonel of the regiment. July 25, 1888, he was appointed a member of the military board. As commanding officer, the interests of his regiment were always uppermost in his mind. During the great fire in Seattle he rendered distinguished service as commander of the troops, restraining and controlling the lawless element which threatened at one time to take possession of the city, and by his untiring zeal and attention to duty contributed largely to the suppression of the fiery elements. In the disturbances incident to the labor troubles in New Castle and elsewhere, and during the recent mining troubles in King county, in command of the troops he displayed marked executive ability, and by unceasing attention to duty prevented the loss of both life and property. As a lawyer, eminent; as a politician, foremost; as a soldier, alert. In the death of Colonel flames the National Guard has lost one of its most energetic officers, and the first regiment an able commander. To the bereaved family of its deceased comrade the National Guard of Washington extends the most heartfelt sympathy and a sincere wish that when they shall be summoned to answer the last bugle call it will be to join in the fields of eternal peace the, spirit of him who has gone before. It is ordered that the usual badge of mourning be worn, and the armories of the first regiment be draped for the period of thirty days. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 2: OLYMPIA, January 9, 1892. The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: APPOINTMENTS. B. W. Coiner, of Tacoma, to be aid-dc-camp on the staff of the adjutant general, with rank of captain, from December 25, 1891. He will be respected and obeyed accordingly.


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

180

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

181

RESIGNATIONS The resignation of Lieutenant D. E. Dunbar, company K, first infantry, is accepted, to date from November 30, 1891. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

Name.

Rank.

Co.Regiment.

Cause.

D. E. Fairweather ......... .Private.......G ..........First infantry ...... ..Removal from state. A. B. Ilyerdahl ...............Private.......U .........First infantry .......Removal from state. B. H. Hoffer ...................Private...... G .........First infantry ........Continued absence. F. F. Ilough....................Private......U ..........First infantry ........Removal from county. II . Huseman...................Private......U.........First infantry ...... ..Removal from county. Charles L. Jett ............... ..Private......U ........ .First infantry.......emoval R from state. Thomas E. Lambert ...... ..Private......U .........First infantry

Removal from state. H. H. Suteliffe................rivate......B .P .........Second infantry... Removal from state.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, February 24, 1892. General Order No. 4:

B. M. Swingler ...............Private...... U .........Second infantry... Removal from state.

The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned:

Charles Block .................Private

U. W. Beach ...................Private......C .........First infantry

RESIGNATIONS. The resignation of Charles Esplin, jr., as first lieutenant and adjutant of the first infantry regiment, is accepted, to date from February 19, 1892, and he is granted an honorable discharge from the service of the National Guard of Washington.

0. M. Latimer ................Private

EXAMINING BOARDS.

HONORABLE DISCHARGES.

Rank.

Hiram E. Mitchell ...........Q. M. S......

Co.

Cause.

Commanding officers of regiments or battalions are hereby notified of this fact, that they may proceed with the examination of all officers-elect as to their classification for commission.

TP. B First. cavalry ......... Removal from state.

Chas. W. Pollock ............Private... ... Tp. B J. G. Carroll .................. First Sgt

Regiment.

By order of the commander-in-chief.

First cavalry......... Removal from state.

E .........First infantry ...... . Business engagement. Official: CHAS.

J. B. Eagleston .............. .. Private...... E......... First infantry ...... Expiration of term. C. W. Kellogg ............... Private...... E......... First infantry ...... . Business engagement.

A .........Second infantry... Removal from state.

The regulations promulgated by the military board, and approved February 4, 1892, now in the hands of the public printer, provides that the lieutenant colonel, major and a medical officer of each regiment, or such as may be available, shall constitute the examining board for the examination of all officers elected to be commissioned.

Honorable discharge is granted to the following named and enlisted men for the reason set forth herein: Name.

Removal from state.

C ........ .First infantry .......Removal from state. H. B. Campbell ...............Private......C .........First infantry.......{Lack fi time to attend

R. U. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

/

E. Morganstein .............. .. Private.......E......... First infantry ...... ..Expiration of term. Benjamin Moore ............ Private...... G ......... First infantry ....... Removal from state. J. H. Misner .................. .. Private...... G......... . First infantry ...... Removal from state. F. H. Poinsett. ............... Private...... G ........ . First infantry ...... ...Removal from state. P. J. Soukup .................. .Private...... G ........ First infantry ....... Removal from state. C. A. Wentworth .............Private.......G .......... First infantry ...... ..Removal from state. W. H. Brodhagen ............Private.......U ........ ..First infantry ...... ..Removal from state.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 5: OLYMPIA, March 22, 1892. The following changes in the National tuard of Washington are announced for the government of all concerned: RESIGNATIONS.

A. B. Collier .................. ..Private.......U......... First infantry ...... ..Removal from state. Richard Eskridge .......... Corporal

G ........ . First infantry

Removal from state.

Robert N. Hall ............... ..Private...... U ........ . First infantry ...... . Removal from state. Edward Herald ...............Private...... U ........ First infantry...... .Removal from county. W. S. Haynes ................ . Private...... U ........ ..First infantry ...... .Removal from state.

The resignations of Lieutenant Colonel George A. Bethune, assistant quartermaster general, and First Lieutenant J. J. White, A. D. C. on the staff of the brigade commander, are accepted, to date from February 27,

1892.


FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

182

PROMOTIONS. Lieutenant J. A. Hatfield, commissary of the first infantry regiment, to be lieutenant colonel and assistant quartermaster general on the staff of the brigade commander, vice Bethune, resigned, with rank from February 27, 1892. Sergeant Ellsworth P. Gillette, to be A. D. C. to the brigade commander, vice White, resigned, with rank of first lieutenant from February 27, 1892. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. ASSIGNMENT AND COMMISSION. Major Charles H. Ayer, assistant adjutant general and special mustering officer, having filed his report of the muster of the volunteer company at Olympia, said company is designated as company A, and assigned to the first infantry regiment, N. G. W. ELECTIONS. C. S. Rinehart to be captain, Mark E. Reed to be first lieutenant, Walter J. Milroy to be second lieutenant, of company A, first infantry regiment, with rank from December 11, 1891. Frank L. Hilton to be first lieutenant, vice Gorham, resigned; William Crist to be second lieutenant, vice Gorham, promoted, of company D, first infantry regiment, with rank from February 15, 1892. George D. Allen to be first lieutenant of company K, first infantry regiment, vice Dunbar, resigned, with rank from February 16, 1892. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge is this day granted: Name.

Rank.

........................Private E. A. Batwell...... Samuel Lucas ........................... Private M. F. Derting ............................ Private Abraham J. Ahola ..................... Private John H. Morris ......................... .Private

Co.

Regiment.

Cause.

I

Second infantry... Second infantry... Second infantry... Second infantry... Second infantry...

Removal from state. Expiration of term. Expiration of term. Expiration of term. Removal from state.

B B B F

By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. ATER, Assistant Adjutant General.

183

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, April 4, 1892. General Order No. 6: The following honorable discharges from the service of the National Guard of Washington are announced: Name.

Rank. Co. Regiment.

Cause.

B Second infantry Expiration of term. Abraham J. Ahola ..................... .Private H. F. Derting ............................ . Private...... B Second infantry... Expiration of term. G Second infantry... Removal from state. J. Munter .................................. .Private C First infantry ...... . Removal from state. A. H. Berbig .............................. .Private G. W. H. Davis .......................... ...Sergeant.. C First infantry ....... Removal from state. J. H. G. Kelley .......................... Private...... C First infantry ....... Removal from state. W. A. Rainey ..............................Sergeant.. C First infantry ....... Expiration of term. J. A. Wolbert .............................Corporal... C First infantry .......Expiration of term. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, April 12, 1892. General Order No. 7: The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: PROMOTIONS. Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Greene, to be colonel of the first infantry regiment, N. G. W., vice J. C. Haines, deceased; and Captain William S. Shank, of U company, first infantry regiment, to be lieutenant colonel of said regiment, vice Greene, promoted; with rank from March 24, 1892. They will he respected and obeyed accordingly. RESIGNATIONS. The resignation of Captain W. J. Fife is this day accepted. The colonel commanding will order elections to fill all vacancies in the several companies of his command.


FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

184

185

HONORABLE DISCHARGES. Name.

I Rank. I

Co. I

Regiment.

I

Came.

Melvin L. Cloyes....................... .Sergeant... C First infantry....... .Expiration of term. Edward

L. Koehler...................Private

K First infantry....... Sufficient reasons.

By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, April 22, 1892. General Order No. 8: The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are an nounced for the benefit of all concerned: PROMOTIONS. First Lieutenant Frank L. Hilton, to be captain, vice Allen, resigned, and Second Lieutenant William Crist, to be first lieutenant, vice Hilton, promoted, of company D, first infantry regiment, with rank from March 14, 1892. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. RESIGNATIONS. The following resignations are this day accepted: First Lieutenant James H. Barry, troop B, first cavalry battalion, and Second Lieutenant Theodore N. Hailer, B company, first infantry regiment. Commanding officers will order an election to fill the vacancies thus created. ADMISSION TO THE SERVICE. Upon the recommendation of the military board, the application of William B. Buffum and associates, of Clyde, Walla Walla county, for admission into the National Guard of Washington as a volunteer company, is hereby granted upon condition that said Buffum and associates purchase their uniforms and provide their armory expenses until such time as the state is in funds to reimburse them therefor. Upon the acceptance by said Buffum and associates of the conditions before mentioned, an officer will be detailed to complete the muster of the company. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 9: OLYMPIA, May 12, 1892. The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: RESIGNATIONS. The resignations of the following named officers are accepted, to date from May 1, 1892: Captain C. H. Merriam, G company, second infantry regiment, and Second Lieutenant E. F. Lake, K company, second infantry regiment. The commanding officer of said regiment will order an election to fill the vacancies thus created. PROMOTIONS. First Sergeant George W. Saum, to be second lieutenant of D company, first infantry, vice Crist, promoted, with rank from March 14, 1892. Ithamar M. Howell, to be captain of C company, first infantry, vice Fife, resigned, and Second Sergeant William F. Clark, to be first lieutenant of C company, first infantry, vice Howell, promoted, with rank from April 15, 1892. Second Lieutenant Charles W. Billings, to be captain of G company, first infantry, vice Shank, promoted, and Corporal M. M. Bartlett, to be second lieutenant G company, first infantry, vice Billings, promoted, with rank from April 15, 1892. They will he respected and obeyed accordingly. The commanding officer of the first infantry regiment will order an election to fill all vacancies in said regimen,t. STAFF APPOINTMENTS. Charles Esplin, jr., to be adjutant of the first infantry regiment, with rank of first lieutenant, from February 19, 1892; Dr. H. E. Henderson, to be assistant surgeon of said regiment, with rank of captain; Second Lieutenant James Ross, of C company, first infantry, to be inspector of small arms practice of said regiment, with rank of first lieutenant; and Commissary Sergeant H. D. Allison, to be commissary of said regiment, with rank of first lieutenant, from March 2, 1892. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. First Lieutenant Herman Chapin, paymaster of the first infantry regiment, is assigned to duty as quartermaster of said regiment, and will be respected and obeyed accordingly. First Lieutenant F. J. Elsensohn, paymaster second infantry regiment, is assigned to duty as commissary of said regiment, and will be respected and obeyed accordingly.


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOUR TB BIENNIAL REPORT.

HONORABLE DISCHARGES. Honorable discharge from the Service of the National Guard of Washington is this day granted the following:

and horses for which transportation will be necessary. Transportation for the second infantry regiment will be so arranged that Colonel E. W. Pike, commanding, will meet his command and troop A of the first cavalry battalion, together with the brigade commander and staff, at Pasco, on the evening of the 21st inst., and will take up company E of said regiment, at North Yakima, en route, the same date. The brigade commander and staff, together with the commander and staff of the first cavalry battalion, will join the second infantry regiment at Pasco and proceed thence to the place of encampment. 3. Company commanders will at .once report to the regimental commanders the number of officers and men that will answer for this tour of duty. Commanding officers of companies coming from a distance will provide the necessary travel rations prescribed in paragraph 495 of the regulations, for a two days' journey while en route, together with forage for horses, keeping a correct account of the same, and present all claims to the adjutant general duly verified. Regimental commissaries will at once make requisition for the number of rations required for the tour of duty. 5. Colonel Joseph Greene, commanding first infantry regiment, will detail one company from Tacoma, and Colonel E. W. Pike, commanding second infantry regiment, will detail company A of said regiment, to proceed to Murray on the 20th inst., for the purpose of establishing camp; and will report to Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general, for that duty. 6. Companies F and I of the first infantry will take steamer, respectively, at Whatcom and Port Townsend, and proceed to Tacoma, from whence, accompanied by one company of infantry and troop B of the first cavalry battalion, they will niarch in light order to the camp ground. Company A, first infantry, at Olympia, will likewise proceed overland in light marching order. 7. Requisitions will be made by regimental quartermasters upon the adjutant general for the forage necessary during the period of the encampment. 8. Fatigue uniforms only will be worn by enlisted men during the encampment. 9. The provisions of paragraph 787 of the regulations must be strictly enforced by the brigade commander. 10. The following hours of service and roll calls are hereby established for the encampment of 1892: Reveille (assembly of trumpeters).................................. ...................... 5:30A.M. Stable call and assembly for roll call .. ...........---- Immediately after reveille. Breakfastcall ............................................................................ ............ ...... .... 6:30 A. M. Sickcall ................................................. .... ....................... .. .............................. 7:00 A. H. First sergeant's call ............................................................------- ....................7:15 A. H. Fatiguecall ...................................................... .... ------- .... ...................... ........ ..7:30 A. H. School of officers ................................ .......... ....... .................. .................... 7.30 A. H. Guard mounting .........................................................................................8:30 A. M. Guard details (assembly of trumpeters).

186

Name.

I

Rank. I Co. I

Julius W. Parker ....................... ..Private G. E. Derby ................................Private Lee W. Marcy ........................... . Private A. S. Woods .............................. .Private Benjamin Hartup ...................... Private Granville W. Felker .................. Private William E. Likim .......................Private Mathew Bridges........................ . Private Thomas U. Early ....................... Private George T. Elithorpe .....................Private John B. KuhelmaĂą .................... ..Private Fred. Taylor ...............................Private Rudolph Mcli .............................Private Frank D. Axtell..........................Private James Crofton ........................... Private George W. Jackel ..................... . Private Charles H. Wells ........................ 1st serg'nt Charles F. Jackel ...................... .Corporal ... Conrad B. Yerkel ...................... Private Edward Clanton ........................ Q.M. serg't

C

E F P F F F F F F F F C C 0 C C C C C

Regiment.

I

Cause

First infantry ....... Appt. U. S. civil serv. First infantry ....... Sufficient reasons. First infantry ....... Sufficient reasons. First infantry ....... Removal from state. First infantry ........Removal from state. First infantry ........Sufficient reasons. First infantry ....... Removal from county First infantry ........Removal from state. First infantry ........Removal from state. First infantry .......emoval R from state. First infantry ....... Removal from state. First infantry ........Removal from state. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term.

By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 10: OLYMPIA, June 9,1892. 1. The annual muster and camp of instruction of the National Guard of Washington, for the year 1892, will be held at Murray, in Pierce county, on the line of the Tacoma, Olympia & Gray's Harbor Railroad, for the period of ten days, commencing June 22, and closing July 1, proximo; Brigadier General A. P. Curry, commanding. 2. Transportation will be furnished by the adjutant general from the headquarters of the respective companies to the camp ground. Regimental commanders will at once report by telegraph the number of men

187


188

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

At this call the guard details will form and be inspected by the first sergeant, and the hand will march to the regimental parade. Adjutant's call ............ .......... ..................... .... ........................................... .... S:45A.M To be sounded by all the trumpeters (at a signal from the adjutant) followed by a march from the band. At this call the guard details will be conducted to the regimental parade by the first sergeant. Re-call from fatigue (by a musician of the guard) ---------------------------9 :15 A. M. Watercall ...................................................--------... ......................... -.............. --9:30A. M. Battalion drill (assembly of trumpeters) ................... ------------- ..............9:50 A. M. Drill call (boots and saddles) .................................. ..................... .------.--- 10:00 A. M. Assembly .................................... ....... ....................... .Immediately after drill call. Adjutant's call .................................................................................. ... ......... 10:05 A. M. To be sounded by all the trumpeters, followed by.a march. At this call all the companies will be marched to the regimental parade to form the battalion line; after which music will form for practice. Re-call from drill (by a musician of the guard) .... ....................... ...11:30 A. M. First sergeant's call ...................................................................................11 :45 A. M. Dinnercall ....................................................................................................12:00 M. School call (non-commissioned officers) ..............................................1:30 P. M. Drill call for skirmish drill, by companies or regiments (boots andsaddles) ...................................................................................2:30 P. M. Assembly ..................................................................Immediately after drill call. Re-call from drill (by a musician of the guard) ................................ 4:00P.M. Stablecall -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------4:30 P.M. Suppercall ......................................................................................................5:00 P. M. Dress parade (assembly of trumpeters) ...............................................5:45P.M. Adjutant's call (to be sounded by all the trumpeters) ..................... 6:00P.M. At this call the adjutant and the sergeant majors of the regiments and the band (the latter playing) will march to the regimental parade, and the battalion line be formed. Retreat...........................................................................................................At sunset. At dress parade, retreat is sounded after the return of the band to its position in line. When there is no dress parade, the band assembles at the first call for retreat, and the companies form for roll call the same as at reveille. Bandpractice ......................................................................................... ........7:00 P M. Tattoo (musicians of the guard) ............................................................ ..9:30P.M. Taps (by the musicians of the guard) ....................................................10 P. M. 11. The assembly of trumpeters will be sounded ten (10) minutes before all stated roll calls, except reveille and dress parade, which will be fifteen minutes before. 12. Sunday inspection will take place at S A. M., and divine service at such hours as may be ordered by the brigade commander. There will be no drills on Sunday. Morning reports must be sent to the office of the regimental adjutants by 8 o'clock A. M. Regimental surgeons will send their sick reports by the same hour. The reports of regiments and battalions must be in the office of the commanding officer of the camp at 9

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT. *

189

A. M., at the latest, accompanied by the reports of the companies and troops. 13. Schools of instruction will be ordered by company officers of the respective companies. If the weather or other circumstances make it ecessary to omit the drills, immediately after the first hour for drill, the guard details which came off duty the preceding day will be assembled and thoroughly police the camp. The officer of the guard is charged with the prompt sounding of the calls. When (for any purpose) drill is suspended, re-call from drill will be sounded immediately after the first call for drill. 14. The trumpeters of each company in regiments or battalions shall form the trumpet corps of said regiment, which shall, upon the signal for the assembly of trumpeters, at once report to the chief trumpeter on the centre of the color line; and said trumpet corps shall sound all the signals and calls announced in this order, except as otherwise provided herein. 15. Challenging will commence at tattoo and ceace at reveille. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 11: OLYMPIA, June 29, 1892. With profound sorrow the commander-in-chief announces to the National Guard of Washington the death of Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Frederick E. Trotter, major twenty-fourth U. S. infantry, at Camp Murray, on Tuesday, June 28, 1892, at 4:53. P. M., of cerebral apoplexy. Colonel Trotter's genial character and sterling qualities as a man and soldier endeared him to all who enjoyed his acquaintance, and especially the National Guard of this state, which has so often profited by his careful, earnest and intelligent instruction. He had a particular affection for the militia. Its every effort toward advancement met his prompt approval, while every unsoldierly act hurt him. His services to his country have been eminent, and have but recently been rewarded by promotion so faithfully earned. The summons of the Great Commander has called one of the brightest soldiers and most earnest Christian gentlemen. The heartfelt sympathy of the National Guard of this state is tearfully extended to the bereaved family of our deceased comrade, and to the loving care of Him "who tempers the wind to the shorn lamb" we commend them. Let the usual badge of mourning be worn for the period of thirty days. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: B. W. COINER, Captain and Aid-de-Camp.


-

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 12: OLYMPIA, July 26, 1892. The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information and guidance of all concerned: Pursuant to the provisions of section 46 of 'An act to provide for the organization, maintenance and discipline of the militia of the State of Washington," approved March 27, 1890, an election Was held for field officers of the second infantry regiment at Spokane Falls, June 1, 1892, at which the following were elected for the ensuing term of four years: Enoch W. Pike, to be colonel of said regiment, to succeed himself. Captain E. H. Fox, of K company, Tekoa, to be major, vice Greene, term expired. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 13: OLYMPIA, October 6, 1892. The following is announced as the roster of the National Guard of Washington to this date:

190

ELECTION OF LINE OFFICERS. The following changes in the line of the second regiment are announced for the government of all concerned: George W. Billington, captain of C company, second regiment, reelected. First Sergeant W. H. Hudson, to be first lieutenant of C company, vice Jackel, term expired, with rank from June 11, 1892. H. G. Shuham, captain of D company, second infantry regiment; C. F. Smith, first lieutenant D company, Second infantry regiment, with rank from May 2, 1892, vice D. N. Smith, time expired. F. Dudley Eshelman, Captain of E company, second infantry, with rank from May 2, 1892, vice J. C. McCrimmon, time expired. Benjamin B. Combs, first lieutenant of E company, second infantry, vice F.. D. Eshelman, promoted; Joseph C. Liggett, second lieutenant of E company, second infantry, vice Matt. Bartheolett, term expired; with rank from May 2, 1892.. Charles R. Dorr, first lieutenant of F company, second infantry, reelected; Ernest W. Lyons, captain of G company, second infantry, vice Merriam, resigned; with rank from May 10, 1892. Charles F. Kay, second lieutenant of K company, second infantry, vice Lake, resigned; J. W. Sterns, captain of K company, second infantry, with rank from June, 1892, vice Fox, promoted. Everett G. Griggs, first lieutenant of troop B, first cavalry, with rank from May 25, 1892, vice Barry, resigned. Pierre N. Borringer, second lieutenant of troop B, first cavalry, VZCC Dougan, promoted, with rank from May 22, 1892. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

Name.

I

Rank.

I Date of rank.I

191

Residence.

Elisha P. Ferry ........................Commander-in-Chief. ......... .......................Olympia. Brig. Gen. B. G. O'Brien ......... .Adjutant General .................Jan. 10,'81 '81 Olympia. Quartermaster General. Commissary General. Inspector General. Chief of Ordnance. Chief of Staff. Col. E. M. Carr ........................ Assist. Adjutant General.... May 12,'90 Seattle. Col. Henry Landes .................. Paymaster General ............. May 12.'90 Port Townsend. Col. Charles E. Claypool Judge Advocate General.... May 12, 190 Tacoma. Col. Edward Smith .................. Surgeon General ................. May 12, '90 Seattle. Col. J. Kennedy Stout ..............Chief Signal Officer ............ ..May 12,'90 Spokane.. Col. C. L. F. Kellogg ............... .Chief of Ordnance .............. Oct. 1, '91 Seattle. Col. Wellington Clark .............. Assist. Inspector General... April 28, 191 Walla Walla. Col. Will. L. Visscher .............. ..Assist. Com. General .......... May 12, '90 Tacoma. Col. J. D. McIntyre ................. ..Chief Engineer ................... .May 12, 190 Seattle. Lt. Col. Albert Whyte............. .ssist. A Corn. General.......... .an. J 10, '88 Tacoma. Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson .......... Assist. Q. M. General ......... June 12,'88 Tacoma. Lt. Col. Clinton P. Ferry ......... ..A. D. C. to Cotn'r-in-Chief.. May 12, '90 Tacoma. Lt. Col. L. Frank Boyd........... A. D. C. to Com'r-in-Chief.. May 12, 190 Spokane. Lt. Chas. Iteichenbach...... A. to Corn'r-in-Chief.. May 12, '90 Tacoma. Lt. Atkins ............... A. D. to Com'r-in-Chief.. May 12, 190 Whateom. Major Chas. H. Ayer ............... Assist. Adjutant General.... May 12, 190 Olympia. Capt. E. B. Wise ...................... A. to Adj. General ..... Aug. 90 Goldendale. Capt. B. Coiner .................. A. D. to Adj. General ..... Dec. 25, 191 Tacoma.

.. .. .. . . Col.C. M. . B. C. W. . B. C. . 1,1 CCoollC..S. W.P. . . . .. Corn.. . . . . .... P. . BRIGADE STAFF.

Name.

Brig. Gen. A. Curry ............ Lt. E. J. Fellows.............. Scott .................. Lt. Lt. J. A. Hatfield Lt. Marshall K. Snell ....... Lieut. F. Lake ...................... Lieut. William E. Cromwell Lieut. Ellsworth Gillette Capt. Wallace Mount ...............

Rank.

Date of rank.

Commanding Brigade ........ Jan. 7, '89 Assist. Adjutant General Oct. 21, 191 Assist. Inspector General April 28, '87 Assist. General ....... Feb. 27, 192 Assist. Q. M. General .ar. M 18, '91 Aid-dc-Camp ....................... June 17, '92 Aid-dc-Camp Mar. 18, '91 Aid-dc-Camp ....................... Feb. 27, '92 Paymaster ........................... April 14, '92

Residence.

Spokane. Spokane. Seattle. Seattle. Tacoma. Spokane. Tacoma. Spokane. Sprague.


192

.. .. .. ..

.. .. . . . .. . . . . .. . .

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FIRST INFANTRY REGIMENT-HEADQUARTERS, Name.

Rank.

Joseph Greene ......................... William S. Shank .................... Fred. A. Gasit .......................... Major L. R. Dawson ................ Rev. L. H. Wells ..................... First Lieut. H. D. Allison......... First Lieut. Herman Chapin Dr. H. E. Henderson ............... Chas. Esplin, jr ........................ Jas. Ross ....................... .........

Colonel ............................... Lieutenant colonel ............. Major .................................. Surgeon .............................. Captain and chaplain .......... Commissary ........................ Quartermaster .................... Capt. and assist, surgeon First lieut. and adjutant....... First lieut. and I. S. A. P

SEATTLE.

Dale of rank.

Mar. 24, '02 Mar. 24, '92 Jan. 4, '91 June 29, '90 May 23, '87 Mar. 2, '92 June 27, '91 Mar. 2, 192 Feb. 19, '92 Mar. 2, '92

Residence,

Seattle. Tacoma. Tacoma. Seattle. Tacoma. Anacortes. Seattle. Seattle. Seattle. Tacoma.

.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

193

SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT-HEADQUARTERS, GOLDENDALE. Name.

I

Rank.

Date of rank.

Enoch W. Pike ........................ Colonel .............................. ..June 1, '88 M.McCarthy ........................... Lieutenant colonel ................April 27, '91 E. H. Fox................................ Major ................................... June 1,'92 1)r. J. H. Hudgen .................... Major and surgeon .. ........... April It, '87 Dr. Allen Bonebrake ............... Captain and east, surgeon Nov. 1, 189 Rev. J. T. Eshelman ............... Captain and chaplain ......... Nov. 1, '89 N. B. Brooks ............................ First lieut. and adjutant..... Nov. 10, '90 Edwin S. Isaacs ....................... .First lieut. and Q. M............ July 27, '90 F. J. Elsensohn ....................... .First lieut. and com'is'ry Mar. l,'91 George W. Barker ..................I First Lieut. and I. S. A. P Oct. 1, '90

Residence.

Goldendale. Walla Walla. Tokoa. Waitsburg. Goldendale. North Yakima. Goldendale. Walla Walla. Pomeroy. Dayton.

COMPANY A. C. S. Reinhart . ......................... Captain................................ Dec. 11, '91 Olympia. Mark E. Reed ........................... First lieutenant.................... Dec. 11, '91 Olympia. Walter J. Milroy .............. ........ Second lieutenant ................ Dec. 11,. '91 Olympia.

COMPANY A. .J. E. Frost................................ Captain ................................ Oct. 4, '90 Ellensburgh. J. P. Becker.............................. First lieutenant .... ................ Oct. 4, '90 Ellensburgh. J. T. Armstrong ...................... Second lieutenant ................ .Oct. 4, '90 Ellensburgh.

COMPANY B. Lawrence S. Booth ................. captain ............................... June 27, '91 Seattle. William M. Calhoun............... First lieutenant.................... June 27, '91 Seattle. George H. Fortson.................. Second lieutenant ................ May 3, '92 1 Seattle.

COMPANY B. B. D. MeCully.......................... C-plain ................................ Mar 24, '91 Goldendale. H. C. Jackson........................... First lieutenant.................... Mar. 24, '91 1 Goldendale. H. C. Phillips .......................... Second lieutenant ................ .Mar. 24, '91 Goldendale.

COMPANY C.

COMPANY C.

I. M. Howell ..............................Captain.................................April15, '92 Tacoma. Willie F. Clark......................... First lieutenant.................... April15, '92 Tacoma. J. G. Jolly ............................... Second lieutenant ............... May 4, '92 Tacoma.

George W. Billington.............. Captain ............................... Sept. 7, '89 Centerville. William H. Hodson................. First lieutenant .................... June 11, '92 Centerville. Charles H. Weld .......................Second lieutenant ................ .Feb. 28, '91 Centerville,

COMPANY D. Frank L. Hilton ................ ........Captain................................ Mar. 14, '92 Seattle. William Crist ........................... First lieutenant..................... Mar. 14, '92 Seattle. George W. Sawn ..................... Second lieutenant ................ .Mar. 14, '92 Seattle.

COMPANY D. H. G. Shuham......................... Captain ............................... Dec. 1, '86 Waitsburg. C. S. Smith ............................... First lieutenant.................... May 2, '92 Waitsburg. W. H. Fletcher ........................ Second lieutenant ................ .May 27, 191 Waitsburg.

COMPANY E. E. S. Ingraham ......................... Captain................................ Feb 18, '91 Seattle. ....... ......... Feb. 18, '91 Seattle. F. L. Stinson ............................ First lieutenant.... H. H. Smith ............................. Second lieutenant .................Feb. 18, 191 Seattle.

COMPANY E. I'. Dudley Eshelman................ .May May 2, '92 North Yakima. 11. B. Combs ............................. First Captain lieutenant. ............................... .................. 2, '92 North Yakima. Joseph C. Liggett .................... Second lieutenant ................ ..May 2, '92 North Yakima.

COMPANY F. Sept 17, '90 .Whatcom. J. J. Weisenberger.. ................. Captain ................................ Sept. 17, '90 Whatcom. W. C. Gregory ........................ First lieutenant.................... William M. Leach ................... Second lieutenant ................. Sept. 17, '90 Whateom.

COMPANY F. John Carr ................................. Captain..................................May 11, '87 Dayton. .................. First lieutenant.............................. C. A. Booker ........................... Second lieutenant ................. Aug. Dayton.

COMPANY G. Charles W. Billings ................. Captain ................................ April15, '92 Tacoma. E. S. Stafford............................ First lieutenant.................... Feb. 20, '91 Tacoma. M. M. Bartlett ........................... Second lieutenant ................. April 15, '92 Tacoma.

E. W. Lyons ............................. Captain ............................... May 10, '92 Spokane. A. W. MeCallum...................... First lieutenant.................... Sept. 22, '91 Spokane. A. T. Brown ............ ................. Second lieutenant ................ .Sept. 22, '91 Spokane.

COMPANY H .... Captain Frank Morris............................ First lieutenant.................... Mar. 27, '90 Vancouver M.S. Wintler ........................... Second lieutenant ................ .May 20, '91 Vancouver.

COMPANY H. harry St. George ..................... Captain................................ Oct. 2, '90 Pomeroy. Elmer R. Brady ....................... First lieutenant.................... Oct. 2, '90 Pomeroy. J. W. Murphy ......................... Second lieutenant ................ .Oct. 2, '90 Pomeroy.

COMPANY I.

George H. Jones ..................... Captain ................ ............... Sept. 17, '00 Port Townsend.. Charles B. Wood...................... First lieutenant.................... Sept. 17, '00 I'ortTownsen. N. S. Snyder ............................ Second lieutenant ................ .Sept. 17, '90 Port Towusen COMPANY K.

Captain George D. Allen....................... First lieutenant.................... Feb. 16, '92 Aberdeen Charles T. Delosh ................... Second lieutenant................. Sept. 17, 190 Aberdeen. ....

COMPANY G.

COMPANY I.

W. B. Buffum........................... Captain............................... May 17 '92 Clyde. Perry J. Lyons........................ First lieutenant.................... May 17 '92 Clyde. S. P. Young ............................. Second lieutenant ................ .May 17,'92 Clyde. COMPANY K.

J. W. Stearns .............................Captain................................ June 17, '92 Pekoa. Ilenry D. Kay.......................... First lieutenant..................... Aug. 25, '91 Charles F. Kay......................... Second lieutenant................. May 2,'92 Tekoa. Tekoa.

-13


FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

194

FIRST CAVALRY BATTALIONâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; HEADQUARTERS, SPOKANE. Name.

Rank.

Date of rank.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, General Order No. 15: OLYMPIA, October 11, 1892. Thee ollowlng changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: CASUALTIES.

Residence.

28, '90 Spokane. B. Johnson .................... Maior.............................. .... June 11, '91 Spokane. Henry B. Schwellenbach..........First lieutenant and adj........May June e,Spokane. Rev '92 Tacoma. Dr. J. A. Beebe ....................... ..Captain and asst. surgeon... July 1, '90 Tacoma. ....T.S. A. P Tnoop A.

Charles

:::::::::::::::: 8: : Frank Gehres .......................... .Second lieutenant ................ Oct. 12' '91 Taoop B. 27, '90 James M. Ashton ...................... Captain ............................... .June May 25, '92 Everett G. Griggs .....................First lieutenant.....................May 25, '92 Pierre N. Boeringer ................ .Second lieutenant ...............

The commander-in-chief announces with regret the death of First Lieutenant C. R. Dorr, of company F, second infantry regiment, at Dayton. Lieutenant Dorr was recognized as one of the brightest and most efficient officers of the National Guard. The family'of the deceased have the heartfelt sympathy of every member of the service. The usual badge of mourning will be worn for the prescribed period

Sprague. Tacoma. Tacoma. Tacoma.

By order of the Commander-in-Chief. H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, October 10, 1892. General Order No. 14: W. J. Canton and associates, of Waterville, Douglas county, seek1. ing admission into the National Guard of Washington as a volunteer company from said county, having submitted a proposal to the military board that if admitted as such volunteer company they will purchase their own uniforms and pay the incidental expenses of their company until such time as the state military fund shall be in a condition to make good the cost thereof, and the said proposition having been fully considered by the military board and its acceptance recommended, it is ordered that said W. J. Canton and associates be admitted as a volunteer com pany into the National Guard of Washington upon the conditions recited above. i 2. Captain E. W. Lyons, commanding G company, second infantry, at Spokane, will proceed to Waterville and inspect and muster said cornpany on Wednesday, the 26th day of October, 1892, following closely the requirements of paragraphs 34, 35 and 36 of the regulations of the N. G. W., and make report to the adjutant general at the 'earliest moment thereafter. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant Genertl. -

195

.

RESIGNATIONS. The resignation of First Lieutenant Ira H. Bamber, inspector of small ç .' arms practice, first cavalry battalion, is this day accepted. COMMISSIONS. J. G. Jolly to be second lieutenant, company C, first infantry regiment, with rank from May 4, 1892. George H. Fortson to be second lieutenant of B company, first infantry regiment, with rank from May 3, 1892. C. F. Lake to be first lieutenant and A. D. C. on the staff of the brigade . commander, with rank from June 17, 1892. ' HONORABLE DISCHARGES. Name

Rank

W. R. Hall ...........................Private Mark Aiway ........................Private C. E. James .........................Private Marc Clark ...........................Private D. W. Huggins ... ................ .Private H. A. Hanson ......................Private . L.Hanson ....................... .Private Charles Y. Burns ..................Private S. H. Potter ......................... Private J. A. Saup ............................ Private Frank Bailey ........................ Private James H.Ward ................... Private Theodore Husemen ..... ........ Private James Clark ..........................Private J. Osterberg ........................ .Private

Co.

Regiment

Cause.

A First infantry.,.....Removal from state. A First infantry .......Removal from state. A First infantry .......Removal from state. A First infantry ........Removal from state. C First infantry .......Physical disability. C First infantry .......Absence from county. C First infantry .......Absence from county. C First infantry .......Removal from state. C First infantry ....... Expiration of term. C First infantry ....... Removal from state. B First infantry .......Removal from state. B First infantry .......Removal from state. G First infantry .......Removal from state. (I First infantry .......Removal from county. U First infantry .......Removal from county.

1


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

196

Name.

Rank. Co. Regiment.

Private G. K. Perrin ......................... C. C. McDonald ...................Private Stephen Treston ...................Private J. P. Haynes ........................let corp'l C. R. Hovey .........................Private Otis Buford ...........................Private James H. Canfield ................ Private Syrus Guy ............................ Private William Gregory ................. Private Frank Lucas .........................Private George B. Stoughton ............ Private E. Shoemaker ..................... . Private E. J. Hyde ........................... Private Robert B. Brown .................. Private Saul Calisher ........................ Private William Seigrist ...................Sergeant Frank Jackson ..................... Private Peter McClung ... ................ .Private

0 U H A A C C

.

Cause.

First infantry ....... Removal from state. First infantry ....... Removal from state. First infantry ....... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Change of residence. Second infantry... Change of residence. Second infantry... Expiration of enlistment. Second infantry... Expiration of enlistment.

Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. Second infantry... Expiration of term. G Second infantry... Physical disability. H Second infantry... Removal from county. H Second infantry... Removal from county. II Second infantry... Change of residence.

C C C C C

II Second infantry... Removal from county. H Second infantry... Removal from county.

DISCHARGED FOR THE GOOD OF THE SERVICE. Upon the recommendation of the company court of discipline of G company, second infantry regiment, duly approved by the colonel commanding, the following named, members of said company, are discharged for the good of the service: R. W. Buchloz, private, G company, second infantry, for the good of the service. W. S. Plummer, private, G company, second infantry, for the good of the service. W. A. Haymaker, private, G company, second infantry, for the good of the service. W. H. Whitney, private, G company, second infantry, for the good of the service. E. F. Eastner, private, G company, second infantry, for the good of the service. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

197

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, October 15, 1892. General Order No. 16: It appearing that all the companies of the National Guard have been unable to take advantage of the season of small arms practice within the time prescribed in the regulations, the time for the season of small arms practice is extended to December 1, 1892. Commanding officers of companies will see .that their several commands are exercised the same before the close of the extension, and make prompt report at the close of the season. By order of the commander-in-chief.

H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, December 28, 1892. General Order No. 17: The following changes in the National Guard of Washington are announced for the information of all concerned: RESIGNATIONS. Captain and Reverend L. H. Wells, chaplain of the first infantry regiment; Second Lieutenant C. H. Weld, company C, second infantry; Second Lieutenant Charles C. DeLosh, company K, first infantry regiment. COMMISSIONED. Second Lieutenant Charles A. Booker, to be first lieutenant company F, second infantry, and First Sergeant Chester F. Miller, to be second lieutenant, vice Booker, promoted, with rank from October 8, 1892. C. B. Owens to he first lieutenant company H, second infantry, with rank from October 8, 1892. Charles 0. Downing to be first lieutenant and inspector of small arms practice on the staff of major commanding first cavalry battalion, vice Bamber, resigned, with rank from November 19, 1892. Aloysius J. Kane to be lieutenant colonel and assistant inspector general on the staff of the adjutant general, with rank from December 1, 1892. They will be respected and obeyed accordingly.


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

198

HONORABLE DISCHARGES.

Honorable discharge is granted to the following: Rank.

Name.

.4th serg't W. A. Rainey..............2d serg't R. H. Rice................... 5th serg't J. A. Wolbert.............. . 2d co'l J. H. C. Kelley............ Private W. F. Clark...............

Co. C

I Regiment.

Cause.

First..........Expiration term of enlistment.

C

. First.......... Expiration of term. First......... .Expiration of term. Removal from state. First..........

C C C

C

First.......... Removal from state.

W. W. Bassford ..........

.

Private

C

First......... Continuous absence from state.

C. H. Clunn ................

Private

C

Roland I. flopper ....... Private

George E. Miller........ Private

E

. First..........Expiration of term. First..........Expiration of term. First..........Expiration of term. First..........Change of residence. First..........Expiration of term.

T. L. Lynch................ .Private

E

Second.:... Distance from armory.

Levi C. Lovell............ Private

E

Second..:.. Over age subject to military duty.

E

Second..... inability to attend drills.

F

Second..... Removal from county.

. B. T. Carr............ . ....... Private

J. B. Williman............ Private

Noble Wallingford..... Private

.

. J. G. Lawrence............Private

C E E

John H. Morris........... Private

F

. . Second ...... Removal from county.

J. Munter ................... Private

G

Second._. Removal from state.

C

Second ..... Expiration of term.

H

Second ..... Removal from county.

H

Second..... Removal from county.

II

Second

K

Second ..... Removal from county.

William IllcWilliam... Private

. . C. J. Bowman ............. Private Orville D. Berry .......... Private Jesse H. Arant ............ Private Ed. C. Dixon ............... Private John U. O'Keefe ......... Private

W. E. Coul ...................Private J. R. McIntyre............. Private Seymour L. Hall .......... Private

B B B

Charles J. Smyser........ Private

B

EXHIBIT K.

rst......... Expiration of term.

SPECIAL ORDERS. GE&ERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, April 28, 1891. Special Order No. 1: The case of the State of Washington on the relation of W. H. Gorham vs. Charles B. Ames, second lieutenant elect of D company, first regiment, having been tried before the superior court of King county, J. J. presiding, and the said court having entered judgLi.chtenburg, jjudge, presiding, ment of ouster from the said office of second lieutenant of company D, first regiment, first brigade, National Guard of Washington, against the said Charles B. Ames, and that he do not in any way intermeddle or concern himself with said office; and that the relator recover his costs to be taxed against the respondent, it is ordered that Chas. E. Claypool, judge advocate general, prepare and take the necessary appeal from the judgment of said court to the supreme court of the state for final determination of this question. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

. .

...... Removal to Oregon. .

OF

WASHINGTON GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

First cay... Removal from state. First cay... Absence from city. First cay... Unable to attend drills on account business. First cay... Removal from state.

By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

.

OLYMPIA, June 23, 1891. Special Order No. 2: Permission of the governor of the State of Oregon having been obtamed therefor, the companies B and C of the second regiment of infantry, N. G. W., tinder command of Colonel E. W. Pike, are granted leave to visit The Dalles in said State of Oregon for the purpose of participating in the celebration of the Fourth of July at that place. No expense on account of transportation will attach to the state under this permit. The provisions of law relating to parades of National Guard of Washington on the Fourth of July in the matter of pay and subsistence will

apply. By

order of the commander-in-chief.

R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. (199)


200

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, September 1, 1891. Special Order No. 3: Second Lieutenant-elect Charles B. Ames, of D company, first regiment, will report to Colonel Chas. E. Claypool, judge advocate general, for the purpose of rendering such assistance as may be desired by the judge advocate general in accomplishing an appeal to the supreme court of the state in the case of the State of Washington in relation of W. H. Gorham vs. Charles B. Ames, respondent. The said Ames will render such assistance as may be required by the judge advocate general in accomplishing said appeal. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, September 1, 1891. Special Order No. 4: Brevet Lieutenant Colonel F. E. Trotter, fourteenth U. S. infantry, under detail by the secretary of war as military instructor for the National Guard of Washington, is instructed to proceed to Vancouver, Tacoma, Seattle, Fort Townsend and Whatcom, and instruct the companies of the first regiment of infantry and first battalion of cavalry located at said places, in small arms practice. The commandants of said companies will report with their respective commands to Lieutenant Colonel Trotter for such instruction as in the opinion of the military instructor may be necessary. The necessary expense in setting up rifle range and targets will be taken up by the company commanders on voucher form 11. â&#x20AC;˘ Commanding officers will preserve the empty shells and return them to the chief of ordnance to be reloaded. Lieutenant Colonel Trotter will visit the following places on the following dates: Vancouver, September 3 to 7, 1891; Tacoma, September 7th to 13th; Seattle, September 14th to 19th; Port Townsend, September 19th to 21st; Whatcom, September 23d to 25th. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, September 22, 1891. Special Order No. 5: The proceeding and finding of dismissal from the service of the National Guard of Washington, of the general court martial convened

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

201

on the 18th day of August, A. D. 1890, under special order No. 9, series 1890, for the trial of Second Lieutenant W. H. Gorham, of company D, first infantry regiment, first brigade, N. G. W., having been set aside by a decree of the superior court of King county, Judge J. J. Lichtenburg presiding, and the state not having taken an appeal from said decree within the time allowed by law, IT IS ORDERED That said Second Lieutenant W. H. Gorham report for duty to the commanding officer of said company D, and enter upon the discharge of the same. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 6: OLYMPIA, September 18, 1891. Such regiments or companies of the National Guard of Washington as may desire to participate in the exercises of 'Military Day" at the exhibition of the Western Washington Industrial Association at Tacoma, on the 23d inst., are hereby granted permission so to do. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 6j: OLYMPIA, October 14, 1891. I. Brevet Lieutenant Colonel F. E. Trotter, fourteenth U. S. infantry, under detail by the secretary of war, as military instructor for the National Guard of Washington, is instructed to proceed to Goldendale, Centerville, Waitsburg, Dayton, Pomeroy, Spokane, Sprague, North Yakima, and Ellensburgh, and instruct the companies of the second regiment of infantry and first battalion cavalry at said places, in small arms practice. 2. The commandants of said companies will report with their respective commands to Lieutenant Colonel Trotter upon such dates as he may designate, for such instruction as in the opinion of the military instructor may be necessary. 3. The necessary expense of setting up rifle range and targets will be taken up by the company commanders on voucher form 11.


202

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

4. Company commanders of all companies will preserve the empty shells and return them to the adjutant general to be reloaded. By order of the commander-in-chief. H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, October 19,189t. Special Order No. 7: A general court martial is hereby appointed to meet at the city of Olympia on the 5th day of November, 1891, or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the trial of Colonel J. C. Haines, commanding first infantry regiment, National Gurd of Washington, and such other parties as may be brought before it. DETAIL FOR THE COURT. 1. Brigadier General A. P. Curry. 2. Colonel E. W. Pike, second infantry regiment. 3. Colonel Henry Landes, paymaster general. 4. Colonel John D. McIntyre, chief of engineers. 5. Colonel J. Kennedy Stout, chief signal officer. 6. Colonel Frank T. Gilbert, assistant quartermaster general on staff of commander-in-chief. 7. Colonel Wellington Clarke, assistant inspector general on staff of commander-in-chief. Judge advocate, First Lieutenant Chas. R. Derr. The court will sit without regard to hours. No other officers than those named can be assembled without manifest injury to the service. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, . OLYMPIA, October 19, 1891. Special Order No. 8: 1. Charges have been preferred against Colonel John C. Haines, commanding the first infantry regiment, National Guard of Washington, and court martial for his trial ordered to convene at Olympia on November 5, 1891, he is hereby placed in arrest. 2. Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Green, first infantry regiment, National Guard of Washington, is ordered to assume command of the regiment. By order of the commander-in-chief. H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

203

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA., October 28, 1891. Special Order No. 9: Upon the application of Captain L. S. Booth, commanding B company, first infantry regiment, for the action of an inspector upon certain property reported as unserviceable, Colonel E. M. Carr, assistant adjutant general, will inspect and report upon the condition of six helmets, six dress coats, twenty-eight blouses, twenty-five pairs of trousers, twentyfive overcoats and twenty-five fatigue coats, for which Captain Booth is responsible. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, November 2, 1891. Special Order No. 10: For good and sufficient reasons, First Lieutenant C. H. Derr is excused from service as judge advocate of the general court martial called in special order No. 7, c. s., and Captain Charles H. Merriam, second infantry regiment, is hereby detailed instead. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, November 4, 1891. Special Order No. 11: A board of survey is hereby convened for the purpose of examining and reporting upon the condition of certain arms and equipments, for which Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Green, late captain of company B, first infantry regiment, is responsible; of which the following is a list: 2 arms chests, 1 bugle, 12 bayonets, 12 bayonet scabbards, 20 belts and plates, 20 cartridge boxes, 10 canteens and straps, 48 Cross rifles, 48 cap letters, 48 cap numbers, 1,000 cartridges, rifle ball, 'caliber 45; 20 gun slings, 10 blanket bags, 12 rifles, Springfield, caliber 45; 1 sword, officer's; 4 swords, sergeant's; 4 swords, belts and plates, sergeant's; 50 screwdrivers, combination; 12 sight covers, 20 blouses, fatigue; 20 caps, fatigue; 17 coats, dress; 10 coats, over; 23 trousers, infantry.


204

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

205

DETAIL FOR THE BOARD.

DETAIL FOR BOARD.

Colonel E. M. Carr, assistant adjutant general. Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg, chief of ordnance. Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, assistant commissary general. Said board will meet at Seattle on the 17th day of November, 1891, at the hour of 10 o'clock in the forenoon, and examine closely into and report upon the condition of said property, and inquire closely into the cause of the loss or destruction of the property named, and report upon the responsibility therefor, and whether or not that on hand shall be condemned. By order of the commander-in-chief. H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

Colonel B. M. Carr, assistant adjutant general. Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general. Captain B. S. Ingraham, commanding E company, first infantry. Said board will inquire into the condition of the state property to be examined, report upon that lost or missing, if any, and the responsibility therefor. By order of the commander-in-chief. H. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 1: OLYMPIA, January 14, 1892.

1. Captain George H. Jones, commanding I company, first infantry regiment, at Fort Townsend, will muster his command for inspection on Thursday, January 28, 1892, at the hour of 8 o'clock P. M. He will prepare muster rolls in triplicate and present to the inspecting officer previous to inspection. 2. Colonel Henry Landes, Paymaster general, will inspect company I, first infantry regiment, on the date aforesaid, and make full return directly to the inspector general, ofâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; (a) The care and condition of the uniforms and equipments. (b) The number of members in attendance at said inspection, and the number of each article of military supplies on hand. c) The condition and character of the reports kept by the company. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Major and Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 2: OLYMPIA, February 4, 1892.

A board of survey will convene at Seattle on the 15th day of February, 1892, at 10 o'clock A. Al., or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the purpose of examining and reporting upon the condition of certain arms and equipments in the possession of company D, first infantry regiment, for which Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg, chief of ordnance, late captain of said company D, is responsible.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS. NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 3: OLYMPIA, March 14, 1892.

1. A board of survey will convene at Tacoma on Wednesday, March 23, 1892, or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the purpose of examining and reporting upon the condition of certain arms, clothing and equipments in the possession of company C, first infantry regiment, for which Captain W. J. Fife is responsible. 2. Captain Fife will make an invoice of all state property issued to him, and which has subsequently come into his possession, and deliver to the board of survey for their consideration. FJ

DETAIL OF BOARD.

Lieutenant Colonel Albert Whyte, assistant commissary general. Lieutenant Colonel H. F. Garretson, assistant quartermaster general. Major F. A. Gaus, first infantry regiment. Said board will inquire closely into and report the condition of the said state property; also all property reported damaged, lost or missing, if any, and who is responsible for said damage or loss. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant Genera]. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 4: OLYMPIA, March 21, 1892.

The board of survey, ordered to examine certain property for which Captain W. J. Fife is responsible, will, upon conclusion of said duty, examine and report upon the condition of the following property for which Captain W. S. Shank, commanding G company, first infantry, is


206

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

responsible, to wit: 1 Springfield breech loading rifle, 31 fatigue caps, 1 pair trousers, 39 fatigue blouses, 10 helmets, 6 blankets. Said board will follow the instructions relative to making the report laid down in special order No. 3. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. GJ O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, April 13, 1892. Special Order No. 5: A board of survey will convene at Seattle on Friday, April 22, 1892, for the purpose of examining and reporting upon the condition of the following military property, for which Captain E. S. Ingraham, commanding E company, first infantry regiment, is responsible, to .wit: 6 lniform dresscoats, 6 overcoats, 26 pairs pants, 28 fatigue caps, 26 blouses. DETAIL FOR BOARD. Colonel E. M. Carr, assistant adjutant general. Colonel C. L. F. Kellogg, chief of ordnance. Captain L. S. Booth, company B, first infantry regiment. Said board will inquire closely into the condition of said property, and as to loss, damage, serviceableness and responsibility for said loss or damage. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, May 6, 1892. Special Order No. 6: Companies B, D, E and F of the first infantry regiment, Colonel Greene commanding, are hereby granted permission to visit Port Townsend for the purpose of participating in the celebration to be held at said city on May 7th and 8th, 1892. 2. No expense to the state shall attach by reason of said permission. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G.. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

207

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 7: OLYMPIA, May 12, 1892. W. B. Buffman and associates, of Clyde, Walla Walla county, seeking admission as a volunteer company into the National Guard of Washington, having accepted the terms of said admission recommended by the military board, Colonel E. W. Pike, commanding the second infantry regiment, will proceed to Clyde, Walla Walla county, and muster said company into the service of the state, making report thereof at the earliest moment possible. Said company, upon muster, will be known as company I, and be attached to the second infantry regiment, Colonel E. W. Pike commanding. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 8: OLYMPIA, May 12, 1892. Captain Wallace Mount, brigade paymaster, will inspect one uniform issued to Harry Purcell, private, ttoop A, first cavalry battalion, Sprague, reported to have been damaged or burned in the fire at Sprague on March 9, 1892. If said uniform is unserviceable, he will condemn the same, and so report through the regular channel to these headquarters. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, Special Order No. 9: OLYMPIA, July 12, 1892. The commander-in-chief acknowledges the receipt of a communication from the field, line and staff officers of the National Guard of Washington, expressing their kind feelings towards him, and their appreciation of his efforts in behalf of the guard. This manifestation of the confidence and appreciation of the National Guard is highly gratifying to the commander-in-chief, and amply repays him for all his efforts to advance and promote the welfare of the guard. Whether as commander-in-chief or as a private citizen he will ever feel a


208

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

deep and lasting interest in the citizen soldiery of Washington, for whom the people of this state entertain the strongest feelings of pride and admiration. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, July 26, 1892. Special Order No. 10: Inspection will be made, by the inspector general, of all military property reported as unserviceable by the boards of survey convened under special orders Nos. 2, 3 and 4. c. s., on the 11th day of August, 1892, or as soon thereafter as the inspector general may designate. Commanding officers of companies B, C, D. E and G, of the first infantry, will lay out for inspection the property reported upon by said boards of survey, that no delay may follow the duty. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, August 2, 1892. Special Order No. 11: By request of his excellency, the governor of the State of Oregon, permission is given two companies of infantry and one detachment of artillery to enter the State of Washington, for the purpose of holding an encampment at Long Beach, from August 6th to 14th, inclusive. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, October 8, 1892. Special Order No. 12: Brigadier General R. G. O'Brien, adjutant general, N. G. W., is directed to proceed to Chicago. Illinois, for the purpose of attending a convention of the adjutants general of the several states there to as-

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT..

209

semble for the consideration of matters pertaining to the good of the National Guard of the various states and territories, to be held on or about October 18, 1892. By order of ELISHA P. FERRY, Governor.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, December 19, 1892. Special Order No. 13: Leave of absence for the period of six months, to leave the state, is granted Major Fred A. Gans, to date from November 1, 1892. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, December 29, 1892. Special Order No. 14: The commanding officer of company A, first regiment of infantry, National Guard of Washington, at Olympia, will hold his command in readiness for escort duty on the occasion of the inauguration of Governorelect J. H. McGraw, January 11, 1893. 2. Permission is given such companies of the National Guard as may desire, to visit Olympia and take part in the exercises, but no expense therefor shall attach to the state. 3. Officers of the general staff and commanding officers of troops who shall attend will report to the adjutant general for assignment. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, December 29, 1892. Special Order No. 15: The action of the inspector general in condemning as unfit for further use, in accordance with the reports of the boards of survey heretofore made of the following named property, is hereby approved, to wit: Property for which Captain C. L. F. Kellogg, company D, first infantry, â&#x20AC;&#x201D;14


210

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

is responsible: 26 pairs uniform trousers, 49 fatigue caps, 39 blouses, 3 sergeant's sword belts, 10 helmets. Property for which Captain I. M. Howell, company C, first infantry, is responsible: 1 overcoat, 39 pairs trousers, 42 fatigue caps, 60 helmets, 1 breech loading Springfield rifle, caliber 45, 1 trumpet. Property for which Captain W. S. Shank, company G, first infantry, is responsible: 31, fatigue caps, 1 pair trousers, 38 fatigue blouses, 10 helmets, 6 single woolen blankets, 1 canteen. Property for which Captain E. S. Ingraham, company E, first infantry, is responsible: 1 uniform dresscoat, 6 helmets, 17 fatigue blouses, 28 fatigue caps, 17 pairs trousers. The above named items will be dropped from the property return of the commanding officers of said companies, and a copy of this order attached to said return is authority therefor. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AYER, Assistant Adjutant General.

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, NATIONAL GUARD OF WASHINGTON, ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE, OLYMPIA, December 31, 1891. Special Order No. 16: The action of the inspector general in condemning as unfit for further use, in accordance with the report of the special inspection held pursuant to special orders No. 9, dated October 28, 1891, heretofore made of the following state property for which Captain L. S. Booth, commanding B company, first infantry, is responsible, is hereby approved, to wit: 8 helmets, 21 blouses, 13 pairs trousers, 32 fatigue caps, 10 gun slings. The above named items will be dropped from the property return of said company commander, and a copy of these orders attached to said return as authority therefor. Captain Booth will turn in to the chief of ordnance, five breech loading Springfield rifles, calibre 45, for repairs. By order of the commander-in-chief. R. G. O'BRIEN, Adjutant General. Official: CHAS. H. AvER, Assistant Adjutant General.


EXHIBIT L-HISTORICAL ROSTER. GOVERNOR AND GENERAL STAFF NAME, GRADE

DATE

SERVICE. CO.

BORN.

RESIDENCE. In the Army of the United States.

In the National Guard.

Governor. ELISA P. FERRY ................. .........Michigan .................. Colonel of cavalry on staff of governor Olympia. Commander-in-chief, of State of Illinois from 1862 to 1865, and detailed to represent the state in the organization and muster of Illinois volunteers during the war of the Brigadier general, rebellion. RO5SELL G. O'BRIEN .......... .........Ireland, 1846 ...... Private company D, 134th Illinois volunPrivate Ellsworth Zouaves (governor's Olympia. Adjutant general, teers infantry, April 28, 1864; second guards), of Chicago, 1862 to 1864; first Ex officio quartermaster .lieutenant May 31. 1864; served in lieutenant 1865 to April, 1870; resigned general, commissary summer campaign in Kentucky from April 12, 1870; brigadier general and gen'l, inspector gen'l May to September, 1864: ordered to quartermaster general N. G. W. 1881; and ehiefof ordnance, Saint Louis with regiment and served elected adjutant general January 10, January 7, 1881. in the campaign against the rebel 1881, to October 12, 1890; reelected general, Price, in Missouri, 1864; musbrigadier general and adjutant gentered out with regiment October 25, eral, quartermaster general, commis1864. sary general, inspector general and chief of ordnance, October 12, 1890, Colonels, with rank from .January, 1881. EUGENE M. CARR .............. ....... Illinois, 1859 ...... ....................................................................First lieutenant Vermont National Seattle. .Assistant adju Aadjutant genGuard; second lieutenant company eral. B, first regiment, N. G. W., 1884; first May 12, 1890, lieutenant 1885; captain company E, first regiment, 1886; colonel and assistant adjutant general, May 12, 1890. HENRY LANDES ......... ................ Germany ............................................................................... Lieutenant colonel and assistant adju- Port Townsend. Paymaster general. tent general 1883 to 1889; colonel and April 20, 1889. assistant quartermaster general April 20,1889; reappointed and assigned to duty as paymaster general on staff of commander-in-chief, May 20,1890,with rank from April 20. 1889.

.

.

.

EDWARD L. SMITE Surveyor general. May 12, 1890.

Appointed colonel and surveyor genera!, N. G. W., on governor's staff, May 12, 1890.

Seattle.

Private company F, fourth regiment, National Guard Pennsylvania, 1873 to 1875; private company (1, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., 1887; first lieutenant, September 13, 1887; major and assistant adjutant general on staff of commander-in-chief, June, 1888; colonel and chief signal officer on staff of commander-in-chief, May 12, 1890.

Spokane.

and assistant quartermaster .Captain general on staff of adjutant general, N. G. W., 1883; colonel and assistant quartermaster general on staff of corn mander-in'chief, May 12, 1890.

Seattle.

Appointed colonel and chief of enginears on staff of commander-in-chief, May 12, 1890.

Seattle.

Appointed colonel and commissary general staff commander-in-chief, N. G. W., May 12, 1800.

Tacoma.

Served in National Guard of California; appointed colonel and assistant inspectorgeneral on staff of commanderin-chief, N. G. W., April 28, 1891.

Walla Waite.

B

N

J. KENNEDY STOUT Chief signal officer. May 12, 1890.

FRANK T. GILBERT Colonel and assistant quartermaster gen'l. May 12, 1890.

0

. r

......

.

J. D. MCINTYRE Chief of engineers. May 12, 1890. I WM. L. VIsscmER ............... ........... Assistant commissary general. May 12, 1890.

.

-i

company Independent talion, July 7, 1861; seeit same company, July ered out December 31, n term of service; reencompany I, 24th Kenvolunteers, January 1, ed corporal January 1, pd color sergeant 24th kntry March 10, 1862; of service February 27, n term of service.

B

N WELLINGTON M. CLARK Assistant inspector general. April 28, 1891.

-


GOVERNOR AND GENERAL STAFF —CONTINUED. SERVICE. NAME, GRADE AND DATE OF RANK.

CO.

RESIDENCE.

BORN. In the National Guard.

In the Army of the United States.

Colonels— concluded. CHARLES L. F. KELLOGG Chief of ordnance, October 1, 1891.

... ..Wisconsin,1858.....................................................................

Three years and six months in Wisconsin N. G.; commissioned first lieutenant company C, fourth battalion, W. N.G.,August24,1881; resigned November 15, 1882; commissioned second lieutenant company B, first regiment, N. G. W., November 4,1884; commissioned first lieutenant company B, first regiment, N. G. W., September 22, 1885; commissioned captaincompany D, first regiment, N. G. W., May 1,1888; colonel and chief of ordnance on staff of commander-in-chief, October 1, 1891. -

Lseutenanl Colonels.

... .............

Scotland ALBERT WHYTE ... Assistant commissary general. January 10, 1888.

Scotch Fusileers, Montreal, ..............Captain Canada; captain company C, Tacoma

Tacoma.

Guards, first infantry regiment, N. G. W., July 28,1884; resigned 1885; captain and aid-dc-camp July 22, 1885; commissioned lieutenant colonel and assistant commissary general on staff of adjutant general January 10, 1888.

........ .....Pennsylvania....

HIRAM F. GAERETSON Assistant quartermaster general. June 12, 1888.

Enlisted as private in company A, 136th Pennsylvania volunteer infantry, August, 1862; appointed commissary 5crgeant, August, 1862; mustered out June, 1863.

Commissioned lieutenant colonel and assistant quartermaster general on staff of the adjutant general, June 12, 1888.

Tacoma.

............ ....... .................................. . ...............................................

.

Lieutenant colonel and aid-dc-camp to . commander-in-chief, N. G. W., May 12, 1890.

Tacoma.

..............................................................................

.

Appointed lieutenant colonel and aiddc-camp on staff of governor, May 12, 1890.

New Whatcom.

CLINTON P. FERRY Aid-dc-camp. May 12, 1890.

..................... .......

C. M. ATKINS Aid-de-camp. May 12. 1890.

Loris FRANKLIN BOYD. Aid-de-camp. May 12, 1890.

CHAS. REICHENBACE Aid-de-camp. May 12, 1890.

...................

ALovsItJs J. KANE Assistant inspectorgeneriil. December 1, 1892.

. Michigan

• Iowa, 1859

...............Enlisted in company A, N. G. W., at Walla Walla, 1880; appointed corporal and promoted to sergeant during same year; elected second lieutenant and commissioned July 13, 1881, by Governor Newell; served until company disbanded, having received no aid from state; reenlisted as private in company A on its reorganization in 1888; appointed aid on staff commander-in-chief, May 12, 1890.

......................................................................

Germany, 1842

.................

(ltptaiiss.

..............

..........................

B. W. COINER Aid-dc-camp. December 25, 1891.

.

.................Master's mate, U.S. navy, March 14,1861;

Canada

Connecticut

.................................................................. ......

Lieutenant colonel and aid-dc-camp on staff of commander-in-chief, May 12, 1890.

Spokane.

Tacoma.

Lieutenant colonel and assistant inspector general on staff of adjutant general, December 1, 1892.

ensign, U. S. navy, September 20,1864; took part in 11 naval engagements of the late war; was wounded twice in action; pensioned for wounds; pension certificate navy, No. 5751; resigned from the navy March 1, 1871; appointed secretary of the U. S. Naval Home, Philadelphia, Pa., July 16,1890; resigned July 16, 1891.

Jf,ijor. CHAS. H. AYRR Assistant adjutant general. May 12, 1890.

EUGENE B. WISE Aid-dc-camp. August!, 1890.

Seattle.

.

Private company A. first reciment. N G. Washington Territory, 1885; riUstered outwith company January, 1886; appointed major and assistant adjutaut general on staff of commanderin-chief, May 12, 1890.

Olympia.

First lieutenant and adjutant second infantry regiment, N. G. W, July 27, 1888; promoted captain and aid-dccamp on staff of adjutant general, August 1, 1890.

Goldendale.

Colonel commanding Washington division Sons of Veterans; appointed captain and aid-dc-camp on staff of adjutant general December 25, 1891.

Tacoma.


Lo

FIRST BRIGADE, N. G. W. NAME, GRADE AND DATE CO. OF RANK.

BORN.

In the Army of the United Stales.

SERVICE. RESIDENCE. In the National Guard.

Brigadier Generat,

AMOS P. CURRY ................. ........Maine ................Private in company A, 13th Illinois in- Elected brigadier general by the people, Spokane. with rank from January 7, 1889; reJanuary 7, 1889. fantry, from April, 1861, to August, July 7, 1836. elected October 6, 1890. 1861; second lieutenant company 18, 10th Missouri cavalry, from August, 1861, to August, 1862; captain company B, 10th Missouri cavalry, from August, 1862, to October,1864; colonel first West Tennessee infantry from October, 1864, to December, 1865. Lieutenant Colonels.

S. W. SCOTT ........ ............... . .......New York, 1833.. First sergeant and color bearer 7th New Private company B, 7th N.Y. N. G., Jan- Seattle. uary, 1854; first sergeant, 1856; color Assistant inspectorgenYork N. G., April 16,1861; first lieusergeant April 16, 1861; major first eral. tenant and assistant quartermaster battalion, N. G. W., March 12, 1886; March 18, 1891. 174th New York volunteer infantry; major and assistant provost marshal captain and aid-dc-camp on staff of February 8, 1886; lieutenant colonel (leneral N. A. M. Dudley, commanding brigade; again promoted and de- first regiment, N. G. W., January 1, tailed on staff of Major General Auger. 1888; lieutenant colonel and assistant inspector general 1st brigade, March 18, 1891. MARSHALL K. SNELL ......... ........ Iowa, 1860 ......... .................................................................... Private troop B, first cavalry battalion, Tacoma. June27, 1890; promoted lieutenant colAssistant quartermaster onel and assistant quartermaster gengeneral. eral first brigade, N. G. W., March 18, March 18, 1891. 1891. EUGENE J. FELLOWS .................. Louisiana, 1847...................................................................... Private company G, second infantry Spokane. regiment, N. G. W.; first lieutenant Assistant adjutant genand commissary, second infantry, eral. July 1, 1888; lieutenant colonel and October 21, 1891. assistant adjutant general, first brigade, October 21, 1891.

J. A. HATFIELD .................. ........ England ............ ............................ ...................................... ..Appointed assistant commissary gen- Seattle. Assistant commissary eral on staff of adjutant general, N. general. G. W., February 9, 1886; resigned; February 27, 1892. first lieutenant and commissary first infantry regiment May 23,1887; promoted lieutenant colonel and assistant commissary general on brigade staff February 27, 1892. Captain. WALLACE MOUNT .......................Oregon ..................................................................................Private troop A, first cavalry battalion, Sprague. Brigade paymaster. March 1,1888; first lieutenant and payApril 14, 1892. master second infantry regiment June 5,1891; promoted captain and brigade First Lieutenants, paymaster April 14, 1892. W. E. CROMWELL ............... ........ Ohio, 1864 ............ ....... .............................................................Private company G, first infantry regiAid-dc-camp. ment, N. U. W., December 12, 1889; March 18, 1891. . promoted first lieutenant and aid-decamp to brigade commander March 18, 1891. C. F. LAKE .......................... ................................... ................................................................... ..Appointed first lieutenant and aid-dc- Spokane. Aid-dc-camp. camp to brigade commander June 17, June 17, 1892. 1892. ELL5WORTII P. GILLETTE...................................... .................................................................... Appointed first lieutenant and aid-dc- Spokane. Aid-de-camp. camp to brigade commander FebruFebruary 27, 1892. ary 27, 1892.

to


FIRST INFANTRY REGIMENT.

NAME, GRADE AND DATE OF RANK.

SERVICE. CO.

-

BORN.

RESIDENCE. In the Army of the United States.

Colonel.

......................

JOSEPH GEEENE March 24, 1892.

England

In the National Guard.

............................

Private company A, fifth infantry, N. G. C., May 4, 1875 reenlisted May 4,1878; sergeant May 4, 1879; second lieutenant June 3, 1881; first lieutenant December 12, 1881; resigned June 19, 1883; first lieutenant company B, first infantry, N. G. W., April 15,1884; captain November 4, 1884; lieutenant colonel May 25, 1891; colonel March 24, 1892.

Lieutenant Colonel.

........................................

WILLIAM S. SHANK March 24, 1892.

Private company G, first regiment, N. G. W.; first lieutenant, captain, lieutenant colonel, March 24, 1892.

Seattle.

Tacoma.

Major.

.........................

Fitcu A. GAyS January 5, 1890.

.....................

Wisconsin,1865

Enlisted as private in company B, first infantry regiment, National Guard Minnesota, July 3, 1883; appointed corporal April 21,1885; appointed first sergeant April 12,1887; commissioned captain June 5, 1888; elected captain of company U, first infantry regiment, N. G. W., December 12, 1889; elected major first regiment January 4, 1890.

REGIMENTAL STAFF. Surgeon.

.......... .........................................

Major L. H. DAW5ON June 29, 1890.

Chaplain.

...........

Capt. LEMUEL H. WELLS May 23, 1887.

Assistant Surgeon.

..............

Capt. H. E. HENDERSON May 2, 1892. Adjutant.

............

Lieut. CHAS. ESPLIN, JR February 19, 1892.

Quartermaster.

............

Lieut. HERMAN CHAPIN June 27, 1891.

Commissary.

................

Lieut. H. D. ALLISON March 24, 1892.

.New York, 1841.. Second lieutenant October 4, 1862; first lieutenant July 23. 1863.

Private company B, first infantry, N. G. W., 1884; first lieutenant 1888; promoted major and surgeon first infantry regiment June 29, 1890.

Seattle.

Not promoted. (Elected bishop of the diocese of Snokane.)

Spokane.

..........

New Whatcom.

.................................................................. ..........

Seattle.

Cadet adjutant Cornell college 1886; captain and assistant surgeon, N. U. W., May 2, 1892.

Indiana, 1862

.. Private company A, first infantry regiment, National Guard of Minnesota, January 31,1886; honorable discharge on account of leaving the state July 15,1889; private company G, first infantry regiment, Oregon National Guard, July 1889; second lieutenant company E, same regiment. February 28, 1890; resigned September, 1890; acting adjutant first regiment, N. U. W., August, 1890; first lieutenant and adjutant first infantry regiment, N. U. W., May 1,1891; resigned February 19, 1892; reappointed first lieutenant and adjutant first infantry regiment with rank from February 19, 1892.

..Canada, 1866

.......................................................................

.. Massachusetts 1858.

................................................................................

.. Michigan

Tacoma.

Private company E, first infantry regiment, N. U. 'V., March 23, 1888; corporal 1889; first lieutenant and quartermaster first infantry regiment, N. G. W., June 27, 1891. Private company B, 1st infantry, N. U. W., June 7, 1887; corporal, January, 1888; sergeant, June, 1888; regimental commissary sergeant, 1889; first lieutenant and commissary, March 24, 1892.

-

Inspector S. A. P.

............... . . . . ................................................................................................

Lieut. JAMRS Ross March 24, 1892.

Private company C, first regiment, N. U. W.; first sergeant same company; second lieutenant, November 27,1889; promoted first lieutenant and inspector small arms practice first regiment, March 24, 1892.

Tacoma.


FIRST INFANTRY REGIMENT- CONTINUED. SERICE. NAME, GRADE AND DATE OF RANK.

CO.

BORN.

RESIDENCE. In the Army of the United Rates.

In the National Guard.

COMPANY OFFICERS. Captains.

.......... .F

J. J. WEISENBURGER September 17, 1890.

.............. ................................................................... . Private company C, first artillery, Na-

Illinois

.................. ................................................................... .Elected captain company I at organiza-

.................... .I

Ohio

GEO. H. JONES September 17, 1890.

.................. .E ......... .B

LAWRENCE S. BOOTH June Z7,1891.

................. . A

C. S. REINRART December U, 1891.

April 8, 1852

.........................................................................

FRANK L. HILTON............. . D March 14, 1892.

Enlisted February, 1886; promoted corporal April 8,1888; promoted sergeant June 18, 1889; elected second lieutenant June 17,1890; elected captain February 18, 1891.

....................................................... ............... . Enlisted in Seattle Rifles (company B)

Michigan, 1861

September 1, 1884; promoted corporal September 1, 1885; promoted sergeant May 1,1886; promoted sergeant major, first regiment, June 16, 1888; commissioned second lieutenant June 19,1889; commissioned first lieutenant November 18, 1890; commissioned captain June 27, 1891.

..........................................................................

Washington April 5, 1856.

I

.................... .

Port Townsend.

tion of company September 17,1890.

E. S. INGRARAM February 18, 1891.

I. M. HOWELL April 15, 1892.

New Whateom.

tional Guard California; promoted, respectively, corporal, sergeant and second lieutenant; nine years service; captain N. G. W. September 17, 1890.

Washington, D. C., 1866

............... ...................................................................

Enlisted in N. G. W., company B, seeond regiment, 1885; appointed first sergeant; commissioned first lieutenant company B, second regiment, N. G. W., January 5,1887; commissioned captain company B, said regiment, May 11, 1887; resigned March, 1891; commissioned captain of company A, first regiment, N. G. W., with rank from December 11. 1891.

Enlisted company C, District of Colum.bia National Guard, in December, 1887; enlisted in company D, first regiment, N. (1W., May 27,1890; appointed corporal, July 4, 1890; appointed color sergeant in September, 1890; elected first lieutenant, November 3, 1890; elected captain, March 14, 1892.

..................................................................................... .Private company C, first infantry regi-

C. Iowa

-

Seattle.

Tacoma.

ment, N. G. W., September 1, 1885; fourth corporal October 1, 1885; third corporal September 1, 1886; second sergeant October 20, 1886; first sergeant May 25, 1887; second lieutenant March 13, 1889; first lieutenant November 27, 1889; captain April 15, 1892.

............ ..0

CHAS. W. BILLINGS April 15, 1892.

Vermont

................................................................................Private company G, first regiment, N.

First Lieutenants.

.................. . H

FRANK MORRIS March 27, 1890.

.................. ..I

......................

E

Vancouver.

Ohio

..................................................................................Elected first lieutenant at organization

Port Townsend.

of company, September 17, 1890.

............................................................................ Private company B, first infantry reg-

Seattle.

iment, N. G. W., May 29, 1889; first lieutenant February 18, 1891.

................. ..0

.................. .

........................................................................Private company IT, first infantry, N. G. .

E. F. STAFFORD February 20,1891.

MARK B. REED December 11, 1891.

Oregon

W., March 1, 1888; first lieutenant March 27, 1890.

CHAS. B. WOOD September 17,18W. F. L. STINSON February 18, 1891.

Tacoma.

G. W., December 12,1889; fifth sergeant January, 1891; second lieutenant February 10, 1891; captain April 15, 1892.

A

England,1861....................................................................Private company 0, first infantry, N. G. W., December 12, 1889; second sergeant February, 1890; first lieutenant February 20, 1891. Washington

...... ................................................................... . Private company A, first infantry regiment, December, 1891; first lieutenant December 11, 1891.

-.

-

...

,.

Tacoma.

Olympia.

Lo Lo

,...


FIRST INFANTRY REGIMENT-CONTINUED. SERVICE. NAME, GRADE AND DATE OF RANK.

Co.

RESIDENCE.

BORN. In the Army of the United States.

First Lieutenants-con e'd.

....................

GE0. D. ALLEN February 16, 1892.

K

.............

... . ...................................................................

Massachusetts 1860.

Washington 1861.

............

A

Indiana

......................

D

Ohio, 1860

M. M. BARTLETT April 15,1892.

..................

G

Iowa, 1869

GEO. H. FORrsoN May 3, 1892.

BGeorgia, 1860

JAMES G. JOLLY May 4, 1892.

C

Second Lieutenants. WALTER J. MILROY December 11, 1891.

GEO. W. SAUM March 11, 1892.

Cadet Massachusetts Agricultural college military department for three years; private company K, first infantry regiment, N. G. W., 1890; fourth sergeant September 17, 1890; first sergeant April 1, 1891 first lieutenant February 16, 1892.

Aberdeen.

Enlisted in company C', N. G. W., April 4, 1889; promoted to corporal July 4, 1890; promoted to sergeant July 4, 1891; reenlisted as private in company C, N. CL W., April 4,1892; promoted to first lieutenant April 15, 1892.

Tacoma.

Lieutenant colonel and aid-de-camp on governor's stall' April 20, 1889; second lieutenant company A, first infantry regiment, N.G.W., December 11, 1891.

Olympia.

Private company C, first infantry regiment, Ohio National Guard, June 1, 1879; discharged and entered the United States service; private company D, first infantry regiment, N. G. W., April 27,1889; first sergeant February 10, 1892; second lieutenant March 11, 1892.

Seattle.

Private company G, first infantry rcgiment, N. G. W., December 12,1889; corporal February 20,1891; third sergeant February 27,1891; second sergeant December 10, 1891; first sergeant February 22, 1892; second lieutenant April 15 1892

Tacoma.

...........

C

WILLIE F. CLARKE April 15, 1892.

In the National Guard.

.................. .............

Private company G, 14th United States infantry, July 3,1882; corporal March 1, 1884; honorable discharge July 3, 1887.

.............................................................................

........................................ .....................................

New York, 1863

Private company B, first regiment, N. Seattle G. W., April, 1889; corporal November, 1889; fifth sergeant December 2, 1890; first sergeant November 10,1891; second lieutenant May 3, 1892. Private 27th separate company, National Tacoma. Guard State of New York, January, 1879; honorable discharge from department 1880 (left state); private company A, 50th Canadian militia, January, 1861; corporal June, 1881, sergeant July, 1882; first sergeant September, 1883; assistant paymaster January, 1884; resigned July 30, 1885; private Montreal garrison artillery September 1,1885; honorable discharge July, 1886 (left province); private company C, first infantry regiment, N. G. W., May 1, 1888; corporal July 18, 1890; sergeant March 7,1891; quartermaster sergeant July 2, 1891; second lieutenant May 4, 1892.


R1W(N1) INFANTRY REGIMENT.

NAME, GRADE AND DATE OF BANK.

___

SERVICE. RESIDENCE.

BORN.

CO.

In the National Guard.

In the Army of the United States.

Colonel. ...... Maine, 1843.........Enlisted as private in company K, ninth ERodE W. PIKE ................. . Minnesota infantry volunteers, AugJune 1, 1888. ust 22, 1862; served as company clerk; discharged May, 1865.

.

Captain company B, second infantry, N. G. W., December 14,1885; lieutenant colonel second infantry March 26, 1887; colonel June 1, 1888; reelected colonel June 1, 1892.

Goldendale.

First lieutenant company A, Walla Walla artillery, May 18, 1881; captain company A, Walla Walla artillery, August, 1881; designation of this cornpany changed by vote of company to company A, N. G. W., in 1884, infantry; captain company A, N. G. W., May 20, 1884; assistant adjutant general, with rank of captain, March 28,1885; assistant adjutant general with rank of lieutenant colonel March 5, 1887; captain company A, second regiment, N. G. W., May 1, 1888; lieutenant colonel second infantry regiment, N. G. W., April 27, 1891.

Walla Walla.

Private Mayor's Guards, St. Louis, Mo., riots 1877; private company F, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., March 5, 1887; sergeant June 2, 1887; second lieutenant May, 1888; captain August 4, 1890; resigned February 10, 1891; captain company K second infantry, August 25, 1891; major June 1, 1892.

Tekoa.

Appointed major and surgeon of seeond infantry regiment, N. (1W., April 11, 1887.

Wait8burg.

Appointed captain and assistant surgeon November 1, 1889.

Goldendale.

Appointed chaplain of second infantry regiment, with rank of captain from November 1, 1889.

North Yakima.

Lieutenant Colonel. .......Newfoundland.. Enlisted November 3, 1865, G. M. S.; MICHAEL MCCARTHY ......... . quartermaster sergeant company K, 1847.' April Z7,1891. first cavalry, December 23, 1872; first sergeant company K, first cavalry, September 21,1874; regimental quartcrmaster sergeant first cavalry, June 10. 1878; received special mention in report for distinguished service and bravery in the Nez Perce Indian war at the battle of White V Bird Canon, Idaho, June 17, 1877, and recommended for promotion.

Major. K. H. Fox ........................... ........Missouri, 1854 .... ......................................... June 1, 1892.

REGIMENTAL STAFF.

.

Surgeon. Major S. H. HIYDGEN .......... ............................................................................................. April 11, 1887.

Assistant Surgeon. Capt. ALLEN BONEBEAKE., November 1, 1289. Chaplain. Capt. REV. J. T. ESHELMAN, November 1, 1889. Quartermaster. Lieut. EDWIN S. I5AACS.... July 27, 1888.

Private company A, second regiment, N. G. W., May 1, 1886; sergeant January 1, 1887; first lieutenant and regimental quartermaster July 27, 1888. Lieut. GEO. B. BAKER ........ Private company F, second infantry October 1, 1890. regiment, N. G. W., March 6,1887; corporal April 6, 1888; sergeant May 5, 1888; sergeant major June 27,1888; first lieutenant and inspector small arms Adjutant. practice October 1. 1890. Lieut. N. B. BROOKS........... Michigan, 1857...................................................................... Enlisted in company B, N. G. W., DeNovember 10, 1890. cember, 1884; promoted to first lieuCommissary. tenant and adjutant November 10, 1890. Lieut. F. J. ELSENSOHN...... Iowa..................................................................................... Private company H, second infantry, N. March 1, 1891. G. W., October 2,1890; quartermaster sergeant November, 1890; first lieuCOMPANY OFFICERS. tenant and regimental paymaster Captains. March 1, 1891; assigned to duty as commissary subsistence March 31,1892. H. G. SHUHAM................... DI England, 1842.... Enlisted as private in company G, 113th Elected captain in company D, second December 1, 1886. New York state volunteers, August regiment, N. U. W.; date of commis 11, 1862; mustered out August 1, 1865, sion December 1, 1886; retains same with rank of second lieutenant, brevet position to date. first lieutenant; promoted corporal December 13,1862; promoted sergeant April 1, 1864; promoted second lieutenant May 22, 1865; promoted brevet first lieutenant February 10, 1866. Remarks-The 113th New York volunteers was transferred to the seventh New York heavy artillery about September, 1862, and occupied northern defenses of Washington till May, 1864, when ordered to join the second corps army Potomac till March, 1865; ordered to Fort McHenry, Baltimore, until August, 1865, when mustered out.

Walla Walla.

Inspector S. A. P.

Dayton.

Goldendale. Pomeroy.


8ECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT- CoreVINtJED. SERVICE. NAME, GRADE AND DATE OF RANK.

CO.

RESIDENCE.

BORN. In the National Guard.

In the Army of the United States.

Captains- continued.

.........................F

Enlisted in Dayton Grays December 8, .... 1880; fourth sergeant December 15,

Wisconsin, 1852

JOHN CARE May 11, 1887.

Dayton.

1880; third sergeant May 6, 1881; second lieutenant company B, first regiment, N. G. W., December 15, 1881; first lieutenant June 9,1882; first lieutenant December 21, 1882; enlisted in company F, second regiment, N. G. W., March 5, 1887; first lieutenant March 5, 1887; captain May 11, 1887; lieutenant colonel second regiment June, 1890; resigned February 27,1891; captain company F, second regiment, N. G. W., May, 1891.

GEO. W. BII.LINGTON September 7, 1889.

.......... C

Private company C, second regiment, ..... N. G. W., March 3, 1886; second lieu-

Wisconsin,1856

............ .H

HARRY ST. GEORGE October 2, 1890.

........Enlisted in the regular army January

Nov. 15, 1851

30, 1873; discharged as first sergeant company G, second regiment, United States army, January 30, 1878.

Organized company 11, second regiment, N. G. W., October 2, 1890, and commissioned captain of said cornpany October 2, 1890.

captain at organization of corn......................... A ..................................................................................... Elected pany A, second infantry, N. G. W.,

J. E. FROST October 4,1890.

................... B

....... .E

F. Durny ESMELMAN May 2, 1892.

..............

ERNEST W. LyoNs May 5, 1892.

.................

G

................................ ..................................................

Oregon

Missouri

............ ....................................................................

Wisconsin

I

Private company B, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., 1886; second lieutenant January 5, 1887; first lieutenant May 11. 1887; resigned 1888; first lieutenant company E March 17, 1890; captain company E May 2, 1892.

......... ...................................................... ............ .Cadet West Point Military Academy;

Ellensburgli.

.................... .B .................. .K

Oregon

Spokane.

.......................................................................Private

Tekoa.

Missouri, 1854

A

H. C. JACKSON March 24, 1891.

North Yakima.

Clyde.

First Lieutenants.

.......................

Goldendale.

....................................................................... .Enlisted company A, eighteenth regi-

Pittsburg, Pa

ment National Guard of Pennsylvania, November 1, 1875, and served until March 1, 1884; adjutant second regiment, N. G. W., under Colonel C. M. Anderson.

............. . K

HENRY D. KAY August 25, 1891.

Private company B, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., February 24, 1888; first lieutenant August 21,1888; captain March 24, 1891.

resigned; private company C, first infantry, N. G. W.; elected captain company U, but moved away before qualifying; captain company G, second infantry regiment, May 5, 1892.

JOHN W. STEARNS June 17, 1892.

J. P. BECKER October 4, 1890.

Pomeroy.

and commissioned October 4, 1890.

R. D. MCCRLLY March 24, 1891.

WM. B. BUFFUM June 10, 1892.

Centerville.

tenant July 6, 1886; first lieutenant January, 1887; captain September 7, 1889.

.............. ....................................................................

company F, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., June 2,1887; corporal April 6, 1888; first lieutenant May 5,1888; appointed first lieutenant and aid-de-camp on brigade staff February 1, 1889; resigned June, 1892; captain company K, second infantry regiment, June 17, 1892.

ttj

Elected and commissioned first lieuten. ant company A, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., October 4, 1890.

Ellensburgli.

Private company B, second infantry regiment, February 24, 1888; second lieutenant August 21, 1888; first lieutenant March 24, 1891.

Goldendale.

Private company K, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., August., 1891; elected first lieutenant August 25, 1891.

Tekoa.

k

-.4


SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT â&#x20AC;&#x201D;CONTINUED. NAME, GRADE AND DATE OP RANK.

CO.

SERVICE. BORN.

First Lieutenants â&#x20AC;&#x201D;cont'd

.. ...... G

A. W. MCCALLUM September 22, 1891.

..

PERRY J. LYONS ..................I June 1, 1892.

.........................................

Canada

Private company B, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., December, 1857; fifth sergeant June 1, 1888; first sergeant May 12, 1891; transferred to company C; first lieutenant company C, July 14, 1892.

Centerville.

. . . . ........

Private company D, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., 1886; corporal, 1857; sergeant, 1888; first lieutenant May 2, 1892.

Waitsburg.

Private company E, second infantry, N. G. W., April 4,1891; corporal Jan. 4, 1892; first lieutenant May 2, 1892.

North Yakima.

Oregon, 1863

.........

D

Iowa, 1861

..............

B. B. COMBS May 2, 1892.

.....

CHARLES A. BOOKER October 8, 1892.

.

C.B.OwEN ......................... October 8, 1892.

.........

E

Maine

F

Logan county, Illinois, Dec. 14, 1860

-

...........

.....

II

New York

I

Washington, D. C, 1856

....... ......... ............

M. S. WINTLEE May 30, 1891.

C. H. WELD February 28, 1891.

..........

H. C. PHILLIPS March 24, 1891.

Dayton.

'rivate battery B, third United States Private company II, second infantry Pomeroy. regiment, N. G. W., November. 1890; artillery, August 11, 1879; corporal September 5, 1883; honorable disfirst sergeant November 7, 1890; first lieutenant October 8,1892; marksman charge August 10, 1884; reenlisted as private in company E, 12th United 1891; sharpshooter 1892. States infantry, September 8,1884; corporal April 8, 1887; sergeant May 26, 1888; first sergeant October, 1888; honorable discharge, by expiration of term, September 7, 1889; marksman from 1880 to 1889.

......

Port Townsend.

Private company K, first infantry, N. G. W., September 1, 1890; second lieutenant September 17, 1890.

Aberdeen.

A

Elected and commissioned second lieutenant company A, second infantry, N. G. W., at organization of company, October 4, 1890.

Ellensburgh.

..E

Private company E, first infantry regiment, N. G. W., November, 1889; second lieutenant February 18, 1891.

Seattle.

II

Private June 18, 1888; corporal March 9,1889; second lieutenant May 30, 1891.

Vancouver.

Maine, 1853

Private company C, second infantry, N. G. W., March, 1886; first sergeant June 1, 1888; second lieutenant February 28, 1891.

Goldendale.

Missouri

Private company B, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., 1884; second sergeant June 1, 1888; second lieutenant March 24, 1891.

Goldendale.

.K

J. T. ARMSTRONG October 4, 1890.

HUBERT H. SMITH February 18, 1891.

-

Enlisted March 16,1888; elected second lieutenant Augusta, 1890; elected first lieutenant October 8. 1892.

Private company B, first infantry, 1884; second lieutenant company I September 17, 1890.

....... ........

CHAS. T. DE LOSH September 17, 1890.

Private company B, 11th infantry Maine volunteers, October 7, 1861; mustered out as sergeant February 9, 1866.

........................................

Second Lies tenants. N. S. SNIDER September 17, 1890.

Spokane.

Clyde.

C

.

..Private company (1, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., 1885; first lieutenant September 22, 1891. Private company J, second infantry regiment 1892; first lieutenant June 1, 1892.

..........

W. H. HOD5ON July 14, 1892.

In the National Guard.

........ . . . ......

Brit. Columbia

CHAS. T. SMITH May 2, 1892.

RESIDENCE.

In the Army of the United States.

.

.0

.

B

Michigan

....

-


SECOND INFANTRY REGIMENT— CONCLUDED. SERVICE. NAME, GRADE AND DATE OF RANK.

CO.

RESIDENCE.

BORN. In the Army of the United States.

. ........................

Second Lieutenants—cone'd.

...............

W. H. FLETCHER April 6, 1891.

D

A. T. BROWN September 22,189L.

G

JOSEPH E. LIGGErr May 2, 1892.

In the National Guard.

.

company D, second infantry, N. .............................................................................. Private G. W., December 4,1888; second lieu-

Iowa

Waitsburg.

tenant April 6, 189!.

in company G, second regi............................................................................ Enlisted ment, November 24, 1890; appointed

Canada

Spokane.

third corporal May 1, 1891; second corporal July 1, 1891; second lieutenant September 22, 1891.

............ ..E

Oregon

March 17, 1890; corporal July, .................................................................................. Private 1890; fourth sergeant October, 1890;

North Yakima.

third sergeant January, 1891; second sergeant May, 1891; first sergeant August, 1891; second lieutenant May 2, 1892.

. ......................... ........... ...............

August 25,1891; appointed first ........................................................................... Enlisted sergeant of company K, N. G. W., Au-

CHARLES F. KAY May 2, 1892.

K

Feb. 18, 1869

S. P. YOUNG May 17, 1892.

I

Tennessee

CHESTER F. MILLER October 8, 1892.

F

Oregon, 1860

Tekoa.

gust 31, 1891; elected second lieutenant of company K May 2, 1892.

............................................................................

Private company T, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., May, 1892; elected .second lieutenant Msy 17, 1892.

.

...... ..................................... .............................

Private company F, second infantry regiment, N. G. W., March 5, 1887; corporal September 7, 1887; sergeant April 6, 1888; first sergeant May 5, 1888; first lieutenant and regimental paymaster November 20, 1890; resigned February 20, 1891; reenlisted private March 2, 1892; first sergeant May 30, 1892; second lieutenant October 8, 1892.

Clyde.

Dayton.

1 lIST CAVALRY BATT.\ .1 ON.

--

S

NAME, GRADE AND DATE OF RANK.

10

BORN.

SERVICE. RESIDENCE.

In the Array of the United States.

In the National Guard.

Major.

.............. .Alabama..............Served four years in Confederate army.

CHARLES B. JOHNSTON June 28, 1892. Assistant Surgeon.

Cadet three years in military academy; captain troop A, first cavalry, N. G. W., May 1, 1888; major first cavalry battalion June 28, 1890.

.............................................................................................Appointed assistant surgeon first cayaIry battalion, with rank of captain,

Capt. J. A. BEEBE July 1, 1890.

Spokane.

Tacoma.

July 1, 1890.

Chaplain.

.......................................................................................Appointed chaplain first cavalry battalion, with rank of captain, June 6,

Rev. W. A. SHANKLIN June 6, 1891.

Spokane.

1890.

Adjutant. H. B. SCHWELLENBACH May 11, 1891.

................Jefferson,Wis., Aug. 12, 1868.......................................................................Enlisted in company 0, second infantry

regiment, February 27,1888; appointed first corporal September 4. 1888; fifth sergeant February 10, 1889; fourth sergeant August], 1889; second sergeant January 15,1890; first sergeant March 5, 1890; appointed first lieutenant and adjutant first cavalry battalion May 11 1891.

Quartermaster.

................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . W., B, C,

..............................................................................

J. M. DOUGAN May 24, 1892.

COMPANY OFFICERS. Captains. JAMES M. ASHTON June 27, 1890.

.B

..............

Canada...............

Spokane.

Second lieutenant troop B June 27,1890; promoted first lieutenant and quartermaster first cavalry battalioa May 24 1892.

Tacoma.

Private company first infantry, N. G. 1884; discharged 1884; captain troop first cavalry battalion, June 27. 1890.

Tacoma.


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

232

El

za a

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a

a

l

rf

i1 1!

1i

.-.- 0

i

h Date.

'L

• p0

'0

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.110

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'as p.,

:

TROOP

B

.P

a —

S

90

I

0

1

0

rZ

I

c

a-

,e.

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNT.

0

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

Amount.

1891. Mar. 11... Capt. J. E. Frost ...............Freight charges on arms and equipments, company A, second regiment, to Camp Ferry .......... ........... $5 75 11... Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson Carriage hire for conveying General . 546 Gibbon and staff to depot while en route to Camp Ferry ........ .......... 552 750 11... Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson Use of two horses in quartermaster general's department at Camp Ferry ................................................ 40 00 11... Brig. Gen. A. P. Curry Freight and drayage on military 552} supplies and ammunition ............... ..553 13 65 11... Lt. Col. Albert Whyte Fare, Tacoma to Aberdeen and rereturn, mustering company K, first regiment ................................... 555 11 00 11... Lieut. L. B. Dawson .........Fare, Seattl.- to North Yakima and return, while attending election of officers .. ........................................ 12 64 11... Capt. Joseph Green ..........Fare, Seattle to North Yakima and . 557 return, while attending election of Officers ............................................. 559 12 30 11... Lieut. L. S. Booth........,. Fare, Seattle to North Yakima and return, wIptIe attending election of officers ............................................. 561 12 30 11... P. W. Kennedy ................ Hauling two loads of tents at Olym.pia ................................................... . 563 300 11... J. C. Percival ................... Freight charges on military 24 90 11... Col. E. W. Pike ...............Express charges on guidons .............. . 564 565 1 50 11... Union Pacific R. R. Co Freight on one box tents, Seattle to Olympia.......................................... . 570 55 11... Lieut. C. B. Dorr .............. Fare, Dayton to Walla Walla and return, attending board of survey 575 3 50 11... Lieut. T. M. Reed ............ Expressage ......................................... . 584 5 35 11... Maj. Geo. W. Greene Fare from Spokane to North Yakmm and return, attending election brigadier general and adjutant general ............................................ 25 00 11... Maj. Geo. W. Greene...... Cartage on baggage and coupe while . 585 en route to and from Camp Ferry 586 6 50 11... Maj. Geo. W. Greene ....... Express charges second regiment band uniforms ................................ .. 587 5 50 11... Maj. Geo. W. Greene........Fare and sleeper from Spokane to Walla Walla and return .................. .. 588 24 30 11... Maj. Geo. W. Greene....... Fare from Spokane to Sprague and return ............................................ . 589 500 11... J. C. Percival ................... Freight charges on clothing, cartridges and revolvers ...................... 500 103 30 11... Capt. Harry St. George Freight charges on uniforms and equipments .................................... 5911 . 30 27 11... Northern Pac. R. B. Co.. Transportation seven men from Spokane to Coulee City and return 592 71 75 Apr. 6... Pacific Express Co ...........Freight charges, guns from Grant's, Or., to Spokane Falls, Wash........... . 503 26 60 i... Northern Pac. Exp. Co.... Freight on guns from Olympia, Tacoma and North Yakima to Spokane................................................. 594 06 60 Mar. 11... Gen. A. P. Curry ............. Fare, Spokane to Olympia and return, attending meeting of military board ...................................... . 596 39 30 (233)


234

. . .& .

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

.. ... .

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;CONTINUED.

Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1891. Apr. 7... Capt. A. E. Morton ......... Transportation on uniforms .............. .. 599 7... Gen. A. P. Curry ............ Railroad and steamboat fare, Spokane to Olympia and return ........... 618 7... Col. E. W. Pike ............... Transportation,Goldendale to Olympia and return ................................. 618 7... Gurney, Cab& Trans. Co Hauling military supplies at Olympia................................................... 619 7... Gurney, Cab &Trans.Co Hauling and freight paid on military supplies ................................... 628 17... Capt. J. B. Frost ...............Expressage on guns and books.......... 634 17... I. H. Howell ....................Transportation to Seattle and return, 637 17... James Ross ...................... ..Transportation to Seattle and return, 638 17... W. J. Fife........................ . T ransportation to Seattle and return, 639 24... Northern Pac. B. B. Co Transportation on horses, Troop B, from Tacoma to Sprague ................ 643 May 23... Capt. Geo. H. Jones ........ Fare from Port Townsend to Seattle and return and from Port Townsend to North Yakitna and return during court martial, election of major, election brigadier and adjutant generals ................................ 648 23... Lieut. N. S. Snyder ......... Same as above ................................... 649 23... Lieut. C. B. Wood .............Same as above ................................... 650 23... J. P. Becker .................... .Transportation, Ellensburg to Walla Walla and return ............................ 651 23.....1. E. Frost ....................... Transportation, Ellensburg to Walla Walla and return ............................ 652 23... Geo. W. Ellis ................... Hauling cannon from warehouse to storeroom ........................................ 653 23... Lieut. N. B. Brooks ......... Expressage on box blanks from Olympia ............................................654 23... Guriiey,Cab&Trans.Co.. Hauling blankets from railway to storeroom ........................................ 665 23... Lieut. 11. D. McCully....... Freight charges on guns from Goldendale to Grand's ............................ 659 June 9... Capt. .1. C. McCrimmon.. Transportation from North Yakima to Walla Walla during election lieutenant colonel of second regiment ............................................... 662 9... Capt. Harry St. George Transportation from Pomeroy to Walla Walla and return to attend election of lieutenant colonel, second regiment................................... 664 9... Lieut.. Elmer R. Brady Transportation from Pomeroy to Walla Walla and return to attend election of lieutenant colonel, second regiment .................................. 665 9... Lieut. J. W. Murphy ....... Transportation from Pomeroy to Walla Walla and return, to attend election of lieutenant colonel of the second regiment ...................... 666 9... Col. E. W. Pike ............... Transportation from Goldendale to .Walla Walla and return, to attend election of lieutenant colonel, second regiment ............................. .669 9... Gen. B. G. O'Brien ......... Transportation from Portland to Columbia river; freight charges on blankets and cannon, .............. 671 9... J. L. Utterback .............. Hai ling military supplies at Olympia................................................... 672 July 1... Capt, B. B. Wise ............. Transportation from Goldendale to Pomeroy and return ....................... 687 1... Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Transportation from Spokane to Sprague and return ....... ................. 688 1... Union Pacific R. B. Co.... Freight charges on military sup..plies......... .............. ............... ......... 692 1... Gurney Cab Trans. Co.. Hauling 011(1 paying freight charges 69.3 Oil saddle blankets ......................... 6... Northern Pac. Ex. Co ..... Express charges on military supplies. 694 sleeper, 9... Brig. Gen. A. P. Curry.... Fare, Spokane to Tacoma express and freight charges ...... ...... .695

.. &- - .. .

:.. ... ..

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

235

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNT -CONTINUED.

Amount.

$48 25 46 50 90 80 10 00 885 1555 1 50 1 50 1 50 71 60

31 40 31 40 31 40 .17 90 17 00 1 00 2 90 2 00 1055 36 30 7.70 7 70 7 70 14 50 2 05 4 00 22 00 4 60 2 65 1 25 5 95 33 10

Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1891. July 11... Captain A. B. Morton ..... .Fare, Aberdeen to Seattle and return ................................................. 606 11... Captain A. F. - Morton ..... .Fare, Aberdeen to Seattle and return ................................................. 697 20... G. W. McGlothlen ........... .Hauling supplies ..................... ......... 699 20... Port Townsend Southern R. R. Co ................. Freight on supplies........................... 702 20.....T. L. Utterback ............... Hauling supplies .... ........................ .... 703 20... Capt. Harry St. George Freight on equipments ...................... 704 20... Lieut. E. S. Isaacs ........... Drayage on guns ................................ 707 20... J. C. Percival ................. Freight charges on clothing .............. ..713 20... Col. E. W.-Pike .................Horse hire, May 30th and July 4th, 1891, on parade ............................... .716 20... Gurney, Cab &Trans.Co Freight- and cartage on military supplies at Olympia ..................... ... ...... .718 21... Pt. Town. South.R.R.Co Freight charges on five boxes rifles 719 21.....Percival ................... ..Freighteliarges on military supplies 720 21... Northern Pac. Exp. Co Express charges on desk rack ........... 721 Aug. ......Livut. Chas. Esplin, jr Expressage and freight........................732 Sept. 8... Gen. B. G O'Brien Drayage and freight charges .............. 736 8... Lieut. Chas. DeLosh........ Transportation, Aberdeen to Seattle and return ....................................... 741 8... Lieut. Chas. DeLosh ....... Tcansportntion, Aberdeen to Seattle and return... ................................... 742 8... John Utterback ............... .Hauling supplies and furniture ........ 743 8... Capt. H. G. Shuham......... Expressage, freight, drayage on guns......... ........ ............................. 741 8... Capt. H. G. Shuham......... Transportation, Waitsburg to Walla Walla and return ............................ 747 8... Maj. Chas. B. Johnston.. Ilorse hire July 4th, I..JI. on parade 750 8... Lt. H. B. Seliwellenbacli Horse hire July 41-1. 1891, on parade 751 8... SIr. Multhomah ............... Freight charges on military supplies front Cincinnati, 0., to Olympia, Wash ............................................... 760 8... J. L. tjtterbaek .............. Hauling military supplies ....................766 8... H. J. Ellis ....................... Freight charges on guns .................... .. 767 8... Gurney Cab Trans Co Moving adjutant general's office from the Woodruff block to the McKenny block .............................. 768 24... Port Townsend Southern B. B. Co ................. .Freight charges on guns .................... .. 7681 24... Northern Pac. Exp. Co Express charges on military supplies................................................ .. 769 24... Maj. F. A. Gaus.............. .ransportation, T Tacoma to Seattle and return ....................................... 774 24... Maj. F. A. Gans .............. Transportation, Tacoma. to Aberdeen and return ... ....................... .... 775 24... H. B. Schwellenbach ...... Transporiatian, Spokane to Olympia and return .......................... ..... ...... 777 24... I. M. Howell ................... Tacoma to Mount Vernon and return; Tacoma to Aberdeen and return................................................ 778 24... Brig. Gen. Ti. G. O'Brien.. Freight charges on cannon; expressage ..................... ..................... ..779 24... Lt. W. E. Cromwell ........ Transportation, South Bend toAberdeen and return .............................. 780 24... Lt. Col. F. E. Trotter...... Transportation while instructing the first regiment in small arms practice.................................................. 781 Oct. 3... Lt. N. B. Brooks.............. Transportation from Goldendale to Olympia and return ........ ............... 785 3... Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson.. Transportation of camping party to establish camp grounds at Camp Ferry ............................................... 780 3... J. L. Utterback ............... Hauling military supplies at Olympia... ............................................... 792 3 ... .. Percival ................... Freight charges on military siipplies.. 793 26... Gen. B. G. O'Brien ......... Sleeper to and from Olympia toSpokane..................... ............................ 797 26... Lt. H. B. Sehwelleubaeh, Transportation, Spokane to Olympia and return .................. ............... Sol

Amount.

$11 90 11 00 300 2 00 1 00 11 47 1 50 30 85 400 90 1665 40 80 2 40 3 25 Ii 00 11 90 11 00 4 05 10 54 4 20 2 50 2 00 37,55 8 25 2 25 8 00 4 30 4 00 7 50 0 30 36 05 9 80 4 35 31 05 40 90 20 70 20 00 600 5 50 7 00 5 75


236

Date.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNT -CONTINUED.

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNT -CONTINUED.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1891. Oct. 26... James H. Barry ............... ..Transportation, Tacoma to Aberdeen and return .............................. . 802 26... Lieut. James H. Barry.... Transportation, Tacoma to North Yakima and return ......................... 803 Transportation for thirteen men 26... Lieut. Chas. B. Wood from PortTownsendto Fort Townsend and return to attend target practice ........................................... .. 804 26... Northern Pao. R. R. Co... Freight charges on military supplies, 808 26... Lieut. E. F. Stafford..........Transportation, Tacoma to Seattle and return; Tacoma to Aberdeen and return ... .................................... 813 26... Col. E. W. Pike ............... ..Transportation, Goldendale to Spo-

kane and return .............................. .. 815

9... Lieut. Col. F. E. Trotter.. Transportation while acting as instructor to the National Guard........ .. 818 26... Capt. J. E. Frost ................ Freight charges, expressage and drayage ........................................... 819 26... Lieut. J. W. Stearns ......... Express charges on supplies ....... ...... .. 820 26... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbach, Transportation, Spokane to Sprague

and return ....................................... ..821

26... Northern Pao. R. R. Co... Freight charges on supplies ................ 822 26... Capt. H. G. Shoham..........Freight charges and drayage on targets................................................... 826 31... Capt. John Carr .............. ..Freight and drayage on guns............ .. 837 31... Northern Pao. R. R. Co... Freight charges on knapsacks from New York to Olympia.................... .. 839 31... J. C. Percival.................. ..Freight anti wharfage ......................... 840 31... Chas. A. Burr.................. ..Transportation, Olympia to Seattle 854 and return on military business 31... J. L. Utterbaek ......... . .... ..Hauling military supplies........... ........ 856 Nov. 6... Lt. Col. F. E. Trotter...... ..Transportation while instructingthe second regiment in small arms practice......................... ........ . ........ .. 870 Aber19... J. R. Reath....................... Transportation, Tacoma to.............. .. 872 deen and return ............... 19... Capt. Harry St. George... Freight charges and drayage on inilitary supplies.................................. .. 874 19... Capt. Harry St. George... Freight charges and drayage on tar..875 gets................................................... 9... Gen. A. P. Curry ............ ..Transportation, Spokane to Seattle ................. and return, and from ..... Spokane to . .. 876 Olympia and return . 19... S. P. Wiman.................... .. Hauling supplies at Olympia .............. 877 Tacoma to Aber.. Transportation, Marshall K. Snell ............ 19... deen and return ............... .............. . 879 19... Col. J. K. Sto ut ................ Transportation, Spokane to Tacoma and return, and Tacoma to Olympia.................. . ........ . ........... . ..... ...... . 882 19... Capt, Chas. H. Merriam.. Transportation, Spokane to Tacoma and Tacoma to Olympia................. . 883 19... Capt. Chas. H. Merriam.. Trnnsportatioim,Olympiato Spokane.. 886 Col. Henry Landes .......... Transportation, and Port Townsend to 19... return........................ . 887 Olympia Transportation, Olympia to Tacoma . 19... Col. J. K. Stout ............... arid sleeper to Spokane. ................. . 889 Walla Walla to Transportation, 19... Col. W. M. Clark ........... Olympia and return ......... ............... .890 to Goldendale .. Trammsportatiorm, 19... Col. E. W. Pike ............... Grants and return; Grants to Dayton and return ................................ .893 19,.. Col. B. W. Pike ............... ..Transportation, Golendale to Olympia and return ................................. . 894 19... Northern Pao. B. B. Co.. Freight charges on knapsacks from New York to Olympia .................... 895 Dec. L . Northern Pacific Ex. Co.. Express charges on military supplies...................... .......................... . 899 1... J. C. Percival .................. . Freight charges on military supies ................................................ 904 14... Col. J. D. McIntyre ........ Transportation, Seattle to Olympia .and return ........................................911

Amount.

$9 80 17 60

6 50 4 55 12 55 30 95

37 95 19 48 70 4 10 3 35 390 9 00

4200 19 25 4 00 1 25

55 71 13 55 2 90 3 40 53 15

2 50 16 90 35 55 21 40 26 30 7 00

4 75 32 95 16 20 2500 42 00 7 25

2 25 4 00

Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

237

lp~l

1891. Dec. 14... Northern Pao. Ex. Co ..... Freight charges on shells from Ellensburgh to Olympia ..................... . 915 14... Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Transportation, Spokane to Sprague and return ....................................... .916 14... J. L. Utterback ............... . Hauling military supplies at Olympia............................................. ...... .921 14... Northern Pao. B. B. Co Freight charges on knapsacks from New York to Olympia .......... ......... .924 31... Lt. Wallace Mount.......... Sleeper on train from Sprague to Tacoma and return ............................. .926 31... Lt. F. J. Elsensohn........ .Transportation while paying troops of the second regiment for parades of 1891 ............................................. 930 31... Lt. Col. M. McCarthy...... . Transportation, Walla Walla to Tekoa and return ...... ................. ... .931 31... Northern Pao. R. R. Co Freight charges on knapsacks from New York to Olympia .................... . 932 31... Gen. R. G. O'Brien ......... ..Freight charges on overcoat straps from Benicia arsenal to Olympia 935 31... Maj. Geo. W. Greene...... .orse H hire on parade on May 30th and July 4, 1891 ............................... 936 31 ... Lt. Col. Chas. Reiche n bach ............................. . Hack hire during visit of President Harrison at Tacoma for regular army and N. G. W. officers; hack hire during encampment of 1890 943 1892. Jan. 4... Northern Pao. R. R. Co Freight charges on military supplies from New York and Dayton to Olympia.............................. ........... ... ii 8... Brig. Gen. A. P. Curry Transportation, Spokane to Olympia to attend court martial of J. C. Haines............................................ 30... Capt. John Carr .............. ..Hauling targets and material to and . 946 from range...................................... . 952 30... Capt. J. E. Frost.............. Expressage and freight on cartridges and targets...................................... 22... Col. E. W. Pike .............. Transportation,Golden dale toOlym- . 9 pia and return; expressage ............ 960 30... Capt. H. G. Shuman ....... . Freight and drayage on supplies for company D, second regiment 965 30... Lt. Chas. B. Wood .......... .. Transportation of company I, .......... first . regiment, from Port Townsend to Seattle and return, during the riots at the coal mines in King county 966 30... Northern Pao. R. R. Co Transportation of company C, first regiment, from Tacoma to Seattle during the riots at the coal mines in King county; also return transportation......................................... . %9 22... J. C. Percival .................. . Freight charges on two boxes military supplies from Coulee City to Olympia.............. ..................... ...... . 971 22... Col. E. W. Pike .............. . Fare to attend meetiniF of the military board at Olympia ................... 973 22... Lt. Col. F. E. Trotter ...... . Fare to attend meeting of the military board at Olympia ................... 974 30... Adj. Gen. B. G. O'Brien.. Freight and express charges on stationery to Seattle ............................ . 976 30... Dr. J. A. Beebe ... ............ . Use of horse during riots at mines in 30... L. S. Booth .................... E King county ............................... 985 charges on military supplies, 979 30... Northern Pao. R. R. Co .xpress Freight charges on knapsacks from New York to Olympia .................... . 987 30... S. P. Wiman .................... ..Hauling military supplies at Olympia............................................... 30... Capt. J. M. Ashton .......... 30 Transportation Troop B during minin King county mines........994 Feb. 11... J. L. Utterback................ Hauling military supplies at Olympia................................................... . 1011

Amount.

$1 30 3 60 3 00

42 00 600

5670 12 60 23 10 40 75

3850

22 92 41 05 250 17 35 34 00

4 72

123 75

145 00

11 65 11 50 21 20 65 33 00

85 45 36 3 25

171 00 3 75


238

Date.

I

-.. . .. :.- .. . . ' .. .. l. .. :. & .. . . . -.

.. ... .

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNT —CONTINUED.

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNT -CONTINUED.

To whom paid.

I

Amount.

For what purpose.

-i:----Gurney Cab &Trasss. Co

Cab hire at Seattle during riots at Feb 13... mines in King county duringriots at mines 13... Capt. W. S. Shank ........... Transportation in King county .......... .................. .... 1027 Hauling fifteen loads of camp equi13 Seattle Transfer Co ......... page during riots at mines in King county ............................................. 1028 13 .. CoumbiaRiver& Puget Transportation of company G from Sound Navigation Co. Tacoma to Seattle during riots at mines in King county ..................... 1029 13 ... Seattle Lake Shore & Transportation of troops during Eastern B. R. Co ......... riots at mines it, King county ........ 1035 on campsupplies during 13 J. H. Gibson ..................... Expressage riots at mines in King county ......... 1046 Transportation, Seattle to Oilman 13 Lieut. L A. Hatfield........ and return during riots at mines in King county; freight charges 1058 Tacoma to Seattle, 29 Lieut. Herman Chapin Transportation, Seattle to Tacoma, etc., during riots at mines in King county ........ 1059 29... Lt. J. A. Hatfield ............. Transportation, Seattle to Olympia 1072 and return ...................................... hire and transportation dur29... Lt. J. A. Hatfield ............. Horse ing riots at mines in King county 1073 hire and transportation on 29... Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Horse parade, Feb. 22, 1892 ......... ...............1076 hire and transportation on 29... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbaeh Horse parade, Feb. 22,1892 ........................ 1077 charges on supplies ............... 1078 29... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbach Express Express charges on military supplies 1084 29... Adj. Gen. R. G. O'Brien Express charges on military supplies 29... Northern Pac. Ex. Co..... from Chicago to Olympia ............... 1086 29... Columbia& Pug't Sound Special train for General Curry durB. R. Co ....................... ing riots at mines in King county 1090 expressage, etc., paid dur29... Capt. C. L. F. Kellogg Freight, tug riots at mines in King county .1096 Freight charges on supplies during Oregon Impr'v'mentCo 29... riots at mines in King county ........ 1100 Transportation of troops duringriots Oregon Impr'v'inent Co 29... at mines in King county ................. 1101 Transportation of troops duringriots Oregon lmpr'v'ment Co 29... at mines in King county ... .............. 1102 Transportation of troops during riots Oregon Impr'v'ment Co 29... at mines in King county ................ 1103 1105 Hauling supplies at Olympia ............. J. L. Utterback ......... ..... Mar. 23... charges on knapsacks from 23... Northern Pac. R. R. Co... Freight New York to Olympia..................... 1108 of 23... Maj. F. A. Gans .............. Transportation to attend meeting examining board at Seattle.... ........ 1109 Olympia to Spokane, 1111 23... Gen. A. P. Curry ............. Transportation, Transportatioti, Olympia to Seattle 23... Lieut.. W. J. Milroy ......... .and return, to attend meeting of examining board............................. 1115 charges on military supplies 1116 23... Capt. E. H. Fox ...............Freight Freight charges on military supplies 1118 23... Capt. Chas. H. Merriam.. Freight on knapsacks ........... 1127 Apr. 2... Capt. E. H. Fox ............... Express charges charges on supplies .............. 1129 2... Lt. H. B. Sehwellenbach.. Cab services Olympia .................... ..1131 2... Lieut. M. E. Reed .............Cab services atand Ta2... Maj. F. A. Gans .............. coma to Seattle transportation, and return ............. 1133 Transportation, Tacoma to Seattle Lieut. E. F. Stafford........ 2... and return ....................................... 1134 supplies from old to new 2... J. L. Utterback .............. .. Moving armory; hauling military supplies a t Olympia ...................................... 1141 ansportation, Tacoma to Seattle 2.. Capt. I. M. Howell .......... Trand return ................................ ... 1147 I

I

Date.

1892. Apr. 5... 5 5... 29...

22 10

32 00

25 50

805 65 23 75

5 75

6 00 3 75 16 30 6 10 5 60 2 60 5 00 15 50

..

., •

10000 14 95 11 80 351 20 38 60 620 50 2 50 46 19

7...

21 40

..

21 82 13 69 6 50 1 00

3 00 1 75

I

10 2 50

29... 29 29... 29... 29 ... 29... 29... 29... 29... June 1... 1... 1... 1... 1... 1... 1... 1...

7... 7... July 6... 6...

6... 6... 6... 6...

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

239

0

Col. E. W. Pike ............... Transportation, Olympia to Goldendale ..................................... ............ 151 Wm. Scofield.................. Hauling supplies at Olympia... ......... ii3 Capt. E. S. Ingraham ....... Express and freight charges on knapsacks and ammunition ........... 1154 Capt. Geo. H. Jones......... Transportation of men and drayage On blankets during riots at King county mines ........................... ...... iiso Lieut. N. S. Snyder ......... ..Transportation from Port Townsend Seattle and return ....................... 1158 Capt. Gen. H. Jones......... Transportation from Port Townsend Seattle and return .........................1159 Lieut. C. B. Wood.. ........ Transportation from Port Townsend to Seattle and return .............. ........ .1100 Capt. H. G. Shuham ....... Freight and drayage on military supplies ........................................... 1161 Northern Pac. Exp. Co Express charges on cartridge shells returned for reloading... ................. 1162 Capt. J. E. Frost.. ........... .Express and drayage on military supplies ........................................... 1163 Capt. W. S. Shank .......... Transportation, Tacoma to Seattle and return ....................................... 1168 Capt. John Carr .............. Freight charges on knapsacks and belts ................................................ 1171 Capt. Wallace Mount ...... Transportation, Sprague to Tacoma, paying Troop B.............................. 1175 Gen. A. P. Curry ............ Transportation, Spokane to Olympia and Seattle and return .................... 1182 Col. E. W. Pike .............. Transportatiou,GoldendaletoOlym .pia and return ................................. 1191 M. M. Bartlett ................. Transportation, Tacoma to Seattle and return ....................................... 1220 W. M. Clark .................... Transportation, Tacoma to Seattle and return ....................................... 1222 Lieut. Col. W. S. Shank Transportation, Tacoma to Seattle and return ....................................... 1223 Wm. Scofield.................. Hauling military supplies at Oly m pia ................................................... 1258 Brg. Gen. R. G. O'Brien Transportation, Olympia to Portland and return .............................. ..1232 Gurney, Cab Trans. Co Hauling military supplies at Olympta ................................................... 1233 Capt. I. M. Howell .......... Transportation, Tacoma to Seattle and return ....................................... 1234 Lieut. W. J. Milroy ......... Transportation, Olympia to Aberdeen and return, as inspector of election company K .........................1236 Col. E. W. Pike .............. Transportation, Goldendaleto Clyde and return, and from Goldendale to Spokane and return ................... 1237 Gen. A. P. Curry ..............Transportation, Spokane to Olympia and return ................................. 1238 Col. E. W. Pike ............... Transportation, GoldendaletoOlympia and return ................................. 1239 Lieut. E. S. Isaacs .............Fare of Sergt. Pringle from Dayton to Murray during camp of instruetion at American Lake ............ 1241 Lieut. M. S. Wintler ....... ..Transportation of company H. first regiment, from Vancouver to Portland, en route to annual encampment at American Lake .................. 1245 J. L. IJtterback ............... Hauling military supplies at Olympia.................................................... 1249 Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Transportation, Spokane to Tacoma and return ....................................... 1251 Capt. John Carr .............. Transportation, Dayton to Spokane and return ........................................1252 Lieut. Chas. A. Booker Transportation, Dayton to Spokane and return ...................................... 1253

Amount.

816 10 1 00 4 45 7 10 3 00 3 00 3 00 4 55 1 25 7 00 2 00 4 35 33 30 35 30 21 60 2 00 2 00 1 75 1 25 8 25 2 00 2 (N) 5 20 45 50 21 65 20 70 13 50 18 50 7 00 31 30 1740 15 25


240

Date.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; CONTINUED.

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNT CONTINUED.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1892. July 6... Lieut. E. R. Brady ......... Transportation to attend election of field officers second regiment at Spokane.......................................... . 1256 6... I Capt. G. W. Billington... Transportation to attend election of field officers second regiment at Spokane ...................................... . 1257 6... I Lieut. C. H. Weld ........... Transportation to attend election of field officers second regiment at Spokane .......................................... . 1258 6... H. F. Dougherty ............ Hauling blankets at Olympia ............. 1264 6... Gurney Cab &Trans. Co.. Hauling and advance charges paid onguns .... ....................................... 1265 6... J. C. Percival.................. Freight charges paid on military supplies ............................................ 1266 6... Capt. E. H. Fox.............. Transportation, Tekoa to Spokane and return ........................................ 1267 6... Lt. Chas. F. Kay ............ Transportation, Tekoa to Spokane and return ........................... .......... . 1268 6... Lt. Henry D. Kay........... Transportation, Tekoa to Spokane and return ... .................................... 1269 6... Lt. J. W. Stearns............. Transportation, Tekoa to Spokane and return ....................................... . 1270 6... H. C. Phillips.................. Transportation, Goldendale to Spokane and return .... ......................... . 1271 6... Capt. Harry St. George... Freight charges on military supplies.. 1272 6... Capt. Harry St. George... Transportation, Pomeroy to Spokane and return .............................. . 1273 6... Lt. Chas. T. Smith........... Transportation, Waitsburg to Spokane and return .............................. . 1274 6... Lt. D. N. Smith............... Transportation, Waitsburg to Spokane and return .............................. . 1275 6... Capt. H. G. Shoham ....... Transportation, Waitsburg to Spokane and return .............................. . 1276 6... Lt. W. H. Fletcher.......... Transportation, Waitsburg to Spokane and return .............................. . 1277 6... Lt. N. B. Brooks............. Transportation, Goldendale to Spokane and return .............................. . 1278 6... Lt. John Jackel............... Transportation, Centerville to Spokane and return .............................. . 1280 6... Gen. R. G. O'Brien......... Transportation during the state encampment and to Vancouver and return with the remains of Col. Trotter............................................ . 1281 6... W. S. Bedford................. Hauling military supplies at Olympia................................................... . 1284 6... Win. Scofield .................. Hauling military supplies at Olympia................................................... . 1285 6... Maj. J. H. Hudgin.......... Transportation, Waitsburg to Camp Murray............................................. 1294 6... S. P. Wiman.................... Services of self and team during encampment of 1892 ........................ 1297 6... Northern Pac. Exp. Co... Expressage on military supplies ....... ..1209 26... Capt. Allen Bonebrake... Transportation, Goldendale to Spokane and return .............................. ..1304 26... Capt. Allen Bonebrake... Transportation, Goldendale to Centerville and return ............. ............. 1305 26... Capt. J. W. Stearns......... Transferring baggage self and men at Spokane ...................................... 1307 26... Lieut. C. R. Darr ..... ...... Transportation, Dayton to Spokane, to attend election of colonel and major of the second regiment ......... . 1311 Lt. Col. Albert Whyte.... Horse hire at camp of instruction of 1892 .................................................. 1321 Lieut. H. P. Kay ............ Transferring baggage of company K, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray .................... . 1323 26... W. S. Bedford................. Express charges paid on blankets from Olympia to Pasco junction...... 1329 26... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbach, Expressage; sleeper on train ............ . 1831 26... J. L. Utterback............... Hauling military supplies at Olympia.................................................... 1340

Amount.

$19 90 28 00 2800 50 2 15 565 4 90 490 490 490 27 50 16 00 14 00 1630 16 30 16 30 16 30 2600 2800 11 00 75 350 1375 5500 8890 2750 200 50 17 40 2400 400 11 55 425 11 70

Tate.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1892. July 26... Capt. E. H. Fox ...............Freight charges on knapsacks, uniforms and blankets .........................1349 26... Lt. H. C. Jackson ............Transportation from Goldendale to

Grants and return ........................... Sept. 2.. Schuster & Co ..................Hauling tents from armory to wharf .1350 at Seattle ......................................... .1361 Aug. 26... W. Scofield ......................Hauling military supplies at Olympia....................................................1363 26... Lt. H. P. Allison ..............Transportation, Anacortes to Seattle and return, to parade on July 4th, and transportation, Anacortes to Seattle, en route to annual encampment of 1892 ........................... 1366 26... J. L. Utterbaek .................Hauling military supplies returned from the annual encampment of 1892...................................................1375 26... H. F. Docherty ............... Hauling military supplies returned from the annual encampment of 1892 .................................................. 1377 26... J. C. Percival ....................Freight charges on supplies ...............1380 15... Northern Pac. R. R. Co Freight charges on clothing from Cincinnati, 0., to Olympia, Wash 1382 31... Capt. J. E. Frost ..............Transportation, Ellenshurgh to Spokane and return; express charges on military supplies, etc ................. ..1386 26... Capt. John Carr ................Freight charges on military supplies Sept. 2... J. H. Swift.......................Hauling supplies from Tacoma to 1387 Camp Murray ................................. .1388 Aug. 26... Lt. A. W. M. Callum Freight charges on supplies from Olympia .................... ...................... ..1392 31... Capt. H. U. Shuham....... .xpress E and freight charges and drayage on military supplies ...........1394 31... Col. E. W. Pike .............. .Transportation from Goldendale to Grants and return; expressage .......1396 31... Lt. Col. M. McCarthy .......Transportation, Walla Walla to Spo-

kane and return; express and baggage charges ................................... ..1398 31... Capt.Geo.W. Billington.. Transportation of company C, second regiment, from Centerville to Grants ...............................................1400 31... Lieut. M. S. Wintler.........Freight charges and expressage on supplies .............................................1401 2... Maj. Chas. B. Johnston... Horse hire on parade July 4, 1802, and cab hire at Spokane ................. 31... Capt. J. W. Stearns ......... .Drayage on baggage of company K, ..1405 second regiment, at Tekoa on their return from Camp Murray ......1409 31... Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson.. Transportation during state encampment at Camp Murray .................... 31 Gen. R. U. O'Brien ......... .Freight charges on supplies and ..1412 horse hire while at Camp Murray... 1413 31... Northern Pac. R. R. Co... Transportation of horses, supplies and equipments during encampment at Camp Murray.....................1414 31... Wilson Bros .................... .Freight charges paid on hay forwarded to Camp Murray ................ 31 ... ..Col. F. T. Gilbert ......... ...Transportation, Seattle to Olympia .1417 andreturn ....................................... .1418 31... Chas. C. Fisher ............... ..Freight charges paid and transportation from Olympia to Seattle and return while on military business.................................................1419 31... Gen. A. P. Curry .............Transportation, Olympia to Spokane; sleeper on train; express charges on military supplies ...........1421 31... J. C. Percival...................reight F charges on military supplies, 1422 26... J. C. Percival .................. .Freight charges on targets loaned from United States officers at Fort Townsend.......................................1424 Sept. 8... Gen. R. U. O'Brien ......... .Express charges paid on supplies.......1445 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;16

241

Amount.

$30 75 2500 450 100

900 5625 100 12 75 45 41 33 45 840 450 6 80 545 15 45 16 70 10400 350 2 75 1 0(0 4 75 7 60, 623 43 9 80 350. 4 90. 26 910 3600 725 2 00


242

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

243

TRANSPORTATION ACCOUNT -CONCLUDED. Date.

To whom paid.

1892. Sept. 8... 8... 8... 8...

J. L. Utterback ............... . John Kofoid .................... . Capt. J. J. Weisenberger, Capt. J. J. Weisenberger,

27... 27... 27... 27... 27... Oct. 6... 6... 6...

For what purpose.

Amount.

Hauling military supplies at Olympia.....................................................1446 $2 50 Hauling military supplies at Olympia................................................... . 1466 . so Transportation, New Whatcom to Seattle and return ........................... . 1467 6 00 Transportation of company F from Seattle to New Whatcom on their return from the camp of instruction at Camp Murray ...................... 1468 20 00 Northern Pac. R. R. Co... Transportation of troops to and from Camp Murray during the encampment of 1892 ........................ 1471 3,610 84 Canadian Pac. Nay. Co... Transportation of troops en route to Camp Murray ................................. ..1473 95 7 Lieut. Chas. T. DcLosh... Freight charges and expressage on military supplies............................. . 1475 6 40 Lieut. Chas. T. DeLosh... Transportation, Aberdeen to Seattle and return to attend election of colonel and lieutenant colonel of the first regiment ............................ . 1476 10 90 Capt. R. P. McCully Transportation of company B, Second regiment, from Goldendale to Grants and return; freight on baggage ...................................................1478 11500 Union Pac. R. R. Co ..........Transportation of troops en route to Camp Murray ................................. ..1481 733 17 J. C. Percival .................. ...Freight charges on military supplies, 1486 4 75 Oregon & W. T. H. TI. Co. Transportation of troops en route to Camp Murray ................................. ...1489 257 17 Total.............................................................................................$12,289 02

ARMORY ACCOUNT.

Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

N

1891. Mar. I ... S. C. Woodruff ............... .Rent for adjutant general's office and storeroom for ordnance stores and quartermaster supplies for fourth quarter 1890........................... 11... Capt. G. W. Billington Rent of armory company C, second 548 regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1890 ............................ 11... Capt. J08. Green.... ......... .Rent of armory company B, first 554 regiment, for the quarter ending December 31,1890 ............................ 561) 11... T. W. Pynn ......................Rent of bandroom for second regiment band for a period of twelve months ending December 31, 1890 11... Capt. H. G. Shuham ....... .Rent of armory, company D, second 568 regiment for the quarter ending December 31,1890 ........................... 569 11... Capt. Jos. Green ............. . Rent of armory, company B, first regiment .......................................... 11... Capt. J. B. Frost ............. .Rent of armory, company A, second . 578 regiment, for the quarter ending December 31,18W .......................... 580 11... Capt. J. C. Westhoff......... Rent of armory, company H, first regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1890 ........................... 591 11... Capt. Harry St. George Rent of armory, company H, second regiment, for the quarter ending December 31,1890 ........................... 600 April 7... Capt. H. G. Shuham ....... . Rent of armory, company D, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 1891 ................................. . 612 7... Gen. A. P. Curry ............ . Rent of 31, brigade headquarters and janitor service for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 ............................ 613 Mar. 11... Capt. Joseph Green......... Bent of armory, company B, first regiment, for the second, third and fourth quarters 1889.......................... 620 April 7... S. C. Woodruff................ . Rent of adjutant general's office and storeroom for ordnance stores and quartermaster supplies for the first quarter 1891.................................... 626 17... Capt. Jos. Green ............. . Rent of armory, company B, first regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 ................................. . 630 17... Lt. L. B. Brigham ........... . Rent of armory, company C, second regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1890 ........................... 631 17 ... Capt . J.C.MacCrimmon.. Rent of armory, company E, 89cond regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1890............................. 17... Capt. G. GW W. Billington.,, Rent of armory, company C, second 632 regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891................................ . 633 17... Capt. J. B. Frost.............. Rent of armory, company A, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 ................................. . g 17... Capt. Harry St. George... Rent of armory,company H, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 ................................. . 636

Amount.

$120 00 92 40 120 00 180 00 139 98 250 00 90 00 148 33 118 83 139 98 93 00 250 00 120 00 9500 S

107 50 137 50 122 50 150 00 122 50


244

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT. â&#x20AC;˘

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

ARMORY ACCOUNT- CONTINUED.

ARMORY ACCOUNT- CONTINUED. Date.

To whom paid.

245

Amount.

For what purpose.

Date.

For what purpose.

Amount.

:5

1891. of armory, company B. second April 21... Capt. R. D. McCully ....... .Rent regiment, for the third and fourth quarters 1890..................................... 640 of armory, company B, second 24... Capt. B. P. McCully ....... . Rent regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 .................................. 641 of armory, company G, second May 23... Capt. C. H. Merriam ...... . Rent regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 ................. ............... .644 of armory, company G, first June 9... Capt. W. S. Shank ............ Rent regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 18110 ........................... 667 9... Capt. W. S. Shank ........... .Rent of armory, company G, first regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 .................................. 668 ofadjutantgeneral'S office and July 1... S. C. Woodruff................ .Rent storeroom for ordnance stores and quartermaster supplies for the second quarter 1891............................... 676 1... Capt. E. S. Ingraham ...... . Rent of armory, company B, first regiment, for the quarter ending March 31,1891 .................................. .682 Rent of armory, company E, first 1... Capt. E. S. Ingraham regiment, for the third and fourth quarters 1890..................................... 683 1... Capt. J. C. MacCrimmon Rent of armory, company B, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 .................................. 686 of brigade headquarters to July 9... Gen. A. P. Curry ............. Rent 1,1891 .............................................. . 695 20... Capt. J. E. Frost ............ ..Rent of armory, company A, second regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1891.................................... . 698 20... Capt. H. G. Shuham ....... ..Rent of armory, company D, second regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1891 ..................................... 701 20... Capt. Harry St. George Rent of armory, company H, second regiment, for the quarter ending June, 30, 1891 ................................... 705 ..Rent of armory, company C, first 20... Capt. W. J. Fife .............. regiment, for the fourth quarter 709 1890, and the first quarter 1891 of headquarters for the quarter Col. B. W. Pike .............. ..Rent 20... ending June 30, 1891 ........................ . 716 of armory, company G, second Aug. 1... Capt. C. H. Merriam ....... Rent regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1891 ........ .. ........................ . 723 of adjutant general's office and 1... S. C. Woodruff................ ..Rent storeroom for ordnance stores and quartermaster supplies for the month of July, 1891 ......................... . 727 of armory, company G, first 5... Capt. W. S. Shank .......... ..Rent regiment for the quarter ending June 30, 1891 .................................... .730 of armory, troop B, first cav8... Capt. J. M. Ashton ............Rent alry, for the quarter ending December 31, 1890................................. 733 of armory, troop B, for the first 8... Capt. J. M. Ashton ......... Rent and second quarters 1891.................. 734 Rent of band hall for the second regSept. 8... Col. B. W. Pike .............. . iment band to July 1, 1891................ 745 Rent of armory, company P second 8... Capt. R. D. McCully ....... regiment, for the quarter ending 755 June 30, 1891 .................................... . of adjutant general's office to 8... S. C. Woodruff..................Rent August 15, and of storeroom for ordnance stores and quartermas- 762 ter supplies to August 31, 1891......... of armory, company D, second Oct. 3... Capt. H. G. Shuham ....... . tent regiment, for the quarter ending 783 September 30, 1891 ............................

$200 00 107 50 122 50 14000 150 00 12000 11500 227 50 122 50 105 00 12000 12000 117 45 15000 30 00 10750 40 00 15000 150 00 300 00 90 00 87 50 25 125 00

1891. Oct. 3... S. C. Woodruff................ .Rent of storeroom for ordnance Stores and quartermaster supplies for the month of September, 1891 791 26... Lt. Chas. B. Wood ........... Rent of armory, company I, first regiment, for the first and second quarters 1891...................................... 798 26... Capt. W. S. Shank .......... . Rent of armory, Company G, first regiment, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891 ........................... 799 26... Capt. J. J. Weisenberger Rent of armory, company F, first .. regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1891......................................823 26... Capt. J. M. Ashton .......... ..Rent of armory, troop B, first cavalry, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891................................. 825 26... Capt. E. H. Fox .............. . Rent of armory, company K, second regiment, for the month of September, 1891 ..................................... 832 26... Capt. L. S. Booth ............. . Rent of armory, company B, first regiment ......................................... ..833 26... Lt. Chas. B. Wood .......... ..Rent of armory, company J, first regiment .......................................... 834 26... Capt. Harry St. George... Rent of armory, company H, second regiment, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891 ............................ 835 26... Capt. J. J. Weisenberger Rent of armory, company F, first regiment, for the quarter ending September 30,1891 ........................... 836 31... Lt. P. B. Dunbar ............ . Bent of armory, company K, first regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1890 ............................ 842 31... Lt. P. B. Dunbar ............ . Rent of armory, company K, first regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 ................................. ..843 31... Capt. John Carr .............. .Rent of armory, company F, second regiment, for the quarter ending0eptember 30, 1890 ........................... . 846 31... Capt. John Carr ...............ent .R of armory, company F, second regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ............................ 847 31... Capt. John Carr.............. .ent R of armory, company F, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 ................................. 31... Capt. John Carr... ............Rent of armpry, company F, second . 848 regiment......................................... 31... Capt. John Carr .............. . Rent of armory, company F, second . 849 regiment, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891.............................850 31... Capt. W. J. Fife .............. . Rent of armory, company C, first regiment, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891............................ 851 31... Capt. J. B. Frost ..... ...... . Rent of armory, company A, second regiment, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891 ... 855 31... S. C. Woodruff................ . Rent of storeroom ........................ for ordnance stores and quartermaster supplies month of October, 1891.......... 858 31... J. C. C Percival.................. R for the of storeroom for ordnance stores from July 1, 1890, to September 20, 1891....................................... 860 1892. ril29... Lt. F. L. Hilton............... .ent R Rentof armory, company D, first regiment, for the quarter ending g March 31, 1892 ................................. ..863 '. 5... Capt. R. P. McCully ....... . Rent of armory, company B, second regiment, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891 ........................... . 866 5... Capt. A. B. Morton ......... . Rent of armory, company K, first regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1891.................................... 837

$10 00 30000 150 00 12000 15000 35 83 112 50 150 00 107 50 13980 125 00 147 50 120 00 12000 102 48 95 01 85 29 150 00 135 00 1000 20 00 72 50 9750 125 00


246

Date.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ARMORY ACCOUNT- CONTINUED.

ARMORY ACCOUNT - CONTINUED.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1891. Nov. 9... Gen. A. P. Curry............ Rent of brigade headquarters for the quarter ending September 30, 1891................................................... 876 19... Capt. J. J. Weisenberger Rent of armory, company F, first regiment, for the quarter ending June 30,1891 ..................... .............. 896 Dec. 1... Lt. P. E. Dunbar ............. Rent of armory, company K, first regiment, for the quarter ending September 30,1891... ........................ goo 1... Capt. J. C. MacCriminon Rent of armory, company E, second regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1891......................................901 1... Capt. J. C. MacCriminon Rent of armory, company E, second regiment, for the quarter eliding September 30, 1891 ............................ 902 1... Capt.J.J.Weisenberger Rent of armory, company F, first regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 ................................. . 903 1... J. C. Percival ................... Rent of warehouse for storage of military property to November 20, 1891 .................................................. . 904 1... Chas. H. Merriam ........... . Rent of armory, company â&#x201A;Ź1, second regiment, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891 ............ .............. . 905 1... S. C. Woodruff................ ..Rent of storeroom for ordnance stores and quartermaster supplies for the month of November, 1891 910 14... Capt. E. S. Ingraham Rent of armory, company E, first regiment, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891 ........................... ..912 14... Capt. B. S. Ingraliam...... . Rent of armory, company E, first regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1891 ...................................... 913 14... Capt. L. S. Booth ............ . Rent of armory, company B, first regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1891 .................................... . 914 31 S. C. Woodruff................ ..Rent of storeroom for ordnance stores and quartermaster supplies for the month of December, 1891 937 1892. Jan. 8 Gen. A. P. Curry ..............Rent of brigade headquarters to January 1, 1892 ................................ . 946 April 29 Capt. E. S. Ingraham...... Rent of armory, company E, first regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ........................... . ..... . 951 Jan. . .... Paine Bros ...................... . Storage on military supplies during the years 1889, 1890 and 1891............. 959 22 Col. B. W. Pike ............... Rent, second regiment headquarters to December 31, 1891 ................. .960 22 J. C. Percival................... Rent of storeroom for military supplies from October 30 to December 20, 1891.............................................. .61 April 29 Capt. W. S. Shank .......... .Rent of armory, company G, first regiment, for the quarter ending March :11, 1892 ............... .................. . 963 Jan. 22 J. C. Percival ................... Rent of storeroom for military supplies................................................975 30 Capt. John Carr ............. ..Rent of armory, company F, second regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 .............................978 30 Capt. J. M. Ashton .......... ..Rent of armory, Troop B, first cavalry, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891................................. 980 Rent of armory, company E, first 30 Capt. B. S. Ingraham regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ............................ 981 30 Capt. W. S. Shank ........... Rent of armory, company G, first regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ............................. 982

Amount.

$7500 10750 11000 115 00 112 50 10060 10 00 102 50 10 00 8.5 00 135 00 120 00 1000 75 00 137 50 180 00 7500 2o 00 15000 1000 84 99 150

90

90 00 150 00

Date. I

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1892. Jan. 30... Capt. J. B. Frost ...... ....... Rent of armory, company A, second regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ...........................984 30... S. C. Woodruff..................Rent of storeroom for ordnance . stores and quartermaster supplies for the month of January, 1892....... Feb. 11... Capt. L. S. Booth ............ . Rent of armory, company B, first . 1001 regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ........................... 11... Capt. J. C. MaeCrimmon.. Rent of armory, company E, second 1007 regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ............................ 11... Capt. Harry St. George... Rent of armory, company H, second 1008 regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ........................... 13... W. B. Gibson & Bro......... Rent of messroom during riots at 1009 mines in King county..................... 1043 29... Capt. R. D. McCully ....... .Rent of armory, company B, second regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ........................... 1063 29... Capt. H. G. Shoham......... Rent of armory, company D, second regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ............................ 1064 29... Capt. W. J. Fife................Rent of armory, company C, first regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ........................... 29... Capt. A. SV. Lindsay........ Rent of armory, troop A, first cav- 1065 alry, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891.................................1003 29... Capt. A. W. Lindsay ....... . Rent of armory, troop A, first cavalry, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891................................ 1067 29... Capt. A. W. Lindsay.........Rent of armory, troop A, first cavalry, for the quarter ending June 30, 189 1............................................. 29... Capt. A. W. Lindsay ....... . Rent of armory, troop A, first cav- 1068 alry, for the quarter ending March 31,1891............................................. 1069 29... Capt. A. W. Lindsay ....... . Rent of armory, troop A, first cavalry, for the quarter ending December 31, 1890 ................................ 1070 29... Capt. A. W. Lindsay ....... .Rent of armory, troop A, first cavalry, for the quarter ending September 30, 1890 ................................. 1071 29. .. S. C C. Woodru................. ff Rent of storeroom for ordnance stores and quartermaster supplies for the month of February, 1892...... 1081 Mar. 23... Capt. F. P. Eshelman...... Rent of armory, company E, second regilllemit .......................................... 1104 23... Gen. A. P. Curry ............ . Rent of brigade headquarters for the quarter ending March 31, 1891 1112 23... Capt. G. W. Bilhngton... Rent of armory, company C, second regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ............................ 1121 23... Capt. J.J.Weisenberger Rent of armory, company F, first regiment, for the quarter ending g iii 2... W. IT. Learned ................ December 31, 1891 ............................ 1123 Rent of opera house for the inspection of company 1, first regiment 1124 - 2... Capt. G. W. Biliington Remit of armory, company C, second regiment, for the quarter ending September 30,1891 ..... . ......................1125 2... Capt. R. H. IT Fox .............. . Rent of armory, company K, second regiment, for the quarter ending g December 31,1891 ............................ 1128 2... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbaeh Rent of headquarters, first cavalry 2... Capt. W. J. Fife .............. battalion ......................................1129 Rent of armory, company C, first regiment, for the quarter ending q June .30, 1892.................................... 1132

247

Amount.

$142 50 10 00 12000 122 50 117 50 18 00 10750 135 50 148 33 107 50 11000 10000 145

00

117 50 100 00 10 00 132 50 87 50 80 01 145 00 15 00 8000 11500 3000 13000


248

Date.

I

.& .. .. .. .

. .. .. .. .

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT,

ARMORY ACCOUNT- CONTINUED.

ARMORY ACCOUNT - CONTINUED.

To whom paid.

I

For what purpose.

1892. of storeroom for ordnance April 2... S. C. Woodruff................ Rent stores and quartermaster supplies for the month of March, 1892 ..........1142 2... J. C. Percival .................. Rent of storeroom for military sup- 1145 plies................................................ 5... N. B. Brooks and B. W. Rent of headquarters, second regiPike ............ .................. meiit; rent of band room, second regiment ......................................... 1152 Rent of storeroom for military sup29..: Chas. Grainger ................ plies from January 1, 1891, to March 31, 1892 ................................. 1165 29... Bennett Hull Mfg. Co.. Stationery case for regimental head- 1169 quarters .......................................... 29... Capt. E. H. Fox .............. Rent of armory, company K, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ................................. 1170 Rent of armory, company G, second 29... Capt. Chas. H. Merriam regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ........................... 1172 Rent of armory, company G, second 29... Lt. A. W. McCallum regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ................................. 1177 Rent troop A, first cav29... Capt. A. W. Lindsay ....... alry,offorarmory, the quarter ending March 1178 1892............................................. 31, 29... Lt. Col. Jos. Green .......... Rent of headquarters and bandroom, first regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891............1180 29... Lt. Col. Jos. Green .......... Rent of headquarters and bandroom, first regiment, for the quarter ending March 31,1892 ................ 1181 29... Capt. H. G. Shuham ....... Rent of armory, company D, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ................................. 1183 29... Capt. John Carr .............. Rent of armory, company F, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ................................. 1184 29... Capt. J. E. Frost ............. Rent of armory, company A, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ................................. 1185 29... Capt. J. C. MacCrimmon Rent of armory, company E, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ... .............................. 3186 29... Capt. Harry St. George Rent of armory, company Ii, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ............... .................. 1187 29... Capt. C. S. Reinhart......... Rent of armory, company A, first regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891 ............................ 1188 of armory, company I, first 29... Capt. G. H. Jones ........... Rent regiment, for the quarter ending December 31, 1891............................ 1189 of armory, company C, first 29... Capt. W. J. Fife .............. Rent regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ................................. 1190 of armory, troop B, first cav29... Capt. Jas. M. Ashton ...... Rent alry, for the quarter ending March 31,1891 ............................................. 1192 of armory, company B, first 29... Capt. L. S. Booth ........... Rent regiment, for the quarter ending 1193 March 31,1892 ................................. of armory, company I, first 29... Capt. Geo. H. Jones......... Rent regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ........... ..................... 1194 of armory, company A, first 29... Capt. C. S. Reinhart......... Rent regiment, for the quarter ending 1195 March 31, 1892 ................................. of armory, company C, first 29... Lt. I. M. Howell .............. .Rent regiment, for the month of April 1203 1992...................................................

Amount.

$1000 23 67 75 00 112 00 2800 107 50 117 50 120 00 9750 150 00 115000 14000 102 50 13000 12500 112 50 32 50 147 54) 15000 150 00 112 50 15000 112 50 48 33

Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1892. of m'mory, company (3, first April 29... Capt. W. S. Shank .......... Rent regiment, for the month of April, 1892 .................................................. 1206 30... Lieut. F. L. Hilton .......... Rent of armory. company D, first regiment, for the quarter ending December 31,1890 ........................... 1209 30... Lieut. F. L. Hilton .......... Rent of armory, company D, first regiment, for the quarter ending March 31,1891 ................................. l2f0 30... Lieut. F. L. Hilton .......... Rent of armory, company D, first regiment, for the quarter ending June 30,1891 .................................... 1211 30... Lieut. F. L. Hilton .......... Rent of armory, company D, first regiment, for the quarter ending September 30, 1891 ........................... 1212 30... Lieut. F. L. Hilton .......... Rent of armory, company D, first regiment, for the quarter .ending December 31, 1891 ............................ 1213 30... Capt. A. W. Lindsay ........Rent of armory, troop A, first cavalry, for the month of April, 1892 1214 Rent of armory, company B, second 30 Capt. H. D. McCully regiment, for the quarter ending March 31,1892 ................................. 1215 30... Capt. R. D. McCully......... Rent of armory, company B, second regiment, for the month of April, 1892 .................................................. 1216 30... Capt. Geo. W. Billings Rent of armory, company C, second regiment, for the month of April 1892 .................................................. 1217 30...Capt. Geo. W. Billings Rent of armory, company C, second regiment, for the quarter ending March 31, 1892 ................................. 1218 June 1... Col. J05. Greene ............. Rent of regimental and bandroom .from January to September, 1891 1235 7... Gen. A. P. Curry ............ Rent of brigade headquarters for April, May and June, 1892 .............. 1238 July 6... T. J. McKenny ................ Rent of storeroom for ordnance stores and supplies, March to May, 1892................................................... 1201 6... J. C. Percival .................. Rent of storeroom for ordnance stores and supplies ......................... 1266 6... T. I. McKenny .................Rent of storeroom for ordnance stores and supplies ......................... 1291 Aug. 26... Lt. 1. M. Howell ...............Rent of armory, company C, first regiment, for May and June, 1892 1364 26... T. I. McKenny ................ Rent of storeroom for ordnance stores and supplies for the month Of July, 1892 ..................................... 1365 26... Geo. A. Mottrnan ............ ..Rent of storeroom for quartermaster supplies for the month of July, 1892 1369 31...Col. B. W. Pike .............. Rent of regimental and bandroom, second regiment, May and June 1396 31... Capt. E. S. Ingraham ...... .Rent of armory, company E, first regiment, for the quarter ending June 30,1892 .................................... 31... Capt. C. S. Reinhart......... Rent of armory, company A, first 1402 regiment, for the quarter ending June 30,1892..................................... 1403 31... Capt. L. S. Booth ............ Rent of armory, company B, first regiment, May and June, 1892 ........ 1404 31... Col. Jos. Greene ............. Rent of regimental headquarters and bandroom for the months of May June, 1892 ..........................1408 31... Capt. F. L. Hilton ........... ..Rent ofand armory, company I), first regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1892 .................................... ..1428 29... Capt. Harry St. George... Rent of armory, company 11, second regiment, for the quarter ending June 30, 1892 .................................... 1429

249

Amount.

$5000 9500 105 00 72 50 6000 6000 32 50 10500 3500 3000 9000 450 00 67 50 4000 2565 6000 9333 6000 1000 5000 15000 150 00 8500 100 00 11750 122 50


250

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

251

ARMORY ACCOUNTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; CONCLUDED. Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

9 Amou.

1892. Aug. 29... Capt. H. G. Shuham ....... .Rentof armory, company D, second regiment, for the months of May and June, 1892 ................................. . 1430 $85 00 29... Capt. John Carr ...............Rent of armory, company F, second regiment, for the quarter ending June 30,1892 .................................... 1431 142 50 Sept. 8... J. J. Weisenherger .......... Rent of armory, company F, first regiment, for the quarter ending June 30,1892 .................................... 1432 142 50 8... Capt. E. W. Lyons .......... Rent of armory, company (1, second regiment, for the months of May and June, 1892 ....................................1433 83 32 8... Capt. Chas. W. Billings Rent of armory, company G, first regiment, for the months of May and June, 1892 ....................................1434 100 00 8... S. M. Percival ................. .Rent of storeroom for quartermaster's supplies for the month of 29 00 August, 1892 .......................................1444 8... G. W. Billingtou ............. Rent of armory, company C, second regiment, for the months of May and June, 1892 ................................. ...1463 71 66 8... Capt. J. B. Frost ............. . Rent of armory, company A, second regiment, for the quarter ending 140 83 June 30, 1892.......................................1464 8... Capt. J. W. Stearns ......... .Rent of armory, company K, second regiment, for the months of May 83 32 and June, 1892 ................................. ...1465. Oct. 6... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbaeh Rent of headquarters for first cavalry battalion for the quarter end32 50 ing September 30, 1892........................1482 6... Geo. A. Mottrnan ............ ...Rent of warehouse for ordnance stores and supplies for September, 1000 1892 .................................................. ...1484 6... J. C. Percival ......... ............Rent of storeroom for quartermaster supplies for the month of Septem10 00 ber, 1892 .............................................1486 6... S. M. Percival ................. ...Rent of warehouse for ordnance stores for the month of September, 20 01) 1892 .................................................. ................... ...1488 $18,704 82 ........... Total ........................ ................................... ......

CLOTHING ACCOUNT.

Date.

I

To whom paid.

I

For what purpose.

Amount.

1891. Mar. 11... Pettibone Mfg. Co .......... furnished for use of troops.. 573 $3,632 50 Apr. 7... Pettibone Mfg. Co ...........Uniforms .Uniforms furnished for use oftroops.. 597 1,474 00 7... Capt. A. B. Morton.. ........Amount paid for uniforms for company K, first regiment .................... 599 402 50 7... Capt. H. St. George.......... Amount paid for uniforms for company H. second regiment ................622 716 10 17... Neustadter Bros .............. Blankets furnished for use of state .troops .......................................... 629 459 00 May 23... Capt. G. H. Jones ............Amount paid for uniforms for company 1, first regiment ..................... .64.5 23... Neustafiter Bros .............. ..Binding 341 75 for blankets .......................... 658 July 1... St. 1 50 John's Guild .............. Sewing and binding blankets ............ 678 20... Garretson, 27 55 Woodruff, Pratt & Co..................... Stable blouses furnished troop B, first cavalry battalion ............... ...... .711 Sept. 8... J. H. Armstrong ............. .Gloves 22 85 for company A, second regiment infantry ................................. .752 8... Pettibone Mfg. Co ............Clothing 3 00 furnished for the use of Oct. 3 ... R.D. McCullv................. troops ............................................. 756 3,557 00 .Uniforms for company B, second regiment ........................................ 733 26... S.Pals ..............................Altering 37 95 uniforms company A, see1892. ond regiment ...................................817 450 Jan. 30... Dimoek & Clieasty ......... .Six dozen white gloves for use of company B, first regiment ................957 22.. W. 0. Fowler ....................Cleaning 11 25 and repairing uniforms regiment band .....................968 30 ... Troop B, first cavalry,, 7000 Capt. J. M. Ashton ....... Repairing uniforms troop B after 30.. Capt. L. S. Booth............. King county coal mine riots............ 970 171 25 Taking measurements for uniforms for company B, first regiment; 30... W. P. Robertson ..............Cleaning gloves, expressage, etc . ................... 979 17 50 and repairing military Feb, eb 13... Nulin & Wheeler ............ lothing ................................. 983 100 00 ..Two cans indelible ink for marking and blankets .................... 1016 550 Oregon ImprovementCo 36clothing pairs blankets furnished troops during riots at mines in King 29... B. G. O'Brien, adj. gen... y............................................. 180 00 Amount necessary to complete pur- 1020 chase of uniforms from the United States............................................ . M ar. 23... Capt. Chas, H. Merriam.. 20356 Berlin gloves for company G, see- 1087 Ju t... ond regiment ..................................1118 500 Juno Capt. C. S. Reunhart......... Measuring 39 men for uniforms, first regiment, company A...................... 1219 525 Neustadter Bros .............. . 150 July pairs blankets; blanket binding.. 1221 Lieut. F. J. Gehres......... . Three 778 50 dozen white cotton gloves 6 Capt. A. W. Lindsay ....... for troop A, first cavalry ................. . 1240 450 Dyeing plumes and helmet cords, troop A..................................... 1242 2350 St. John's Guild................ Binding 300 blankets .......................... . 1254 26 I. Harris & Sons................ Blankets 30 75 and towels for N. G. W Drury & Allen................. 177 75 Blouse for first sergeant company 133$ G, first regiment .............................. 1341 12 00


ADJUTANT GENERAL.

252

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

253

CLOTHING ACCOUNT -CONCLUDED. Date.

1892. July 26... 26... 26... Aug. 31... Sept. 2... 31... 2... Aug. 26... 31...

I

To whom paid.

W. 0. Fowler................. Lieut. E. S. Isaacs.......... Toklas & Kaufman........ Geo. W. Billington........ Gross Bros..................... Capt. J. B. Frost............ Garretson, Woodruff, Pratt & Co.................. Lieut. A. W. McCallum.. Pettibone Mfg. Co.......... Total...............

For what purpose.

0

Facing and trimming uniforms, troopA............................................ 1343 Uniform for Quartermaster Sergeant ............... 1344 Pringle.............................. Cloth for use at Camp Murray............ 1347 Refitting uniform company C, secondregiment ................................... 1359 57 pairs blankets and 125 yards muslin.................................................... 1381 Repairing uniforms, bugle, chevrons and white gloves .............................. 3386 40 pairs blankets ................................ 1390 Repairing uniforms company G, second regiment .................................. . 1392 Uniforms for companies B and E, second regiment .............................. 1420

Amoust.

$133 00 12 00 20 35 17 00 195 75 31 90 111 50 105 00 2480 15 010,000 01

SUBSISTENCE ACCOUNT.

Date.

For what purpose.

Amount.

:i 1891. Mar. 11... Lt. Col. H. F. Garretsori.. Amount paid for subsistence of Gen. Gibbon and staff while visiting camp of instruction of 1890.............. 11... Lt. Col. Albert Whyte...... Hotel bill at Olympia en route to 552 Aberdeen as mustering officer of company K, first regiment ............. 11... Lt. L. B. Dawson ............ . Subsistence at Yakima during elec- M tion of brigadier and adj utant generals............................................... 557 11... Capt. J05. Green............. at Yakima during election of brigadier and adjutant gej generals erals................................................. 559 11... Lt. L. S. Booth ................ Subsistence at Yakima during election of brigadier and adjutant generals.............................................. 11... Lt. C. R. Dorr .................. Hotel bill while attending board of 561 survey at Walla Walla .................... 575 It Maj. Geo. W. Greene .Subsistence while attending election of brigadier and adjutantgenerals................................................ 580 11... Maj. Geo. W. Greene....... Hotel bill at Walla Walla.................... 588 11... Maj. Geo. W. Greene ...... Hotel bill at Sprague ........................ . 589 11... Gen. A. P. Curry............ .otel H bill at Olympia and Tacoma andmeals on train ........................... 596 Apr. 7... Sidney D. Waters ............ ...Subsistence twelve days while delivering arms and ammunition from Spokane to Conconully ......... . 605 7... Lt. J. J. White ................. Subsistence twelve days while delivering arms and ammunition from Spokane to Concouully ......... . 606 7... Gen. A. P. Curry ............ ..Subsistence while attending meeting of the military board ................ 613 17... Lt. 1. M. Howell ............. .Subsistence attending convention at Seattle for election of major, first regiment ..................................557 17... Lt. James Ross ................ Subsistence attending convention at Seattle for election of major, j first regiment ................................ 638 17... Capt. W. J. Fife ............... Subsistence attending convention at Seattle for election of major, first regiment ................................ 639 TMnv 23... Lt. N. S. Snyder .............. . subsistence during election ofmajor first regiment; subsistence during court martial and while attending election of brigadier and adjutant generals.......................................... 649 23... Geo. H. Jones ....... . Same as above .................................... ...648 23... Capt. Lt. C. B. Wood................ Same as above .................................... . 650 23... J. p Becker..................... Subsistence during election of lieu23... Capt. J. B. Frost ............. . tenant colonel, second regiment.... 651 Subsistence during election of lieu9... Capt. J. C. MacCrimmnon, tenant colonel, second regiment.... 652 Subsistence for three during election of lieutenant colonel, second s... Capt. Harry St. George... regiment......................... ............... . 662 Subsistence during election of lieutenant colonel, second regiment.... 664

$61 25 3 00 400 550 550 300 400 300 300 24 50 24 00 24 00 2500 150 150 150

925 9 25 925 600 600 18 50 600


254

... .

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

... .

SUBSISTENCE ACCOUNT -CONTINUED. Date.

1891. June 9... 9... 9... 9... July 1... 1... 9... II... ii... 20... Sept. 8... 8... 8... 24... 24... 24... 24... 24... 24... Oct. 10... 26... 26... 26... 26... 26... 26... 9... 26... 31... Nov. 6... 9... 19... 19... 19... 19... 19... 19... 19... 19... 19... Dec. 14... 14... 31...

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

.& . ... && .. .. FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

255

SUBSISTENCE ACCOUNTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; CONTINUED.

51,

Subsistence during election of lieuIA. E. B. Brady ......... tenant colonel, second regiment.... 665 Lt. J. W. Murphy ............ Subsistence during election of lieutenant colonel, second regiment 666 Col. E. W. Pike ............... Subsistence during election of lieutenant colonel, second regiment 669 Gen. R. G. O'Brien ......... Subsistence while inspecting cloth671 ing of company II, first regiment Capt. B. B. Wise .............. Subsistence while mustering company I-I, second regiment ............... 687 Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Subsistence while mustering troop A. first cavalry ......................... ...... 688 Gen. A. P. Curry............. Subsistence while attending meetb ig of the military board ............... 695 Capt. A. E. Morton ......... Subsistence while attending board of examination at Seattle ................ 696 Capt. A. E. Morton ......... Subsistence while attending board of examination at Seattle ................ 697 Gen. B. G. O'Brien ...........Subsistence at Seattle ........................ 714 .Subsistence at Seattle ........................ 741 Lt. Chas. DeLosh ............ Lt. Chas. DeLosh ............ .Subsistence at Seattle ........................ .742 Subsistence while surveying stores Capt. H. G. Shuham......... of quartermaster, second regiment 747 Subsistence at Seattle ........................ 774 Maj. F. A. Gaus ............... Maj. F. A. Gans ............... Subsistence at Aberdeen .................... 775 Subsistence at Olympia and on train 777 Lt. H. B. Schwellenbach I. M. Howell................... Subsistence at Mount Vernon and at Aberdeen ........................................ 778 Lt. W. E. Cromwell ....... Subsistence at Aberdeen and meals enroute ........................................... 780 IA. Col. F. E. Trotter ...... Subsistence while instructing the first regiment in small arms practice ................................................... 781 Subsistence atOlympia and en route 785 Lt. N. B. Brooks ............. Gen. E.G. O'Brien ......... Subsistence atSpokaneandenroute 797 Subsistence at Olympia and meals Lt. H. B. Sehwellenbach on train ........................................... 801 Subsistence at Aberdeen and meals Lt. James H. Barry ........ en route ......... ........ ...................... .802 Subsistence at North Yakima ............ 803 Lt. James H. Barry Lt. E. F. Stafford ............ Subsistence at Aberdeen and en route ............................. .. .............. 813 Col. B. W. Pike ............... Subsistence atSpokane and en route 815 Lt. Col. F. E. Trotter ........Subsistence while acting as instructor to the National Guard ................ 818 Lt. H. B. Sehwellenbach Subsistence at Spokane and en route 821 Chas. A. Burr .................. .Subsistence at Seattle and en route while on military business ............. .854 Lt. Col. F. E. Trotter ...... Subsistence while instructing the second regiment in small arms practice ........................................... 870 Gen. A. P. Curry ............. Subsistence at Olympia and Seattle and en route .................................... 876 Lt.Col. Marshall K.Snell Subsistence at Aberdeen and en route ............................................... 879 Col. J. K. Stout ............... Subsistence at Olympia and enroute 882 Capt. Chas. H. Merriam Subsistence at Olympia and en route 88.3 Capt. Chas. H. Merriam Stihsistenceat Portland ..................... 886 Col. Henry Landes .......... SuhsistenceatOlympiaand en route 887 Col. J. K. Stout .......... .... 8iibsistence at Tacoma and en route 889 Col. W. M. Clark ............ Subsistence atOlympiaafld en route 890 and en Col. E. W. Pike ............... Subsistence at Waitsburg route ............................................... 893 Subsistence atOlympiaandeu route 894 Col. E. W. Pike ............... Col. J. D. McIntyre ........ .. Subsistence at Olympia and en route 911 Subsistence at Sprague while examMaj. Chas. B. Johnston ining officers of troop A, first cavalry battalion .................................. 916 T. M. Reed, state auditor Subsistence at Tacoma and en route 927

Amount.

$6 00 6 00 550 1350 5 75 1 90 12 75 3 00 3 00 3 00 300 300 300 2 50 5 25 9 50 5 75 8 40 6845 7 75 620 10 50 525 3 00 5150 16 70 36 20 6 00 1 35 67 21 10 00 5 65 1200 14 50 3 00 15 00 12 25 2275 9 00 2075 1100 2 00 8 25

Date.

For what purpose.

1891. Dec. 31... Lt. F. J. Elsensohn..........Subsistence while paying troops of the second regiment for parades during 1891...................................... 1892. Jan. 8... Gen. A. P. Curry ............. Subsistence at Olympia while attending court martial of Colonel Haines ............................................ 946 22... Col. E. W. Pike ............... Subsistence Olympia and en route.. 960 30... Lt. Chas. B. Wood ...........Subsistence at of company I, first regiment, while en route to riots at mines in King county ..................... 966 22... Col. E. W. Pike ............... .Subsistence while on military business................................................. 973 22... Col. E. W. Pike ............... Subsistence while attending meeting of the military board .................974 30... Gen. R. U. O'Brien ......... ..Subsistence of Colonel Pike and Lieutenant Colonel Trotter while attending meeting of the military board...............................................976 30... Capt. J. M. Ashton .......... Subsistence of troop B during riots at mines in King county .................994 Feb. 13... Seattle Coal Iron Co.... Supplies furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ........ 021 13... C. W. Cordray.................. Milk furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ................ ..1026 13... Capt. W. S. Shank ........... Subsistence during riots at mines in King county................................... ..1027 13... Frye Bruhn ..... . ........... .Meat furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ................ .. 13... Chas. Trustt co .................. Milk furnished troops during riots 1032 at mines in King county ................ ..1033 13... Atkinson & Calhoun ....... Supplies furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ..........1034 13... Spaight Duncolf. ..........Bread furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ................. 1036 13... Mrs. H. 1{abenicht .......... Coffee furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ................. 1037 13... Mrs. ins. Evans ...............Subsistence furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ......... 1038 13... Haley, Glenn Co ........ Subsistence furnished troops during 13... Puget Sound Dressed riots at mines in King county ........ 1040 Beef and Packing Co Meat furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ................ 1041 13... D. A. Duffy ..................... ...Bread furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ................ ..1042 13... B. Hopkins .......................Butter furnished troops during riots King county ................ 1045 13 ... Fred Fnedherg............... at minesasincook's assistant during riots at mines King county ......... 1047 13... John Casura .................... Meat furnishedintroops during riots at mines in King county ................. 1048 13... Seattle Coal Iroii Co.... Subsistence furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ........ 1049 13... Seattle Coal Iron Co.... Supplies furnished during riots at mines In King county .................... 1050 13... C. S. Sanborn ................... Provisions furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ..........1051 13... Northwest Fruit Co..........Provisions furnished troops during riots at mines in King county 1052 13... Geo. W, Tibbets Co...... Provisions furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ........ 1053 13... William Parley ............... .Provisions furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ........ 1055 13... ins. A. Hatfield ............... Provisions furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ........ 1056 13... Jacob Heist ..................... Provisions furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ........ 1057 13... Lt. J. A. Hatfield ............ Provisions furnished troops during riots at mines in King county ........ 1058

Amount.

00. 27 25 3075 17 00 3400 1700 14 00 151 30 80 72 12 60 14 90 227 58 29 75 116 67 1500 3 00 32 50 190 34 3 78 6 00 5.00 5 33 11 25 203 20 14 00 13 20 160 20 36 30 1 00 32 48 30 50 13 30

J


FOURT5 BIENNIAL REPORT.

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

256

.. -. . . ... .

SUBSISTENCE ACCOUNT— CONTINUED.

SUBSISTENCE ACCOUNT - CONTINUED.

Date.

I

1892. Feb. 29... 29... 29... 29... 29... 29... 29... 29... Mar. 23... 23... 28... 23... 23...

To whom paid.

257

. .. . .. .. .

Amount.

Meals and lodging .............................1059 Herman Chapin .............. Subsistence enroute to Olympia and Lieut. J. A. Hatfield ....... return ............................................. 1072 Subsistence during riots at mines in Lieut. J. A. Hatfield ....... King county ................................... 1073 paid cooks during riots at Lieut. J. A. Hatfield....... Amount mines in King county ...... . .............. 1075 Subsistence Sprague.......................1076 Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Subsistence at at Sprague.......................1077 Lt. H. B. Schwellenbaeh Subsistence at Tacoma and Seattle.... 1084 Gen. R. Cr. O'Brien.......... furnished during riots OregonlmprOvementfio Subsistence at mines in King county ..................1091 while attending meetMaj. F. A. Gatis ............... Subsistence ing of examining board at Seattle.. 1109 returning from meeting Gen. A. P. Curry ............. Subsistence of military board at Olympia 1111 while attending examLt. W. J. Milroy ...............Subsistence ining board at Seattle ..................... 1115 while at Spokane and Gen. R. G. O'Brien ..........Subsistence en route........................................1119 while attending examLt. M. B. Reed .................Subsistence ining board at Seattle ..................... 1112 Subsistence while attending elecLt. M. E. Reed ................ April 2. tion at Seattle ......... ........................1131 Subsistence while attending elec2... Maj. F. A. Gans .............. tion at Seattle ..................................1133 ......... .. Subsistence while attending elecLt. B. F. Stafford ............ 2... 1134 tion at Seattle ........................ Subsistence while attending elec2... Capt. C. S. Reinhart tion at Seattle ................................. 1135 .Subsistence tion at Seattle while ................................. attending elec2... Lt. I. M. Howell ............... 1147 Subsistence while attending elecLi. N. S. Snyder .............. 29... tion at Seattle ...................... .......... 1158 Subsistence while attending elec29... Capt. Geo. H. Jones tion at Seattle ............................. ... 1159 Subsistence while attending elecLt. C. B. Wood ................ 29... tion at Seattle .................................. 1160 while attending elec29... Capt. W. S. Shank ........... Subsistence tion at Seattle .................................. 1168 Subsistence while paying troop B, 29... Capt. Wallace Mount first cavalry, for parade on February 22, 1892..................................... 1175 at Olympiaand en route.. 1182 29... Gen. A. P. Curry ............ Subsistence at Olympia and en route 29... Col. E. W. Pike ............... Subsistence while attending meeting of military board ........................................ 1191 furnished troops during 29... Geo. W. Brown ............... Subsistence riots at mines in King county ........ 1204 Subsistence furnished troops during 30... Oregon Jmpr'v'ment Co riots at mines in King county .........1205 while attending examJune 1... M. M. Bartlett ................. Subsistence ining board at Seattle ..................... 1220 while attending exam1... Lieut. W. F. Clark .......... Subsistence ining board at Seattle .......................1222 at Seattle ......................... 1223 1... Lieut. Col. W. S. Shank.. Subsistence at Portland while on 1... Gen. R. U. O'Brien ......... Subsistence military business ............................ 1232 Subsistence at Seattle ........................ 1234 Capt. I. M. Howell ........... 1... .Subsistence at Aberdeen while act1... Lieut. W. J. Milroy .......... ing as inspector of election ............. 1236 Subsistence at Clyde and Spokane ... 1237 7... Col. E. W. Pike ................ subsistence at Olympia while at7... Col. E. W. Pike ................ tending meeting of the military board ................................... 1239 .Subsistence furnished troop A, first July 6... Lieut. F. J. Gehres ......... cavalry, while en route to Murray.. 1240 Subsistence of officers of troop A, July 6... Lieut. E. H. Peterson first cavalry, while en route to .3243 Camp Murray ..................................

Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

Amount.

1509

$6 75 1 50 18 75 203 83 3 50 3 50 6 50 395 28 600 9 50 3 50 15 00 2 50 6 50 7 00 5 25 8 50 6 50 6 50 6 50 4 50 7 50 17 50 13 75 5075 437 50 1 5 3 00 3 5 6 50 4 60 1 50 18 50 10 00 10 65 00

6... Capt. A. W. Lindsay ....... Subsistence troop A, first cavalry, while en route to Camp Murray.......l24 $1000 6... Lieut. M. S. Winiler..........Subsistence furnished company H, first regiment, while en route to CampMurray................................. 11 50 6... Capt. F. D. Eshelman Subsistence furnished company E, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray ............................... 124€ 3555 6... Capt. F. D. Eshelman Subsistence officers company B, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray ...................................1247 465 6... A. C. Steinman ............... .Subsistence furnished company A, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray............................. 1555 6... Maj. Chas. B. Johnston... Subsistence at Tacoma and Olympia.. 3251 1400 6... Capt. John Carr............... Subsistence at Spokane...................... 1252 550 6... Lt. Chas. A. Booker......... Subsisteiice at Spokane 1253 700 6... Lt. B. R. Brady ................ Subsistence at Spokane...................... during election of field officers ........................ 1256 625 6... Capt. Cr. W. Billington.... Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers ........................ 1257 10 25 6... Lt. C. H. Weld ................ Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers ..........................1258 1025 6... Capt. B. H. Fox .............. Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers.......... ..... .. ....... .1267 400 6... Li. Chas. F. Kay ............. .Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers ........................ .1258 250 6... Lt. Henry D. Kay ............Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers ..........................1209 400 6... Li. J. W. Stearns ............. Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers ......................... .1270 404) 6... Li. H. C. Phillips ............. Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers ..........................1271 1025 6... Capt. Harry St. George... Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers ........................ ..1273 650 6... Lt. Chas. T. Smith ........... Subsistence at Spokane during attendance before examining board 1274 650 6... Lt. D. N. Smith ............... Subsistence at Spokane during attendance before examining board 1275 650 6... Capt. H. Cr. Shoham ....... . Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers ........................ 3276 650 6... Li. W. H. Fletcher.......... Subsistence at Spokane during attendance before examining board 1277 650 6... Lt. N. B. Brooks ............. Subsistence at Spokane while re-organizing the second regiment band............................................... 1278 650 6... Li. John Jackel ............... .Subsistence at Spokane during election of field officers ........................ 1280 10 25 6... Gen. R. Cr. O'Brien ......... Subsistence at Tacoma; meals on diner; hotel bill of Colonel Trotter en route to Camp Murray as military instructor under detail from war department..................... 1281 4305 6... Capt. Cr. W. Billington... Subsistence, company C, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray............................................ ..1293 4500 6... Maj. J. H. Hudgin .......... Subsistence while en route to Camp Murray..............................................1294 75 6... Capt. W. B. Buftum ........ Subsistence furnished company I, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray............................. 1295 2820 26... C. T. Uhlman ................... subsistence furnished troops at Camp Murray ...................................134)1 1386 69 26... Capt. H. Cr. Shoham in furnished company 28, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray............................. 26... Capt. Allen Bonebrake... Subsistence 46 00 while attending examining board at Spokane .................. 1304 11 00 —17

.. .. * . ..

.

.. . .


258

.. .. ...... ADJUTANT GENERAL.

SUBSISTENCE ACCOUNT-CONTINUED. Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1892. July 26... Capt. J. W. Stearns ......... .Subsistence while en route to Camp Murray....... ...... ............................. 1307 26... Capt. J. W. Stearns ......... Subsistence furnished company K, second regiment, while returning from Camp Murray ......................... 1308 26... Capt. J. W. Stearns ..........Subsistence furnished company K, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray ............................. 1309 26... Lieut. C. R. Dorr ..............Subsistence at Spokane while attending election of colonel and major of the second regiment ......... 1311 26... Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Subsistence while en route to Camp Murray ......................... .................. 1324 26... Capt. John Carr .............. .Subsistence furnished company F, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray ............................. 1326 Subsistence furnished company H, Capt. Harry St. George 26... second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray ............................. 1327 26... Capt. E. W. Lyons .......... Subsistence furnished company G, second regiment, while en route to Camp Murray ............................. 1328 Subsistence at Tacoma and on train 1331 Lt. H. B. Schwellenbach 26... 26... Lieut. Col. M. McCarthy Subsistence self and horse en route to Camp Murray .............................. 1332 26... Lieut. C. F. Kay .............. Subsistence while en route to Camp Murray............................................ 1333 26... Capt. Harry St. George Subsistence for company H, second regiment, while en route from Murray to Pomeroy ........................ ..1342 26... Lieut. H. C. Jackson ....... Subsistence at Spokaneand en route 1350 Aug. 2... J. G. Tustin .................... Bread furnished troops during annual encampment at Camp Murray .................................................. 1353 Subsistence furnished company C, Sept. 8... Capt. G. W. Billington second regiment, while returning from Camp Murray ......................... 1360 Aug. 26... Lieut. H. D. Allison......... Subsistence at Seattle May 30, 1892, and while en route to Camp Murray...................................................1366 Subsistence furnished company A, 31... Capt. J. E. Frost ............. second regiment, while returning from Camp Murray ......................... 1385 31... Capt. J. E. Frost ............. Subsistence at Spokane ..................... 1386 31... Col. E. W. Pike ................Subsistence of self and staff from Goldendale to Murray and return 136 31... Lieut. Col. M. McCarthy Subsistence at Spokane and en route to attend election of officers ........... ..1398 31... Capt. Wallace Mount ....... Subsistence at Olympia and en route from Sprague to Murray .................. 1399 2... Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Subsistence at Tacoma and en route to parade July 4, 1892 ...................... 1405 31... Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson Subsistence during camp at Camp Murray............................................ 1412 31... Gen. R. G. O'Brien ......... Subsistence at Tacoma while inspecting Defiance park for purposes of permanent state camp grounds ........................................... 1413 Subsistence at Olympia and on boat 31... Col. F. T. Gilbert ............. while en route ................................. 1418 Subsistence at Seattle while on mil31... Chas. C. Fisher ............... itary business ................................. 1419 Subsistence at Olympia and meals 31... Gen. A. P. Curry ............ on diner from Olympia to Spokane 1421 Washingtable linen during encampSept. 8... Mrs. E. Bonney .............. ment............................................... 1435 Subsistence furnished company A, Aug. 31... Lieut. M. E. Reed ........... first regiment, while en route to Camp Murray ................................. 1436

.& . .p &. . FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

-Amount.

$9 75 32 00 53 00 6 50 6 75 37 25 41 90 50 05 4 25 2 00 4 50

Date.

275 76

475

1640

For what purpose.

Amount.

FORAGE ACCOUNT.

45 00

1000 1400 2 60 12 00 825

To whom paid.

1892. Sept. 2... T. W. Pynn ......................Subsistence men furnished second regiwhile en route to Cam Murray ............................................ $20 40 8... Gen. H. G. O'Brien ......... Subsistence at Tacoma and Seattle 1439 while inspecting state property...:.. 1445 7 50 8... Capt. C. S. Reinhart......... Subsistence, company A, first regiment, while en route to Camp Murray... ......................................... 16 30 8... Stowell Steinman ......... Subsistence furnished second regi- .1461 ment band while returning from Camp Murray ................................. 1462 18 65 8... Capt. J. J.Weisenberger.. Hotel expenses at Seattle .................. 1467 5 00 27... W. G. Rowland ............... .Provisions furnished troops at Camp Murray ............................................ 27... Lt. Chas. T. DeLosh......... Subsistence at Seattle and en route 1470 5,395 ii while attending election of colonel and lieutenant colonel of the first regiment ......................................... 1476 8 00 27 ... Capt. R. D. McCully........ Subsistence, company B, second regiment, while en route to and from Camp Murray ......................... 1477 8600 Oct. 6... Capt. F. D. Eshelman ..... Subsistence furnished company E, second regiment, while en route from Camp Murrray ....................... 1490 21 50 Totalsubsistence .................................................................. .......... $11,763 05

52 00 6 75

23 50 650 19 50 11 00 8 00 3 50 1 50

259

SUBSISTENCE ACCOUNTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; CONCLUDED.

Date.

1891. Mar. 11... 11... Jan. 30... Feb. 13... 13... 29 ... July 6... Aug. 31... 31...

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

Lt. T. M. Reed ................ Forage for two horses during encampment, 1890.............................. 584 Lt. T. M. Reed, Jr...............Horse hire during the encampment, 1890........................................... 614 Capt. J. M. Ashton........... Forage for horses, troop B, during mining riots in King county .......... 994 Seattle Coal Iron Co Feed forhorses, troop B, duringmjn ing in King county................. 1049 J. A. Wold ....................... .Hay forriots horses, troop B, during mining riots in King county................ 1054 Isaac Williams W furnished during mining riots inKing county .1092 A. W. Lindsay ................ ..Forage for horses,............................... troop A, first cavalry, en route to Camp Murray ....... Col. E. W. Pike ............... Forage for horses going to and re- 1244 turning from Camp Murray ............ 1396 Wilson Bros .....................Hay and oats at Camp Murray .......... 1417 Total................................................................................... ..

Amount.

$3000 40 00 104 80 203 55 500 10 00 2030 700 40466 $825 31


260

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

ORDNANCE ACCOUNT.

PAY ACCOUNT. mÂŽrs

Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

Amount. Date.

1891. Mar. 11... Ropert Frost ............. ....... Oct 8... Capt. J. M. Ashton.......... Jan. 30... Capt. J. M. Ashton ..........

To ic/ions paid.

For what purpose.

1891. Two-thirds quire emery paper for $100 use in ordnance department .............579 Mar. 11... Gen. R. G. O'Brien .......... Services as adjutant general for the Repairs to saddles and bridles troop quarter ending December, :1890.........547 77 50 B, first cavalry battalion ...................757 11... J. M. Burr ........................ Services as clerk in the adjutant Ordnance furnished troop B, first general's office for the quarter cavalry battalion during mining ending December, 1890 ................... . 549 1600 riots, King county .................... . ..... ..994 13... Charles A. Burr ............... Services as clerk in the adjutant Feb 13... Gordon Hardware Co..... Cartridges for troops during mining general's office for the quarter 3200 riot in King county ........................ . 1031 ending December 31, 1890 ............... . 550 29... R. D. McCully ................. . Express charges and freight on am11... W. S. Bedford ..................Services as armorer and storekeeper munition and cost of setting UP in the quartermaster's department 1745 target ... ............................................ 1060 for the quarter ending December 6 00 29... Lieut. Chas. DeLosh .........Expense incurred setting up target 1062 31, 1890...............................................551 750 29... Chas. C. Fisher ................. Services setting up target at Seattle 1074 11... Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson Ten days' services in camp of in. 29... Olympia Foundry and struction, 1890, in the quartermasMachine Co.....................Labor and material furnished makter's department...............................552 22 ing targets ...................................... 1079 11... Lt. Col. Albert White........Services as assistant commissary 105 29... J. W. Smith & Co ...............Lumber for target frames .................. . 1088 general at camp of instruction, 29... Bilger & Going ............... ...Bolts, etc., for target frames ............... 1089 1890, from June 20 to 29, inclusive 556 6 50 Max. 23... Springer & White ..............Lumber for target frames ................... 1110 11... Col. E. W. Pike ................ Two days' services on parade with 450 23... Capt. Chas. H. Merriam Digging pit for target practice... ......... 1118 companies B and C, second regi6... OlympiaDoorandLumment, N. G. W................................ 565 300 and rammers ...... . 1300 ...Two cannon swabs her Co .......................... 11... Lt. R. C. Washburn ........ . Amount advanced for payment of first regiment band for two days' Total...................... ............................................................... $195 40 services at Camp Ferry, not in____________________________ eluded in pay rolls .......................... . 566 11... Lt. R. C. Washburn ........ . For service, field, staff and band, and drum corps, companies, B, C, D, It and H, first regiment, on Parade May 30. 1890 .......................... 567 April 7... Frank E. Howard ............Ten days' services as guard in transporting arms from Spokane to Conconully ..................................... . /i02 I 7... Byron M. Swigler ............ Ten days' services as guard, transporting arms from Spokane to Conconully..................................... 603 7... EJ1worth F. Westow ...... Ten days' services as guard, trans.. porting arms from Spokane to Conconully 604 7... Sidney D. Waters ............ Twelve days' ...................................... services while transporting arms from Spokane to Conconully .................................... 605 7... Lieut. J. J. White........... . Twelve days' services while transporting arms from Spokane to Conconully .................................... 606 7... Chas. Esplin, jr .............. . Services as clerk to adjutant of the first regiment, N. G. W ................... 616 7... Brig. Gen. R. G. O'Brien Services as adjutant general for the quarter ending March, 1891;........... 623 7... Chas. A. Burr ...................Services as clerk in the adjutant general's office, January, February and March ................................. 625 7... W. S. Bedford .................. Services as storekeeper and armorer in the quartermaster general's department for the quarter ending March 31, 1891................................ 627 May 23... E. C. Macdonald ............. Services as stenographer, adjutant general's office ............................... 646

Amount.

$375 00 75 00 225 00 120 00 20 00 2000 4 90 55 00 547 50 1500 15 00 1500 24

90

24 00 75 00 375 00 225 00 120 00 7 00


262

Date.

.. .. .. , .. .

... ...

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

PAY ACCOUNT -CONTINUED.

PAY ACCOUNT-CONTINUED.

To whompaid.

For what purpose.

1891. May 23... Louise Ayer .................... Services as stenographer for the mouth of April 656 June 9... C. A. Burr ....................... Services as clerk in1891......................... the adjutant general's office for the months of April and May. 1891 ........................ .673 9... Brig. Gen. R. G. O'Brien.. Services as adjutant general for April, May and June, 1891 .............. 675 July 1... J. M. Burr ....................... Servicesas clerk in the adjutant general's office, May and June, 1891................................................... 679 1... Chas. A. Burr....................Services as clerk in the adjutant general's office for June, 1891 ......... ..685 20... Col. E. W. Pike ............... Services May 30th and July 4th, on parade, 1891 .................................... 716 Aug. 1... Brig. Gen. R. G. O'Brien.. ..Services as adjutant general for the month of July, 1891 ......................... 1... Chas. A. Burr .................. Services as clerk in the adjutant 722 general's office for the month of July, ........................................ 725 1... W. S. Bedford ................. ..Services1891 as storekeeper and armorer in the quartermaster's department for the month of July, 1891. ............ ..728 Sept. 8... Maj. Chas. B. Johnson ... Services, 4, 1891, on parade... 750 8... Lt. H. B. Schwelleribach.. Services, July July 4, 1891, on parade..:: arade ........ - 751 8... Gen. R. G. O'Brien ......... Services as adjutant general for the month of August, 1891 ..................... 758 8... Chas. A. Burr .................. Services as clerk in the adjutant general's office for the month of August, 1891 .................................... 759 8... W. S. Bedford ................. Services as armorer and storekeeper for the month of August, 1891, in the quartermaster general's department ........................................ 761 24... Maj. F. A. Gans .............. ..Services, February 23d and May 30th on parade ............................... 774 Oct. 3... Gen. R. G. O'Brien ...........Services as adjutant general for the month of September, 1891 ............... 786 3... W. S. Bedford ............... .... Services as storekeeper and armorer in the quartermaster general's department for the month of Septum. ber, 1891 .......................................... ..787 3... Chas. A. Burr .................. Services as clerk in the adjutant general's office for the month of September, 788 26... Lieut. Herman Chapin... Pay rolls 1891.................................... companies B, C and â&#x201A;Ź1 and field, staff and band on parade February 22, 1891 ............................ 809 26... Lieut. Herman Chapin... Pay rolls B, Gand H companies, first regiment, and field staff and band, on parade May 30, 1891 ......... 810 26... Lieut. Herman Chapin... Pay rolls companies B, E and G, first regiment, July 4, on parade.... 811 26... Lieut. Herman Chapin... Pay rolls company C, on parade May 30 and July ................... 812 26... Lieut. Wallace Mount...... Pay rolls troop B,4.1891 first cavalry, on parade February 22, May 30 and July 4, 1891...................................... 816 26... Lieut. Herman Chapin... Pay rolls company I, first regiment, on parade February 22, May 30 and July 4, 1891 ............................... 824 26... Lieut. F. J. Elsensohn.... Pay rolls company D, second regiment, parade May 30, 1890.......... 827 26... Lieut. F. J. Elsensohn.... Pay rollsoncompanies A, B, C, D, It, F, G and H, second regiment, on parade July 4, 1891 .......................... 26... Lieut. F. J. Elsensohn.... 'Pay rolls companies C, D, E and F, 828 on parade July 4,1890 ..................... 829 26... Lieut. F. J. Elsensohn.... Pay rolls companies A, B, C, 11, It, F, G and 11 inclusive, on parade I May 30, 1891..................................... 830

Amount.

$1400 15000 37500 5000 7500 4 00 125 04) 75 04) 4000 200 200 12500 7500 4000 4 00 125 00 4000 75 00 205 00 17700 20200 14700 466 50 17700 6350 35300 226.50 401 so

Date.

1891. Oct. 26... 31... 31... 31... 31... Nov. 19... Dec. 1... 1... 31... 31... 31... 31... 31... 1892. Jan. 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... 30... Feb. 11... 13... 29...

I

To whom paid.

I

For what purpose.

... ..

263

Amount. ,1

Pay rolls companies A to H, inclusive, on parade February 22, 1891.... 831 Services as adjutant general for the month of October, 1891 .................... 844 Clerk in the adjutant general's office for the month of October. 1891 ........ 852 Pay rolls, company F, first regiment, on parade February 22, May 30, July 4, 1891, and company It May 30, 1891 ..................................... 853 Lt. Wallace Mount .......... Pay rolls, troop B, February 22, May 30 and July 4, 1891, on parade ......... 864 Lt. Herman Chapin ......... Pay rolls, companies P and K, on parade July 4, and company K, February 22 and May 30, 1891 .......... 885 Chas. A. Burr .................. Services as clerk in the adjutant general's office for the month of November, 1891 ............................... 908 Brig. Gen. R. G. O'Brien Services as adjutant general for the month of November, 1891 ............... 909 Lt. Wallace Mount .......... Amount short on pay rolls, troop A, in1891............................................... 926 Maj. Geo. W. Greene...... Services on parade, May 30 and July 4,1891 ............... .............................. 936 Brig. Gen. R. G. O'Brien Services as adjutant general for the month of December, 1891. .............. 938 Chas. A. Burr ........... ...... Services as clerk in the adjutant general's office for the month of December, 1891 ................................ 941 Lt. Herman Chapin ...... ... Pay rolls, company D, first regiment, on parade May 30,1891 .......... 942 Lieut. F. J. Elsensohn. Pay roll, second regiment band, February 22, 1891, on parade ........... 947 Lieut. F. J. Elsensohn. Pay roll for second regiment band on parade July 4, 1891 ..................... 948 Pay roll second regiment band on Lieut. F. J. Elsensohn parade May 30,1891- ...................... 949 Pay roll second regiment band and Lieut. Fi J. Elsensohn company B, on parade July 4,1890.. 950 Dr. J. A. Beebe ............... Eleven 'days' services at riots in King county mines ......................... 985 Lieut. Chas. Esplin, jr ... Pay rolls field and staff and compa. ides B, C, D, E, 0 and I in King county mines .................................. 988 L. E. Browne .................. Services as stenographer, etc., in the adjutant general's office for January, 1892 .................................. 990 W. S. Bedford ................. Services as storekeeper and armorer in quartermaster general's department............................................... 991 Chas. A. Burr .................. Services as clerk in the adjutant general's office for the month of January, 1892 .................................. 993 Lieut. Chas. Esplin, jr Services during the mining riots in in King county ............................... 905 Lieut. Chas. Esplin, jr Services as clerk in adjutant's office, 996 first regiment, during April, 1891 W. B. Younkin ............... Services as clerk in adjutant's office, May and June, 1891 ........................ .997 Chas. Esplin, jr ............... Services as clerk in adjutant's office, 998 September to December 31, 1890 W. B. Younkin ............... Services as clerk in adjutant's office, July, 1891 ..................... .................. ..989 Brig. Gen. R. U. O'Brien Services as adjutant general for the month of January, 1892.................. 1000 Lt. Wallace Mount .......... Services of troop B at the riots in King county mines .......................... 1004 Lt. Ira R. Bamber ........... Services and horse hire during riot at King county mines ..................... 1023 Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Services on parade February 22, 1892 1976

Lieut. F. J. Elsensohn.... Brig. Gun. R. G. O'Brien.. Chas. A. Burr .................. Lt. Herman Chapin ........

$39450 125 00 75 00 183 50 128 00 178 50 7500 12500 3 00 400 125 00 7500 4200 3000 3150 3150 8500 22 00 5,069 50 4000 40 00 75 00 10600 2500 5000 10000 2500 12504) 2,247 50 7000 2 00


264

A

UT_4NT GENERAL. FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

PAY ACCOUNT Dale.

265

PAY ACCOUNTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; CONTINUED. To whom paid.

For what Purpose,

Amount.

Feb. 29... Lt. H. B. SchwelIeflbaeh 29.. W. S. Bedford Services on parade February 22 1892.. ................. .Services as storekeeper and armorer 1077 00 in quartermaster general's depart. merit for the month of February, 29... L. 1892................................1080 B. Browne................... Services as 40 00 grapher and typewriter in the adjutant genera's Office for the month of February, 29... Chas. A. Burr................... 1892......... .... ......................1082 SeI'ices as clerk in the adjutant 4500 office for the month of 29... Gen, B. G. O'Brien .......... general's February, 1892 .................... ......... 1085 as adjutant general for the 75 00 29... Isaac Williams................. Services month of February, 1892.................1085 125 00 Work in kitchen during riots at 29... J. B. Allen King County Mines ...................... . ...................... .Services as cook dung the riots in 1092 33 00 29... G. 0. Lock ............... Kiiigcoun ty705............... ........Services as cook during the riots in 1094 2408 29... Jacob Kuhn ..................... King county mines ...................1095 and Packing stores during 00 29.. Jacob Kuhn .................... Cleaning riots in the King county mines.......1097 .Packiiig and shipping stores during 6 00 Mar. 23.. Lt. Wallace Mount the riot at the King .......... Services county of troops A and B on mines.. parade 1098 6 50 April 2... Brig. Gen. B. G. O'Brien. February 22, 1892.................... Services as adjutant general for the 1197 4... Chas. A. Burr ................... month of March, 1892 ............. ....... ... 1136 Services as clerk in the adjutant 125 00 general's office for the month of 4... L. B. Browne................... March, 1892 ...... ...1137 Services in the..... ....... ......... .......... 75 00 adjutant, general's office as stenographer, etc., for the W. S. Bedford.................. month Of March, 1892 ..................... ..1138 45 00 Services as storekeeperand armorer in the adjutant general's office for 29... Capt. Wallace Mount the month of March, 1892 ....... First and second ...............1139 4000 first cavalry 00 regimcn5 and parade February 29... L. E. Browne .............. 92,1892 ........................... .... .Services as stenograph 1174 1,065 50 the adjutant genera'5 office infor the 29... W. S. Bedford ................. month of April, 1892 .......................1197 . Services 45 00 as storekeeper and an armorer in the quart general's department for the month of April, 29... Chas. A. Burr ................... 1892..................... ................................. Services as clerk in the adjutant .1198 40 00 general's Office for the month of 29... John Robert................... April, 1892.......................... Services as cook during the riot at 75 09 June 1... Chas. A. Burr ................... King county mines .....................1208 Services as clerk in the adjutant 32 50 general's Office for the month of 1.. Brig. Gen. B. G. O'Brien.. May, 1892..............................1226 services as adjutant general for the 75 00 1... L. E. Browne................... month of May, 1892 ...................1227 Services as stenographer 125 00 and typewriter in the adjutant general's 1... W. S.- Bedford office for the month .................. ofand May,armorer 1892.... 1228 45 00 Services as storekeeper in the quartermaster general's department for the month of May, July 6... Capt. Wallace Mount 1892........ ..................... ....... Amount required .... 40 00 for the payment 1229 of troops at the state encampment 6... B. 0. O'Brien of 1892.............................. ................... Services as adjutamit general for the 1282 20,525 92 month of June, 1892........................ . 1283 125 00

Date.

I. I

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

1892. July 6... W. S. Bedford ................... Services as storekeeper and armorer in the quartermaster general's department for the month of June, 1892.. .1286 6... L. B. Brownc.................... Services................................................ as stenographer and typewriter in the adjutant general's office for the month of June, 1892... 6... C. A. Burr ....................... . Services as clerk in the adjutant 1287 general's office for the month of June, 1892 ......................................... 6... Robert Littlejohn ............. Services at Camp Murray .................. 1288 6... G. W. Abernethy .............Services, packing supplies for ship- . 1290 ment to Camp Murray .................... 6... Capt. B. W. Coiner ........... Services on duty at Camp Murray .1292 6... W. H. Greene ................... Two street sprinklers, laying dust 1296 at Camp Murray ............................. 26... Capt. J. B. Frost ............. Services, company A, second regi- .1298 ment, preparing camp grounds ...... ..1303 26... Capt. B. H. Freean m .........Services during camp of instruction at Camp Murray.............................. . 1310 Aug. 2... W. G. Rowland ............... .Services during camp of instruction at Camp Murray ...............................1319 2... Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson.. Services during camp of instruction at Camp Murray .............................. 2... Lt. Col. Albert Whyte...... Services during camp of instruction ..1320 at Camp Murray ................. ............ .1321 July[26 ... Lt. W. E. Cromwell, A. P. C ...............................Services and horse hire on parade February 22, May 30 and July 4, 1892.................................................. 1346 Aug. 15... W. S. Bedford ..................Services as storekeeper and armorer in the quartermaster general's department for the month of July, 1892 ................................................. 15... Gen. R. G. O'Brien .......... Services as adjutant general for the 1367 month of July, 1892 ........................ 15... C. A. Burr ........................ Servicesas clerk in the adjutant .1368 general's office for the month of July, 1892 ........... ............................. 15... C. I. Taylor ....................... Services as clerk in the quartermas- . 1370 ter general's office during the months of June and July, 1892 ....... . 1372 15... C. C. Fisher ...................... Services in the quartermaster's department, marking and invoicing and preparing stores ........................ 1373 15... L. B. Browne ................... Services as stenographer in the adjutant general's . office for the month of July, 3892 .......................... 15... J. W. Lott ........................ .Services loading camp equipage for 1374 and unloading from Camp Murray.. 1378 26... B. L. Garretson ............... . Services assisting the quartermaster general during the encampment at Camp Murray ............................. . 1379 Sept. 2... E. J. King ........................ Services setting up hospital tents at Camp Murray ................................. . 1397 Aug. 2... Maj. Chas B. Johnston ... Services on July 4, 1892 ...........1405 Sept. 2... W. S. Bedford .................. Services as parade storekeeper in the quartermaster general's department for the month of August, 1892 .......... . 1440 2... C. A. Burr .............. . ......... Services as clerk in the adjutant general's office for the month of August, 1892 ..................................... 1441 2... Gen. R. G. O'Brien...........Services as adjutant general for the month of August, 1892 ..................... . 1442 2... C. C. Fisher ...................... Services cleaning camp equipage and supplies for the month of August, 1892.......................................... 1445 8... C. I. Taylor ..................... . Services as clerk in the quartermaster general's department for eleven days in August, 1892 ........................ . 1447

Amount.

$4000 45 00 75 00 1500 400 40 00 3000 72 00 24 00 2 1 575 36 24 00 24 00 15 00

40 00 125 00 75 00 120 00 50 00 4500

20 50 45 00 1 50

200 40 00 7500 125 00 5000

27 50


66

ADJUTANT GENERAL

FOURTH BiENNIAL REPORT.

267

PAY ACCOUNT- CONCLUDED. Date.

1892. Sept. 8...

TO Whom Paid

.For what purpose.

.

Amount.

L. B. Browne ..................

Services as stenographer and typewriter in the adjutant general's Oct. 6... W. S. Bedford.................. office for the month of August, 1892.. Services as storekeeper and armorer 1460 quartermaster's department 6... C. A. Burr ........................forinthethemonth of September, 1892 Se rvices as clerk in the adjutant... 1483 general's office the month of 6... Brig. Gen. R. 0. O'Brien September, 1892for .............................1491 Services as adjutant general for the 6... L. B. Browne................... month of September, 1892 ............... Services as steuographer clerical . 1492 services for the month of Septem1892........................................... 1493 Total. .. ......................ber, .......................................................... . .

INCIDENTAL ACCOUNT. $4500 4000 75 00 12500

Date.

60 00 639 81

MEDICAL ACCOUNT.

Date.

To whom paid

For what purpose.

Amount,

Jan. 30... Dr. J. A. Beebe ............... Drugs purchased during riots at 30.. Capt. J. M. Ashton .......... .. King county mines ....................... 985 $2 00 .Medicine furnished troop B at the Feb. 13... D. M. Stone, M. D............ King county mines ..........................994 5 95 Services during riots in King county 13... J. L. Fierstone M. D ...... mines....................................1017 2700 Services during King county mine 13... W. B. Gibson, M.D ........ riots.........................................1018 1600 .Services during riots at King county 1&.. Stewart & Holmes Drug .mines ................................... 1019 5 00 COn paay ................. furnished during the King 13... W. B. Gibson & Bro......... Drugs county riots.................................. 1030 30 35 furnished during the King Mar. 23... Stewart & Holmes Drug Drugs county riots................................ 1043 1 95 Company................ Medicine chests for first and second regiments and first cavalry bat-... John L. talion.................................. Cook ....................Painting 1117 225 00 April 23 2... Marr & Ross...................... chests .......................1L20 3 00 Cleaningmedicine and refilling medicine July 26... B. Henderson............. chests......................... ..................... 500 Aug. 26... H. Dr. J. A. Beebe................ Medicine for use at Camp.. Murray..... 1322 4 80 Supplies for hospital corps at Camp 26.. B. B. Thater..................... Murray....................................1395 9 28 Stretcher frames for use of hospital 26... A. F. Iloska.................... corps ........................ .......... ...... 1425 2700 Seven pairs U. S. regulation shoul26... H. Felitz & C straps for hospital corps ............ 1426 o................... Sixderyards 1400 No. 6 72-inch canvass for the hospital corps ........................... . 1427 6 00 Total........................ ....................................................................... $382 33

.1

I

To whom paid.

I

For what purpose.

Gen. R. G. O'Brien ........... Amount paid for preservation of state tents ........................................ Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson Telegram to Vancouver for car[ridges for use in sham battle; telegram for supplies at camp ............. Gen. A. P. Curry .............. Postage, lights, janitor and office rent................................................. E. C. Macdonald ............... Services as stenographer in adjutant general's office for the month of December, 1890 ............................... . Olympia Gas and Electric Light Co .......... ..... ...Gas and meter rent for adjutant general's office ...................................... . Col. E. W. Pike ................ Office rent, postage and telegrams D. W. Morgan .................. .. Stationery for use of company A, second regiment ............................. . A. G. L. Jiarbin.............. .auling done at Camp Ferry during camp of 1800..................................... John Macready & Co ...... ..One set each steel letters and figures M. O'Connor .................... Stationery for adjutant general's office ................................................ Bilger & Going ................ Brace and set of bits, nails, etc., for use in the quartermaster general's department ........................... .......... Pacific Printing and Publishing Co ............... Printing from March 25 to May 17, 1889 .................................................. . J. H. Calvert & Co ............ Heektograph, envelopes and letter paper................................................ Ingraham, Coryell & Co Printing from July 15, 1889, to March 6,1890 .............................................. Lieut. T. M. Reed ............ Telegrams; drum heads; postage; repairing drums; postal cards......... Pacific Postal Tel. Co....... Telegrams sent responsive to threatened Indian outbreak in Okanogancounty ..................................... Val. A. Milroy, P. M ....... Postage stamps ................................... B. M. Denton ................. . Services as stenographer and typewriter in the office of the adjutant general for the months of October and November, 1890 ........................ . Louise Ayer .....................Services as stenographer and typewriter in the office of the adjutant general for the month of Febru, 1890 .......................................... . ary Edw. G. Sprowl ...............Six and one-half dozen street riot tactics.............................................. C. A. Bauer ...................... Transcribing and filing commissions for officers of the N G. W....... Talcott Bros ..................... Seal (board of military auditors) Bilger & Going ............... .Hardware for use in the quartermaster general's department ................ (len. A. P. Curry ............. Stamps, light and telegrams ............... SemI. Williams................ Supplies for use in the quartermaster general'sand the adjutant general's departments ........................... Western Union Tel. Co Telegrams received and sent ............. Col. J. C. Haines ............. Printing...............................................

Amount.

:5 547

$2540

552 553

350 159 40

558

1000

562 565 571 572 574 576

15 90 62 50 320 1000 850 1325

577

860

581 582 583 584

3625 530 2000 35 95

595 598

41 52 1000

601

5000

607 608 609 610 611 613

1200 39 00 500 700 285 20 45

615 617 621

18 70 26 50 7 00


-1

ADJUTANT GENERAL INCIDENTAL ACCOUNT

Date.

To whom paid.

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

269

CONTINUED

INCIDENTAl. ACCOUNT -CONTINUED.

For what purpose

Arno

1891. April 7... Val. A. Milroy, P. 17.. Capt. J. B. Frost M ........Postage stamps.................................... $1000 May 23... W. ...............Packing and boxing uniforms........... 6 Ii. Morrison...............Two copies Winthrop's military law.. 6 23... Sunset Telephone Co 6 2 .......Messages sent from the adjutant 6 00 23... Lt. N. B. Brooks general's office.......................... 61 7 200 ...............Postage and telegrams.......................6! 23... Olympia Gas & Electric 4 Light Co...................... Light for adjutant general's office 23... Val. A. Milroy, P.M from January 1 to April 30, 1891 ........Postal cards for use of adjutant gen- 61 23... Talcott Bros eral's office............................ ..................... One 68 Standard rubber 200 stand for quarterma5t stamping general's department................ June 9... J. B. Ite agh...................... Fuel for use 5 00 of adjutant general's 9... J. Benson Starr................ office... ............ ............ 4 50 Pens for use in adjutant general's 9... Gen. B. G. O'Brien ......... office........................... 67â&#x201A;Ź 9... Pacific 5 Postal Telegraph ..Telegrams, etc.................................... 671 Cable Co...................Telegrams received and sent, adjuJuly 1... Val. A. Milroy, tant general's office ........................ .674 P.M ....... . Postage 17 36 stamps for adjutant gen1... W. S. Bedford ................. eral's office......................... .Services as storekeeper and armorer 1000 in the quartermaster general's department for the months of April, L. Lt. B. B. Wise.... ...... ........ May and June, 1891 ..................681 1... Bilger & Going and postage ... ..................684 ...... Slatioiiery ............... Hardware for use in the quarter 1... Val. A. Milroy P. 1g. ....... tar general's department ......... . 689 1... L. Smith .......................... 5 85 ....... Postage stamps ............................. 690 Services as stenographer and typewriter in the adjutant general's office............................ 9... Gen. A. P. Curry ............. 691 Printing, Painting, file 36 15 .cabinet, lamp, postage, carpet, letter press, etc.................................... 20... Geo. D. Barnard & Cc 695 20... Capt. Harry St. George... 102 85 etc.. rack ........................................... 790 8 00 20.....sunset Telephone Co ...... Telephone messages...........................704 Use of telephone in the 75 .adjutant general's office, and messages re20... Alex. Farquhar ceived and sent ...........................705k ................ Crow 6 bar for use in the adjutant general's department............ 20... Olympia Light & Power 706 3 00 Co ................................ .Use of lights in the adjutant general's office for the month of June, 20... John Macready & c0...... 1891........................................ 2 00 .Truck for use in the quartermaster 20... Gen. B. G. O'Brien general's department......................712 ..........Telegrams cash paid for 1200 Packing 20... Ridabock & Co ............... tents, etc............................. 6 00 .One set Browning's apparatus for 714 20... Pacific Postal Tel. Co demonstrating Upton's tactics.. ....... Telegrams 500 Telegrams received and sent, adjuAug. 1... W. H. Morrison ............... tant general's office .......................717 15 W. V. Wolf...................... Two sets Winthrop's military law 724 1... Bilger 20 00 & Going ............... Bowrs for Packing tents.....................726 6 00 Wheelbarrow, nails, etc., for use in quartermaster general's depart5... Louise Ayer ..................... Services as stenographer in the adjutant general's office for the months Sept. 5... Chas. Esplin, ji of June and July, 1891..................731 ................ Postage......................................... 8... West Side Mill Co 20 00 ............ 732 8.. Gen. B. G. O'Brien.......... 10 50 Lumber for tent boxes........................735 Cash paid for labor for storing sup11 78 plies................................. ................... . 730 1 00

Date.

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

Amount.

1891. Sept. 8... Vulcan Iron Works

Truck wheels and axles for use in the quartermaster general's department ..........................................737 8... Sunset Telephone Co ...... ..Placing telephone and rental of same ................................................ .738 8... Sunset Telephone Cc Messages sent..................................... 739 8... G. Schindler Furniture C o ................................ .Furniture for adjutant general's office ....... ........................................ .740 8... L. Smith........................... Services as stenographer and typewriter in the adjutant general's office ............................................... . 744 8... J. Benson Starr ............... . Stationery for use in the adjutant general's office ................................ ..745 8... Val. A. Milroy, P. 53 ...... . Postage stamps .................................. 749 8... Toklas & Kaufman ......... .Carpet for adjutant general's office... 753 8... M. O'Connor .................... Stationery for adjutant general's office............... . . . .......................... . 754 8... Marr & Ross .....................Camphor, oil and varnish for use in the quartermaster general's department .......................763 8... Pacific Postal Tel. Co....... Telegrams received and sent during July, 1891..... .................................... .764 8... Val. A. Milroy, P.M........ Postage .................................. 765 24... Louise Ayer ........ ............. Servicesstamps as stenographer in the adjutant general's office to Septembar 12, 1891 ...................................... .770 24... A. Farquhar..................... Iron for repairing tent Poles............... 771 24... Chas. Scribner's Sons....... Thirty copies Blunt's Firing Regufor Small Arms Practice ......... . 772 24... Taleott Bros .................... set rubber type.................... ........773 24... B. M. Denton ....................One Services as stenographer and typewriter in the office of the adjutant general to September 30, 1891 .......... 776 24... Lt. I. M. Howell .............. . Cab hire ............................................ 778 24... Gen. B. G. O'Brien........... Telegram from Seattle ....................... 779 24... Lt. W. E. Cromwell......... .... 780 24... Lt. Col. F. B. Trotter ...... . Telegram ........................................... .......................................... . 781 Oct. 3.. Val. A. Milroy, P. 53 ...... . Telegrams Postage stamps for adjutant general's office and for headquarters first regiment ..................................782 3... Col. B. W. Pike .............. ..Expenses of general headquarters second regiment for the quarter ending September 1891 ................789 3... Pacific Postal Tel. Co ....... Telegrams received30, and sent, adjutant general's office. ............. . ..... . 794 3... Western Union Tel. Co... Telegrams received and sent ..... adjutant general's office... .... ..... ............ . 795 3... Sunset Telephone Co....... Rentoftelephone and Messages sent.. 796 26... Gen. R. It G. O'Brien ......... . Camphor and turpentine for use in the quartermaster general's department ........................................ . 797 26... H. B. Schwellenhach ...... .Stationery and stamps ....................... . 800 26... Lt. Herman Chapin ........ .Stationery stamps ....................... ..805 26... Bilger & Going ............. ....Hardwareand for use in the quartermaster general's department .......... 814 9 Lt. Col. F. B. Trotter ...... . 26... Capt. H. G. Shuham......... Target materials................................. 818 Expenses setting up ................ 826 31... Arthur Ellis ..................... Letter press stand fortarget use in the adjutant general's office ...................... . 838 31... Louise Ayer .................... Services as stenographer and typewriter in the office of the adjutant general for the months of Septem.. .......841 31... W. S. Bedford................. .. ber and October, 1891 ..... ... ...... Services as storekeeper and armorer in the quartermaster general's department for the month of October, 1891 ................. ...... ............. ... ... .. 845 31... .J. Benson Starr ................ Stationery for use in the office of the adjutant general ....................... . 857

$45 90 16 75 2 50 352 00 240 3 90 500 151 63 19 95 1 75 53 10 00 20 90 65 48 00 3 00 10 00 100 50 1 25 6 05 10 00 95 45 2 65 4 35 8 00 .1 65 13 75 590 6 4,5 3 10 15 75 15 00 30 00 40 00 10 20


. . , .. . & & .. . . . &. .

270

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

INCIDENTAL ACCOUNT—CONTINUED

Date Date.

1891. Oct. 31... 31... 31... Nov. 19... 19...

To whom paid

For what pu1pose

Sunset Telephone Co ...... ..Rent of telephone for the adjutant office ................................ 59 Val. A. Milroy, P. 1W ........general's Postage stamps .................................. 251 M. O'Connor.................... Stationery for the use of the adjutant general's office....................... 862 Palcott Bros ......................Stencils .............................................. .8s The Office Specialty Manufacturing Cc Document file for use in the adjutant general's office......................... 869 19... Western Union Tel. Co Telegrams received and sent, adjutaut general's office........................ 871 19... J. R. Heath...................... Services as stenographer at Tacoma and Aberdeen ................................. 872 19... Capt. J. C. MacCrimmon Expenses of target practice of cornpany E, second regiment ............... ..873 19... Capt. Harry St. George Expense of setting up targets ............ 875 9... Gen. A. P. Curry ..............Telegrams, postage, express charges, 19 W G Johnson Services as court martial stenog 876 rapher....for......... ... ...........of . .... . ............ ..878 19... J. H. Calvert Co ........... ..Supplies the adjutant the first regiment......................................... 19... Ingraham, Coryell Co.. Printing orders and circulars for the 880 first regiment ..................................881 19... Pacific Postal Tel. Co....... Telegrams sent from the adjutant general's office ................................ .564 19... Arthur Bedford ............... Services assisting storekeeper in the quartermaster general's departmerit.............................................. 19... Army and Navy Journal drill regulations .................. 19... Capt. A. W. Lindsay ...... Infantry Expense of setting up targets ............ 891 Dec. 1... W. S. Bedford ................. Services as storekeeper and armorer 892 in the quartermaster's department for the month of November, 1891 906 1... Lizzie B. Browne ..............Services as stenographer and typewriter in the office of the adjutant general for the ............................... month of Novemher, 1891 .......... 14... Key City Graphic Co........Envelopes furnished company I, 907 first regiment .................................. 917 '14... Louise Ayer ......................services as stenographer in the adintact general's office ......... ............ 918 14... Pacific Postal Tel. Co ...... Telegrams sent from the adjutant general's office................................. 919 14... Western Union Tel. Co Telegrams received and sent, adjutaut general's office .......................... 14... Sunset Telephone Co Rent of telephone in the adjutant 920 general's office and messages sent 922 14... John D. Reagh ................ Fuel furnished the adjutant general's office...................................... 14... Val. A. Milroy, P. M....... Postage stamps furnished ........ ...........923 31... T. M. Reed, state auditor.. Copy of session laws for use in the 925 adjutant general's office.................. 927 31... West Side Mill Co.............Lumber for packing boxes for tent poles................................................ 928 31... Lt. F. J. Rlsensohn.......... Telegrams, postage, exchange, etc 930 31... Olympia Light Power Co ................................. Lights for adjutant general's office to August 15, 1891 ..............................938 31... Crandall Machine August ribbons ........................... 934 31... Gen. R. G. O'Brien.......... 100to copies new infantry drill regulations.......................................... ..... 935 31... ltEgj. Geo. W. Greene........Amount paid for the examination of Corporal A. T. Brown................ 31 ... W. S. Bedford......... ......... Services as storekeeper and armorer 936 in the quartermaster general's department for the month of Decemher, 1891............................................939 31... Lizzie E. Browne ............ Services as stenographer and typewriter in the office of the adjutant general for the month of December, 1891........................................... 940

.. ..' pi , - p& & .° ' & . - . •- ." & .. '

FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

INCIDENTAL ACCOUNT —CONTINUED.

_i-

Date.

Amount

1802. Jan. 30... Western Union Tel Co... Gen. A P Curry............. ... d0 John Carr Frank Tillotson

1000 8 35 21 oo 116 75 so

86 50 14 15 11 00 13 7 40 00

22 22

10 75 4 77

.•

3000 955

30 30 Feb. 11 11 11

40 00 35 00 5 12 00 90 4 70 6 90 5 00 1000 2 00 75 7 80

11 11 11 II

n

13 13

3 00 3 00 45 00 3 00

13 13... 13...

40 00 3500

TO

_______

13... 13...

For what purpose.

.

Telegrams received and sent by the adjutant general's office.................. 945 946 Stamps, expressage, printing, etc for clothing and blankets disks for target practice .................. 952 work on twenty-two iron targets to be used in company armories .................................................. 053 Marr Ross..................... White lead, varnish and glue for quartermaster's department ........... 954 M O'Connor.................... Typewriter paper, carbon sheets, pens, etc., for use in adjutant general's office.......................................965 Rent of telephone in the adjutant Sunset Telephone Cc general's office and messages sent 956 targets, target frames, a!Capt. J E Frost tering pants for Private Skillman 958 Col. E. W. Pike . ............. ..Stamps, fuel etc ................................. ..960 Olympia Light Power Light furnished the adjutant gen eral's office from September 1 to December 31, 1891.............................962 Repairing two Springfield rifles and Bea............................ C one typewriter.................................964 j Benson Starr................ One set drafting instruments; blottar.....................................................967 Lt H B Schwellenbach One roller top desk for headquarters first cavalry battalion .................. ..986 Bil er Going............... Hardware for use in the quartermaster general's department..................989 Capt. J M Ashton........... Telegrams, etc., during riots at P J. mines in King county......................994 Gen R ti O'Brien ......... Express charges on military supplies .................................................1000 of telephone in the adjutant Sunset Telephone Cc general's office, and messages sent 1002 Telegrams received and sent by the Pacific Postal Tel. Cc adjutant general's office...................1003 costs in mandamus case of C S Reinhart Herman Chapin, paymaster first regiment, vs. Governor E. P. Ferry, Brigadier General R. G. O'Brien and T. M. Reed, state auditor ........................................... ..1005 Gen RR.GG.O'Brien ......... Express charges; iron; electro plates from surgeon general's office, U. S. A.................................................. 1006 Lt H. B Schwellenbach Postage stamps for use of regimental headquarters first cavalry battalion ................................................... 1010 Western Union Tel. Co Telegrama received and sent by the adjutant general's office................. 1012 Talcott Bros..................... Rubber stamps and ink ..................... 1013 Olympia Light Power Oo ................................. Use of lights in the adjutant general's office; one lamp .................... 1014 Val. A. Milroy P. M ...... Postage stamps ................................ 1015 W W. Davis horses for troop B, first cayairy, during riots at mines in King county ................................... 1022 Western Union Tel. Co... Telegrams received and sent during riots at mines in King county......... 1025 Capt. W. S. Shank received and sent during riots at mines in King county ........ 1027 Louis Becker .................. Chopping block used in kitchen during riots at mines in King county ............................................ 1044 Seattle Coal and Iron Co Rope, tacks, etc., furnished during riots at mines in King county......... 1049 Lt. J. A. Hatfield received and sent during riots at mines in King county .........1058

.

271

Aunt.

$4 80 12 25 9 75 200 00 1 so 4 15 6 50 11 25 11 25 40 00 4 23 3 25 50 00 6 84 1725 60 6 50 4 70

55 93 5 36 500 16 25 1 75 20 00 10 00 10 00 3 67 14 15 75 1 55 1 35


272

ADJUTANT GENERAL. FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT. INCIDENTAL ACCOUNT -CONTINUED

273

INCIDENTAL ACCOUNT â&#x20AC;&#x201D;CONTINUED. Date.1

To whom paid

For what purpose.

Amount.

1892. Feb. 29... Edward Lange ................. Two electro plates for use in rules 29... Lt. J. A. Hatfield ............. and regulations..... ......................it II $500 Telegrams received and sent during riots at mines in King county .. ..... 29... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbach 4 75 Copy press and stand, rubber bands, .10 '3 29... Col. J. C. Haines .............. ink, file case..............................10 '8 20 95 Telegrams received and sent during 29... Western Union Tel. Co... Telegrams riots at mines in King county.... ... 3 6261sent during riots at mines in King county................... 10( I Mar. 23... Sunset Telephone Co...... 10 16 .Rent of telephone in the adjutant 23... Gen. A. P. Curry ............. general's office and messages sent.. lit 550 23... C. W. Townsley .............. Postage and printing ......................311 10 50 .Map of Washington for the adjutant 23... Capt. C. H. Merriam......... general's oflice................................111 1050 23... Gen. R. G. O'Brien ......... Rubber stamp.....................................111 100 .Sleeper, Olympia to Spokane and return April 2... H. K. Harrison................ ................................. 700 2... Sunset Telephone Co....... Services at brigade headquarters 1800 Rent of telephone in the adjutant 1131 general's office and message to Tacoma ............................. .... 1141 2... Bilges. & Going............... 550 Rope, nails, etc.,....... for use in the quar2.. Marr & ROSS .................... ..termaster general's department ...... .1141 195 .Turpentine for use in the quarter2... Ingraham & Coryell......... master general's department ............1144 165 2... Olympia Light & Power Printing for first regiment..................1146 825 Co ................................ .Lights for adjutant general's office 2... Western Union Tel. Co... for February and March, 1892 ......... . 1148 2000 Telegrams sent from adjutant general's office ...................................... 2... J. Benson Starr ............... 434 Stationery, letter and impression .1149 .books for the several companies of the N. G. W..........................1150 5... N. B. Brooks and E. W. 69 35 Pike ............................. 5... Capt. E. S. Ingrahamn........ ..Postage stamps, rubber bands, etc.... 1152 825 5... M. O'Connor .................... Engraving on bugle...........................1154 100 Stationery for adjutant general's office ............. ....................1155 29... Capt. Geo. H. Jones 630 Telegrams sent during riots at 29... Val. A. Milroy, P. H........ mines in King County .....................1150 288 Postage stamps .................................. 29... M. O'Connor ................... 2000 Stub letter files, cash books, ledgers, 1157 etc., for the several companies of 29... Capt. John Carr................the N. G. W..............................1166 16600 29... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbaeh Sheeting for skirmish targets.............1171 350 Rent of battalion headquarters; tel29... Lt. Col. Jos. Green ......... egrams; expressage, etc ..................1176 3750 .Draping armory at Seattle pursuant 29... Val. A. Milroy, to general order No. 1, c. s., 1892......1179 M ...... 14533 29... Sunset TelephoneP.Co ...... . Postage stamps.............................1196 5000 .Rent of telephone in the adjutant 29... M. O'Connor .................... general's office ................................ ........1201 30... Col. E. W. Pike'.. Gum stub files, pens, pencils,....... etc1202 ike ............... * 3 Rent of regimental headquarters and band room of the second regiJune 1... H. O'Connor ................... ment; telegrams; postage, etc ...... .1207 31 10 Two ledgers and one dozen pens ...... .1225 1... W. S. Bedford ................. .. Boxes for packing su 715 1... Sunset Telephone . Co ...... . Use of telephone inpplies............... 4 15 the adjutant 1230 1... Gen. R. G. O'Brien.......... general's office.................. ..........1231 500 Express charges on military sup7... Col. E. W. Pike................ plies...................................1232 525 7... Gen. A. P. Curry ..Printing enlistment blanks................1237 375 July 6... Marr & Ross ................... .............. Postage stamps and printing .............1238 1700 Camphor and alcohol for use in the quartermaster general's department....................................1250 6... Olympia Light & Power 250 Co.. .............................. ... Use of lights in adjutant general's office................................ 1255 2000

500

Date.

I

To whom paid.

I

For what purpose.

1892. July 6... Pacific Postal Tel. Co ...... ..Telegrams received and sent by adjutant general's office during January, February, March, April and May, 1892 ...........................................1259 6... Western Union Tel. Co... Telegrams received and sent by adjutant general's office during April, 1892....................................... iso 6... J. Benson Starr ................. Impression books, mucilage............... 1262 6... W. M. Linquist ............ .....Repairing tents................................... 6... Sunset Telephone Co ...... . Rent of telephone in the adjutant 1279 general's office and messages sent 1289 26... Lt. E. F. Stafford ............ .Horse hire at Camp Murray ............... . 1306 26... Conrad L. Hoska ............ . Casket, etc., for burial of Colonel Trotter............................................ . 1314 26... Western Union Tel. Co Telegrams received and sent during encampment...................................1315 26... Talcott Bros ..................... Rubber stamps, keys and chains ....... 1318 26... Maj. Chas. B. Johnston Telegrams received and sent during encampment.................................. 26... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbach.. Telegrams received and sent during 1324 encampment ................................... ..1325 26... Pacific Postal Tel. Co ..... . Telegrams received and sent during the month of June, 1892 .................. . 1330 26... Lt. H. B. Schwellenbach Postage stamps for battalion headquarters ........................................... 1331 26... L. E. Browne ................... Smith-Premier typewriter for use general's office. 1334 26... J. D. Layne...................... in the adjutant Camp mp equipage at Olympia for transportation to Camp Murray 1339 26... Lt. E. S. Isaacs ................ .Telephone messages sent on business pertaining to the annual encampment ....................................... 26... B. T. Loomis ................... Loading and unloading equipments 1345 returned from Camp Murray ........... 1348 26... M. O'Connor... ................ .Ledger journal; pens................. . 1351 26... Geo. Abernethy .............. ..Loadingand and unloading equipments returned from Camp Murray ...........1352 Sept. 8... A. C. Anderson .............. ...Cleaning, handling and storing tents to and from Camp Murray.......1355 2... E. W. Morton ....................Stencil (first regiment) and ink........ ..1356 2... Seattle Hardware Co....... Shipping tags .................................... 2... K. Erland ........................ . Repairing tents and material fur- ..1357 nished............................................ Aug. 15... Marr & Ross.................... . Benzine, paint, vaseline, etc., for use in the quartermaster general's department ...................................... 1371 26... Sunset Telephone Co ...... . Use of telephone in the adjutant general's office and message to Tacoma .......................................... 1376 26... Oscar Nuhn ..................... . Two cans indelible ink for use in the quartermaster general's department 26... T. F. Safely ..................... .Two days' labor in the quartermas- 1383 31... Capt. J. It. Frost............... ter general's department ................ . 1384 Telegrams and express charges......... . 1386 31... Bilger & Going ............... . Tinware, axes, knives, forks, etc ...... . 1391 31... J. H. Calvert & Co .......... . Wastebasket, eraser, pens, penholder , ink, etc ............................... . 1393 31... Col. E. W. Pike ............... . Telephone and telegraph messages; postage stamps ............................... . 1396 31... Lt. Col. H. McCarthy ....... Telephone telegraph messages 1398 31... Western Union Tel. Co Telegrams and received and sent by the general's office ....................1407 Sept. 2... Trou & Town ................... Na Nails, screws, hinges, etc ....................1410 Aug. 31... Lt. H. B. Schwellenba Carpet, waste basket, chairs, etc., for headquarters of the first cavalry battalion....................................1411 31... Lt. Col. H. F. Garretson.. Postage while at Camp Murray 1412 31... A. T. Iteidinger & Co....... Asphaltum for preservation of stoves and ironware ................................... 1415 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;18

Amount.

$1179 995 4100 1000 700 800 23340 6560 425 3 13 295 1388 500 9500 2000 4 25

600 825 18 00 750 130 25 725 390 550 550 400 1 25 294 70 8 15 53 10 2 75 880 14 65 81 75 200 7 70


274

-ADTUTANT FOURTH BIENNIAL REPORT.

Date.

To whom paid.

For what Purpose

a

275

Amount

1892. Aug. 31... Lowman & Hanford ....... machine 31... Chas. C. Fisher........... .Numbering for adjutant general's Office...........................3416 ..Washing sheets and blankets; rat $12 00 31... Gen. A. P. Curry ................. Poison. ..............Printing ............ 31... Lt. M. F. Reed................. .......................... fl41 1419 3 50 ... Telegram ....................................1421 31... W. H. Morrison 285 ............... Books, tactics, etc., for use of adju 1436 25 Sept. 2... Sunset Telephone Co taut generg'5 office .....................1437 ....... Rent of telephone in the adjuta 2375 nt general's office and messages re8... Gen. R. G. O'Brien ceived and sent . .............. ... ..........Telegram boxes for packing su. 9 50 8... Geo. A. Mottman ............. R Plies, Washin g table linen............. ..1445 ent of storeroom for ordinance 3 50 stores and quartcrmas supplie5 8.. St. John's Guild............... for the month of August, 1892 ....... Sheets for general headquarters at... 1448 1000 Murray; flannei cartridge Oct. 5... Gen. R. G. O'Brien bCamp ................................. ags .......... flag for use at the world's fair 1469 3 50 .................. exposition.. 6... Olympia Light & Power State 1479 Co......................... 145 00 Use of lights in the adjutant general's office for the months of Au6... Lt. H. B. Schwejlenbach gust and September.....................1480 Electric lights for uscof first cavalry 20 00 6... wâ&#x20AC;˘ . Bedford .................. battalion headqua r ............. 1482 Hauling ammunjtioii tallow pearl 4 80 me, etc., for quartert 6... Sunset Telephone general's depai-tnient........................1483 Co... ... . Use of telephone in the adjuta nt 1 75 6... Western Union Tel. Co... genera's olIlce and messages sent Messages received and sent at Camp 1485 6 00 Murray................................ 1487 58 67

EQUIPMENT ACCOUNT.

Date.

1891. July 1... 20... Oct. 26... 26... Nov. 19... Dec. 1...

To whom paid.

For what purpose.

White & Wendall ............ ..Saddle blankets for use of the first cavalry battalion ............................ . 677 A. F. Hoska .................... .Feed bags, curry combs, etc., furnished for first cavalry battalion 710 0. E. Pettis ..................... .Supplies for first regiment drum corps ............................................... 806 Thos. H. Bubb .................Fixing and repairing drums .............. . 807 Capt. W. S. Shank ............Overcoat straps for company 0, first regiment ......................................... 868 Waterbury Blank Book Co ................................. 24 copies quartermaster sergeant's equipment books ............................ 897 1... Paul P. Walsh .................Affixing bayonet straps to web belts 898 31... Boston Musical Instrument Co ....................... Band instruments for second regi1892 ment band ...................................... .929 Jan. 30... Ridabock & Co ................ 800 knapsacks for use of troops ......... ..972 30... Albert D. Wright ............ .Affixing bayonet straps to 174 web belts ................. ................................977 Feb. 13... Seattle Hardware Co...... Cutlery, etc., furnished troops during riots at mines in King county 1039 July 6... Bilger & Going ................Hardware ............................................1263 26... Capt. A. W. Lindsay ....... Repairing saddles, troop A, first cavalry.................................................. 1312 26... John L. Cook ................. . Printing letters and flag for use at Camp Murray ................................. . 1313 Aug. 2... H. Felitz & Co ................. ..Tents .................... ..... ........................ ..1316 2... Paul P. Walsh ................. ..Breast straps, curry combs, horse brushes, holsters and leads ............. 1317 July 26... John Macready ............... ..Table supplies for use at Camp Murray .................................................. 1335 26... Arthur Ellis .................... ..Mattresses and pillows for use at Camp Murray ................................. ...1336 26... TacomaLumberMfg.Co Lumber for use at Camp Murray .........1337 26...M. O'Connor . ................. . Crockery, knives and forks ..................1351 Aug. 2... Paul P. Walsh .................. 50 martingales for troop H....................1354 Sept. 2... J. H. Swift ...................... ...20 wool mattresses ........ ........................1388 2... Holmes & Bull Co ........... ...Camp chairs and wire cots...................1389 27...St. Paul and Tacoma Lumber Co .....................Lumber for use at Camp Murray 1472 27... W. H. Branchied ...............Ranges, ironware, tinware, etc ......... ...1474 Total..............................................................................................

A

Amount.

$399 15 80 25 46 20 17 00 5 40 51 92 12 50 1,041 00 1,800 00 17 40 4 55 2 10 71 35 3 00 2,041 51 326 00 68448 17 50 479 02 58 25 100 00 75 00 46 85 383 18 1,004 29 $8,767 90


276

ADJUTANT GENERAL.

RECAPITULATION Transportationaccount......................................................................................... 02 Armoryaccount....................................................................................................$12,289 18,704 82 Clothing account................................................................................................ 15,583 51 Subsistence account .......................................................................................... 11,753 05 Forageaccount........................................................................................................825 31 Ordnanceaccount................................................................................................. 195 40 Payaccoun t........................................................................................................... Medicalaccount.................................................................................................... 43239 81 .. 382 53 Incidentalaccount.............................................................................................. Equipmentaccount............................................................................................... 5,526 84 8,76790 Audited to November 1, 1892 ................. ....................................................... $11,277 99 Audited November 1 to December 31, 1892 .................................................... 9305 54 Audited during 1891 and 1892........................................................................ $126,534 53

.

SCIIIEDT-TIIES. A—Roster of Field, Staff and Line Officers of the First Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion.

SCHEDULE

B—Muster Rolls of Volunteers in the Territory of Washington during the Indian War of 1855-6.

SCHEDULE


SCHEDULE A. HEADQUARTERS FIRST W. T. INFANTRY, FORT WALLA WALLA, W. T., February 14, 1863. SIRâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;By direction of the colonel commanding I have the honor to submit herewith enclosed an official copy of "List of the commissioned officers of the first regiment W. T. infantry," approved by your excellency on the 31st of December, 1862. Second Lieutenant Samuel Purdyjun, having declined the appointment and promotion, has been tranferred as second lieutenant to company E (Captain Knox's). vice Second Lieutenant Lewis G. Cabanis, who, in accordance with 373, Revised Regulations of the U. S. Army, 1861, was nominated to the honorable secretary of war for his approval to the position of regimental quartermaster, with the rank of first lieutenant on the 31st of January last. I have the honor to, remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, WILLIAM KAPUS, First Lieutenant First W. T. Infantry, Regimental Adjutant. To His Excellency, WILLIAM PICKERING, Governor of Washington Territory, Olympia, W. T.


LIT OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS With authorit of the first regiment of Washington Territory infantry, raised and Organized in compliance r18,

Remarks. colonel

I

Justus

11

Mustered intoservice serviceApril in Washington D. Major C., October 1861, bymustering order of the secretary of war. T. C. ngijsh....................Mustered into 16, 1862, by G. H.is, Ringgoto officer and superintendent of Major..........................C. H. Rumvi recruiting service at San Francisco Cal., in accordance with gene Mee August 19, 1861, upon cometjon of four companies of the regime 4 Adjutant orders No. 61, adjutant general'8 .Mustered service February 15, 1862, San Francisco, Cal., by MajorntRinggold by authority of the general into commanding the department of at the to Pacific .Wm. ICapus......................Mustered into service September 20, 1862, at Fort Vancouver W. P., by Brevet Major facilitate the early orgauizatj0 ofP. theLugenbe regime n 5.......Quart Quartermaster ............ L. t. U. S. A., as first lieutenant company A, vice Wm. Myles, resigned, by special order No. 68, headquar el, ters district of Oregon September 20, 1862; appointed adjutant Nov. 24, post regimental order 56. G. Cabanis into Service as second lieutenant of company B June 20, 1862, by Captain Winder U. No. S. A.; appointed regimental 6.......Surgeon ......................F. 56. Ringgold...................Mustered quarterm5 regimental order No. 67 same date. with the rank of first lieutenant (extra), January 13, 1863, post 7 .Notice of his appointment was semit to Sail Francisco, his residence, on lime 2d of December last, with the by it, illto.seryiee iuustered service. request to tile into commanding general that he be ordered before the board of examination, and if passed Assistant surgeon.......Samuel Wilitemore..........Mustered March 8 No notice of his acceptance has Yet been received Assistant surgeon....... as necessary for regimental . 10, 1862, by authority from the adjutant general's office of October 19, 1861, organization Chas. Stemnberger.............Appointed October 27, 1862, and placed on duty with a detachment of troops in San Francisco under COMPANY A Orders from Fort Vancouver, 9 .... Captain.......................W. W. Thompson special OrderatNo.Fort 192, Waila headquarters Pacific, October 27, 1862; mustered into service subsequently Walla, bydepartment Lieutenant of W.theB. Hughes. .Mustered into Service October 9, 1862, at Fort Vancouver, by Major P. M Winston, U. S. A., as captain Of company A, viceApril Daniel Taylor, resigned per special order No. 71, headqr October 9,into 1862. 10.......First lieutenant..........J. W. Clawson ..................Mustered service 7, district of Oregon, ant company C, transferred to1862, company 11.......Second lieutenant ...... .Jas. Monroe ..................... at Alcatraz Island, by Captain Winder, U. S. A. as second lieutenA, ant Hoardley to company C. per regimental order No. 26, of June 29, 1862, vice Lieimten. try, U. into service January 6, i868, at Fort Walls Walla; by Lieutenant W. B. Hughes, ninth infanCOMPANY D. .Mustered 12 ...... .Captain ...................... S. A., in accordance with special order No. headquarters district of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, December 20, 1862, and assigned by same order to104, company A. 13 ...... .First lieutenant ......... ..S. W. Shulock....................Mustered into service April 1, 1862, at Alcatraz Island by Captain Winder, U. S. A., on completion of company organi za0 .W..F. Mason .....................Mustered into service February l7, 1862, in accordance with general order No. 61, adjutant general'8 office, when forty were mustered in. 1862, 14.......Second lieutenant.......Christian Gatz...................Mustered intomcml service December 20, at Fort Walla Walla, by Lieutenant COMPANY C 1863. 'ice Lieutenant Samuel Purdy, transferred to company B, post regime w. B. Hughes, U. S. A., 15 Order No. 67, January 13, Captain...................... .G. A. Glazure ...................Mustered into service April 17, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, on completion of company Organization

S

LIST OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THE FIRST REGIMENT OF WASHINGTON TERRITORY INFANTRY-CONTINUED. No.

I

Rank.

I

Names.

I

Remarks.

C'MP'NY C-Concluded. 16....... First lieutenant......... Max Weisendorf............. Mustered into service March 26, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, forty men having been mustered in. Second iieutenant...... Silas Hoardiy................ Mustered into service as second lieutenant of company A, March 21, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., 17 at Alcatraz Island, transferred to company C, per regimental order No. 26, of June 29, 1862, vice Lietenant Clawson, transferred to company A. COMPANY fl 18 ...... Captain ...................... Frederick Seidenshiker... Mustered into service April 11, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A.. at Alcatraz Island, on completion of company organization. 19........First lieutenant......... N. E. Funk...................... Mustered into service March 21, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, when forty men had been mustered in. 20 .... ... Second lieutenant...... Louis Herser.................... Mustered into service April 11, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, on completion of company organization. COMPANY N. 21....... Captain..... .... ............. W. M. Knox..................... Mustered into service as first lieutenant May 10, 1862, and as captain June 19, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island. 22....... First lieutenant......... C. P. Eagan ..................... Mustered into service June 21, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, on completion of company organization. 23 ...... .Second lieutenant...... S. Purdy, jr...................... Mustered into service as second lieutenant of company B April 1, 1862, at Alcatraz Island, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., and transferred to company E by regimental order No. 67, of January 13, 1863. COMPANY F. 24 ...... . Captain ...................... W. V. Spencer ...................Mustered into service September 17. 1862, by Brevet Major Lugenbeel, U. S. A., at Fort Vancouver, W. T., on completion of company organization. 25 ....... First lieutenant......... Peter Fox .........................Mustered into service August 1, 1862, by Major Winston, U. S. A., at Fort Vancouver, W. T., fifty men being then mustered in. 26 ....... Second lieutenant...... Is. Halloran ......................Mustered into service September 17, 1862, by Brevet Major Lugenbeel, U. S A., at Fort Vancouver, W. T., on completion of company organization. COMPANY U. 27....... Captain ...................... Ed. Barry .........................Mustered into service August 31, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, on completion of company organization. 28 ....... First lieutenant......... Geo. B. Hall ........ ..............Mustered into service August 21, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, forty men being then mustered in. 29 ...... . Second lieutenant...... Is. R. Hardenbergh ......... .Mustered into service August 31, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, on completion of company organization. COMPANY H. 30....... Captain ...................... W. M. Dowling ................ .Mustered into service August 2, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, on completion of company organization. 31 ...... . First lieutenant......... J. H. Smith ...................... .Mustered into service October 2, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, forty men being then mustered in. 32 ...... . Second lieutenant...... W. J. Sanborne ................ .Mustered into service October 2, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, on completion of company organization. .4

C'S

ox


LIST OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THE FIRST REGIMENT OF WASHINGTON TERRITORY INFANTRYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;CONCLUDED. No. I

Rank.

Names.

I

01

Remarks.

COMPANY I. 33 ...... .Captain .......................Daniel O'Regan............... Mustered into service October 21 by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island, on completion of company organization. 34 ...... .First lieutenant ..........Paul B. Ryan................... Mustered into service October 21, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island. 35 ...... .Second lieutenant.......C. F. West......................... Mustered into service October 21, 1862, by Captain Winder, U. S. A., at Alcatraz Island. Cap COMPANY K. 36....... tain.......... ............ .Egbert H. Tucker 37 ...... .First lieutenant ......... .J. E. D. Jester............ 38 ...... seeond lieutenant.......P. E. Toohill..............

Mustered into service December 5, 1862, by Lieutenant Colonel English at Fort Steilacoom, on completion of company organization. Mustered into service October 11, 1862, by Major G. W. Patton, U. S. A., at Fort Steilacoom, on completion of company organization. Mustered into service December 5, 1862, by Major T. M. Winston, U. S. A., at Fort Vancouver, on completion of company organization.

I certify that the above and within is a correct list of the officers belonging to the first regiment of Washington Territory infantry, United States volunteers, and that the remarks set opposite their names exhibit a true history of their connection with the regiment. (Signed) Jusvus STEINBEEGER, Colonel First W. T. Infantry Commanding. Headquarters First W. T. Infantry, Fort Walla Walla, December 20, 1862. TERRITORY OF WASHINGTON, EXECUTIVE OFFICE, OLYMPIA, W. T. The above and within appointments of the officers of the first Washington Territory infantry, United States volunteers, are hereby approved. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seat of the said Territory to be affixed, at Olympia, Washington Territory, this 31st day of December, A. D. 1862. (Signed) WILLIAM PICKERING, (Seal of the Territory of Washington), Governor of Washington Territory. By the Governor. (Signed) ELWOoD EVANS, Secretary Washington Territory.

RETURN OF THE FIRST

HEADQUARTERS FIRST W. T. INFANTRY, FORT WALLA WALLA, W. T., February 13, 1863. I certify that the above is a true copy of the list of the commissioned officers of the first regiment Washington Territory infantry, approved by his excellency the governor of Washington Territory, now on file at these headquarters. WILLIAM KAPUS, First Lieutenant First W. T. Infantry Regiment, Adjutant. HEADQUARTERS FIRST W. T. INFANTRY, February 10, 1863. This list, with the approval of the governor of Washington Territory, was received at these headquarters on the 22d of January last. Since its transmission to the capital at Olympia, Second Lieutenant Samuel Purdy, company B, declined the appointment of regimental quartermaster with the rank of first lieutenant, and as Second Lieutenant C. Gatz was assigned to company B the former officer was transferred to company E, in the place of Second Lieutenant L. G. Cabanis, appointed regimental quartermaster with the rank of first lieutenant (extra). (Signed) Jusvtrs STEINBERGER, Colonel First W. T. Infantry Commanding. A true copy. WILLIAM KAPU5, First Lieutenant First W. T. Infantry, Regimental Adjutant.

REGIMENT of Washington Territory Infantry, Army of the United States (Colonel Justus Steinberger), for part of the month of May, 1862.

s

PRESENT.

PRESENT.

Com'ss'd officers.

Enlisted men.

...

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PRESENT AND ASSENT. _Enlisted men. Commissioned officers.

Commissioned officers.

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1 1 ............ 1 .. 6 6 .. Field and staff ....................... .. 5 S 2 66 81 2 1 1 81 2 81 ... Daniel Taylor ......................... ..A 2 ... 5 8 2 61 76 3 1 1 1 .......76 ..... 3 76 S. W. Shulock ...........................B 3 5 8 2 64 79 3 1 1 1 79 .......... 3 79 ... G. A. Glasure............................C 3 . 5 8 2 64 79 3 1 1 1 79 ........... 3 79 .... F.Seidenshiker........................1) 3 ..... 1 1 1 ........... 1 .... Attached ..................................E ......... Total ................................ .... .... j 17 .............. 17 317 ..............317

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1 17

1 20 32

83 79 82 82 1

8 256 317 334

* First Lieutenant Myles, adjutant of the regiment, reported on the line "Field and Staff." Company A organized March 21,1862; company B organized April 1,1862; company C organized April 7,1862; company D organized April 12,1862. Headquarters of the first regiment of Washington Territory infantry. Station: Fort Vancouver. Date: May 24, 1862. (This refers to date of actual signature by regimental commander. WN. MYLES, First Lieutenant, First Washington Territory Infantry, Adjutant. JU5TU5 STEINBERGER, Colonel Commanding the Regiment.


8

SCHEDULE A.

REPORT OF ADJUTANT GENERAL.

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Rifle and light infantry tactics....................................................................................................22

Descriptive lista.........................................................................................................10 Blan k discharges............................................................................................................... Blank certificates of disability

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22 ...................................................................................................32 Blank company monthly returns........................................................................................... Blank muster and pay rolls Blank muste 7 ..........................................................................................................21 r roll..................................................................................................................

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I certify, on honor, that this muster rollis made out in the manner required by the printed notes; that it exhibits the true state of Captain George A. Glasure company ment, Washingto o, of the first regin Territory infantry, for the period herein mentioned that remarks set Opposite the name of each officer and soldier are accurate and just, and that theri~ca Pit-u l ation in every rules andexhibits of war. particular the true state of the company as required by the regulations Station: Fort Colville, W. T. Date: December 31, 1864.

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G. A. GLA5URE Captain Commanding the Company.

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Discipline, good; military appearance fine; accoutremen good; clothing, good. ts good; instruction good; arms, U. A. GLASURE Captain First W. T. Infantry, Inspecting and Mustering Officer.

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MUSTER ROLL OF THE COMMISSIONED AND NON. COMMISSIONED STAFF OF THE SECOND REGIMENT, ETC.'_ CONCLUDED Name.

Duty,

When appointed.

Rank.

C. H. Armstrong....................... .Ass't quartermaster ...........Captain ...... Robert Hunt............................... Quartermaster sergeant... Q. M. serg't MEDICAL DEPT. G. K. Willard .Purveyor and surgeon.... .Major.......... M. P. Burns Surgeon ........................... Major..........

j

Remarks.

I

May 3,1856 Disb'd Nov. 30, 1856.... $93 50 April 6,1856... Disb'd Sept. 1, 1856...... 164 75

............................... .........

Attached as regimental Q. M. to right wing in the field. See muster roll of Co. D," Captain Achilles.

Feb. 1, 1856... Disb'd Oct. 30, 1856........15 00 Oct. 14, 1856... Disb'd Nov. 1, 1856...... 102 25

Headquarters Olympia. Attached to central battalion, accomR. M. Biglow............................... Surgeon panied the right wing across the ............................ Major.............. Feb. 25, 1856... Samue McCurdy ........................ mountains. Res'd June 25, 1856 Henry P. Smith............................Slirgeol) ............................ 19 50 Attached to northern battalion. ...............Feb. 18 1856 Disb'd Assistant s urgeon..............Captain Aug. 16,1856 Justin Millard ............................ ................... .......... ..Feb. 7' 1&-,6::: Disb'd July 29, 1856 Attached to battalion. ............................Major............. .Mar. U. 1). Warbass. ..... ... ........ ............ Surgeoii ................... Stationed 1, 1856... Disb'd Oct 30, 1856..... Seattle. Assislaiit surgenu............. Captain Daniel Kiser............................... ......... Stationed at .......... .Apr. 3, 1856... at Vancouver. Assistant surgeon . ... Disb'd July 17, 1856 ............ Henry 'l'uz ................................ .......... Stationed at Cowlitz Landing. .......... ..Apr . 30, 1856.. Assistant surgeon............. Captain Albert Eggers .............................. Assistant Captain.......... May 1, 1856... Res'd July 22, 1856 44 50 Attached to central battalion. surgeon............. Captain........... Mar Disb'd July 16, 1856 21 00 Stationed . 26, 1856... Res'd May 1, 1856...._ 1950 at Vancouver. STAFF OF THE 2D EEG'T, In the field with southern battalion. W. T. VOLUNTEERS. B. F. Shaw................................... right wing, Lieut. col ...... Apr. 9, 1856... Eustis Huger ............................... A. J. Kane .................................. Adjutaiitsecoi1 reg't......... First lieut........ 65 76 Adjutant right wing ......... First lieut ...... .Feb. 2t, 1856.. Ites'd June 29, 1856 31 Apr. 26, 1856... Res'd June 6, 'M6 Also extra aid to governor. 21 Captain DeLacy was then appointed Gallager acting adjutant, iMr. Kane reSerg't maj. second reg't.... Serg't major... Apr. 9, 1856... Disb'd Oct. 30, 1856 turned to the ranks of Maxon's Co. 28 NORTHERN BATTALION. Wounded slightly whilst on a scout J. J. H. Van Bokkelin coming down from the Council Major Humphrey Hill ........... Grounds at Walla Waite. Major.............. Mar. 16, 1856... Disb'd Oct. 30, 1856 First llent Aijutiit 75 ........ Mar. 16, 1856... Disb'd Sept. 20, 1856 ... CENTRAL BATTALION Gilmore Hays .......... George Blalikenship................................................Major...............Feb, 22, 1856... Res'd April 1856 ...... F. Ruth Major May 31, 1856... Disb'd Oct. 30, 1856 Adjutant First lieut ...... Feb. 23, 1856... Disb'd Oct. 30,1856 ..... 60 75 SOUTHERN BATTALION. J. Maxon W.W. DeLacy............................ Major ................................ Major.............. Apr. 15, 1866... Adjutant........................... First lieut Oct. 30, 1866 G. Gallagher Feb. 20,1856... Disb'd Adjutant ....... Res'd April 261856.............. Appointed captain First lieut ...... May 1856... Res'd July 28,'1856.'* 4625

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.................

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............... ........

11

engineers.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPT. GILMOEE HAYS, Company B, of the First Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army 0! tile

United States, from the 14th day of October, 1855, to the 14th day of January, 1856.

Names, present and

When

Enlisted. Residence.

Rank.

When.

. .................. .................

. co.......... co............... co .......... .......... .......... .......... . ...... eo......... eo.......... .......... ....... .......... ..........

Where.

Remarks.

iâ&#x20AC;˘

ha Period. cprd.

14 3 m. Olympia..... .......... Oct. 14....... Olympia.......... Gilmore Hays .................. Captain 14 m. Olympia................Oct. 14....... Olympia.......... 3 1st lieut rd Drew from Fort Steilacoom overcoat, 2 shirts, jacket, Jared Hurd Jan. 14 Oct. 14....... Olympia.......... 3 mos...... 2d lieut......Thurston pair socks. blanket, pair drawers. William Martin Drew from Fort Steilacoom, 1 overcoat. Lost horse, sad. Jan. 14 3 inns...... Olympia Oct. 14....... Pierce Surgeon die, blankets and instruments on October 31, 1855, in Matthew Burns................. an action with enemy near Connel's prairie. I overcoat, 2 shirts, jacket. 3 mos......Jan. 14 Drew from Fort Steilacoompair Oct. 14 Olympia Thurston drawers. Joseph Gibson ..................1st sergt pair socks, blanket, Lost in service on Yelmn's prairie, pistol. Oct. 14....... Olympia.......... 3 mos...... Jams. 14 Thurston en overcoat. Fort Steilacoom Henry D. Cock.................. 2d sergt. Drew from 14 Jami. Oct. 14....... Olympia.......... 3 Thomas Prather ................ 3d sergL Thurston en from Fort Steilacoom overcoat, 2 shirts, jacket Olympia.......... 3 inos...... Jan. 14 Drew Oct. 14 Joseph A. White............... 4th sergt Thurston en pair socks, pair drawers. Reduced to ranks at Camp Connel, November 5,1855. Olympia 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Oct. 14 Thurston James Taylor................ 1st corp 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Drew from Fort 8teilaenom 2 overcoat. Olympia.......... 14....... Oct. Thurston corp...... 2d Whitfield Kirtley.............. from Fort Steilacoom shirts, jacket. Oct. 14........Olympia ......... 3 moos...... Jan. 14 Drew en 2 shirts, jacket, pat Darius T. Wheelock ......... 3d corp..... Thurston en 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Drew from Fort Steilacoom Olympia.......... Oct. 14 .......... Thurston 4th corp.... John Scott......................... socks, blanket, pair drawers. Drew from Fort Steilacoou gun in the service. Lost Jan. 14 3 mos...... Oct. 14....... Olympia.......... Private...... Thurston en overcoat, shirt, 3 pair socks, 2 blankets. Augery, blanket, pai overcoat, Fort Steilacoom Drew from Jan. 14 3 moos...... Oct. 14 ...... .Olympia ......... Private ..... Thurston en Axtell, John drawers, jacket, pair shoes, 2 pair socks, 2 shirts. Lost saddle in service. Jan. 14 3 mos...... Private ..... Olympia................ Oct. 14....... Olympia.......... 3 Rica Anthony, 14 Lost horse, saddle, blankets, bridle and pistol in am action with the enemy near Connel's prairie, Bright, George Robert...... Private...... Olympia................ Oct. 14....... Olympia action October 31, 1855. Horse from November 3d furnishe Saunders. Bright by furnished by George Bush. Oct. 14 ..... Olympia ......... 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Horse Drew from Fort Stilaenom Private ..... Thurston en horse in service. -Bush, Joseph Lost Jan. 14 3 Oct. 14 ..... Olympia ...........mos...... Billings, William .............. Private ..... Tlmurston en overcoat, 2 shirts, pair shoes, pair socks, blankel 2 pair drawers. shirts, jacke from Fort Steilacoom overcoat, 3pair Oct. 14 ...... Olympia ......... 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Drewpair drawers. Brennan, Joseph............... Private...... King shoes, 2 pair socks, blanket, jaeke overcoat, 2 shirts, from Fort Steilacoom Oct. 14 ...... Olympia.......... 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Drew Butler, William ................. Private ..... Thurston en 2 pair socks, 2 blankets, pair drawers, pair shoe! pal overcoat, 2 shirts, 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Drew from Fort Steilacoom Olympia Bound, Henry................... Private...... Thurston en ......... Oct. 14 shoes, pair socks, blanket, pair drawers. Oct. 14 ...... .Olympia ..........3 mos...... Jan. 14 Lost saddle in service. Drew from Fort Steilaenoi Cameron, Harvey J.......... Private...... Thurston en 3 mnos...... Jan. 14 Olympia Oct. 14 Private ..... Thurston Campbell, William shirt, pair socks, blanket. overcoat, shirt. .Oct. 14 ...... ..Olympia ......... 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Drew from Fort Steilacoom .Private.... .Thurston en

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MTTSIPFR PCT.T. CbS' Names, present and

absent.

Rank

When.

Residence.

. Nebuzaraden . .. .. . . 'innelHenrlAndr, eyw .. . . . . Melancthon .. .. .

. ... . . . .. .

('APPATM g1.rn.rs.

Enlisted.

When djcharged. Period,

Where.

.

Chambers, Matthew T ...... Private..... Thurston co, ......... Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 3 mom Jan. 14 Coffey, Private ..... Thurston co Oct. 14... Olympia ........... 3 mos...... J an. 14 Cooper, Thomas ............... Private ..... Thurston co ..........Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 3 mos...... Jan. 14 looper, William H ........... Private ...... Thurston co, ......... Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 3 moe.......Jan. 14 Ilinton, Wesley T ............ ..Private ..... Pierce co .............. Oct. 21... Ft Steilacoom... 3 mos Jan. 14 )ay, Joseph ......................Private..... Olympia ............... Oct. 14... Olympia .............3 moo...... Jan. 14 )avis, Nerrian ................. .Private ..... Thui'ston co ......... Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 3 moe....... Jan. 14 )avis, W. W ..................... ..Private .......Lewis co ........ ...... ..Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 3 mos...... Jan. 14 )odge, Francis M ............ ..Private.......Thurston co......... Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 3 moe.......Jan. 14 raucett, Franklin ............ Private.......Thurston co...........Oct. 14... Olympia .............3 mos...... Jan. 14 roet, J................Private .......Thurston co......... 14... Olympia ............ .......Jan. 14 R. A .................... Private........Pierce co.............. Oct. Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 33 moe mos.......Jan. 14 'inch, C .................Private ..... Pierce co.............. . Oct. 21... Ft. Steilacoom 3 mos.......Jan. 14 Ueason, Aaron B..............Private...... Tburston co ...........Oct. 14... Olympia Smoe.......Jan. 14 loodwin, Francis B ........ Private ..... Thurston co...........Oct. 14... Olympia ........... .............3 moe...... Jan. 14 winnep, John .................Private ..... Thurston co ...........Oct. 14... Olympia .............3 moe...... Jan. 14 Oudy, James H............... Private ..... Olympia .................Oct. 14... Olympia .............3 mos.......Jan. 14 -allagher, Henry ............ Private...... Olympia ................ Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 3 mos...... Jan. 14 ibson, Edward .............. Private ..... Olympia ............... Oct. 14... Olympia .............3 moe...... Jan. 14 oodell, Z Private ..... co......... Oct. 14... ............ 3 moe.......Jan. 14 ates, Levi L ................... Private...... Thurston Thurston co, ......... Oct. 14... Olympia Olympia ............ 3 mos.......Jan. 14 ruess, Wilson .................. Thurston en.......... Oct. 21... Ft. Steilacoom... 3mos...... Jan. 14 Luger, Eustis .................. Private...... Private ..... Olympia ............... Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 14

- . .

Enlisted. Names, present and

Rank.

Richard . .. . . . . . LiLakt le,john, .. . .. . . ..

Residence.

When

____________________________ chared. Period. Where. When.

.

............... Oct. 14... D.... Private ..... Olympia Herrington, ..... Olympia ................Oct. 14... Harsell, Henry W ............ Private Haggerty, Alfred ..............Private ..... Thurston en..........Oct. 14... Hicks, Thomas B..............Private ..... Thurston en..........Oct. 14... Hughes, Thomas ............... Private......Olympia ................Oct. 14...

14 Olympia ............3 mos......Jan. 14 Olympia ............3 moe......Jan. Jan. 14 3 mos...... ............ Olympia Jan. 14 3 mos...... Olympia ............ Olympia ............3 moe......Jan. 14

Thurston............... en ..........Oct. 14... Holmes, William .............. Private ..... Olympia Oct. 14... Horton, Hector ................. Private...... Oct. 14... . Thurston en ......... Kills, Henry M .................Private...... Oct. 14... Thurston ce ......... Private ..... Jones, Morris ................... Olympia ............... Oct. 14... Private...... Lodge, James Irwin ......... Olympia ............... Oct. 14... Private ..... Le Clare, Lewis ............... Oct. 14... Thurston en ......... Private ..... William ......... James A.................. Private...... Pierce en............... Oct. 24... Miles, Joseph .................. Private ..... Olympia ............... Oct. 14... ............... Oct. 14... Martin, David.................. Private...... Olympia Myree, Jacob L ................ Private...... Thurston co......... Oct. 14... en .......... Oct. 14... Thurston............... Mounts, D. M ................... Private ..... Olympia Oct. 14... Miller, Charles ................. Private .....

Jan. 14 Olympia ............3 inos...... Jan. 14 Olympia ............3 moe...... Olympia ............ 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 14 14 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 1855. 1 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Dec. 1856. 14 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. Camp Porter...... 3 moe...... Jan. 14 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 14 14 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 14 14 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 14

Morgan, James F............. Private .......Summit Mts ......... Oct. 27... Northcraft, William S ....... Private ..... Thurston en .......... Oct. 14... Otl'utt, Milford ...................Private ..... Thurston en .......... Oct. 14... Ogle, Van.......................... Private...... Thurston en.......... Oct. 14...

Summit Mts ...... 3 mos...... Jan. 14 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 14 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 14 Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 14

m,,

'Ph.

I............

. .. .. .. ..

.

Private ......Thurston co, ......... .Oct. 14... Olympia ............ 3 moe...... Jan. 14

Remarks.

furnished furnished blanket, blblaanknkeett,, furnished December blanket, furnished blanket, jacket,

Drew from Fort Steilacoom I overcoat, 2 shirts, 1 jacket, 2Horse pair shoes, 1 pair socks, 1 blanket, I pair drawers. by Tebo. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, 1 jacket, 1 pair shoes, 2 pair socks, 1 blanket, 1 pair drawers. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 2 shirts. Horse by Metcalf. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 4 shirts, 1 jacket, 2 pair shoes, 2 pair socks, 1 1 pair drawers. Drew from 2 shirts,1 pair shoes, 1 pair socks, 1 Fort Steilacoom 1 pair drawers. Horse by William Packwood. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, 1 pair socks, I I pair drawers. Drew from Fort Steilacoom I overcoat, 2 shirts,1 jacket, 2 pair socks, 1 blanket, 1 pair drawers. Lost in service near Steilacoom on 20, 1855,horse socks. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 2 pair Drew Fort2Steilacoom shirts, 1 jacket, 1 pairfrom shoes, pair socks, 11overcoat, I.3 pair drawers, 2 pair drawers. Appointed first corporal Nov. 6th, at Camp Montgomery. Horse by A. W. Sergeant. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, 1 I pair shoes, 1 pair socks, 1 1 pair drawers. Drew Fort Steilacoom I overcoat, 1 pair socks, I pair from drawers. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 1 pair shoes, I pair socks. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 1 jacket, 1 pair socks, 1 blanket. Drew from Ft. Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, 1 jacket, I pair shoes, 2 pair socks, 2 pair blankets, I pair drawers. company quartermaster at Camp l%iontgomcry Novemhr

Appointed

- '

Remarks.

l bl a nk e t , furnished blanket, blanket, furnished

Horse furnished by Nebuzaraden Coffey. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat. 2 shirts, jacket. 1 pair shoes, 2 pair socks, 1 blanket. I pair drawers. 1 jacket Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat,12pair shirts, drawers. 2 pair socks, 1 pair shoes,Drew 1 from Fort Steilacoom' Lost 1 saddle in service. overcoat, 2 shirts, 1 jacket, 1 pair shoes, 2 pairbysocks Jno 1 pair drawers. Horse 1 Montgomery. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, 1 jackel I pair shoes, I pair socks, 1 blanket. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, I jacket I pair drawers. 1 pair socks, 1 by (iabrn Lost 1 gun in service. Horse Jones. Detailed as company clerk. Lost horse by exhaustio in the Cascade mountains October 31, 1855. On account of disability from sickness. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 4 shirts, 2 pa shoes, 2 blankets, 2 pair drawers, 2 pair socks. Killed in action on Connel's prairie October 31,185 Lost horse, saddle, blankets and bridle. Lost I pistol on White river in service. Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, 1 pa 1 pair drawers. socks, 1 Drew from Fort Steilacoom 4 shirts, 1 jacket, 1 pa r shoes, 2 pair socks, 2 blankets, I overcoat. Horse fu by William K. Melville. Drew from Fort Steilacoom I overcoat, 4 shirts, 1 pa r shoes. 2 pair socks, 2 blanke's, 2 pair drawers. lost in service. Drew from Fort Steilacoo S One 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, 2 pair socks, I pair drawers. 1 overcoat, 2 shirts, 1 pa r Drew from Fort Steilacoom 1 pair drawers. socks, 1 Lost 1 saddle in service. Drew from For Steilacoom 4r shirts, 1 pair shoes, I pair socks, 1 blanket, 1 pa drawers.

blanket, nishsedad le blanket,

C)!


SCHEDULE B.

REPORT OF ADJUTANT GENERAL.

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REMARKS ountains, reached the White river on the 2d On the 31st of October left summit of the Cascade M November. On the 3d November engaged the enemy. In this day's fight killed thirty Indians. river on the 4th, and had a running fight which lasted from 2 P. M. until Pursued them Greenthat any of the enemy were killed. Oci the 6th pursued a party to the dark. It is not to certain small party behind, who fired from amdark. upper PuyallUP. They abadOfled li their camp leavingcoammand, two of who'll have since died. ounding five men of Lieutenant Slaughter's Ninthw left Camp Connel and made camp at Montgomery's on the 11th; 12th, 13th and 14th capture some sixty head of Indian horses, which were turned over to the government; during these three days also captured several parties of Indians, part of whom were afterward set at liberty, on Lieutrial, and part are retained; 18th made Camp Smith; 20th a party of thirty-five men under Lieutenant Hurd, with several days rations, explored the country on the north bank of the Puyallup and NisquallY rivers. At the same time a party of ten men under Sergeant Cock examined prairies eutenant Slaughon the south bank of the PuyalluP found no Indians. On the 25th heard that Li ter was surrounded by a large body of Indians Ofl the north bank of the Puyallup went to his relief on the 27th with Captain Keyes, 3d artillery; found the Indians had left, driving with them nt Slaughter's party. First December returned to Camp horses and mules belonging to Lieutena Smith; 3d camped on Yelm prairie, south side of NisquallY river; 4th sent thirty-five me]' under Lieutenant Martin to reconnoiter the country south of the Nisqually. This command destroyed a large quantity of provisions, took a squaw and child prisoners seeing no other Indians. During this party's absence, intelligence was received that Lieutenant Slaughter ofathe 4th of United river and that party forty mand were killed on White States Infantry and others of his command men and all the pack animals belonging to his command were in great danger on the PuyallupOn the return of Lieutenant Martin, marched in company with Captain aloney, U. S. A., to relief; found men and animals safe and guarded them into Fort SteilacOom on the 16th December. on the 25th at PattersOfl's on the 27th divided my company to On the 18th camped at Eaton's; thing of importance has been done. On the get them comfortable quarters, since which time no 31st October an escort, who were with the express on the way from the mountains to Olympia, were attacked by several ambush of Indians. After much suffering and gallant fighting they arrived safe at Olympia, having lost of my command one private. I certify on honor that I have carefully examined this muster roll and that I have mustered and minutely inspected the company, the condition of which is found to be as expressed in my arms, —; accoutreremarks hereunto annexed. ; military appearance, —; Discipline, —; instruction, —; Clothing, -. I certify, on honor, that this muster roll is made out in the manner required by the printed notes; that it exhibits the true state of Captain Gilmore Hays, company B, of the first regiment of Washington Territory volunteers, for the period herein mentioned; that the remarks set oppoh officer and soldier are accurate and just, and that the recapitulation exhibits site the name of eacthe true state of the company as by regulations and the rules and the articles in every particular GIt.MORE HAYS, (Signed) Commanding the Company. . of war. Station: -. Date: January 14, 1856. —2


18

REPORT OF -4DTUT-4NT GeNERAL.

Recapj(uj.g ice

19'

SCHEDULE B.

91.

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..................................................1 Present ........ (Porduty On 1 extra or daily duty .......................................... 1441765 88 88 (Sick................................................................

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On detailed service .............................. With leave or Ofl fu rlough............................. Absent .........Without leave............................................3 Sick............................................. 3 [Discharge~*j~:~rd er.............................. Totals I Muster roll Of Captain Gilmore Rays, compan tory volunteers, army of the United State, January, 1856 from the 14th day of October, 1855, to the 14th day of I certify, on honor, that this muster roll is made out in the manner required by the printed notes; that it exhibits the true state of Captain Gilmore Hays, company B, of the first regime Washington Territory volunteers, for the period herein mentioned; that remarks set oppo the name of each officer and soldier are site accurate every particular, the true state of the company, as and just and that the recapitulation exhibits, in of war. ' red by the regulations rules and articles Date July 14, 1856. (Signed) GILMORE HAYS, Commanding the Coinpan .

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M

USTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN B. L. HENNES

Names, present and Rank

Enk Enlisted.

Residence

When.

Where

Camby, James ................Private Thurston co .......... 1855, 1... Ft. Hensiess....... Nov. Camby, Russell D............Private

Period

When diecharged

a

Remarks

1856. Feb. i.... $85 00 $25 00 Stop for I great coat, i private infantry Thurston co..........Nov. 1... Ft. Henness........3 wool jacket 2 shirts, I pa drawers, i 3 -08 1.... 85 00 blanket Chandler Legrafl B......Private blanket, 1 pair shoes, 1 pair Socks. 2500 Stop for 1 great coat, 1 private infantry Thurston co..........Nov. 1... Ft. Renness wool jacket 2 shirts, I pair drawers, i 3 zoos..... Feb. 1.... 130 00 blanket, I pair shoes, i pair socks, I saddle $30. Case, William 25 00 Stop for 1 great Coat, 1 private i nfantry .Private......Thurston co.......... wool Jacket, 1 shirt, i Pair drawers 1 Nov' 1... Ft- Hencess .......33 -08 Praim James F...............Private blanket$30, 1 pair shoes, i pair socks,'l Feb. ... 85 00 saddle 25 00 Stop for 1 great coat, i private infa ntry Thurston co..........Nov. 1... Ft. Henuess.......3 mon......Feb. i.... 110 00 wool jacket, 1 shirt, I pair drawers, 1 blanket, I pair shoes, I pair socks. Goodell Jotham W.........Private......Thuo0 25 00 Mounted December 18, 1855. Stop for en..........Nov. 1... Ft. IienhIes I great coat, I private infantry wool 5.......35no Frost, Gilbert Ii..............Private jacket, $30. i shirt, 1 blanket 1 pair socks, i saddle, Feb. 1. .. 95 00 Thurstori en 25 00 Stop for 'l great coat, i private i n ..........Nov. 1... Ft. Heiiness.......3 mon......Feb. Wool jacket, shirt, I pair drawers, i Goodell Nathan B..........Private i.... 85 00 blanket, 1 pairishoes. Thurston en 25 00 Stop for 1 private iInfantry wool jacket I ..........No', 1... Ft. Henness.......3 mos Hale, Henry j................. shirt, I pair drawers 1 blanket, 1 pair socks, Pri'ate Feb, 1 .... ...... . ...... .Thurston co..........Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ..............Stop for 1 great coat, i private infantry ..3 mos......Feb. 1.......... wool jacket, I shirt, 1 pair drawers i Hagard Charles .............Private......Thornton co..........Nov. 1.................Stop Ft flenness blanket 1 pairwool shoes I pair socks. ....... for 1 private infantry jacket, James, Samuel, jr........... mos......Feb. 1 2pair shirts, I pair drawers, I blanket, shoes, I Paircoat, sockI s.private infantryI .Private .... Thurston co..........Nov- 1... .... ...........................Stop for 1 great Henness ...... .3 mos......Feb. 1.... 165 00 1 shirt,1 pair 1 pairsocks. draa'ers I blanket, Ijacket, pair shoes, James, William F............Private 25 00 Horse furnished by Joseph Borst, Stop Thurston co...........Nov. 1... Ft. Henness for I great coat, i private infantry jacket i shirt, 1 pair drawers, 1 wool .3 mon Feb. 1. .. 105 00 1 pair shoes. 25 00 Horse furnished by Charles Byles. Stop for I great coat, i private infantry wool jacket blanket, I pair shoes, I pair socks.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN B. L. Names, present and absent,

TIF.NNRSSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;ai,,

Enlisted. Rank.

Residence. -

______

When.

.

Where.

MOB

Period.

TV/i.,I dinb . charged. a '

Remarks.

1855 1856. Thurston Co......... . Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ...... ..3 mon...... Feb. 1..................Stop for 1 private infantry wool jacket, 1 shirt, 1 pair shoes. Thurston co .......... Nov. 1... Ft. Ilenness ........3 mon...... Feb. 1.... $95 00 $25 00 Horse furnished by Whitfield Kirtley. Stop for I great coat, 1 shirt, 1 pair drawers, 1 blanket, 1 pair shoes, 1 pair socks. Kirtley, James ............... . Private .......Thurston Co......... . Nov. 1... Ft. Ilenness ........3 mon...... Feb. 1 80 00 25 00 Horse furnished by Whitfield Kirtley. Stop for 1 great coat, 2 shirts, 1 blanket, 1 pair 1 pair socks. King, Walter .................. . Private Thurston Co......... . Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ........3 mon...... Feb. 1 .... ......................Stop forshoes, 1 great coat, 1 private infantry wool jacket, 1 shirt, 1 blanket, 1 pair shoes. Lum, James K ............... . Private Thurston Co.......... Nov. 1... Ft. Henness 3 muon...... Feb. 1 .... ............. ...............Stop for] private infantry wool jacket, 1 shirt, I pair drawers, 1 pair socks. Laws, John..................... Private Thurston co ......... . Nov. 1... Ft. Hennes. ...... 3 mon...... Feb. 1......................Stop for 1 private infantry wool jacket, 2 shirts, 1 pair shoes. Laws, Thomas ................ Private Thurston Co......... . Nov. 1... Ft. Heuness ........3 mos...... Feb. 1 95 00 25 00 Horse furnished by Captain B. L. Henness. Stop for 1 great coat, 1 private infantry wool jacket, 2 shirts, 1 pair drawers, 1 pair shoes. Leavitt, Andrew S .......... . Private Thurston Co ..........Nov. 1... Ft. Heunesn....... 3 mon...... Feb. 1......................Stop for 1 private infantry wool jacket, 2 flannel shirts, 1 pair drawers, 1 blanket, 1 pair shoes, 1 pair socks. Mills, William ................ Private Thurston Co...........Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ........3 mon Feb. 1 85 00 25 00 Stop for 1 great coat, 1 private infantry wool jacket, 1 blanket. Mills, Nathaniel .............. Private Thurston Co......... ..Nov. 1... Ft. Henness...... 3 mos...... Feb. 1.........................Stop for 1 great2 shirts, coat, 1 private infantry wool jacket, I flannel shirt, 1 pair drawers, I blanket, 1 pair shoes. Mills, John It ................. ..Private Thurston Co.......... Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ...... . 3 mon Feb. 1...........................Mounted December 1st, 1855. Horse furnished by Samuel Coulter. Stop for I private infantry wool jacket, 2 flannel shirts, 1 pair drawers, 1 blanket, 1 pair shoes, 1 pair socks. 4cCormac, Andrew ....... Private Thurston en .......... Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ...... . 3 mon Feb. 1..................... Stop for 1 shirt, 1 pair socks. gedcalf, William ............. Private Thurston co .......... Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ...... 3 mos...... Feb. 1...... 85 00 25 00 Stop for one pair socks. iIize, William ................ Private...... Thurston co .......... Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ...... . 3 mon Feb. 1 95 00 25 00 Stop for 1 great coat, 1 private infantry wool jacket, 1 flannel shirt, 1 pair drawers, 1 pair shoes, 1 pair socks. tiorgan, Richard F ......... Private...... Thurston co .......... Nov. 24.. Ft. Henness ...... . 3 mon...... Jan. 24 80 00 25 00 Stop for 1 great coat, I flannel shirt, 1 pair drawers, 1 blanket, 1 pair shoes, 1 oair socks. James, Thomas .............. Private Kirtley, Milton ................ Private


MUSTER Eam.es, present and absent.

ROLL OF CAPTAIN B. L. HENNESS_

CONTINUED.

Enhj8ted

I Rank.

Residence 1 he

Newman, William B. D.. Private...

Thuiston co.........

Period.

When dCharged.

Remarks.

.

1856 Ft. Henness......3 mos.....Feb. 1.... $95 00

$25 00

Stop for 1 private infantry wool jacket, 1shirt,.1 pair drawers 1blanket, ipair Socks. Pollen, Thomas.............. Stop for Igreat coat, I .Private.... Thurton private infantry wool jacket, 2 flannel shirts, i pair co ......... . Nov- 1... Ft. Hermess....... 3mos.... Feb.!. .. 10500 drawers, 2500 Stop for 1 ipair shoes, 1 pair socks. great coat, Iprivate infantry Remley, Joseph.............. . wool jacket, 1 flannel shirt, Private.... Thurston Co 1 pair ........ Nov. 1... F . lIenness....... drawers 1 pair shoes, I Remley, John................. . pair socks, 1 Smos.. saddle, 30. Feb. I. Private..... Thurston co Stop for 1great coat, 1 ........ Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ...... shirt, 1 pair drawers, 1 .3 urns.... Feb. 1. shoes. Roundtree, James........... S top forpair 1great Coat, 1shirt, 1 Private ..... Thurston co pair drawers, I blanket, ........ Nov. 1... Ft. Henness ...... .3 mos.... Feb. 1...Ii8oÂŽ 2500 1Saddle, $80. ipair shoes, Ipairsooks, [Jorge furnished by Joseph Borst. Simm Stop vuhjam ......... j Private ..... for I greatcoat ! private infantry wool Thurston co jacket, 1shirt, Nov. 13.. Ft. Hennes ....... 1 pair shoes. 1'pair drawers, iblanket, 3 mos.... Jan. 13.../13000/ 2500 Jorse furnished by William Mise, DeSmith, James...... ...... Private Chehalis co........... - Stop for Igreat coat, Ishirt, ...... Ipair drawers, Nov. 12., Ft. Henness . 3 mos.... Jan. 12............................ 1pair socks. 1 blanket, ipair shoes, Saylor, Conrad George ...... .Private Thurston ........ co......... Nov. 1... Ft. Henness...... top for Igreat Coat, 2 Tilley, Abram.................. .3 mos.... Feb. 1....................... blanket, 1pair shoes. flannel shirts, 1 Private Thurston Co......... Nov. Washburn, Francis top for 1 private infantry 1... Private wool jacket, Thurston en......... Nov. 13.. Ft. Hermess ...... .3 mos..... Feb. 1. 2 flannel shirts. 10500 2500 Ft. Ilenness...... .3rnos.... Jan .13... 95 00 25 00 op for 1 great Coat, 1 flannel shirt, Wallace, Milton B .......... Private Thurston Co 1 pair drawers, ipair shoes, 1 Nov. 1... Ft. Hen ness....... pair Socks, 3 mos 3 blankets Jan. 12 ... ! 8500! 2500 orse furnished Samuel Coulter from December so. by Stop for I private infantry wool jacket, Waddell, Robert ............ .Private......Thurston Co ...... 1 pair drawers, 1blanket,flannel shirt ....Nov. 1... Ft. Henness.......3 mos.... Jan. 12... 235 00 oes, 1 Williams, Samuel H .......Private pair socks, 1saddle, $30. 1 pair shoes, 25 00 Chehalis co ........... .Nov. 12.. Ft. Hen ness DP for 2 flannel shirts, I drawers, [blanket, 1 pair shoes, 1pair 3 mos......Jan. 12... 100 00 pair socks. 25 00 )rse furnished by Thomas Ford, No'ember 12, 1835. Stop for 1 flannel shirt, 2 pairs Socks.great Coat, Pullen, William H .......... Private...

Thurston

co..........

Ft. Henness

Feb. 1.... ...... ...... ...... ....

I

MUSTER ROLL Enlisted. Names, present and sent.

Rank.

Residence.

______

_______ ______ Period. Where.

, When. 1855

on .......... Nov. 1...

Ft. Henness ...... . 3 mos..

Yantis, Alexander S ....... . Private...... Thurston

co .......... Nov. 1...

Ft. Henness .......

Ticknor, Joel T............... . Private...... Thurston

on ......... .Nov. 13..

Ft.

I certify, on honor, that this muster roll exhibits the true state of Captain B. L. ilenness' company (F) of the first regiment, Washington Territory volunteers, for the period herein mentioned; that remarks set opposite the name of each officer and soldier are accurate and just, and that the valuation of all horses and horse equipments was made by disinterested and good judges and (Signed) at fair and just rates. B. L. HENNESS, Captain Commanding the Company. I certify, on honor, that I have at Fort Jienness on this, the first day of February, 1856, carefully examined this roll, and as far as practicable caused the allowances, stoppages and remarks to be justly and properly stated, and mustered the company for discharge, and it is hereby honorably discharged from (Signed) the service of the United States. B. L. HaylcEss, Captain and Mustering Officer.

Remarks. : a

1856. Jan. 12 ... ............. .............. Stop for Igreat Coat, 1 private infantry wool jacket, Ishirt, 1 pair drawers, 1 blanket, 1 pair shoes, 1pair socks. 3 mos...... Jan. 12... $155 00 $25 00 Stop for I great coat, 1 private infantry wool jacket. 2 flannel shirts, 1 pals drawers, Iblanket, Ipair shoes. 25 00 Horse furnished by Joseph Borst, De3 coos...... Jan. 13... ItO 00 cember 12, 1855. Stop for 1 flannel shirt, I pair socks.

Yantis, William H .......... Private ...... Thurston

Jienness .......

When dis charged.

I do hereby certify that the above articles of clothing charged on this roll is correct, and that I was unable to give the different prices of the articles as they were drawn from Lieutenant John Nugen, acting assistant quartermaster at Fort Steilacoom, and invoices failed to show the different prices. B. L. HENNESS, (Signed) Captain Commanding the Company.

tu

ttj v

19

17,1


MUSTER ROLL o CAPTAIN W. A. L. MCCORKLE, Company G, of the First Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 24th day of October. 1855 to thp ilist lav nf .Iar.r. Names, present and absent.

Enlisted.

_______

Rank.

When.

________

--

Where.

W. A. McCorkle ............... ..Captain.... .............................. O1855 ct. 24... John Catlin .................... ..1st Ijeut.... ................ Oct. Charles Bishop.................. 2d lieut..................... Oct. 24... Elisha C. Mayhew..............1st sergt.... Carpenter ............. Oct. 24... 24... James Redpatli................ 2d sergt.... Farmer.................. Oct. 24... Jeptha S. Powell.............. .Corn. s'gt.. Merchant .............. Oct. 24... Ambrose Patten............... 1st corp'l.. Farmer................. Oct. 24... Ziba S. Miller .................. .3d corpI... Farmer Oct. 24... Reuben R. Foster............ .Drummer, Farmer Oct. 24... Joseph Caples .................. Fifer ........ Farmer ................. 5... Henry Hastings ............... Private.... Farmer.................. Oct. 24...

.

. . .................... .................. .. .. [)cc. . F.orenzo P. Smith ..............Private.... Farmer ................. 24... iamuel Washburn........... ..Private .... Farmer................. ...Oct. Oct. 24... Peter Moore .......................Private .... Farmer ..................Oct. 24... William Irwin ...................Private .... Farmer ...................Oct. 24... leorge P. Gray .................Private .... Farmer...................Oct. 24... liram Towner.................. Private .... Farmer .................. Oct. 24... Facob Ott.......................... Private .... Farmer.................. Oct. 24... William Jackson............... Private.... Farmer.................. Oct. 24... crancis H. Atkins............. Private.... Farmsr...................Dec. 1... corman Burbee.... ............ Private.... Farmer.................. Oct. 24...

Period.

Monticello............ ..3 moe...... Monticello............ ..3 moe Monticello............ 3 moe...... Monticello............ 3 urns...... Monticello............ 3 moe...... Monticello............ . 3 moe...... Monticello............ 3 os...... Monticello ............ .3 mos..... Monticello Lewis River ......... .3 moe Monticello ............ 3 mnos......

When dis.. charged.

Remarks.

k56. Jan. 31 Jail. 31 Jauu. 31 Jan. 31 Jan. 31 Drawers, $3; brogans, $2.50; 200 pounds beef, $16; 16 pounds sugar, $2. Jan. 31 Jan. 31 Jan. 31 Jan. 31 1855. Dec. Dishonorably discharged December 1855; ilud. son's Bay gun, $14. 856. Jan. 31 Jan. 31 Jan. 31 Jan. 31 water proof hat, $2; 2 large knives, $2. Jan. 31 Jau,. 31 Jan. 31 Jan. 31 Jan. 31 Jan. 31 mu. 31

... . uui .............31,,os .. 10 1 Monticello ..............3 moos Monticello ............ . 3 nuns...... Monticello............. 3 nios...... Monticello ..............3 urns...... 1 Monticello..............3 umos...... Monticello ............ 3 moe...... Monticello ............. 8 mnos...... Monticello. .... ..........3 inns...... Mouitjcello..............luulos...... Monticello ............. 3 nba

10,

1

(Signed) W. A. L. MCORKLE, First Regiment W. T. Volunteers. I certify, on honor, that the above named company of volunteers were mustered into time service on the 24th day of October, 1855. (Signed) JAMES TILTON, Adjutant General W. T. Volunteers.

MUSTER ROLL OF LIEUTENANT W. GOSNELL'S COMPANY of whites and auxiliary Indians raised by order of Isaac I. Stevens, Govar(hif Ma,rh 19. 1856. for expedition to Johnson's Point. '......â&#x20AC;˘...,... .-..,,-1 ( Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Residence.

When.

OF ............................. W. ...................................................... 19, 19, .. ................................................. OF iNi)IANI. 19, 10, ....... ... ...........

Where.

When discharged.

Period.

of

Value clothing.

WHITES. NAMES 4 days... March 22, 1856................... March 19, 1856 ..... Gosnell ............. 4 days... March 22, 1856 ...... Lieutenant March 19, 1856. ..... 22, 1856.................. Thomas Cambe 1856......................... days... March 1'mlorgaum..........................................................March 4 days... March 22, 1856................... March 19, 1856............................. 1856................... Thomas J. Mounts..................................................March March 1856..................................4 dFiyS... utncy A. Brooks NAMES $6 1856 1856...................................... 3 days... March 19 Goo.go-e-a-had, or Bob.............................................Mm,rclu 1856...................................... days... March 21, 1856 19 Ki-ohe, or Jun.............................................................Maceli 21, 1856 March 19, t856.......3 days... March 1856 March days... South Bay Jim ......................................... March 19, 1856....... 19 Jim McAllister...............................................................March 19, 1856...... 3 days... March 21, 1856 19 uake-wats-ali, or Bill Borce..........................................March 19, 1856.......days... March 1856 q 19 Ahla-huse, or Charley...............................................................March 19, 1856.......days... March 3856 19 1856 March days... Fril-a-c March 19, 1856 days... March Yel.la-la 1856....... 19 Psit-ca-min, or Jim....................................................................March 1856 March days... 1856....... 19 (Imah-tan-ah, or Charley...........................................................March days... March 1836 1856....... March 19 1836 March days.. Ji 19, 1856....... Tlep-wheg-hin, or Squally Clmarley............................................March 6 1856 19. 1856......days... March 6 Stel.Iole......................................................................................March 1856 March days... 1856....... 6 Mats-mow-y, or Charley.........................................March days... March 1836 1856...... 6 19 1856 Skul-lah...................................................................March 3 days... March Mardi 19,1856 6 19 Snohomish Sampson..............................................March hO, 1856.......3 days... March 1856 1856 March 3 days... Kaish March 19, 18i6....... 19 1856 Bill, or LIa-Mal-it....................................................Marclm 19, 1856.......3 (lays... March 19 1856 Cuitau, Tom................................................................Mardi 19, 1856.........days... March 6 19 1856 March Sis-Iceim 19, 1856...........3 days... March 19 Packwood..............................................................March 185(1 3 days... 19, 1856............... 6 19 John Wylie.........................................................................Mardi 1856 19, 1556.....................days... March 6 19 Whey-o-ha, or Lack................................................................March 1856 March days... March 19, 1856.......................... (1 19 1856 Ya-sha, or Sam, paid 19, 5856..........................days... March -la-co-las, or John........................................................................................March 19, 6 19 1856 1856.............................days... March Bob-a-loo-chee, paid................................................................................................March 6 19 1856 March 19, 1856................................days... March 6 19 Skookuin Bay Charley...........................................................................................March 19, 1856................................days.. March 1856 6 19 1856 Cap-c-tel, or Bill ...................................... March 19, 1856................................days... March 6 19 1856 March days... Pe-el-la March 19, 1856................................ Charley Sackeet .. le amouu, us Icertif,v that time above named Indians being employed by and received Lieutenant, sue W.me B. GOSNF.LL, Commanding Auxiliary Indians, Second Regiment W. T. Volunteers. (Signed)

H. D. Q

................................................................................ ...................................................................................... mmy............................................................................

Bill

Ti

...................................................................... ....................................................................... ...................................................................................

............................................ ......................... ................... ............................................................................................ .....................................................................................................

........ .............4

3 'o . ....... 19, 19, 19, 19, 10, .......

.............

22, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21, 21,

19 19

19

1919 19 19

tumj


MUSTER ROLL OF THE NEZ PERCE INDIANS regularly enlisted and mustered into the service of Washington Territory as volunteers

in the Indian war now existing, by Isaac I. Stevens, Governor and Commander-in-Chief at Craigs, in Nez Perce county, December 15, 1855. Names, present and absent.

Enlisted. Rank.

Residence.

.. .. .. ...........................................- ........... ...................................... ............................. .................. .......... .............................. y ........................................... ................................. ......................................... ............................................... -oo-Ii ............................................. .................................. .. ow ................................. ................................ .......................................... ................................. ........................ ............................ .................. .. .............................. .

. .

When discharged.

--

When.

Where.

Value of

Period.

.

Spotted Eagle.............................. Sub-chief ................... Nez Perce county...... Dec. 15. 1855........... Nez Perce Looking Glass............................. Sub-chief ................... .Nez Perce county ...... ..Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Perce...............37 days.. Jan. 20, 1856.......... ................. ............. .. days..... Jan. 20, 1856.......................... Joseph ................................... ........ Sub-chief ................... Nez Perce county ..Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Peres............. ..37 37 days..... Jan. 20, 1856.......... ................... Lone Bird .................................... .Sub-chief .................... Nez Peree county...... ........Dec. 15, 1855.......... Nez Perce............... 37 (lays..... Jan. 20,1856.......... .................. Th ree Feathers............................ Sub-chief .....................Nez Peree county ........ Dee. 15, 1855 ............ Nez Perce ............ 37 days..... Jan. 20,1856 Real Grizzley............................... Head man ....................Nez Perce county...... ..Dee. 15, 1855.......... Nez Peree............. 37 days..... Jan. 20, 1856 .......... .......... Red Crow..................................... Head man ....................Nez Peree county 1)ee. 15, 1855 .Nez Perce .37 days ..... 20,1856 .......... O n-tashen ..................................... Head man....................Nez Perce county........ Dec. 15, 1835........... Nez Perce ............. ..37 days ......Jan. .Jan. 20,1856 .......... ek-yatome Weset ..................... Head man....................Nez Perce county Dec. 15,1855 Perce .............. 37 days ..... Jan. 1856.......... lW ames Head man....................Nez Perce county........Dec. 15, 1855. ......... Nez Nez Peres ............ 37 days ..... Jan. 20, 18.56 .......... W ettew.......................... -a-hi-pen Head man....................Nez Perce county........Dec. 15, 1855 ......... .Nez Perce 37 days .... Jan. 20, 1836 .......... 1ats-en-pom ....................... Head man................... Nez Perce county ....... Dec. 1855 .......... Nez Perce ............. ............ 37 days Jan. 20, 1836 Pall-a-ken Head man....................Nez Perce county....... Dec. 15, 1855........... .Nez Perce ............. 37 days......Jan. 20, 1856 .......... EE as-hen-ka-kin Head man .................. Nez Perce county 15, 1855 Nez Perce 37 days ..... Jan. 20, 1856 .......... Elosep-ta-kelsa ............................. .Head man.................. ..Nez Perce county....... 15, 18.55 .......... -Nez Perce ............. 37 days ..... Jan. 20, 1856 .......... Wanes-at-wates Head man .................. Nez Perce county ...... Dee. Dec. 15, 1855 .......... Nez Perce ............. 37 days.. Jan. 20, 1855 .......... ay-ap-an-ack Head man .................. Nez Peree county Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Perce ............. ..37 days ..... Jan. 20, 1856 Sill Head man.................. Nez Perce county ....... 15,1855 .......... Nez Perce ............. 37 days ..... Jan. 20, 1856 ...... ralking Tabaeco .......................... Head man .................. Nez Perce county ...... 1)ec. Dec. 15, 1855............ Nez Pci-ce 37 days Jan. 1856 Valip-shee-li Head man Nez Perce county....... Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Perce ............. 37 days ..... Jan, 20, 1856 .......... leorge Head man .................. Nez Perce county Dec. 15, 185.5 Nez Pci-ce 37 days ...... Jan. 20, 1856 ......... [' u-ki-en-lik-it ............................... Head man ... Nez Perce county ...... Dec. 15,1855 .......... Nez Perce ............. 37 days ..... Jan. 20, 1856 .......... Fason Head man....................Nez county ...... Dec. 15,1855 .......... Ner Perce .............. 37 days..... Jan. 20, 1856............................. 2aptain John ............................... Head man ................... Nez Perce Perce county Dec. 15. 1855........... Nez Perce 37 days 20, 1856 c Head man.................. Nez Perce county ...... Dcc. 15, 1855............Nez Perce ............. 37 days ..... Jan. Jan. 20, 18.56 .......... C ue-ee-takus ................................ Head man Nez Perce county ...... 15,18M Nez Perce 37 days Jan. 20, 18.56 Vers-tas-kut Head man.................. Nez Perce county ...... Dec. 15, 1855............Nez Perce ...............37 days .......Jan. 20, 1856............................ Vah-wee-wasli-wattus................. Head man ................. Nez Perce county ...... Dec. Dec. 1855 Nez Perce 37 days Jan. 20, 1856 led Eagle .................................... Headman Nez Perce county ...... Dec. 1855............Nez Pepce ........... 37 days Jan. 20, 1856............................ r -ish-pells Head man ....................Nez Perce county Dec. 15, 1855 Nez Perce 37 days..... Jan. 20, 1856........................... (oung-ta-hut Head man ........ Nez Perce county ...... Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Peres ............. 37 days ..... 20, 1856.......................... cish4one Head man .................. Nez Perce county ...... Dec. 15,1855 .......... Nez Perce ............. 37 days..... Jan. Jan. 20, 1856 .......... ss-scoh-tum ................................ Head man................... Nez Perce county ..... Dec. 15,1855 .......... Nez Perce 37 days Jan. 20,1856 Vee-ass-kiis Head man .................. Nez Perce county ........ Dee. 15, 1855 .......... NezPerce............... 37 days..... Jan. 20,1856 .......... 'im-mish-coh-poo Head mail ................... Nez Perce county Dec. 15, 1855 Nez Perce 37 days ..... Jan. 20,1856 .......... 'eep-home-kun Head man Nez Perce county ...... 15,1855 .......... Nez Peres 37 days ..... Jan. 1856 .......... %'ill-lee-ap-miini-tuni Head mail .................. Nez Perce county ...... Dec. Dec. 15,1855 .......... Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 days.. Jan. 20, 1856............................. toop-toop-nin Head man ................. Nez Perce county ...... Dec. 15,18M Nez Pci-ce................ 37 days Jan. 20,1856 )uck............................................ Head man ....... Nez Perce county ...... Dec. 15, 1855 .......... Nez Perce ... 37 days ..... Jan. 1856 ----------

........ ........

15,

.. .... .. ....................... ................ ...................... ...................... ............. .. .................. ... ..............

...... ..11cc. . . .......... .. ... ... 15, . 15, .... ... ....... ...

............. ...........

.. .... .............. . .. .............. ............... . ................ ............... .............. .................. ................. ............. ............. ...........

............. ..

...........

............ ............ ............

.......... .. ............

r ,-,a. 'cr-re' M'c7 paRr'v TT-cfll A

XS-

. ..

. ..............

.................. ................... .................. .................. 20, ................... ................... ................... ............................. ................... ................... ............... ... ............... ... ............................ ...................... 20, ............................ ................... ................. ................... ............................. ................... ............................. ............................

. ........ . ......... . ......... ....... ....... . ...... ............................. .................. .................. .. 20, .................. ..... .............. ....... 20. ..........I.....................

eQNCLUDED.

Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

.. .......................... ..................... .........................

When discharged.

Residence.

Rank.

When.

Value of

Period.

Where.

20, 20, 20, . 20, ...........

days..... Jan. 1856........... Perce county ...... Dec. 15, 1855 .......... .Nez Perce ............... 37 Ack-sck-tow-hum ........................ Head man .................. Nez 1856........... Dec. 15, 18.55........... Nez Perce ............. 37 days ..... .Jan. Pci-cc county We-at.-say-kun-att ........................ Head man...................Nez 20, 1856........... Nez Perce county....... Dec. 15, 1855 .......... .Nez Perce ............. 37 days......Jan. Red Bird...................................... Head man ..... 1856 Jan. 37 days Nez Perce Dec. 15, 1855.......... Head man................... Nez Pci-ce county Talla-home-mish days...... Jan. 1856 .......... Peree county....... Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 Pe Ay-natt'sone-poo-un..................... Head man.... Jan. 20, 1856........... 37 days...... Nez Pci-ce.............. Dec. 15, 1855........... Head man................... Nez Pci-ce county....... Ay-mop-ti-un-ipputs 20, 1856........... Dcc. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 days...... Jan. Head man................... Nez Perce county Tee-pap-ee-lis-cut .......... . 1856 Jan. 20, 37 days...... Nez Pci-ce.............. 1855........... Dec. 15, Perce county Jesse ............................................. Head man................... Nez days...... Jan. 20, 1856 .......... . Pci-ce county....... Dcc. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-cc.............. 37 Moh-sec-chow............................... Head man................... Nez 1858........... Jan. 20, 37 days...... Nez Pci-ce.............. 5........... Dcc. 15, 1 85 county....... Silas .............................................. Head man................... Nez Pci-cecounty....... 20, 1856 .......... . .Dee. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce...............37 days..... .Jan. Seven-days-whipping ................... Head man................... Nez Perce days...... Jan. 20, 1856........... county....... Dcc. 15, 185'S........... Nez Pci-cc.............. 37 How-lish-loun............................... Head man ............... Nez Perce county....... 20, 1856 .......... . Dcc. 15, 185.5.......... Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 days..... .Nez Perce Boy ............................................... Head man................... 20, 1856........... ....... Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 days...... Jan. Him-in-u-pup ............................... Head man .................. Nez Pci-cc county 20 , 1856 .......... . .......Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce .............. 37 days ...... Jan. 20,1856 Lodge........................................... .Head man.................. .Nez Pci-ce county .......... Jan. co unty....... Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce............. . 37 days......Jan. Hat-tun-bi-un ................................ Head man....................Nez Perce 1856 .......... . 20, 15, 1855........... Nez Perce.............. 37 days...... Jan. 20, Hors-koot-u................................. Head man................... Nez Perce county....... Dec. 1856........... 37 days.. .... Nez Pci-ce.............. Dec. 15, 1855........... Peres county....... Ip-ni-hal-pun ................................. Head man................... Nez 1856........... Perce county...... . Dec. 151 1855.......... Nez Perce.............. 37 days...... Jan, 20, Noph-fer......... ............................. . Head man................... Nez 1836............ Jan. 20, 37 days...... .............. Nez Pci........... 1855 Pci-ce county....... Dec. 15, N-shag-ky-ik ......................... ..... . Head man................... Nez ce 37 days...... Jan. 20, 1856............ Nez Pci-ce county....... Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Perce.............. Broken Arm................................. Head man................... Nez -. 20, 1856............. Dec. IS, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 days...... Ja county Bears Claw ................................... Head man................... Nez Pci-ce days...... Jan. 20. 18.56....... ... . Perce county........Dec. 15, 1855............Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 Hump Back ...................................Head man......... ........ . Nez Pci-ce Jan. 20, 1856............... ... ... 37 days...... Nez Perce.............. 1855........... Dcc. 15, Koo-nancha .................................. Head man................... Nez Pci-cecounty........ .. days.......Jan. 20, 18.56.......... .................. county........Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce............ 37 The Old Sear............................... Head man....................Nez Pci-ce co 18.56........................... Jan. 20. 37 days...... .............. Nez Perce ........... 1855 unty........Dec. 15, Note-hose.......................................Head man.................. 1856........................... Jan. 2)), Dee. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 days...... Howlish-lah-ky-ee-tut................... Head man................... Nez Pci-ce county........Dec. 15,18M.......... Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 days...... Jan. 20, 18.56........................... Timothy ....................................... Head man ........ .......... Nez Perce county Jan. 20, 1856 .......... ................. 37 day,...... Nez Pci-ce.............. 1855 .......... . 15, ....... Dec. Perce county Nez man................... Ume-u-il-pilp................................. Head ....... ................ ..... Jan. 20, 1836.... Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-cc.............. 37 days...... All-wee-sec-mskum ........................ Head man................... Nez Pci-ce county....... 20, 1856........................... M-mec-ah...................................... Head man ................. .Nez Perce county...... . Dec. 15, 1855........... Nez Pci-ce.............. 37 days . Jan.

..............

.......

..............

......

.

own horses, arms and accoutrements, and were in all respects serviceably equipped. Besides NOTE. - Each of the above named volunteers furnished his which they brought with them men not armed, who served as a guard for all the animals, night and day. ISAAC I. STEVENS, Governor and Commander-in-Chief. (Signed)


MUSTER ROLL OF THE STAFF OF THE FIRST REGIMENT of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from

the 14thday of October, 1855, to the 11th day of February, 1856. Name.

Corps.

Rank.

When appointed.

Out of

S

service.

Remarks.

. . Commanding combined regular and volunteer force in Wash'gton Ter. Brigadier gen ....... October 14, 1855............ ... ..Continued ......................... See muster roll of general staff.

C. J. Rains, U. S. A .................. ..Bt. maj. 4th inf.... Brigadier gen ...... October 30, 1855................ Disbanded Jan. 31, 1856 James Tilton............................ Adjutant general.. E. C. Fitzhugli.......................... Aid to governor... H. R. Crosbie................ .......... ..tid to governor... B. Lander................................. .Aid to governor... W. Craig................................... Aid to governor... J. Doty..................................... .Aid to governor... B. F. Show............................... ..Aid to governor...

.

Lieutenant col....... October 14, 185,5................ ..Continued ........................ ..See muster roll of general staff'. Lieutenant cot....... October 14, 1855................ .Continued ......................... See muster roll of general staff. Lieutenant col November 13,1855............ Continued ........................ See muster roll of general staff. Lieutenant col........December 31,1855 ............ .Continued .................. ..... See muster roll of general stalL Lieutenant col....... December 2,18M.............. Continued ........................ See muster roll of general staff'. Lieutenant col....... December 31,1855........... ..Continued ........................ ..See muster roll of general staff. A. B. Stuart ............................... Commissary......... ...Captain ................. November 13, 1855............. Disbanded Jan. 30, 1856 Stationed at headquarters, Olympia. G. K. Willard ........................... ..Surgeon ..............................................November 1,1855............... Disbanded Jan. 31, 1856 Stationed at headquarters, Olympia. H. P. Burns ................................Surgeon October 1855 ................ Continued ........................ See muster roll general staff; attached to company B. M. Bigelow .......................... Surgeon November 13,1855 ............ Disbanded Jan. 31 ............ Attached to company D. Sam McCurdy ........................... Surgeon November 3,1855 .............. Disbanded Feb. 1856... Attached to company H. Tappan .......................... F. and M.. Captain ................ December 2, 1855 .............. Disbanded Jan. 20,18W Attached to Walla Walla battalion.

.

.

................................................ .. ................................................ . ................................... . Corn. . Q.

R.

W.

14,

..

. .

11,

. ..

of

I.

I certify, on honor, that this muster roll exhibits a true statement of the staff employed for the periods above mentioned, and that the remarks opposite the name of each officer are accurate and just. Office of Adjutant General Washington Territory Volunteers, JAMEs TILTON, Olympia, W. T., February 11, 1856. Adjutant General, Washington Territory Volunteer Forces.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN BENJAMIN L. HENNESS, Company C, of the second regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army

of the United States, from the 1st day of February, 1856, to the 31st day of March, 1856. Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Residence.

When.

Where.

1856 Olympia Feb. Benjamin L. Henness ................... Captain ................ Thurston county Olympia Feb. George C. Blankenship ................. 1st lieutenant ....... Olympia Olympia ......... Feb. Thurston county 2d lieutenant.......... Francis Goodwin Olympia Feb. 1st sergeant............Olympia David L. Phillips .Olympia Feb. 2d sergeant ........... Olympia Daniel C. Beaty ................ Olympia Andrew Laws ............................... 3d sergeant ........... Thurston county......... Feb. Olympia James T. Phillips .......................... 4th sergeant ......... Thurston county......... Feb. Olympia James Trairn..... ........................ 1st corporal .......... Thurston county......... Feb. Olympia 2d corporal ........... Thurston county......... Feb. Thomas B. Hicks Olympia Sylvanus A. Phillips ..................... 3d corporal ........... Thurston county......... Feb. Olympia Feb. Thurston county......... 4th corporal ......... Henry Johnston Olympia Feb. Olympia Private Anthony, Solomon P .Olympia Feb. Olympia Private Barnes, hell ... Olympia Thurston county......... Feb. Private Bites, George Olympia Cowlitz county .......... Feb. Bishop, Charles ............................. Private Feb. 2 ...... Olympia Olympia Private 56 Brown, Olympia Feb. Cowlitz county .......... Private Brezee, James Olympia Shoalwater Bay ......... Feb. Bullard, Seth ................................. Private Olympia Feb. Shoalwater Bay ......... Private Bullard, Mark .Olympia Thurston county......... Feb. Burnes, James ................................Private Olympia Feb. Shoalwater Bay ......... .Private -----Bush, Daniel Olympia Thurston county......... Feb. Private Bytes, David Olympia Feb. Thurston county......... Private Camnby, James Olympia Thurston county......... Feb. Cameron, Harvey J ....................... Private Olympia Feb. Cooper, Thomas ........................... Private ................. Thurston county......... Olympia Thurston county......... Feb. Private Croll, Jacol,.............. Olympia Feb. Olympia Cushman, Joseph .......................... Private Olympia Thurston county..........Feb. Dunlap, Samuel ............................ Private Olympia Feb. Olympia Ensign, Sherley ............................. Private Olymph Cowlitz county .......... Feb. Private Foster, Reuben Olympia Thurston county..........Feb. Guess, Wilson ............................... Private Olympia Thurston county......... Feb. Guthrie, Sanford ........................... Private Olympia Feb. Thurston county......... Hale, Henry J ............................... Private Olympia Thurston county..........Feb. Hays, Isaac ................................... Private I Olympia Thurston county..........Feb. Private Hills, Alfred Olympia Thurston county......... Feb. Hildreth, William ......................... Private Mar.12 ...... Olympia Thurston county........ Private Jeal, Herbert ................. Olympia Thurston county......... Feb. Klady, William E........................... Private Thurston county......... Mar.52 ...... Olympia Lennon, George ............................ Private .Olympia Olympia .................... Feb. Lyle, William ................................ . Private ........ .Mar.12 ...... .Olympia .Thurston county .Private Malmard, William ..

.. ....................... P. ............................ .............. . F. ............................. ............................ ..................... ... W .......................... ............................. Isaac V............................ .............................. W ............................ W ............................. F ............................... ................. .............. . ............ ............ . .. B ............................ ... ................................... ................ . .........................

.... .... .... .... .. .................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. .................. ................. ................ ................ ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ........ .................

........ 111 ...... ...... 1 1....... 11...... . 1 ...... 1....... 11....... ...... . 1 ...... . ..................... ..................... 1....... 1 ...... .......... ....................... 11....... ... 11 ...... ...... .. 1 ...... .. 1....... 11 ...... ........... 11 ..... ...... . 1 1 ........ ..................... 1........ 1 . ...................... 1 ...... ...... 11 ...... ...... ... ...... . 11....... ...... 1....... 1 ........ ......... 1 ......

......... ..................... ..................... .....................

Period.

Remarks.

6 months.. ..................... 6 months.. ..................... 6 months.. ..................... ..................... 6 months. ..................... 6 months.. On detailed service. 6 months.. ..................... 6 months.. On fatigue duty. ..................... ..................... 6 months.. 6 months.. ..................... ..................... 6 months.. On detailed duty. 6 months.. On detailed service. ..................... 6 months.. On detailed service. ..................... 6 months.. On detailed service. ..................... 6 months.. On detailed service. ..................... On detailed service. .................... 666 months.. months.. On detailed service; horse furnished .................... [by S. Ensign. months.. ..................... ..................... C6 mouths.. months.. On detailed service ..................... ...................... months.. ...................... months.. months.. On detailed service. ...................... months.. On detailed service. ...................... ...................... months.. On detailed service; returned his [cartridge box June 10. ...................... months.. ...................... months., months., On furlough. ...................... ...................... months., months., ...................... months.. On detailed service. ...................... months.. On detailed service. ...................... months.. ...................... months.. On detailed service. ...................... months., ...................... months., ...................... 6 ..................... months.. 6 months., ..................... 6 months.. ..................... 6 months. .................... ..................... months.. ..................... 66 months..


MUSTER

ROLL

OF CAPTAIN BENJAMIN L. HENNESSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;CONCLUDED. Enlisted.

Names, present and absent.

.. .. V . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. C . . . . . . . ..

............................ ............................... ............................... ...................................... ............................ ........... ............ ................... ..............................

Mills, Nathaniel Mills, William Mize, William Ott, Jacob Platter, Oliver P Plumb, William W Roundtree, Andrew J Scott, James D Smith, James ................................ Stark, James Thallhimer, Nathaniel G Wallace, Milton B ................... Westgate, Thomas H ........... Whitaker, Lemuel White, William N .........................

Rank.

.. .1.. . . . . . . . . . 111... .. .. . . . . . . .. 1.. . . When.

................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. .................

Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private ................ Private Private Private Private Private

.. .. .. ............. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .

Private

Remarks.

Residence.

.......... ......... .......... .......... ......... ......... ............. .........

Thurston county Thursten county Thurston county Thurston county Thurston county Thurston county Lewis county Thurston county Thurston county........ Lewis county Thurston county......... Thurston county......... Cowlitz county........... Lewis county

...... ....... ....... ...... ....... ...... .......

Feb. 1 Feb. 1 Feb. 1 Mar.12 Mar.12 Feb. 1 Feb. 1 Feb. 1....... Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Thurston county ........ Feb.

Period.

Where.

..................... ..................... ....................... ....................... ...................... ...................... ......................

Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia Olympia ................... Olympia Olympia

6 months.. months.. months.. mouths.. months.. months.. months.. 6 months.. months.. months.. months.. months.. muontlis.. months..

Wounded on March 14 at crossing of [White river. On fatigue duty. On detailed service.

.. .. ......... .. .. .. ... . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ...... .. ........... 6 {

On detailed service. On furlough.

months..

m

N

10.

[cartridge box June On detailed service; returned his mander-in-chief, dated Mar. 7, '56.

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MUSTER ROLL OF COMPANY B, of Puget Sound Mounted Volunteers, called into service by proclamation of Acting Governor C H. Mason, for hostilities against the Indians east of the Cascade mountains. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

55

Enlisted.

Residence.

When,

Where

Period.

When discharged

Gilmore Rays ..................................... .Capteiti................................................ Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ......................3 months or during the war............................ Jared S. Hurd....................................... 1st lieutenant....... Willi am Martin................................... 2d lieutenant ........ .................................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... 3 months or during the war ... .................................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... 3 months or during the war ......................... Josep Gibson ......................................1st sergeant ............................ ....................................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... Henryh D. Cock.......................... ... ....... 2d sergeant ........... 3 months or during the war............................ ..... ............................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... "months rhomas Prather.....................................3d sergeant............................................ or during the war ... .......... ............... Joseph A. White ............ .....................4th sergeant ......................................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ...................... months or during time war........................... Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... 3 months or during the war........................... James S. Taylor .................................. ..ist corporal.......... ...............................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ...................... Whitfield Kirtley ................................ 2d corporal ......................................... 3 mouths or during the war........................ Oct. 14, 18u5 Olympia ....................... D. T. Wheelock.................................... 3d months or during the war.......................... ............................................Oct. 14, 1855 John Scott......................................... 4thcorporal Olympia ....... ...............months or during the war............................ corporal.......................................... Oct. 14, 185.5 Ll eorge Robert Bright ........................... Olympia ...................... 3 months or during the war............................ .Private Joseph Miles........................................ private .................................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ..................... or during the war............................ Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ......................33 months gustis Huger.......................... ...............Private .................................................. months or during the war........................ Joseph T. Bush ................................... ..Private ...............................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ..................... 3 months or during the war............................ ................................................. Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ...................... months or during Harvey J. Cameron ...............................Private the war............................ Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia .......................months or during the war............................ aron B. Gleason..................................Private ................................................ ......................................... Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ...................... months or during the war............................ Richa rd D. Herrington ..........................Private Henry M. Harsel ................................. Private ................................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ....................... or during the war.......................... William Krise .....................................Private .................................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia .......................months months or during the war............................ William Billings...................................Pri'ate ................................................Oct. 14, M55..... Olympia ...................... months or during the war........................... ................................................ Oct. 14, 185.5 Olympia .......................months or. during the war........................... tlorris Jones ..........................................Private 14, 1855 Olympia ....................... Fames Irwin Lodge ............................. Private .............................................. or during the war........................... ...............................................Oct. Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia .......................months lilford Offutt....................................... Private ................................................ months or during the war......................... Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia .......................months William P. Campbell.......................... . Private or the war........................... ................................................. Oct. 14, 1855 lollin TI. Wood....................................Private Olympia ..................... 3 months or during during the war........................... 'rank lin Faucett.......................... .......Private .................................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ......................3 months or during the war........................... ........................................... Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ..................... 3 months or during the war............................ iarzi lla D. Wright................................Private oseph Day.......................................... Private ................................................Oct. 14,1855..... Olympia .................... ..3 months or during the war ... lfred Hagarty..................................... Private .................................................Oct. 14, 18.55 Olympia ..................... 3 months or (luring the war... ......................... ......................... 'homas B. Hicks ................................. Private ...............................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ..................... months or during the war.......................... .................................................. ames R. Wood .....................................Private .................................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia .......................33 months or during the war.......................... Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ........... ...........3 months or teobe n Crowder...................................Private the war ............................ ..................................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ....................... months or during rernen Davis........................................Private ................................................ during the war........................... amuel Scott.........................................Private ..................................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia .....................33 months or during the war............................ Oct. 14, 185.5 Olympia ...................... 3 months or during time L. J. Frost............................................. private war.......................... oseph Tebo........................................ Private ........................................................... ............................................... Oct. 14, 1855 lenry M. Hills ........................... Olympia ...................... 3 .......... months or during the war Private .......................... ................................................Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ...................... 3 months or during time war............................ 'rancis T. Goodwin............................ Private ................................................ Oct. 14, 1855...' ames D. Scott ..................................... private ..................... 3 months or during the war............................ 'olumbus White .................................. Private ............................................... Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ......................3 or during the var.......................... oseph Bramnon................................... Private ................................................ Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ...................... months months or during the war............................ )avid Martin....................................... Private ................................................ Oct. 14, 1855 Olylmmpia ..................... 3 months or during the war............................ ................................................ Oct. 14, 1855 Olympia ..................... 3 months or dorino. fl

MUSTER ROLL OF COMPANY B, OF PUGET SOUND MOUNTED VOLUNTEERS-CONCLUDED. Enlisted. Names, present and absent

Rank.

Residence

Period.

When.

When discharged.

.....................3 months or during the var.... Private .................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia .....................3 months or during the war.... Private .................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia Olympia .....................3 months or during the war.... 1855.... Oct. 14, Private ................. B months or during the war.... Olympia Private .................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... .....................3 months or during the war.... 14,18M.Oct. Private ................. 3 months or during the war.... Olympia ..................... Oct. 14, 1855.... Private .....................3 months or duri ng the war.... Private .................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... te 3 months or during the war.... .................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia Priva .....................3 months or during the war.... ri te Private .................Oct. 14, 18.55.... Olympia 3 months or during the war.... .................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... P va .....................3 months or during the war.... Private .................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia 3 ..................... months or during the war.... Private .................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia .....................3 months or during the war.... Private .................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia during the war.... 14, 1855.... Olympia .....................3 months or Thomas Hughes.................................. Private .................Oct. Olympia .....................3 months or duri ng the war.... Oct. 14, 1855.... JamesH. Goudy................................. Private .................. 3 months or during the war.... 14, 1855.... Olympia .....................3 months or duri ng the war.... A. J. Simmons..................................... Private ..................Oct. ..................... ..................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia Henry Gallagher................................. Private 3 months or during the var.... Olympia ..................... te ..................Oct. 14, 1855.... S. P. Anthony...................................... Priva ......................months or during the war.... ..................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ri months or during the war.... Clark Drew......................................... Private Olympia ...................... P vate ..................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ......................months or during time war.... Lewis La Clare.................................... Oct. 14, 1855.... Alfred Hill s 5....................................... Private ..................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ......................months or during the war.... .................. Nebuzaradan Coffy............................. Private ......................mnommtims or during time war.... ..................Oct. 14, 4855.... Olympia Edward Gilison................................... Private ..................... 3 months or during time war.... Private ..................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ................... JohnT. Stewart.................................. 3 months or during the war.... Olympia. : Oct. 14, 1855.... .................. months or during the war.... Mclancthon Z. Goodell....................... Private 14, 1885.... Olympia ................... 3 Thomas Cooper.................................. Private ..................Oct. 3 months or during time war.... Olympia ...................... Oct. 14, 1855.... William Littlejohn.............................. Private ..................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... 3 months or during the war.... MosesR. Tilly..................................... Private ................ .. 1855.... Olympia ................... 3 months or during the war.... M. P. Burnes....................................... Surgeon ..................Oct. 14, Olympia .................... 3 months or during the war.... William S. Northcraft......................... Private .....................Oct. 14, 1855.... 1855.... Olympia ..................... 3 months or during the war..... LeviH. Gates...................................... Private .....................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... 3 months or during time war..... 14, William Butler.................................... Private .....................Oct. .................... 3 months or during time war..... ......................Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia months or during time war..... R. A. Finnell....................................... Private Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia .................... 3 ................................... Private Francis M. Dodge............................... Olympia .................... 3 months or during time war....... 14,1855 .... William H. Cooper............................. Private .................................... Oct. 3 months or, during the war.......... Olympia ..................... William Holmes................................. Private ........................................... Oct. 14, 1855.... 3 months or during the war.................. Noah Kritzer....................................... Private..................................................... ............................................ Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... 3 months or duri ng the war..................... Henry Bound...................................... Private Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia .................... JohnC. Axtell..................................... Private ................................................ Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia ..................... 3 months or during the war............................ Thomas J. Perkins.............................. Private ................................................ Oct. 14, 1855.... Olympia .................... 3 months or during time war............................ 3 months or during the war............................ James Wilson..................................... Private ................................................ 14, 1855.... Olympia .................... 3 months or during time war............................ Hector Horton................................... Private ................................................ Oct. Olympia .................... Henry C. Finch................................... Private ................................................ Oct. 14, 1855....

PaulAngery ............................. .......... B. F. Ruth........................................... VanOgle............................................. J. L. Myers.......................................... John W. Woodward............................ JohnUwiunep.................................... W. W. Davis........................................ D. M. Mounts...................................... F. M. Rhodes...................................... Charles Miller..................................... Matthew T. Chambers........................ A. W. Sargeant.................................... Antonio B. Rabbeson..........................

* Not mustered.

October 20, 1855.

GiL1W0RE HAYS, Captain.

55 55


.. . .. .. . . .. . . . .. . . . .. .

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN DAVID E. BURNTRAGER, Company B, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the thirty-first day of May, 186, to the twenty-third day of July. 181111 Nani e.s, present and

Enlisted.

Rank.

Residence,

When.

Where.

Period,

Value

?f°

Remarks

drawn.

1856. 1856. Gilmore Hays .................Captain ....... Olympia............. Jan.23 ...... Olympia ............ ..6 months ...................... Elected major February 18. Resigned Antonio B. Babbison April 1, 1856. Captain........Olympia ............ Jan. 23 ........Olympia ..............6 months ............. David E. Burntrager ...... ..Captain....... Olympia .............Jan. 23 $45 00 Resigned May 22, 1856. Van Ogle ........................ ..1st lieut ....... Olympia ............ . Jan. 23....... Olympia ............. 6 months.. July 23 31 00 captain May 23,1856. Four rifles. Olympia ............ 6 months ... .................. ..12 00 Elected John Brady .....................lstlieut....... ..Olympia: ........... ..Jan.23 ...... ..Olympia............. Resigned April 1, 1856. months ...............5300 Elected William Marten ...............2d lieut..........Olympia ............. Jan. 23....... Olympia ............ 6 April 1, 1856. 6 months ............... William K. Temple ....... ..26 lient..........Olympia ......... .... Jan. 23........Olympia ............ 4 00 Resigned April 1, 1856. ...............68 77 Elected Benjamin F. Ruth ...........Adjutant April 1, 1856. I rifle. Olympia ......... .... J an. 23....... Olympia .............66months months .........6th 50 Appointed adjutant ofCharge Cent, battalion Andrew J. Moses ............Sergt. maj... Olympia ............ ...Jan. 23 ...... Olympia ............ 6 months.. February 19. May 3 Freeman Hack ................1st sergt ........Olympia ................Jan. 23........Olympia ............ ..6 months ............ 3051 109 75 Elected February 19. Melancthon Z. Goodell 2d sergt........ Hen ry M. Hills ...............2d sergt ....... ..Olympia..............Jan.23 ...... ..Olympia ............ ..6 months ..............7 00 Transferred April 1, 1856, to company C. ..............Jan. 23 ...... ..Olympia............. 6 months..............60 00 Elected April 1, 1856. David Martin ..................3d sergt.........Olympia â&#x20AC;˘Jan. 23........Olympia ............ ..6 months ..............4 00 Transferred April 1, 1856. Richard F. Morgan......... 3d sergt........ Olympia ............. ............ Jan. 23 ...... ..Olympia............ ..6 months.. June 3 45 00 Elected April 1, 1856. James R. Wood...............Com.sergt Olympia Olympia ............ Jan. 23 ...... Olyilipia............. 6 months ...............81 75 Appointed commissary sergeant May 10, Joseph Brannon ............ 4th sergt ...... ..Olympia ............ Jan. 23 ...... Olympia ............ 1856. Stop I U. S. rifle. months ...............4 00 Transferred Marion Dodge ................ 4th sergt...... Olympia ............ Jan. 23 ...... Olympia ............ 6 April 1, to company C. months.. June 3 63 00 Elected April 1. Nebuzaradan Coffee ....... 1st corpl........Olympia ..............Jan. 23........Olympia ..............66 months ......................22 00 Coffee turned his rifle over to Captain B. Miller in Walla Walla and took his receipt. One for blankets lost in taking Jacob L. Myers ...............2d corp) ........Olympia..............Jan.23........Olympia..............6 months .......................... express to Colonel Wright's camp. John C. Axtell ............. ..3d eorpl ...... ..Olympia ..............Jan.23........Olympia............. 87 ...........................737 00 Mathew T. Chambers,., Transferred April 1, 1856. corpl ...... ............ ..Jan. 23 ...... ..Olympia ............ 66 months months ........................ Charles Miller................. 3d 124 25 4th corpl........Olympia April 1, 1856. Charge 1 rifle. Olympia ............ .. Jan. 2.3....... Olympia.............. months ........................174 88 Elected Rector Horton ......... ........Private ........ Olympia............. Jan.23 Elected April 1, 1856. ........Olympia ............ months ..............................Transferred tienry Horsel ................ ..Private .........Olympia ............. Jan. 23,,, March 18, to company F. iarnuel Scott.................. ..Private .........Olympia ........ ..... Jan. 23 ........Olympia................ months ......................96-00 Olympia ............ ..6 months ... .................... 4 00 William H. Cooper ..........Private .........Olympia ............ Jan. 23...... ..Olympia Transferred to company C April 1. 6 months ... .................... 100 45 James Wilson ................ Private .........Olympia.....,...,, Jan. 23 ...... ..Olympia ............. ..............6 months ............... ........ 96 83 Levi Prince .................... Private ........ Olympia ............ Jan. 23,.,,, Olympia............. 6 months .......................119 80 Jonathan D. Prince ....... ..Private ...... ..Olympia ............ Jan. 23 ...... Olympia .........6 months ......................76 25 Joseph Al. Little ..............Private ....... ..Olympia ............ Jan. 23.,,, Olympia ..... ............. 6 months......................39 Jeorge C. Bracken ......... Private ........ Olympia ............ . Jan. 23....... Olympia ............ 00 Deserted April 3, 1856. One rifle, $50. .William N. Yantis ......... Private ....... Olympia............. Jan. 23 ...... Olympia............. 6 months ...................... 136 75 saao N. Chapman .......... Private ....... . Olympia ...... ....... Jan. 23 ...... Olympia............. 6 months...................... 152 40 6 months...................... 80 30

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN DAVID E. BURNTRAGER_CoNCLUD Enlisted.

Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Residence.

................._-_-

When.

Where.

Period,

Value Remarks. drawn.

1856. 1856. Olympia................... 6 months ..... $71 25 April 1,1856, to company C. pia ..........Jan. 23.. )lym .7 00 Transferred 6 months JohnP. Hays ................. Private Olympia................... 23.. Jan. )lympia.......... 6280 StoplU. S. rifle. Thomas I. Axtell............ Private ....... )lympia..........Jan. 23.. Olympia................... 6months....... 170 75 6 months ...... Henry Anderson ............ Jan, 23.. Olympia................... 217 00 Stop 1 U. S. rifle. James McFadden .......... Private ....... )lympia.......... ...... 6 months......10530 Jan. 23.. Olympia............. ....... )lympia.......... ...... 6 months .......... Corodan F. Porter .......... Private Olympia......... 23.. Jan. )lympia.......... .51 39 ....... )lympia .......... Jan. 23.. Olympia ................... 6 months Joseph Snider ................ Private ....... )lympia 6 months.......9146 Transferred April 1, 1856, to company C. Josiah Ward .................. Private Olympia................... 23.. Jan. ....... )lympia.......... Jan. 23.. Olympia................... 6 months......... Albert Schmidt .............. Private ....... 6 months ...12425 George R. Buchanan ...... Private Jan. 23.. Olympia................... months.. ........'" 11595 Freeman Brown ............. Private ....... Olympia.......... 23.. Olympia................... 6 1 U. S. rifle, Jan. Olympia.......... 75 00 Stop Private John Moore ................... Private ....... Olympia.......... Jan. 23.. Olympia................... 66 months .. 71 00 stop 1 fine Kentucky rifle, $40. James H. Roundtree....... Private ...... Olympia.......... Jan. 23. Olympia................... 1 20 menths...... 114 Nicolas Code .................. Private ::-- Olympia.......... Jan. 23.. Olympia................... 6 75 16 Stop 1 U.S. rifle. Franklin Van Wormer Private ....... Olympia.......... Mar. 14.. Olympia................... 6 months........... 39 50 .............. 6 months John Herald ................... Olympia................... Mar. 14.. Olympia.......... 75 ....... Montesello ...... Mar. 14.. CampMontgomery.. 6 months.................... 37 John D. Eaton ................ Private 30 59 ....... Lewis River June 20.. CampMontgomery.. 6 months.................... Zeba S. Miller ................ Private 65 25 Private ....... Vancouver...... June 20.. ampMontgomerY.. 6 months...................... William Miller ................Private ...... Robert Nerton ................

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36

REPORT OF ADJUTANT GENERAL

SCHEDULE B.

37 ri

0 Recapitutojj

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(For duty ............. Present...... On extra or daily........................................1 1 1 2 ..........25 3 .............. duty ......................................... I Sick .............................................................. Absent

I On detached service ...... ...................................1 ............1 .............. With leave or On furlough................................. Without leave.................................................... Sick.................................................................. Discharged by order......................................2 ............

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.................52 ....... Muster roll of Captain D. B. Burntrager, company B of the second regiment of Washington Territory volunteers, army of the United States, from the thirty-first day of May, 1856, to the twenty-third day of July, 1856. I certify, on honor, that this muster roll is made out in the manner required by the Printed notes; that it exhibits the true state of Captain David B. Burntrager's company (B) of the second regiment, Washington Territory volunteers, for the period herein mentioned; that remarks set Opposite the name of each officer and soldier are accurate and just, and that the 'recapitulatio', exhibits, in every and articles of war.particular, the true state of the company, as required by the regulations, rules, C. W. SWINDAL, Inspecting and Mustering Officer.

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MUSTER ROLL OF COMPANY B, SECOND REGIMENT Names, present and absent.

Rank.

CONCLUDED.

co

50

Enlisted.

Residence.

Remarks. When, Where. Period, H. P. Burns...................................................................................... John P. Hays ................................... 23 .............Olympia.. .... Thomas .J. Axtell............................ Private .......................................................Jan. 23 ............ Olympia ................... 6 months......... Appointed surgeon. John Brady.....................................Private .......................................................Jan. ..6 months...... Jan. 23 Private ............ Olympia ...................... Henry Anderson ............................ ...................................................... James McFadden........................... Private ........................................................Jan. 23 .............Olympia ......................6 months........ months........ Jan. 23 ........... Private C. F. Porter ..................................... .......................................................Jan. 23.............Olympia ......................66 months ........ Private ...................................................... Edward Brady Olympia ......................6 months........ ............................... Jan. 23 Private ............ Lemuel c. Whitacre ...................... ........................................................Jan. 23 ........... Olympia ......................6 months....... Private ...................................................... Joseph Snyder Olympia Jan. 23.............Olympia 6 months......... Not mustered. Private Josiah Ward 6 months Jan 23 Private Olympia AlbertSmith.................................. Jan. 6 months........ Private 23............. George R. Buck hannon.................. Olympia 6 months Jan 23 Private Freeman Brown Olympia Jan. 6 months........ Private 23............. John Moors Olympia Jan. 23 6 months........ .Private James Olympia Uoundtree...................... Private lati. 23 6 months........ Nicholas Code Olympia Jan. 23 6 months........ Private John Olympia Woodard 6 months Jan. 23 .Olympia Franklin all Wormer ................... Private Jan. 23 6 months....... 3* Private Olympia 6 months......... Not mustered Jan. 23 Olympia................ ..... .6 months........

................................ .................................. ............................ TI. ................................... W. ................................ ...... ..................

....................................................... ......................... .............................. ....................................................... ....................................................... ....................................................... ....................................................... ...................................................... ...................................................... ...................................................... ......................................................

............. ............. ............ ............ ............ ............ ............

..................... ..................... ..................... ...................... ...................... ...................... ..................... ..................... ..................... ..................... .....................

........ ........

......

GILMORE HAYS, Captain.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN EDWARD LANDER, Company A, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of

the United States, from the 31st day of March, 1856, to the31st day of May, 1856.

Names, present and

Rank.

Residence.

Enlisted.

-

When discharged.

When. 1856.

Where.

Period,

Value

of arms.

Value

clo' received.

Remarks.

6 mos......Resignationrec'd ... ......... May 9................ $8 25 Rifle, $40; pistol, $35 6 mos......July 29 .................. Seattle..... Feb. 16...... 1st lieut.... Seattle ............... Lieut. Neeley or A. Denny....... ............... A. Jan. 29..... Seattle ......6 mos ........ 2d lieut......King county ...... dered to assume D. A. Neeley ...................... command on the 24th of June. 6 00 ... Time appears on 6 mos...... Seattle Henry A. Smith .................Surgeon ... King county ..... Jan. 29 the staff roll...... 6 mos......Rifle, $25.........................12 00 Seattle 29...... Jan. . King county ..... 1st sergt.... . John Henning .................. pistol, $35.......................11 50 . 6 Seattle mnos ..... Jan. 20 ............ Feb. 5...... Seattle 6 mos ......... 2 50 Boren ........................2d sergt......Seattle ............. C.JohnD. Ross ..........................3d sergt.... Seattle:: 5 75 .... Seattle 6 mos ..... 29...... Jan. Jacob WjbinS..................... 4th sergt... Seattle ............... 31 50 .... 6mos ..... 29...... Seattle James Fieldin.................... lstcorp'l... Seattle ............... Jan. 50 U ....................... Pistol, $25 . Seattle ...... 6 mos ..... 20...... Jan. Walter Graham .................. 2d corp'l... Seattle ................ 00 9 Jan. 29...... Seattle......6 mos..... .... 31 75 David Maurer. .................. 3d corp'l... Seattle ............... .... 6 mos ..... Seattle 29...... Jan. Asa Fowler ........................ 4th corp'l.. Seattle ............... 6 mos.........Absent wlthou leave. Barrier, Eugene ......... ....... Private.... Seattle .............. Jan. 29...... Seattle 6 mos.........29 00 .... King county.. Jan' 29...... Seattle 18 75 Beatty, R. H ..................... .Private ......... mos S Seattle ......... Feb Private .... King county...... Beehtelheimer, Samuel 6 inns......... 29...... Seattle 1158 505050 Bowker, Gerge ................ Private.... Seattle ............... Jan. 6 mos ......... King county...... Jan. 29...... Seattle Brown, W.011.................. Private.... 6 mos......... Seattle Brown, Solomon................ Private . Seattle ............... Feb. 29...... 11 50 6 mos......... Seattle ............... Jan. 29...... Seattle Broad, James ........ ............ Private.... 6 mOs.........8 00 Seattle ...... Feb. 21 ............... .... Seattle Private Burlingame, I. B............... 6 mos........... Seattle 16...... Private .... Seattle ............... Feb. 21 25 Clark, E. A ........................ Private. 6 mos..........Rifle, $50; pistol, $40 .............. Feb. 16...... Seattle .. Seattle Gjlliam, Wm. H................. Private.... Seattle..... 6 mos................... King county...... Jan. 29 Hanford, E. S..................... 6 mos..................... Feb. 21 Seattle...... It Honey, John...................... Private .... King 6 mos.........................6 00 Seattle Hicks, Robert.................... Private.... King county......20...... 6 mos......................................... Seattle 29...... Jan. King county..... . ... Private Hograve, August............... 6 mos..................................................... Seattle Jan, 29...... Holgate, Lemucl................ Private .... King county..... . Mar. 14...... Seattle .6 mos............................................................... .... Hooper, Benjamin............. Private.... Seattle ............... Jan. 29...... Seattle 6 mos...................................................................... 12 50 Private .... King county...... 6 mos......................................................................... 18 75 Johns, B. L........................ King county..... Jan. 29...... Seattle .... 6 mos.......................................................................... 12 00 Johns, W. F ..................... ..Private ...... .Jan. 29 .... King county...... 50 Johns, B. W ...................... Private 6 mos........................................................................... county ...... Jan. 29...... Seattle 1092 00 Lake, Joseph ..................... Private .... King Seattle 6 mos ......................................................................... .3 Peter ............ Private... King county..... .Jan. 29...... 50 ..................................... Landreville, I .................... -.Pivnt ..... Kine county...... Jan. 29...... Seattle 6 mos ................

Edward Lander.................Captain


MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN EDWARD LANDERâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;CONCLUDED. Value

Enlisted. Names, r5rt and

Rank.

Value of arms.

When discharged.

Residence.

When.

Where.

Remarks.

clothing received.

Period,

.. ......... ... .......................... .. .......... ................... ....................... .. ................................ 00 mos....................................... ..................... ..................................11 mos............................. ................................... 11 ....................................... ....... ..... ........................ ....... 00 ............................................................... .............. ............................ ..................................... ................. ..................................... ....... .. Resigned. Edward Lander .................Captain ............................................................................... 49 87 Deserted April 2d. 6 coos.................................................................. Walters, Thomas............... Private.... King county...... Feb. 23..... Seattle 21 00 April 19 ...................................................... 6 Seattle Thomas, John M............... Private .... King county...... Jan. 29 . ... . . . ................. W.S.PW...................... C.GC.................. W. W ........................ .

Mapel, E. B....................... .Private Maple, S. A....................... Private MeDonell, Michael............. Private McNatt, Francis................ Private Morrison, James............... Private Moss, I. John.................... Private Phillips, John................... Private Russell, Alonzo................. Private Russell. Private Smith, Private Stanley, David .................. Private Terry, Alfred ..Private Thompson, .Private Van Asselt, Henry ............ Private Ward, Private Williams, Henry ............... Private Woodbridge, William ....... Private

1856. Rifle, $50........................... $8 75 King county..... Jan. 29.......Seattle .......6 mos..... Rifle, $50............................6 00 Seattle .......6 MOB....... ..Jan. 29 King county....... 14 50 S mos ....... Jan. 29 Seattle ..... King county..... 1000 Rifle, $30; pistol, $35 6 mos..... Seattle King county..... ..Jan. 29 10 00 ............................ ... Rifle, $25 ....... Seattle 29 ....... 6 MOB ..... King county..... ..Jan. Pistol, $30..........................18 00 Seattle ................ Jan. 29..... Seattle .......6 MOB..... 7 75 Seattle 6 MOB..... Seattle ................ Jan. 29 19 Seattle 6 MOB..... King county..... Jan. 8 75 6 MOB ..... Seattle Jan. 29 King county ..... 6 Seattle Jan. 29 Seattle 50 6 MOB ..... 29..... Seattle King county ..... Ian. Pistol, $35................................... 6 Seattle Seattle 50 6 MOB ..... Seattle 29..... King county ..... Jan. 6 50 Rifle, $50; pistol, $35 Seattle 6 mos ..... King county ..... Jan. 29 32 ..S MOB ..... Seattle..... 25....... Feb. Olympia 17 50 6 MOB ..... Seattle Feb. 27 Seattle 5 75 Seattle 6 MOB ............................. King county ..... Jan. -99 '22q

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MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN HAMILTON J. U. MAXON, Company A, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 13th day of February, 1856, to the 27th day of April, 1856. Names, present and absent.

Rank..

Enlisted.

Rejidence.

.j

Where Period.

Remarks.

H. J. G. Maxon ................ Captain............... Ervin T. Taylor................ 1st lieutenant...... Washington Territory.... Feb. 13.......Vancouver..... months.. Furnished horse and equipages. William S. Benington...... 1st lieutenant...... â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ Washington Territory.... Feb. 13.......Vancouver..... 66 months.. Silas B. Curtis................... 2d lieutenant....... Washington Territory.... Feb. Feb 13.......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Furnished horse and equipages (gun, Q. M's). . 13.......Vancouver..... 6 months.. William Gee..................... ist sergeant........ Washington Territory..... Ambrose S. Cunimings..... 2d sergeant.......... Washington Territory.... Feb. 13.......Vancouver ..... 6 months.. Furnished horse, equipages and gun. William Lakin................. 3d sergeant........... Washington Territory.... Feb. 13.......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Furnished horse, gun and equipages. Alexander McAndrew....... 4th sergeant......... Washington Territory.... Feb. 13 Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Walter McKenzie.............. 1st corporal.......... Washington Territory.... Feb. 13.......Vancouver.... 6 months.. Furnished horse, equipages and Q. M's gun. Furnished horse, gun, equipages, etc. Miechell Merelieno .......... 2d corporal........... Washington Territory.... Feb. 13 Vancouver... 6 months.. Quartermaster's Washington Territory.... Feb. 13 horse, equipages, gun, etc. James Frisby.................... Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's corporal........... Washington Territory.... Feb. 13 Joseph Stanely ........... .. ...... 3d gun and equipages. Vancouver..... months.. Furnished horse,horse, 4th corporal......... gun and equipages. Stephen McDonald............ Musician.............. Washington Territory.... Feb. 13.......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Furnished horse, gun and equipages. Andrews, Chester.............. Private ................ Washington Territory.... Feb. 13.......Vancouver..... 66 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Allen, Benjamin................ Private ............... Washington Territory.... Feb. 13........Vancouver..... Furnished gun, Q. M.'s horse and equipages, Aussure, Antoine .............. Private ................ Washington Territory.... Feb. 13...... Vancouver ..... 66 months.. months.. Anderson, J. S................... Private ................ 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Augar, Pall........................ Private ............... months.. Deserted. BUrgy, John ...................... Private ................ Washington Territory.... Mar. 28.......Steilacoom..... 66 months.. Bates, Tyler...................... Private ................ Washington Territory.... Feb. 13.......Vancouver ... 6 months.. Furnished horse, saddle, gun and equipages. Buston, John..................... Private ................ Washington Territory.... Feb. 13...... Vancouver....... months.. Q. M.'s horse and equipages; furnished gun. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Burns, Adam..................... Private ................ Washington Territory.... Feb. 13...... Vancouver ..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Burns, George ................... Private ................ Washington Territory.... Feb. 13..... Vancouver..... 6 6 months.. Washington Territory.... Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Feb. 13....... Brezee, Ehnen D................ ................ Washington Territory.... Feb. 13.......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Brezee Francis M ............. Private Monticello...... & months.. Private ................ Washington Territory.... Furnished gun, Q. M. 's horse and equipages. Feb. Burk, James A................... Private ................ 13.......Monticello..... months.. Furnished horse, gun and equipages. Burk, John........................ Private ............... Washington Territory.... Feb. 13..... Vancouver..... 66 months.. Bynan, Davies................... Private ................ Washington Territory.... Feb. 13...... Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Butler, William................. Private ................ Washington Territory.... Mar. 12 ........ 6 months.. Quartermaster's Washington Territory.... Mar. 12..... Olympia horse, gun and equipages. Bartlet, James.................... Private .....---Olympia ........ 6 months.. Furnished Washington Territory.... horse and equipages (Q. M.'s gun). Feb. Barton, Jonathan.............. Private... 13....... Vancouver ..... ............. 6 months.. Oregon Territory............. Quartermaster's horse, Mar. 12 Bell, Charles..................... Private................ Oregon Territory............. Olympia ........ months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Mar. 28..... Olympia ........ 6 Campbell, William........... Private.. * ... ** gun and equipages. 6 months.. Furnished horse, gun and Oregon Territory............. equipages. Mar. 28...... Coffie, Alex. L.................... Thurston Co... 6 months.. Quartermaster's ................ Oregon Territory............. Feb. horse, gun and equipages. Como, Thomas................... Private 13....... Vancouver ... .. Private ................ 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, Oregon Territory............. ft Feb. Deenia, William T........... Private ................ 13.......Vancouver..... months.. gun and equipages. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Dick, ilitchard................... Private ............... Oregon Territory............. Mar. 12,.... Olympia ........ S6 months.. Oregon Territory............. Feb. 13...... Vancouver..... Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Davis, George G................ Private ................ Oregon Territory............. Mar. 7...... Dallas ............ 5 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages, Doag, Phenis..................... Private ................ months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Washington Territory.... Feb. 13....... Dupary, Joseph................. Private................ 3 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Washington Territory..... Feb. 13.......Vancouver..... Duston, Charles................. Private ................ Oregon Vancouver..... i months.. Quartermaster's Territory............. Feb. 13...... Vancouver..... gun and equipages. Dean, George .................... Private ............... i months.. Furnished horse,horse, Territory.. Apr. 2.......Steilacoom..... months.. gun and equipages. Deshaw, John.................... Private ................ Washington M's Washington Territory... horse Q. . .. Apr. and equipages; furnished gun. Edwards, George .............. Private ................ 2.......teilacoorn..... months.. Furnished horse, gun and Washington Territory.... Apr. 2...... Steilacoom ......6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gunequipages. and equipages.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN HAMILTON J. G. Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

I

Residence.

When. I

Where.

Remarks.

I Period. 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages.

13......Vancouver..... Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Private .................Washington Territory..... Feb. 13......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Furnished horse, gun and equipages. Private .................Washington Territory..... Feb. Apr. 4......Steilaeoom..... 6months.. Quarterniaster's horse, gun and equipages. Private .................Washington Territory..... Feb Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Private .................Washington Territory.... Feb.. 13...... Vancouver..... 6months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Private ................Washington Territory.... Feb. 13...... Vancouver..... 6 months.. 13...... Washington Territory.... M.'s saddle. Private ................. ..... 6 months.. Furnished horse and gun; Q. Territory.... Feb. 13......Monticello Ilulburt, Jacob................... Private .................Washington Vancouver..... 6 months.. Deserted. 13...... Feb. Washington Territory..... Hull, William.................... Private .................Washington Territory..... Apr. 24......Olympia ........ 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. M's horse, etc. ................. s.. Disch'd March 26, for stealing Q. Haward , John.................... Private Territory..... Feb. 13......Vanco uver..... 'month Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Ingles, James.................... Private ................Washington Feb. 13......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Washington Territory..... Private ................. Irvin, James...................... ..... 6 months.. Furnished horse, gun and equipages. Oregon Territory............. Feb. 13......Vancouver Kane, Andrew J................ Private .................Washington Feb. 13......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Furnished horse and equipages; Q. M.'s gun. Lindsay, John B................ Private .................Washington Territory..... Steilacoom ..... 6 months.. 2...... Apr. Territory..... Legg, William................... Private .................Washington Territory..... Apr. 4......Steilacoom ..... 6 months.. Furnished horse; Q. M.'s equipages and gun. Laclar Lewis...................... Private .................Washington Territory.... Apr. 4.... Steilacoom..... 6 months.. Q. M.'s horse; furnished equipages and gun. gun and equipages. Legard, Joseph ................ Private ................Washington Territory.... Feb. 13..... . Vancouver..... 6 months. Quartermaster's horse, horse, gun and equipages. Martin, Harvy ................... Private .................Washington Territory.... Feb. 13......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's Furnished horse, gun and equipages. Martin, Terry.................... Private .................Washington Territory.... Feb. 13 6 months.. Vancouver gun and equipages. Maxon, Silas D.................. Private .................Washington Territory.... Feb. 13......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, M.'s gun and equipages. Furnished horse; Q. McArd, James.................... Private .................Washington Territory 6 months.. Monticello ..... Feb. 13...... Miller, Zibe S.................... Private .................Washington Territory..... Feb. 13......Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, equipages and gun. Mocheil, Andrew............... Private .................Washington Territory..... Mar. 12..... Olympia ........ 6 months.. Q. M.'s horse and equipages; furnished gun. Private ................. MeGuire, John.................. 6 months.. Deserted. horse, gun and equipages. Miller, George A................ Private ................. Vancouver..... 6 months.. Quartermaster's Feb. 13, Washington Territory.... horse, gun and equipages. Private ................. Owhee, Alexander............. Olympia ........ 6 months.. Quartermaster's Territory.... Mar. 27 Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. 6 months.. Osterland, Francis............. Private .................Washington Olympia ........ Mar. 27...... Washington Territory.... Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Private ................. Sharp, William A.............. Olympia ........ 6 months.. Furnished horse and equipages; Q. M.'s gun. Washington Territory.... Mar. 27 Stice, Peter J...................... Private ................. Washington Olympia ........ 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, equipages and gun. Mar. 27 Territory.... Private ................. Toolton, James B.............. Olympia ........ 6 months.. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Territory..... Mar. 27 Turner, Allan.................... Private ................. Washington Territory............. Mar. 27..... Salem ............ 66 months. months. Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Taylor, Archabald............. Private ................. Oregon Vancouver..... Mar. 27 Territory..... Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Towner, Hiram A.............. Private ..................Washington Mar. 27.......Vancouver..... 6 months. Furnished horse and equipages; Q. M.'s gun. Washington Territory..... Private .................. Tooi, William.................... ..... 6 months. Territory.... Mar. 27.......Vancouver Deserted. Taylor, Jordon 0 ............. Private ..................Washington 6 months. Vancouver ..... Territory............. Mar. 27.......Vancouver.. 6 months. Quartermaster's horse, equipages and gun. Taylor, Mortimer W.......... Private ..................Oregon Territory.... Mar. 27 M's horse and equipages; furnished gun. Tooly, William B.............. Private ..................Washington 6 months. Territory.... Apr. 4.......Steilacoom.... 6 months. Q. Quartermaster's horse, equipages and gun. Vargar, Lessen................. Private ..................Washington Apr. 4.......Steilacoom.... Vanbuskirk, Andrew....... Private ..................Oregon Territory............. Apr. 4.......Steilacoom.... 6 months. Quartermaster's horse, equipages and gun. Territory............ Vanbuskirk, Daniel.......... Private ..................Oregon months Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Territory.... Apr. 4..... ..Vancouver.... 6 M's horse and equipages; furnished gun. Willisoii, William............. Private ..................Washington Feb. 13.......Vancouver.... 6 months Q. Washington Territory.... horse, gun and equipages. Private .................. Wilson, Daniel.................. Vancouver.... 6 months Quartermaster's Territory.... Feb. 13 Quartermaster's horse, gun and equipages. Williams, John................. Private .................. Washington 6 months Feb. 13..... Vancouver.... Washington Territory.... Furnished horse, gun and equipages. Private ................. Williams, George W......... Vancouver.... 6 months Oregon Territory............ Feb. 13 M.'s horse and equipages; furnished gun. Wiffler, John.................... Private .................. Washington 6 months Q. Feb. 13........Vancouver.... Territory.... Private ................. Weldon, Robert................ 6 months Wallas, "Indian ............... Private..........................................................

Fresby, Henry M.............. Frazer. Thomas................. Gravell, Francis................. Goddard, William.............. Hagnit, Marie.................... How, John.........................

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CAPTAT WILLIAM KELLEY'S Company (A) of the Washington Mounted Volunteers, called into the service of the Territory of Washington by proclamation of the Acting Governor dated 22d October, A. D. 1855, from the 26th day of October, 1855, to the 2d day of February, 1856.

MUSTER ROLL OF

. . W... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... I. 0. W. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..... - . . .... .. .. .. .. .. .. To ly, .S......................... Names, present.

Mustered.

Rank.

When.

Where. Period.

Horses —bwhom owned.

Arms,

., ' 0 ......... S ........ . ' .. .. . -0 ............. ' 0 ......... o' a : .., .. ,- ao . . . . .W.. . . . . . . . ,.' 0', .. .. .0 . . . . . . ......... .. . 2a''a40i 2.0 > 0.. .. 'g.a,

William Kelley ............ ... ...... Captain.... John D. Biles........................ 1st lieut Patrick Ahern ....................... 2d lieut Joseph Wright .........................1st sergt... Philip Hanselman...................2d sergt W. S. Hatton ......................... 3d sergt.... David Parker ........................ 4th sergt... Henry Burlingame.................1st corpl ... P. M. Buchanan ......................2d corpi.... A. C. Shot.................................3d corpl.... Reuben Riggs .........................4th corpl... Bateman, Nicholas .................Private Birch, Peter ........................... ..Private Private Dodd, John C Private Hart, Geo. Hartley, Benjamin ................ Private Private Irby, Charles Durgan, Joseph ..................... Private Private Linsey, John Private French, Egbert Murphy, Elliott ..................... Private Private Mathews, L Private McFadden, B Private Morrow, Gei. McCarty, Edward .................. Private Minnie, John ........................ Private.... Stece, Peter .......................... Private Private Strong, Smith, John F ....................... Private Phillips, Alonzo ......................Private Private Sehrodc, Jacob Private Spurgeon, Mathias Private Turner, John Ryan, William... .....................Private.... Private John Private John Wallace, Lewis .......................Private Private Seward, Orion M Private Vogaizant, William

Not mounted............ John D. Biles P. Ahern Joseph Wright P. llanselman..........

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.2 a 11. Burlingame.......... 2 A. C. Shot.................2 N. Bateman

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Remarks

Commanding company during service. On scouting detail when required. On scouting detail when required. On scouting detail when required. On scouting detail when required. No duty. No duty. On scouting detail when required. No duty. On scouting detail when required. No duty. Joined Washington mounted rifles. On scouting detail when required. No duty. No duty. No duty. No duty. Left the company. No duty. No duty. No duty. Left the company. No duty. Left the company. No duty. Left the company. No duty. No duty. On scouting detail when required. No duty. No duty. No duty. No duty. Left the company. No duty. On scouting duty when required. No duty. No duty. Left the company. No duty. No duty. No duty. No duty. No duty. No duty. On scouting duty when required.


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the United States, on the 29th day of January, 1856, when first mustered into service.

Names, present and absent.

Enlisted.

Rank.

Residence.

When.

Where.

When ded

Value of arms.

Remarks.

Period.

1556. Edward Lander ...................................... Captain .............. H. H. Peixotto ........................................ 1st lieut.... Seattle .................. Jan. 29....... Seattle ......... 6 moe ..... P. H. Neeley ........................................... 2d lieut...... King county ........ Jan. 29....... Seattle ........ 6 moe ..... John Henning ........................................ 1st sergt.... King county ..........Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ......... 6 moe ..... Rifle, $25..................... Edmund Carr .......................................... 2d sergt.... King county: ....... Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ......... 6 mos ..... Walter Graham ....................................... 3d sergt.... Seattle .................. Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ......... 6 moe ..... mos........ Jan. 29..... .Seattle .......... C. D. Boren............................................. 4th sergt... Seattle .................. I. H. Nale..................................................1st corp'l... Seattle .................. Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ......... 6 moe ..... ... ............... Jan. 29....... Seattle .......... mos......... Ira Woodm ............................................. 2d corp'l... Seattle... Rifle, $40; pistol, $25.... David Maurer ......................................... 3d corp'l... Seattle ...................Jan. 29 ...... . Seattle ......... moe ..... ..... Asa Fowler ............................................. 4th corp'l.. Seattle ...................Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ......... 6 moe.......... Burlingame, Ira B .................................. Private .... Seattle ...................Jan. 29........Seattle ......... 6 mos............ Beatty, K. H ........................................... Private .... King county ..........Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ......... 6 moe ..... ....... Bowker, George ..................................... Private .... Seattle ...................Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ......... 6 moe............. Broad, James .......................................... Private.... Seattle ...................Jan. 29....... Seattle ......... 6 mos............. Brown, Wm. H ....................................... Private .... King county ........ Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ......... 6 mos.. .. ........ Barrier, Eugene....................................... Private.... King county..........Jan. 29....... Seattle ......... 6 mos.............. Buckley, John......................................... Private .... King county..........Jan. 29....... Seattle ......... 6 mos.................. Cox, William A........................................ Private.... King county..........Jan. 29....... Seattle ......... 6 mos..................... ..Jan. 29....... Seattle ......... 6 moe....................... Fieldin, James......................................... Private .... King county.......... Holgate, John C' ..................................... Private .... King county ........ ..Jan. 29 ...... .Seattle ......... 6 moe ..... ...................... Holgate, Lemuel ......................................Private .... King county ........ ..Jan. 29....... Seattle ......... 6 moe ..... ........................ Hanford, Edward ................................... Private .... King county ........ ..Jan. 29....... Seattle ......... 6 moe ..... ......................... Hanford, K. S .......................................... Private .... King county ........ ..Jan. 29 ...... Seattle .......... mos..................................... Hograve, August .................................... Private .... King county ........ ..Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ........ ..moe ..... .................................. Johns, B. L ............................. . ... ... ... .. .... ..Private.... King county ..... .....Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ........ ..moe ..... ...................................... Johns. W. F ............................................ Private .... King county ........ ...lan. 29 ...... Seattle ........ moe ..... ........................................ Johns, B. W ............................................ Private .... King county ........ ..Jan. 29....... Seattle ...........moe ..... ............................................ Kirkland, Moses ..................................... ..Private .... King county* ....... ..Jan. 29...... Seattle ........ ..moe................................................. Kirkland, William .................................. Private .... King county ........ ..Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ........ ..Inos.................................................. Lake, Joseph .......................................... ...Private .... Icing county ........ ..Jan. 29....... Seattle ........ ..moe ..... ............................................... ..moe.............................................. ................ Landreville, Peter .................................. Private .... King county ........ ..Jan. 29 ...... Seattle .......... Maple, S. A ................................................Private.... King county ........ ..Jan. 29....... Seattle ........ ..moe................................Rifle, $50.................................... ...................... Maple K. B ............................................. Private.... King county ........ ..Jan. 29 .......Seattle ........ ..moe ..... ............................... .Private.... King county ........ ..Jan. 29 ...... Seattle ........ ..moe ..... ......................... ............................... Mane, Henry ...... ...................................... McDonell, Michael .................................. Private .... King county ........ ..Jan. 29....... Seattle ........ 6 moe ..... ......................... ............................... Morrison, James .......................................Private. ... King county ........ ..Jan. 211 ...... Seattle ......... 6 moe.................................Rifle, $25; pistol, $35........................... Mercer, Thomas....................................... Private.... King county..........Jan. 29....... Seattle ......... 6 moe............................................................................... Moss, I. I.................................................. Private.... Seattle .................. Jan. 29 ...... .Seattle ......... 6 moe.................................Pistol, $30.......................................... Miller. Chance................ ................... ...... Private .... Seattle ................. Jan. 29 ...... .Seattle ......... 6 moe ..... ......................................................................................


MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN EDWARD LANDER—CONCLUDED. Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Residence.

When.

.... C.W . .CM. ................................ ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...... .........

......................................... ............................................ .......................................... ....................................... ....................................... .......................................... ......................................

Phillips, John Private .... Russell, T. S Private .... Russell, S. W Private .... Russell, Alonzo .Private .... Stairley, David .... Smith, Wm. P Private .... Smith, Henry A Private.... Thomas, John Private Thompson, Private Utter, Ira Private Woodbridge, William ............................. Private Webins, Jacob ........................ Private Van Spilt, Henry .................... .Private....

... ... .. ..

Where.

.. .................. ......... .. .........

...... ...... ....... .......

.. .

Value of arms.

Remarks.

Period.

1856. Seattle Jan. .99 Seattle Seattle Jan. 29 Seattle King county........ Jan. 29 .Seattle King county........ Jan. 29 .Seattle King county........ .Jan. 29 Seattle__ Seattle Jan. 29 Seattle King county Jan. 29 Seat tle King county ........ Jan. 29 ...... Seattle King county ........ Jan. 29 ...... Seattle King county ........ Jan. 29 ...... Seattle King county ........ Jan. 29 ...... Seattle Seattle Jan. 29 ...... Seattle King county ........ .Jan. 29 ...... .Seattle

.................. .................

— ..... . ........................ . . . . . . . . . . . ..................................... ...... ..................................... ...... ........................ ..................................... .................... .......... ..................................... ................................................................... ....... .. .. .. ....................................................... ..................................... ... .. .. .............................................................................................. ....................................... ..................................... ...................................... . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ......................................... $50; $35.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . When discharged.

---

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MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN U. E. HICKS' Company of Pioneers, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 31st day of March, 1856, to the 31st day of May, 1856. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Enlisted.

Residence.

When.

Where.

When 8- Value of charged. clothing.

Period.

Remarks.

Urban E. Hicks ..................... Captain .................Wash. Ter ...............Feb 8........Olympia ............... 6 months ... .................. ......$76 17 Elected May 23. Benjamin F. Lewis ............... 1st lieutenant ........Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb 8........Olympia ............... 6 months ... ........................59 56 Elected May 23. William Sherwood ................ 2d lieutenant Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb 25........Montgomery ........ 6 months ... ........................29 80 Elected May 23. John Press ............................ 1st sergeant .......... Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb 8........Olympia ............... 9 months ... .................. ......39 05 Elected May 23. John Geary ........................... 2d sergeant ........... Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb 8........Olympia ............... 6 months ... .................. ......35 94 Elected May 23. G. W. Downy ........................ 3d sergeant ........... Wash. Ter ...............Feb 9........Olympia ............... 6 months ... ........................66 73 Elected May 23. Thomas Richardson .............. 4th sergeant ......... ..Wash. Ter ...............Feb 8........Olympia ............... 6 months .................. .........51 72 [Rangers. Milton P. Clute ..................... 1st corporal .......... ..Wash. Ter ........... ...................... 6 months ... ........................76 92 Transferred from Puyallup James A. Lake ...................... .2d corporal ........... Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb 8........Olympia .............. 6 months ... ........................88 Cl Elected May 23. William H. Ruddell ...............3d corporal ........... ..Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb 8........Olympia ...............6 months ... ........................64 65 Joseph Bensor ....................... 4th corporal ......... ..Wash. Ter ...............Feb 8........Olympia .............. 6 months ... .................. ......66 29 Bell, James H ........................ Private ..................Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb 8........Olympia ............... 6 months...........................52 05 Broswell, Joseph ................... Private ................. Wash. Ter ........ ......Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months...........................72 37 Bacheldor, Charles ................ Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ ...May 28 Montgomery ........ 6 months...........................46 23 Campbell, William ................ Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months...........................93 60 In hospital. Campbell, George ...................Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months...........................133 69 Fossett, Thomas .................... Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months..................................Sick at home. Gheear, Thomas W................ Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months...................... 47 25 Howe, John ........................... .Private ................. Wash. Ter ........... ...Feb. 8..... Olympia ............... 6 months..................... 90 83 Hubbard, Daniel J ................ Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months...................... 56 75 Hison, Alexander ................. Private ..................Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months..................... 36 02 In hospital; accidentally Lannand, George H ............. Private ................. Wash. Ter............ ...Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months ...................... 94 95 [wounded April 12. Mowry, Henry ...................... Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months ..................... 58 92 Moihee, John ........................ Private ..................Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb. 8..... Olympia ............... 6 months .......................65 07 Mahoney, Andrew ................ Private ..................Wash. Ter ............ ...Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months ..................65 65 Nelson, .John ......................... Private ................. Wash. Ter ...............Feb. 8........Olympia ............... 6 months ...................2 60 Perkins, William 0 ............... Private ..................Wash. Ter ............................................ 6 months ..................35 00 Deserted the Co. April 12. Roame, Thomas .................... Private ................. Wash. Ter, ........... Feb. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months ..................56 70 In hospital. Studley, James ...................... Private ................. Wash. Ter ..... ...... Feb. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months ..................13 45 Sigo, Jacob .............................Private ..................Wash. Ter ............ .Feb. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months ..................64 29 Whaklin, Charles ................... Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ Feb. 8..... Olympia ............... 6 months ..................25 40 Whitting, Benjamin H .......... Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ Feb. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months ..................23 25 Joseph H. White ................... Captain ................ Wash. Ter ............ Jan. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months ..................17 22 Resigned May 20. Columbus White .................... 2d sergeant .......... Wash. Ter ............ Feb. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months.. May 18 1 20 Discharged May 18. P. McClain Chambers ............ 2d lieutenant Wash. Ter ............ Feb. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months........................Resigned May 17. Henry U. Parsons ................. 3d sergeant .......... Wash. Ter ............ Feb. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months.. May 18 1 75 Marcus McMillan .................. 4th sergeant ......... Wash. Ter ............ Feb. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months.. May 28 20 00 Discharged May 28. William Robinson ................. Private ................. Wash. Ter ............ Feb. 8...... Olympia ............... 6 months...................................... T nsferred to Captain Lryatle's company May 18.

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MUSTER ROLL OF SERGEANT WILLIAM PACKWOOD'S Squad (Nisqually Ferry Guard) of the Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 24th day of January, 1856, to the 9th day of April, 1856. Enlisted.

Names, present and

Rank.

Residence. When.

.

William Packwood ....... Sergeant

Where.

Period.

When d8charged.

. . .. . .

Remarks.

1856. Thurston co.... Jan. 24... Nisqually Ferry ...... 6 mos...... April 9...... In consequence of resignation.

John W. McAlister..........Private...... Thurston co... Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry ...... 6 mos...... Feb. 28 S. N. Woodruff.................Private...... Thurston Co.... Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry ...... 6 mos...... Feb. 28

Withdrawn by refusing to take military oath.

W.J. Yeager ...................Private...... Thijrston co... Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry....... 6 mos...... Feb. 21

In consequence of inability by sickness.

Thomas Owens ............... Private...... Pierce co ......... Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry ...... 6 mos...... Feb. 21

In consequence of refusing to obey marching orders.

.. .. .

Joseph Bunton ................Private.......Thurston Co.... Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry ...... 6 mos...... Feb. 21

Withdrawn by refusing to take military oath.

In consequence of refusing to obey marching orders.

G. W. McAlister ............ Private...... Thurston co.... Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry ...... 6 mos...... Feb. 21...... Withdrawn by refusing to take military oath. Samuel Wilson .............. Private...... Thurston co.... Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry ...... 6 mos...... Feb. 21...... In consequence of refusing to obey marching orders. Fayette McCarty ........... Private...... Pierce co

Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry....... 6 mos...... Feb. 28

Joel Myers .................... Private...... Pierce co,

Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry ...... 6 mos...... Feb. 28...... Withdrawn by refusing to take military oath.

Geo. T. Spurgeon .......... Private...... Thurston Co.... Feb. 2... Nisqually Ferry....... 6 mos...... Feb. 21

Withdrawn by refusing to take military oath.

Withdrawn by refusing to take military oath.

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MUSTER ROLL OF THE LEWIS Names, present and absent.

.1

Rank.

I

RIVER MOUNTED RANGERS, reorganized on the 11th day of February, 186. Enlisted.

Residence,

When

Where.

By whom.

Remarks. Period.

Sehubel C. Achilles..............................Captain.... Jeptha Powell ........................Feb. 11, 1856... Lewis River... to of Governor Stevens..........6 mos..... ............................ liejit............................Feb. Thos. B. Lyttle...................................... 11, 1856.,. ....................................1st River... Directions of ... 2d Ijeut.............................. Richard Lane....................................... Governor Stevens..........6 mos..... ............................... Feb. 11, 1856... Lewis Lewis River... Ord. sgt........................... Feb. Willi am Irwin Directions of Governor St en... 11, 1856... mos .................................... .................................... Lewis River. 2d sergt........................... Feb. 11, 1856... William Miller Directions of Governor Stevetis .................................... .6 ................................. sergt.... ...................... Feb- H, 1856... Lewis giver... Directions of Governor Stevens....... John H. Timman ................................ 3d ......... 6 mos.................................... Lewis River... Directions of Governor Stevens......... 4th sergt...........................Feb. Joseph Caples...................... .................. 11, 1856... 6 ...... ............................... ..Bugler.............................. eb. 11, 1856.., Lewis River... Directions of Governor Stevens Benser, John U Private ...........................Feb. 11, 1856... Lewis River... Directions of Governor Stevens..........6 mos................................. Gilbreath, John.................................... B 6 inos.................................... Miles Spencer D ............................... Private .... .................Feb. 11, 1856... Lewis River... Directions of Governor Stevens River ... Directions of Governor Stevens..........6 mos................................... Private edrow Feb. 1856... Lewis Christian.............................. Private 6 mos............................... Lewis River... Powey Dad Directions of Governor Stevens Feb. 1856... B. 6 mos.................................. River... Directions Private Feb. 1856.. Lewis Stevens ......... 6 Williams, John................................... Private Lewis River l)irections Governor Lucas Governor Stevens (Indian) Feb. 1856... Lewis .6 mc,s ..... River... Private Directions Ean, Joseph............. Governor Stevens ........ .6 mos .Feb. 1566... Lewis River Private Directions of Governor Stevens ........ inos.................................... Feb. 1856... Lewis River... Directions Governor Stevens certify, that the foregoing a correct roll of the company of Lewis it exhibits all the men River mounted rangers, Washington volunteers, under have enlisted in said company under the new regulations. my command, and that

.

,, ,

I

.................................. B............................. ................................... ........................ is Who

........................... ............................ ............................ ............................ .... ...................... ...........................

11, 11, U, 11, 11, 11,

......... .......... ....... mos.................................... ............................ .................................... .6 ........ .6 11108....................................

of ofof of

...

of

SCRUBEL C. ACHILLES.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN WILLIAM KELLY'S COMPANY, Clark County Rangers, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, !rom the 26th day of March, 1850, to the 30th day of April, 1856. r.

-. -.

--

.--.----- -..Enlisted.

N,uunes, present and absent.

Residence.

Rank.

Kelly. .............................. Riles................................ Heiii yS ... ....... l'liillip Aiouizo A. C. ..................................... ....... E.......................... A ......................... ............ ............................. P.............................. .............................. B........................... 0. ............................. HB........................ ....... ................

When.

Captain.William 1st lieut.... lient 1'.ilriek Aliern...............................2d llurliuiganie ................... 2d sergt 3d sergt Hui,slnn',n ........... Phillips..............................2d corp'l 3d eorp'l U. Shout corp'! Joliti Dodd................................4th Private Belle, Isaac Private lleiii,itte, James .Private ('llaiiLl)rile, Edward ........... .Private Fair, Morgan ... Private Freiieli, Will. .tlurain t,entis, llroWii............................Private Private lliukley. Private Islarble, Butler Private McFadden, B Private McFadden, Win. Private Messenger, John .Private U............................. Sloise. henry Lafrombis, Francis........................ Private Lee. Josii'h..................................... Private Private Parker, James 56 ....... Private l'uicllea,.tbraliam............................ Moses Private ltiah,ie, St. Andrew, Peter.......................... Private St. Andrew, Peter.......................... Private Private Stuirges, l)avid Stuirges, D.................................. Private Private l4unith, John Private weggle, Daniel .................... Wright, Joseph............................. Private

........................... ........................

.

...... ......

. ............. . . . 1...... ...... . ....... 11...... ........... ...... ............ ............

....

Remarks. Period.

. ...... . . ..... ..... ......

war..

......

......

...... Vancouver...... 6 months or during the war... 1 Vancouver...... 6 months or during the war... 1...... Vancouver...... 8 months or during the war...

Fourth Plain ......... April 6 Richard Covington ....................... 1st corp'l... Wasliougal............ April Durgan............................. J. Fourth Plain Birch, Peter................................... Private

B. E.

--

1856. 6 months or during the war... Vancouver ........... Mar. 26...... Vancouver...... Vancouver......6 months or during the uvar... Resignation took effect June 1st. Mar. 26 Vancouver... or during the war... Vancouver............ Mar. 26...... Vancouver......66 months or during the war... Fourth Plain......... Mar. 26...... Vaicouver......6 months months or during the war... Vancouver...... Vancouver ........... Mar. 26 6 months or during the war... Vancouver ..... Mar. 26...... Vancouver............ 6 months or during the Vancouver............ Mar. 26...... Vancouver or during the war... months 6 Vancouver...... Mar. 26...... Vancouver 6 months or during the war... Vancouver ..... New York ............. Mar. 26 Vancouver.......... April19 Lake River........... 6 months or during the war... Vancouver Vancouver ........... Mar. 26 6 months or during the war... Vancouver Washougal ........... April 6 months or during the war... Vancouver ........... Mar. 26......Vancouver 6 months or during the war... Vancouver...... Mar. 26...... Salmon Creek....... months or during the war... April26......Vancouver...... 6 months or during the war... 6 Vancouver...... April 19...... Vancouver ........... months during the war... Vancouver............Mar. 26......Vancouver...... 66 months or or during the war... Vancouver...... Mar. 26...... Vancouver............ months or during the war ... Mar. 26...... Vancouver...... 6 Salmon Creek or during the war... Vancouver............ Mar. 26...... Vancouver...... 66 months months or during the war... Vancouver Vancouver............ Mar. 26 Vancouver.......6 months or during the war... April Lake River 6 months or during the war... Vancouver...... Washougal ........... April 6 months or during the war... Vancouver............ Mar. 26...... Vancouver...,. months or during the Vancouver............ Mar. 26...... Vancouver...... 66 months or during the war... war... Vancouver Vancouver............ Mar. 26 or during the war... Vancouver............ Mar. 26...... Vancouver...... 66 months months or during the war... Vancouver...... Mar. 26...... Vancouver or during the war... Vancouver............ Mar. 26...... Vancouver...... 66 months months or during the war... Vancouver...... Mar. 26...... Vancouver or during the war... Salmon Creek....... Mar. 26...... Vancouver...... 66 months months or during the war... Vancouver...... Mar. 26...... Vancouver............

......

............................... 0. P................................ .......... ON DETACHED SERVICE. .4th sergt...

Where.

Commanding detachment at Fond Plain, Clark county, Commanding detachment at Fe Riggs, Washougal district, Plain, Detached at county,

W. T.

W. T.Fourth

W.CIaT.


MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN WILLIAM KELLY'S COMPANYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;CONTINUED. Names, present and absent.

Enlisted.

Rank.

Residence. When.

ON DETACHED SERVICE. Bird, John

.................................... Private.... Bird, Nicholas.............................. Private.... Buchanan, Phillip........................ ..Private Dampbelle, John............................ Private Larnpbelle, Wm. B........................ Private Davis, Alexander.......................... ...Private Erlecher, Thos. J............................. Private Fischer, John M........................... .Private Erlecher, Wm. H............................. Private

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .S.. ..P.. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . ... C . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... .. S . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

Remarks.

Where.

Period.

1856.

......... April 6.......Vancouver..... ..6 months or during the war... ......... April 1.......Vancouver...... 6 months or during the war... Washougal........... April 1.......Vancouver..... 6 months or during the war... Fifth Plain........... ..April 6...... Vancouver...... 6 months or during the war... Fifth Plain............ April 6...... Vancouver...... 6 months or during the war... Mill Plain............ April 1...... Vancouver...... 6 mouths or during the war... Lackamash.......... Mar. 31...... Vancouver..... 6 months or during the war... Lackamash.......... Mar. 31.......Vancouver...... 6 months or during the war... Lackamash.......... Mar. 31.......Vancouver..... 6 months or during the war... Fourth Plain Fourth Plain

. .. .. ..1....... ..... 1.1... .. .. . . .... .............. 116.. . . .. .. . . . . . 6.. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . ... 1. . . . .. . . . . . .... ... ... . . . . . .. 11.......

. . ... ... ........6 . . .. 6 .. .. ......66 . . ..... .. .. .... ti . . ...

ibbons, Joseph .............................Private Vancouver 6 months or during the war... ;ibbons, Edward Private Wasliougal........... April Vancouver 6 months or during the war... ibbouis, Jacob ...............................Private Washougal ........... April Vancouver months or during the war... Elaber, Frederick .......................... Private Salmon Creek ...... Mar. 28.......Vancouver ..... months or during the war... iarber, Peter Private Salmon Creek ...... Mar. 28....... Vancouver...... 6 months or during the war... Elouston, Albert A Private ............................... April 12.......Vancouver 6 months or during the war... rby, Charles Private.... Salmon Creek........Mar. 28.......Vancouver...... 6 months or during the war... sbister, John ..Private April Vancouver .6 months or during the war... Cnapp, Henry M .......................... Private Near Mill Plain April Vancouver months or during the war... Eaybey, Walter Private .... Fourth Plain April Vancouver ..... months or during the war... 6cAllister, James Private Fourth Plain April Vancouver ..... 6 months or during the war... IcAllister, Alexander .................. Private.... Fourth Plain 6 Vancouver 6 months or during the war... IcCary, R .................................... Private .... Fourth Plain..........April Mar. 28...... Vancouver ..... 6 months or during the war... ertruui, Thos ................................ Private.... Fourth Plain ......... Mar. 26 Vancouver..... months or during the war... )verinan, J.A ............................... Private Washougal April Vancouver months or during the war... 'arker, David Private Washougal ........... Mar. 26..... Vancouver months or during the war... otter, Benjamin .......................... Private.... Washougal ............ April19.......Vancouver months or during the war... 'roebstel, John ............................. Private Lackamash Vancouver months or during the war... 'roebstel, Jacob ........................... Private.... Lackamash .......... April 6....... 6...... Vancouver ..... months or during the war... 'roebstel, Valentine ..................... Private .... Lackamash .......... April 6...... Vancouver 6 months or during the war... 'roebstel, George ......................... Private.... Lackamash April 6...... Vancouver ..... 6 months or during the war... tiggs. Ruben ................................ Private Washougal ........... April 10...... Vancouver 6 months or during the war... chub, Epperhart Private Lackamash .......... Mar. 31...... Vancouver ..... 6 months or during the war... ooley, John ................................ Private Washougal April Vancouver 6 months or during the war... ooley, John Private.... Washougal ........... April Vancouver ..... 6 months or durine

Detached at Fourth Plain, Clark county, W. T. Detached at Fourth Plain, Clark county, W. T. Detached at Fort Riggs, Washougal district, W. T. On duty at Fourth Plain, Oil duty at Fourth Plain. Lookout at Mill Plain. Scouting duty on trails leading to Lackamash. Scouting duty on trails leading to Lackamash. Scouting duty on trails leading to Lackamash. Detached at Washougal district. Detached at Washougal district. Detached at Washougal district. Salmon Creek detachment. Salmon Creek detachment. Detached at Fort Riggs, Washougal district. Salmon Creek detachment. At Washougal district. Lookout at Mill Plain. On duty at Fourth Plain. On duty at Fourth Plain. On duty at Fourth Plain. duty at Fourth Plain. On duty at Fourth Plain. At Washougal district, Fort Riggs. At Washougal. At Washougal. On duty as at Fourth Plain. On duty at Fourth Plain. On duty at Fourth Plain. On duty at Fourth Plain. At Fort Riggs, Washougal district. At Lackamash, scouting on trails. At Fort Riggs, Washougal. Fn.t

On

the wer. . At Rlio.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN WILLIAM KELLY'S COMPANY â&#x20AC;&#x201D;CONCLUDED' Entiited. Names, present and absent.

ON T.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F.. . . .B.. .. ..................... SICK. LEAVE. W.

Residence.

Rank.

When.

1. . . 311.. . . . ...

Remarks. Period.

Where.

1856. or during the war... Vancouver...... 6 months months or during the war... Private.... Washougal ............ April 9...... Vancouver...... 6 months April Washougal............ or during the war... Private Vancouver ..... Salmon Creek ....... Mar. 28...... Private 6 mouths or during the war... Vancouver Vancouver...... Vancouver Lake.. April months or during the war... Mathew, Samuel............................ Private Mar. Lackamash ........... Private McCumber, J. B............................. ABSENT WITHOUT Vancouver ......6 months or during the war... Mar. 26 Hart ................................. 1st sergt.... Vancouver ........... Geo.

DETACHED SERVICETooley, G. Tanner, B. Goddard, Joseph

.. .. .. ..

.6 r,

Fort Sick

Riggs Washougal. At At Washougai district. At Salmon Creek. in quarters at Salmon Creek. Kicked by a horse while on scouting duty April 15,18M. Absent since 26th April, 1856.


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A. WHITE'S Company of Pioneers of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory V teers, Army of the United States, from the 8th day of February, 1856, to the 8th day of April, 1856.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN JOSEPH

Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Residence.

When dis-

_____________

When.

Where.

____

Remarks.

Period.

Elected February 8. months.... months..... Company clerk, elected February 8. .. Elected February 8. ............... months..... months.............Elected March 18. months..............Elected February S. months...................Elected February 8; detailed under protest to garrison Fort Posey. .... Feb. 8........... Olympia ......... 6 months.....................Elected February 8; March 1 received I

Joseph A. White .................... ..Captain ................ .Wash. Ter...... Jan. 28.............Olympia .........6 Urban E. Hicks ......................1st lieutenant....... ..Wash. Ter...... ..Feb. 8........... ..Olympia .........6 Wash. Ter...... . Feb. 8............. Olympia .........6 T. McClain Chambers............ . 2d lieutenant 1st sergeant .......... Wash. Ter...... ..Feb. ' ..............Olympia .........6 Benjamin F. Lewis................ . Columbus White.................... .2d sergeant.............Wash. Per....... Feb. 8..............Olympia .........6 Wash. Ter...... .Feb. 8..............Olympia .........6 Henry G. Parsons.................. ..3d sergeant........... ..W

Wash. Ter Marcus McMillan................... ....

days' furlough; not present since. Feb. 8........... ............... Isaac Lemons......................... ..1st corporal.............. Elected March 18. 6 months...................... Milton P. Clute.........................1st corporal........... Wash. Ter........... John Geary............................ ..2d corporal ............ ash. Ter...... Feb. 8............ Olympia ......... 6 months...................... Elected March 18. Elected February S. 6 months...................... Olympia ......... ........... . William H. Ruddell.................3d corporal............Wash.Ter........Feb. 8 [Posey George W. Downey ..................Wash. Ter ...... .Feb. 8............ Olympia ......... 6 months..................... .Elected March 18. Detailed under protest to garrison For . 6 months ... .................. ........... Olympia ......... 8 . Bell, James A......................... .Private ................. Wash. Ter...... .Feb. Bensor, Joseph........................ Private ................. Wash. Ter...... .Feb. Broswell, Joseph.................... .Private ................. Wash. Ter...... .Feb. Campbell, William.................. Private ................. Wash. Ter...... . Feb. Campbell, George .................. .Private ................. Wash. Ter...... . Feb. Fussell, Thomas...................... Private ................. Wash. Ter...... . Feb. Gear, Thomas W.. ................. .Private ................. Wash. Ter...... . Mar. Howe, John ........................... . Private ................. Wash. Ter...... . Feb. Hison, Alexander ................... Private ..................Wash. Ter...... . Feb. Larmand, George H................ Private ................. Wash. Ter ...... . Feb. Lake, James A........................ Private ................. Wash. Ter...... . Feb. Leison, John ............. .............. Private ................. Mowry, Henry ....................... Private ................. Mohee, John ........................... Private ................. Mahoney, Andrew ................. . Private ................. Press, John P ......................... Perkins, William 0 ................ Roame, Thomas..................... . Richardson, Thomas............... Studley, James....................... . Sigo, Jacob............................. .

Wash. Ter.... .. Wash. Ter...... . Wash. Ter....... Wash. Ter...... .

Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.

Private ................. Wash. Ter ...... . Feb. Wash. Ter...... . Feb. Wash. Ter....... Feb. Wash. Ter...... Feb. Wash. Ter...... .. Feb. Wash. Ter...... .Feb.

Private ................. Private ............... . Private ................. Private ................. Private ................ .

months... .................. .Detailed under protest to garrison For [Posey months months... .................. . Wounded in battle Mar. 10; in hospital months..................... months... .................. . Sick on furlough at home. months......Detailed to drive team in Q. M's employ ..... Detailed under protest to garrison For months.... .................. Posey. Detailed under protest to garrison For .......... ......... 6 months 8........... . Olympia Posey. 8 ........... . Olympia ......... 6 months................ 8........... . Olympia ......... 6 months.................. Detailed under protest to garrison For Posey. 8........... . Olympia ......... 6 months.................. 10 days steward in hospita l. [Posey 6 months 8........... . Olympia ......... 8........... . Olympia ......... 6 months ..................... . Detailed under protest to garrison For Detailed under protest to garrison For Olympia ...................... 6 months ......... 8............ Posey. 6 months..................... Olympia ......... 8............ 25............ Montgomerys 6 months... .................. . April 4, received four days' furlough. 8............ Olympia ......... 6 months ..................... . Wounded in battle Mar. 10; in hospital 8............ Olympia ......... 6 months..................... 8............ Olyixipia ......... 6 months... .................. . Detailed to garrison Fort White. 8............ Olympia ......... 6 months... ................. .Detailed under protest to garrison For Posey. 8............ Olympia ......... 6 8............ Olympia ......... 6 8........... . Olympia ......... 6 8........... . Olympia ......... 6 8........... . Olympia ....... 6 6 1........... . Fort Hays 8............ Olympia ......... 6

I

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MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN JOSEPH A. WIIITR'S

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nil'

Enlisted.

Names, present and absent.

Rank.

..

Sherwood, William .................Private ................. Whaklin, Charles ...................Private ..... ............ Whitting, Benjamin H ........... Private ................. Hubbard, Daniel J ................. .1st sergeant .......... Robinson, William ................. Private .................

When

Residence.

.

Wash. Ter ...... Wash. Ter....... Wash. Tar....... Wash. Ter....... Wash.

When. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.

Where.

.

.

8 ............Olympia ......... 8............ Olympia ........ 8........... Olympia ......... 8............ Olympia ......... 8............ Olympia .........

Remarks.

.

Period.

6 months ... .................. 6 months .............. 6 months................ 6 months................ 6 months.. April 3......

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Comp any artificer. Detailed under protest to garrison Fort Posey. Wounded in battle Mar. 10; in hospital. Resigned March 18. Detailed to garrison Fort White, and discharged by order of Major Hays.

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MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN Joiiw A. RICHARDS' Company N of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 2d day of June, 1856, to the 2&I day of AuusL 1 Names, present and

Enlisted. Rank.

Residence.

When discharged.

._ When.

Remarks.

Where. Period. ------------1856. John A. Richards Captain James Williams ..lst lieut Resigned his office and left the company June 28, 1856. John Estes 2d lieut Elected captain July 25, 1856. Geo. M. Abill . 1st sergt Killed in battle on July 15, Parkersville, 0. T on Burnt river, o. T. June 2... Vancouver W. G. M. Orr 3 mos . 2d sergt.... Luckamute June 2... Vancouver 3 mos Transferred to Captain Goff's company on the 28th of A. J. Lovelady ..3d sergt.... Dallas, Or Julie, 1856. June 2... Vancouver 3 ..Transferred to Captain Goff's company on the 28th of . S. Ferris .4th sergt... Roseburgh June,1856. June, June 2... Vancouver Transferred to Captain Goff's company on the 28th of 43 Orchard ..]St corpl... Roseburgh June, 1856. June 2... Vancouver . J. Richards 3 mos ..2d corpl ... Bloomington, 0. T . June Elected second sergeant on the 25th of June, 1856. 2... Vancouver 3 mos Transferred to Captain Goff's company on the 28th of 3. Wood 3d corpl ... Bridgeport, 0. T June,1856. June, June 2... Vancouver mos.. ................... Transferred to Captain Goff's company on the 28th of I.MCox ............................... 4th corpl... Salt Creek, 0. P .......... June 2... Vancouver June, 1856. en, John W ....................Private.......Portland, 0. T............. .... mos..................... June 2... Vancouver ...... 33 mos ..................... .July 10th, one horse appraised into service at $150, for lounds, John A .................Private...... Bloomington .............. use of company. . June 2... Vancouver.......3 mos ...................... Transferred to Captain Goff's company on the 28th of lurler, Newton H ............. Private.......Bloomington............... June 2... June, 1856. Vancouver ...... 3 mos ....................... Transferred to Captain Goff's company on the 28th of tell, James C ................... ..Private.......Parkersville, 0. T........ June 2... Vancouver...... 3 coos..................... June, 1856. lirchell, Henry..................Private...... Salem, 0. T ................ .. June 2... Vancouver...... 3 coos..................... urden, William ................Private...... Willamina ................... June 2... Vancouver eauford, Geo. W............. Private .... Amity, ...... 3 mos..................... 0. T ............... . June 2... Vancouver..... . 3 rnos....................... lark, Bethmell ................ Private....... Bridgeport, 0. P .......... June 2... Vancouver ...... 3 mos ............. Elected third corporal on the 29th day of June, 1856. ......... Drowned the Cascades, Columbia river, on the 11th leaver, James F............... Private....... of June, at1856. lark, James A ...................Private....... Parkersville, 0. T ........June 5... Vancouver .......3 mos..................... Silverton ......................June 2... Vancouver..... . 3 coos.......................Elected second sergeant on the 29th of June, 1856; happel, Pelutiah ..............Private...... Salem, 0. P.................. elected second lieutenant on the 25th of July, 1856. June 2... Vancouver ...... 3 mos..................... I ole, Irwin L.................... Private...... Hullsborough, 0. P...... June 2... Vancouver...... 3 mos ..... . ................ Transferred to Goff's company on the 28th of June, I ugle, Joseph ................... 1856. ...... Parkersville, 0. -T ...... June 2... Vancouver ...... I nyent, James L. ...............Private 3 mos..................... Private...... Hillsborough, 0. T June 2... I itzgibins, Thomas ........... Private...... Muddy, 0. T .............. ...... 3 mos..................... . June 2... Vancouver Vancouver .... 3 mos ...................... One horse appraised into service of company as express horse, $100; one horse appraised into service .Inlv flhlh ..f 5)nn

.............. ............... ......................... ................... .................... .................. ....................... ....................... .................. ............................

...................... ...................... ............................ .................. ........ ...... ................. ...... ..................... ..... .................. ................... ...... coos ..................... .................. coos...................... ................. ...... ...... ...... ...................... ....................... ..........

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN JOHN A. RICHARD'S COMPANY -COTi1Y. Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Residence.

-

When discharged.

______ When.

Where.

Remarks.

Period. 1856.

1856 3 coos...... 2... Vancouver horse appraised into service on July 10, at $225. Private......Muddy, 0. T...............June Fields, William ................. Vancouver ......3 mos......One June 0. P............... Wapato, Elected first lieutenant on the 25th of July, 1856. foi Fryer, William W.............Private......Willamina...................June 2... ...... 3 mos ...... Vancouver 2... On extra duty in the quartermaster's department Gates, Albert.....................Private...... Vancouver ......3 mos...... seven days. Griffin, Benjamin L..........Private......Wapato, 0. P..............June 2... 3 mos......Transferred to GolF's company on the 28th of June Private......Luckamute, 0. T.........June 2... Vancouver ...... 1856. Hastings, John C .............. to Goff's company on the 28th of June coos......Transferred Private ......June 2... Vancouver ......3 1856. Hastings, A. L ................... 2... Vancouver ......3 coos...... Transferred to Goff's company on the 28th of June Private......Parkersville, 0. T ..... June Hays, Andrew A ........ ...... June 2... Vancouver ......3 mos..... . Private......Corvallis, 0. P ............. 1856. Haptonstall, Jesse B.. ....... 3 coos...... Discharged from the service on account of disease o Vancouver...... 2... .June 0. P ............ June25... Hill, Elijah H ...................Private......Corvallis, ...... 3 mos June 2... Vancouver...... the eye June 25, 1856. Hubbard, Gideon C.......... Private......Oregon........................ on the 28th of June 3 coos......Transferred to Goff's company . Vancouver..... June 2... . Bloomington ............. ...... 1856. Johnson, William ............. Private Transferred to Goff's company on the 28th of June . 3 mos..... June 2... Vancouver...... 1856. Jewett, John ..................... Private ...... Elected fourth sergeant on the 29th of June, 1856. 2... Vancouver......3 mos...... 0. T................June Johnson, Richard T ..........Private ......Tulatin, June 2... Vancouver......3 mos...... Parkeraville ............... Private .. 56 ........... 3 mos...... Elected first corporal on the 25th of July, 1856. Kinney, James Md ............ June 2... Vancouver..... Keenan, Turrence............. Private...... Baltimore, ...... .......33moB into service at $200. Elm Grove, 0. T......... June 2... Vancouver Louderbaek, John 56........ Private....... mos......July 10 one horse appraised Vancouver...... June 2... 0. T.......... Willamina, ....... Elected third sergeant on the 29th of June, 1856. Lamson, Roswell H.......... Private 3 mos...... . Vancouver..... June 2... 0. T ............. Wapato, Transferred to Goff's company on the 28th of Jun Private....... ............... Lucas, Marcellus June 2...- Vancouver ...... 3 mos...... 1856. McBride, Henry ................Private ....... Elected second corporal on the 29th of June, 1856. 2... Vancouver......3 mos ...... .Private...... Parkersvllle, 0. T....... June McKee, David A................ June 2... Vancouver ...... 3 mos...... ................ . 0. T MeQueston, Varnum B..... Private-... Salem, coos....... Osceola, 0. T............... June 2... Vancouver..... McGhee, John W.............. Private...... June 2... Vancouver ...... 3 mos....... McClure, Lindsay ............ . Private...... Willamina.................. coos....... extra duty in the quartermaster's department f 3 Vancouver...... June 2... 0. T ............... Muddy, McPhilips, James ............. Private...... Vancouver ...... 3 coos........... Oneleven days. Nelson, Cornelius G ......... Private...... Lafayette, 0. T ............ June 2... one horse appraised into service at $200 10, .June 2... Vancouver..... .3 mos................. July ..................... Portland company as a pack horse. .Private..... of use Peterson, William A coos..................... 2...- Vancouver...... S coos.................... ............. ..June Pettigrew, Thomas ........... Private...... Albany, 0. P................ June 2... Vancouver...... 33 mos..................... City Riggs, Greenbury ............. Private...... Oregon ..... Oregon City ................ June 2... Vancouver. Riggs, Francis M ............... Private ...... Willamina, .June 2... Vancouver...... 3 coos..................... 0. T ......... ..... Private...... Rice, John J................. 3 mos..................... .Transferred to Goff's company on June, 28, 1856. ...... Vancouver Q Private... Lafayette, 0. P............ June 2...

I.


MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN JOHN A. RICHARD'S COMPANY —CoNcI.ulD Names, present and absent,

Enlisted. Rank.

Residence.

When diecharged.

... . .... .0. T. . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. . . .. .. .. . . .. .. .0..0T...P.... .. . 22.. . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. July 10, P . . . . .. .. .. .. 0. T .0..T.. .. 2. . 3 . . . . . . . 10, When.

1856. ...... Private ...... Luckamute, 0. T......... June 2... ............... Private...... Silverton, 0. T ........... June 2... ............. Private...... Lafayette.................... June 2... ............ ...... Mt. Hood, 0. T........... June 2... ........... Private Private...... Willamina, 0. T......... June 2... ................. Private...... Lafayette.................... June 2... ......... Private Parkersville, 0. T...... June 2... ............ Private...... Bloomington.............. June 2... Vanderpool, James.......... .Private...... Bloomington.............. . June 2... Dames, Samuel E............ .Private...... Hillsborough, June 2... Wichsar, Mdlchedr ............Private Willamina, June 2...

Simpsots, Marshall W Smith, Jennings Smith, George H Smith, William H Stephens, Thomas Taylor, John F Thornetree, John W Vanderpool, C. M

Pearcy, Edwin .Private Riddle, Alfred E ............... Private...... Kelly, Peter ..................... Private Osgood, William F Private...... Bohnsick, Henry F .......... Private 0mm, John Private...... Kelly, Patrick ......... Private......

Where.

Period.

...... moe..... ................ ..... ...... moe..... ..... ................ ................ ..................... ..... ..... ..................One pistol al ....... ..................... 1 ..... ................ Discharged Transferred ...................... 1856. ..... Transferred 1856.

Vancouver 3 Vancouver 3 Vancouver 3 moo Vancouver 3 moe Vancouver ..3 moe Vancouver 3 moo Vancouver 3 moe Vancouver 3 moo Vancouver 3 moe Vancouver 3 moe Vancouver 3 moe ..... Sauve's island............. June Vancouver..... .3 moe ..... Portland .. June 2... Vancouver 3 moe Vancouver ................. June Vancouver 3 moe ..... Portland, June Vancouver..... 3 moo Portland, June 'Vancouver moe Luckamute ................ June Vancouver 3 moe Hillsborough, June 29.. Vancouver..... 3 moe......................

one Transferred 1856. Transferred 1856, July 1856, Transferre 185&

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MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN HRNRI M. CHASE, Company M, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 11th day of March, 1856, to the 12th day of July, 1856. Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Residence.

When.

. .. J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . ... poos . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ...................... ...................... ........................ ........................ ........................ ......................... ................... ..................... ...........................

Waite Co... ................ ..........Walla Walia Walla Co... ........... Walla Walla Co... ........... Walia Walla Co... .......... Walla Walla Co... .......... Walla Walla Co... ......... Walla Walla Walla Co... ............. Walla Co... .................. Walla Walla Walla Walla

Henri M. Chase Captain V. M. Lafontain 1st lieutenant Louis Rahoine .. 2d lieutenant W. A. Tallman 1st sergeant D. Y. Leonard 2d sergeant Silas W. Tilly 3d sergeant Yeoxe W. Ginnes 4th sergeant Thomas Stratton 1st corporal raneis Hall Private W. Crate ............................. Private Samuel ..Private Spotted Eagle Private Ko-ko-ny-e-he-nicht Private Kule-Wokike ......................... Private Wat-i-wat,i-wohike Private Weas-kis-hen ......................... Private Tseni-si-tle Private Timothy ................................. Private Pip-hom-kun ......................... Private Powen-in-it piep .................... Private We-yok-a-lucks ...................... Private Ha-shin-me-shees-tin-tinum... Private Tqui-lik-ish ............................ Private Hriam Private Ta-koslo-mish ........................ Private Sim-i-pello............................... Private Wat-yat-mus-wat-si-koron Private Ip-na.tum-owe-yat-wa ............ Private Ro-ko-it-plip Private La-kin-kuckt .......................... Private Whe-tsu-ta-kalsi .................... Private Wow-inest-ask-watish ............ Private Tamsh-tle-wat ........................ ..Private

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . Co.Co.. . .... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ........................

Where.

......... Lapwai.... ......... Lapwai. ... ........ Lapwai.... ......... Lapwai. ... ......... Lapwai .... ......... Lapwai .... ......... ......... Lapwai.... Lapwai .... Lapwai....

March 11 March 11 March 11 March 11 March 11 March 11 March 11 March 11 March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March March

11.11... ...... . 11.11.Il......... ..... 11.11.... ......... .. 11.11... .. .. .. 11.11... .. .. .. 11.11.11.... ... ... ... 11.11.11.... ... ... ... 11.11.11.... ......... . 11.. . . . 11.11.11.... ... ... ... 11.. . . .

Period. 6 months.. 6 mouths.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months.. 6 months..

.. .. .. 6 .. .. .. .. .. ..

Lepwai Lapwai Lapwai.... Lapwai Lapwai.... Lapwai Lapwai Lapwai Lapwai Lapwai Lapwai.... Lapwai Lapwai.... Lapwai Lapwai Lapwai Lapwai.... Lapwai.... Lapwai Lapwai Lapwai.... Lapwai.... Lapwai.... Lapwai....

When discharged.

July July July July July July July July July July July

Remarks.

... .. .

........... ........... ........... ........... .......... ........... ........... ...........

31 12 12 12 .. 12 12 12 12 12........... 12........... 12........... 12........... 12........... July 12.......... July 12........... 12...........

To be credited with one rifle ($35) [turned into service.

The herein named volunteers all furnished their own horses, arms and accoutrements, and were in all respects serviceably equipped.

JulJulyy JulJulyy 12.. . . . . JulJulyy JulJulyy July July 12.. . . . . July

12........... 12........... 12........... 21........... 12........... 12........... July July 12.......... July 12........... 12........... July July 12........... July 12........... July 12........... July 12........... 12........... July 12...........

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN HENRI M. CHASE, Company M, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 11th day of March, 1856, to the 11th day of Septeniber,1856. Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Remarks.

Rank.

When.

. W.A. A.

....................... .. . ................................................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .................

Where.

Period.

.6 .. 1111 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . ................. ........... . 1111 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . 11 . . . . . . . .

As the privates of my company are months.............. Lapwai ................ Henri M. Chase .................................................Cap tain ................ March all Nez Peres Indians, I did not Lapwai 1st lieutenant ....... March hink it necessary to state complexI March Lapwai ................ LouisRaboin ................................................... 2d lieutenant ion, etc.; it is impossible to get the Lapwai ................ 1st sergeant ......... March Tallman age, etc., also. .Lapwai ................ .March 2d sergeant ............ D. Lonard Samuel.............................................................. 3d sergeant............ Spotted Eagle ................................................... 4th sergeant.......... 1st corporal........... Bead Necklace ...... Wati-wati-wokike ............................................ 2d corporal............ 3d corporal........... Pierre ............................. Tsim-is-tle poos ................................................ . 4th corporal .......... . Francis Hall ..................................................... Private W. Craig ....................................................... . . Private Flying Raven ..............................................Private . . Weas-kis-hen ..............................................Private Timothy ........................................................... Private . Ne-ne-shila-koos-man......................................Private Private Pip-horn-kum ..................... We-yok-a-lucks .................................................. Private s-shin-me-shas-tin-tin-in ..............................Private -hik-esh ....................................................... Private Private Hiram ... Private Ta-kosh-mish........................... Sim-i-pelle .................................... .....................Private . Private Watyatmus-wat-se-kown ........... -nat-am-owe-yat-wa ...................................... Private .Private RedRaven Takin-kue-kit .................................................. Private Whu-tsu-kah ..................................................... .. Private Red Eagle ........................................................Private .. iasnel ....................................................Private ......... Umla-il-piep ...............................................Private Pop-tish-taken ................................................. .. Private ........................................................................................................ Tamsh-tle-wat .................................................. Private ......................................................................................................... Nick-eas-tsulem ................................................ .. Private .........................................................................................................

P M. Lafontaine

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............... WTqui .................... Ip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .

................. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .................. .................... ........................... ................................... ......................................... . . ...................................................... ................................................................. .................... . ................................................... .......................................................................................... ........................................................................................... ....... .............................................................................. ................................................................................................. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ................. .. ..... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..................... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ................

.......................................................................................................... . Wap-tash-tamanit ............................................Private In-ma-tune-pun ................................................ . Private ............................................................................................................

Em-otus-tin-tin-im ............................ .............. Private ............................................................................................................ Ea.kake-tam-otsut .............................................. Private ..........................................................................................................

Jessec ............................................................... Private ............................................................................................................

Ouish-keesh ..................................................... .Private ............................................................................................................

'1


MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN HENRI M. CHASE'S COMPANY —CONCLUDED. Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

.. .

.......................................................... .................. ......... . .................................. .............. ................................... ............................................................... .............. ............................. ..................................... ................................................. .............. ........................................... ................ ...........................................

Bank.

Wap-tash Private George Private Lil-1i1-kis-tsute Private Skulta Private Wat-yat-mut-waset Private Was-ki-na-tu-tomotaut Private In-ma-tu-walet Private Hote-hose Private Wo-wo-kea-il-piep. ........................................... Private Tlil-kino ..Private

Remarks.

When.

Where.

Period.

......................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................... .......................................................................................................... .........................................................................................................

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MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN E. D. WARBASS, - Company L, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the third day of April, 1856, to the third day of October, 1856.

Names, present and absent.

Rauk.

Residence.

_____ When.

Enlisted.

Where.

Period.

When digcharged.

Value of clothing.

.......... ..........

...... .....

..........

.....

.......... ..........

..... .................. .......................

.........

.......................

..........

..... ................ ................. .................. .................. .......................

Remarks.

Edward D. Warbass..........Captain Lewis eo. .............. ..April 3... Lewis co ..........6 mos ............... $38 60 John W. Anderson ...........1st lieut Lewis co ... ........... ..April 3... Lewis co 6 mos..... ................ ...44 33 John B. Buchard ............. 2d lieut Lewis eo ............... ..April 3... Lewis en ......... 6 moe ..................40 16 Charles L Reed .................1st sergt Lewis eo................. .pril 3... Lewis co 6 moe..... ..................46 83 George Palmer .................2d sergt.......Lewis Co............... ..April Lewis co moe..... .................. 48 20 William Pumphrey.......... 3d sergt.......Lewis co ............... ..April 3... 3... Lewis co mos..... ....................49 20 Joseph P. Matinen .......... 4th sergt Lewis eo................ April 3... Lewis en mos ........................ 49 21 Nerds Farron .................. ...1st Corp Lewis co ............... ..April 3... Lewis on inns..... ....................34 06 John Cantwell ................ 2d corp ..... Lewis Co................ April 3... Lewis en ..... moe .................... 40 16 Charles Layton ............... 3d corp ..Lewis eo ............... ..April 3... Lewis en moe ................... 43 67 Limon Gill ...................... 4th Corp Lewis en................ April 3... Lewis co 6 mn ........................ 48 97 Henry Miles .................... Private ..... eo ............... April 3... Lewis co ......... 6 moe..... ................. 42 86 George D. Clarke ............ ..Private ..... ..Lewis Lewis en ............... April 3... Lewis en ......... 6 mets..... ................ 51 20 Thomas Davis ................. ..Private ...... Lewis en ............... April 3... Lewis co ......... 6 mos....................... 48 76 George Drew .................. ..Private..... .Lewis eo ............... April 3... Lewis co ......... 6 moe..... ..................44 16 Frederick A. Clarke..........Private ..... ..Lewis en ............... ..April K. Lewis co .......... inns..... ..................52 20 Robert Hughes ............... ...Private ..... Lewis on ............... ..April 3... Lewis en inns 48 80 William Bedillinn ........... Private..... en ............... ..April 3... Lewis on 6 moe..... ..................44 68 James F. Morgan ............ Private.......Lewis Lewis en ............... April 3... Lewis co ......... 6 moe 49 68 Henry R. Stillman .............Private ..... Lewis co ............... April 3... Lewis en mos.......................52 00 John Moore .......................Private...... Lewis en.................April 3... Lewis en ......... 66 mns............... ...... .. 35 16 Francis Layton ............... .Private..... Lewis en ............... ..April 3... Lewis en ......... 6 moe.................. .. 43 76 Jonathan C. Davis ........... ..Private ..... Lewis en ............... ..April 3... Lewis en ......... 6 moe ... 43 76 Dominick Farrnii, sr ......... ...Private...... Lewis en............... ..April 5... Lewis en 6 inns....................... 28 Etozile Bereier .................. ate Priv ...... Lewis en ............... ..April 3... Lewis en .......... moe...................... 45 92 40 limon Plemondon, Jr........Private...... Lewis en................ April 5... Lewis en 33 97 John B. Laportrie............Private.......Lewis en................ April 3... Lewis en ......... 6 moe....................... moe ...................... 27 77 ..ouia Blanehet .................Private.......Lewis en.................April 5... Lewis [Warbass. 6 moe...................... 30 44 May 23, dishonorably discharged by Captain Dominick Farron, Jr.........Privat........Lewis en.................April 3... Lewis (co:::::,:, ... moe...................... 45 20 nrace H. Pinto................Private.......Lewis en.............. .. April 5.., Lewis eo ......... 6 moe .. 48 20 Jackson Barton.................Private...... Lewis en................ April 3... Lewis en ..... ..................28 38 Ulan McLeod ...................Private...... Lewis en ................ April 3... Lewis en ..........66 moe inns...................... 51 33 lonas Pike...................... Private.......Lewis en April 3... Lewis en .......... 6 moe ..... 33 20 .ouie Le DieS...................Private...... Lewis en................ April 3... Lewis en ..........6 moe ..... 46 50 lugh McLeod.................. Private...... Lewis en April 5... Lewis en .......... 6 moe ..... 27 20 Deserted April 29, 1856. ames Mcl)nnald............. Private...... Lewis en................ April 3... Lewis on ......... 6 moe.................... 46 00 roseph Windle...................Private...... Lewis en................ April 3... Lewis en 6 moe 44 23 Gi Sorreault..................... Private...... Lewis on.................April 5... Lewis en 6 moe.......................18 56 ames Urquehart............. Private...... Lewis en.................April 3... Lewis en ......... 6 moe.....................43 20 Villiam Lemon .................Private...... Lewis on............... ..April 5... Lewis en ......... 6 moe...................... 24 20 Visenm McDonald .......... Private.......Lewis en................ April 5... Lewis Co ......... 6 moe...................... 36 36 homa.s M. Pearson......... Private..... Lewis en ............... April 5... Lewis en......... 6 moe...... ............... 54 27 lenjamin Laramie Private ..... Lewis on ............... April 5... Lewis on ......... 6 moe................ 29 Ott

.....

................ .................

.......... ..........

.........

.....

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN E. D. WARBASSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;00NCLTJDED.

Names, present an d

absent.

Rank.

Enlisted.

Residence.

When.

Julien Birnie ................... Private ..... Lewis on ............... April 5.. 5.. Alexander McDonald ....... Private ..... ..Lewis en ............... April 3.. Eugene L. Finch ............. Private ..... ..Lewis eo ............... April April 5.. en William W. Davis ............ Private.......Lewis ............... 3.. George B. Roberts .. ........ Private ..... Lewis en ............... April April 5.. Cowlitz on............. James C. Garetiner.......... Private....... Lewis en ................April 3.. Samuel Layton ............... Private ....... ..Lewis en ............... April 5.. .. Private ....... Marselle Birnie.............. Lewis eo ............... April 5.. John B. Reul ................... Private.......Lewis on ............... April 5.. .. Private ..... Xavia Cathman ............... Lewis on................ April 5.. Francis Donier ................ Private April 5.. Lewis en................ .. George Catliman .... ......... Private ..... 5.. Pierre La Plant .................Private ..... ..Lewis en .... ........... April April 5.. Lewis on................. John B. Brouillet............. Private.......Lewis eo................ April 5.. Antoine Gnbar................. Private...... April 5.. Lewis on................ Private ..... . . Joseph T. Brouillet. ......... 5.. John Sutherland ............. .Private ......Lewis en................ April April 15.. Lewis oo................ . Private...... Edward Cottonnire. ........ eo .............. .April 5.. Joseph St. Gerniain.......... Private ...... Lewis en............... .April 5.. Henry Pinto.................... . Private ..... . Lewis en ................ April 15.. David Cottonoire ........... . Private...... Lewis Lewis oo ............... . April 5.. . ...... Private ..... Andrew St. Martin .... co................ April 5.. John McCnrmiok............. Private...... Lewis Lewis en ............... . April 27.. Private ..... . . James Flynn. ................. en ............... . May L. Peter Bereler .......... ........ . Private...... Lewis Lewis en .......... .... April 5.. . Private ..... Isidore St. Martin ............ . 5.. Moses Plemnndon... ........ . Private...... Lewis en ............... .. April May 8.. . Lewis en ............... Private ..... Peter Tevisand ................ . en ............ May 3.. Ezekiel W. Lynn ............ . Private...... Cowlitz Cowlitz 00 ............ . May 3.. -

Samuel K. Hudson .......... Private...... William Whittle .............. . Private..... . Cowlitz en ............ . May 3.. Fraiikliii \Vhittle............ . Private ..... . Cowlitz en ............ . May 3.. Henry Whittle.................. Private...... Cowlitz on ............ . May 3.. William Caigle ............... . Private..... . Cowlitz en ............ . May 3. John B. Prevost ............... Private...... Lewis en................ April 5.. Mitchell Thibeau ............ . Private ..... . Lewis en ............... . April 5.. . April 5. Joshua Thibeau ............... . Private ..... ..Lewis en ............... Peter St. Germain ........... .Private ..... . Lewis en ............... ..April 5.. Comodore Moore ............ . Private...... Cowlitz en ... .......... . May 5.. Lewis Johnson ............... Private...... Lewis en.................May 10.. Charles Van Wormer......Private...... Thurstnn en.......... May 15.. Christian Oxuier............. Private..... . Lewis on ............... . April 5.. Private...... Lewis en................ April 5.. Peter St. Martin ..... Thureton en.......... June 16.. Noah Kretzner................Private I

Where.

When dig-

Period, charged.

Value of clothing.

Remarks.

825 20 Lewis en ..........6 moe ..... .... Lewis en ..........6 moe..........44 38 47 00 ...... Lewis en ..........b coos ..... 30 07 Lewis on ...........moe ..... ...... 60 mos........... Lewis en mns...........42 00 Lewis on Lewis on ...........moe...........43 67 moe ..... ......46 20 Lewis en moe ..... ......37 78 Lewis on moe ...........50 79 Lewis on 27 84 Dishonorably discharged by Captain Warbass. mos......May 23 Lewis en moe ..... ......48 20 Lewis co 28 43 ...... moe ..... Lewis co moe ...........27 00 Lewis en moe...........27 96 Lewis en Lewis on .......... 6 moe...........48 60 Lewis en .......... 6 moe ..... ......45 26 moe ..... ......29 44 Lewis en Lewis en .......... 6 moe ..... ......34 00 Lewis en .......... 6 moe ..... ......53 20 Lewis co.......... 6 moe ..... ......45 58 Lewis en .......... 6 moe ..... ......25 84 Lewis en .......... (I moe...........43 00 Lewis on ......... 6 nine............37 80 Lewis en ......... 6 moe............46 90 Lewis en ......... 6 moe ..... ........40 76 Lewis on ......... 6 moe ..... .........5 38 Lewis en ......... 6 mns ..... ........41 40 Cowlitz en...... . 6 moe ..... ...........40 60 moe ..... ................25 20 Lewis on moe ..... .................40 00 Lewis on Lewis en ......... o nine ..... ......................40 20 6 Lewis en ......... moe............................40 00 Lewis en ......... 6 mos ..... .......................25 20 Lewis en ......... 6 moe..................... .......39 94 Lewis en ......... 6 moe............................25 00 Lewis en ......... 6 moe..................... .......31 40 Lewis on ......... 6 moe...... ............... .......41 40 Cowlitz en....... 6 moe ..... . ............... .......25 20 Lewis co ......... 6 moe.............................3 00 Lewis on ......... 6 moe............................37 40 Lewis en ......... 6 moe................................ 36 00 Lewis en ........6 28 58 Lewis en ......... 6 moe......................

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MUSTER

RoLl. OF CAPTAIN FRANCIS M. P. Gorr's Company K, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 8th day of March, 1856, to the 20th day of March, 1856. Enlisted.

Names, present and absent.

. . . . . HC. C.. . . . . . . . .. 3.. . . . . . . .

Rank.

Residence.

When.

Where.

.-----Period.

Articles turned in for service and appraised.

1816. Horse, $500; saddle, $50; pistol, $50; blankets. $45; Francis M. P. Goff............... Captain .... ........................................................ ...... saddlebag, $15. ................Horse, $450; saddle, $40; rifle, $70; blankets, $18. Israel Hedges ....................... ..1st Iieut. ... .................................. Horse, $325; saddle, $40; pistol, $75; blankets, $35; ................. ........................................................................... ... Thomas B. Wait .................. 2d lieut ..... gun, $40. Saddle, $40; blankets, $24. 6 moB...... Mar. 8....... Polk co., 0. T............... Daniel, Francis M .................1st sergt Polk Co., 0. T.............. co., 0. T ............... 6mos...... Saddle, $40; rifle, $60. Ward, William M ................ 2d sergt Polk Co., 0. T ............. Mar. 8....... Polk Horse, $300; saddle, $50; rifle, $80; blankets, $18; Polk co., 0. T............... 6 moB...... Keesee, John ....................... 3d sergt Polk Co., 0. T ............. Mar. 8 ...... saddlebags $20. 12. Saddlebags, 6 mos...... Polk 0. T............... Mar. 8 ...... Co., Frazier, David ..................... 4th sergt Polk Co., 0. T ............. pistol, $50; blankets, $18. Mar. 8 ...... Polk Co., 0. T............... 6 mos...... Horse, $450; saddle, $30; Crowley, John M ................. 1st corp'l Polk Co., 0. T ..............Mar. 8 ...... Polk co., 0. T............... 6 mos...... Horse, $325; saddle, $60; rifle, $50; blankets, $0. Eddey, Richard ....................2d corp'l Polk co. 0. T ............ Horse, $325; saddle, $50; pistol, $15. Hedges, Eli .......................... 3d eorp'l Polk co., 0. T ............. Mar. 8 ...... Polk Co., 0. T............... 66 mos...... Co., 0. '1'............... mos..... Samist, Daniel ..................... .4th corp'l Polk Co., 0. T ............. .Mar. S ...... Polk $500; saddle, $60; rifle, $100; blankets, $24. Arbogast, Jacob ......... ..........Private Polk Co., 0. T... .......... .Mar. 8 ...... Polk Co., 0. T............... 6 mos...... Horse, Polk Co., 0. T ............. ...mos...... Horse, $325; saddle, $40. Dougherty, Horace .............. Private Polk Co., 0. T ............. Mar. 8. ..... 8 ...... Polk Co., 0. T ................moB...... Horse, $400; saddle, $50; blankets, $9; saddlebags Doughty, Preston E ............ Private Polk co., 0. T ............. Mar. [$13.50 mos Co., 0. T Githens, Henry C..................Private Multnomah co 0. T Mar. 5 ...... Multnomah blankets, $18. Horse, $350; saddle, $45; pistol, Polk Co., 0. Hill, James M .......................Private Polk Co., 0. T...............Mar. 8....... Multnomah Blankets, $18. mos...... Mar. 8....... Holt, James M ..................... Private Multnomah mos.... Mar. 8 ...... .Clark Hengee, Lawrence .............. Private Clark ...mos...... Horse, $200; saddle, $40; blankets, $18. Mar. 8 ...... Linn Private Moore, Francis saddle, $40; rifle, $75. 6 mos...... Horse Mar. 8 ...... .Private McCracken, 6 mos...... Horse, $325; Saddle, $50; rifle, $75; blankets, $27. Mar. 8 ...... Polk Townsend, Jesse B............... Private Polk co., 6 moB...... Horse, $500; saddle, $40; rifle, $95. Mar. 8....... Polk Private Polk Whiteker, David Horse, $200; saddle, $30; rifle, 6 Mar. 8....... Clark Welch, Edwin....................... Private Washington Horse, $325; saddle, $40; pistol, $40. 6 .Mar. 8 ...... .Polk Vanderhof, David ................. Private Polk

. . ,en., 0. T . Polk co.co.Co., ,0.,0.0.TTT.................... . CO., 0. TcoO.. . . . .T. .

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. $80; $30.

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M. P. GOFF's Company K. of Washington Mounted Volunteers, Commanded by Lieutenant Colonel B. F. Shaw, called into the service of the Territory of Washington by proclamation of the Governor, dated 1856, from the 31st day of March, 1856, to the 31st day of May, 1856.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN FRANCIS

Valuation.

Enlisted.

Rank.

Names, present and absent.

When.

Where.

Period.

Horses By whom owned.

Horses. E

-

UI

Arms.

.

1 T

. ..

........ ......... ........ ........ ........ ......... ........... .57 ............ ..... ....... 0( ............... $58 .......... 1010 17StSt $100 g .............19 1104 .............. .............. 1010 a ................. 10 1 .................. II ............................. ........ ..................... 100 .......................... ...... ...................... 20 .................................... ........ ............... (4 ............ . 90 .......... ........ .... ......... ..... ..... ....... ........................... ..

Wash. Ter......... Francis M. P. Goff .......................... Captain ........................ 12 $27 67 months.........Wash. Ter ...... Israel Hedges .................................. 1st lieutenant ........ Mar. 8 ........... l)allas .................. 12 38 17 months.........Wash. Ter ...... Mar. 5............ Dallas .................. Thomas B. Wait .............................. 2d lieutenant 3792 7 months.........Wash. Ter ...... Francis '.1. Daniel ........................... lstsergeant .......... Mar. 8 ........... 1)allas .................. 24 37 3 months ................. John Keesee .................................... 2d sergeant........ .. Mar. 8 ........... Dallas .................. 3195 65 months.........Wash. Ter ...... Henry C. Githens ............................ 3d sergeant ........... Mar. 8............ Dallas .................. 32 91 13 Wash. Ter ..... Dallas .................. months......... David S. Frazier .............................. 4th sergeant .......... Mar. 8.. 14 34 7 months ........ John M. Crowley ............................ 1st corporal .......... Mar. 8............ Dallas ........... 7 34 8 months ........ Richard A. Eddy .............................. 2:4 corporal ............ Mar. 8 ........... Dallas 9 months ...................8 3d corporal ............ Mar. 8 ........... Dallas .................. Eli Hedges ................... 801 4 months ........ David Vanderhoof .......................... 4th corporal ......... Mar. 8............ Dallas .................. mouths........................ Mar. 8............ Dallas Arbagast, Jacob ............................. Private 36 months..........Wash. Ter............. Apr. 28............ Salem. .................. Private Allen, Thomas 200 46 34 . months..........Wash. Ter.......... ..Wash. Ter ............ Apr. lilodget, Henry ............................... Private 22 75 Wash. Ter..................... Apr. 28 ........... .Salem .................. .. months Raker, William ............................... Private 28 Wash. Ter...................... .. months .......... .Salem .................. 28 ........... Apr. Private M Barnes, John 34 Apr. 28 ........... Salem .................. .. months..........Wash. Ter........................ Elevens, Eli ..................................... Private 36 01 12 months..........Wash. Ter.............40 Salem Apr. 28 .Private Bowles, David H ...................... 23 60 51 3 months...........SVash. Ter............. .Salem Apr. 28 ..... .Private Buston, John ....................... 7 62 85 12 months ...................... $350 .Salem .................. 28 ..... Apr. Private Clirismnauu, Abner 37 150 . months..........Wash. Ter.................. Apr. 28............ Salem .................. Private Craine, Charles W. G .... 22 44 80 30 months ......................300 Apr. 28............ Salem .................. Cherry. James ...................................Private 29 84 60 months...........Wash. Ter ...... Apr. 28............ Salem .................. Cave, Bartlett .................................. Private 60 7 ..months...........Wash. Ter ...... Apr. 28 ........... Salem ..... Private Crockett, Thomas 18 8 6 months .....................................8 Mar. 8............ Dallas Private 'omighty, Preston 1464 6 months ..............................12 Mar. 8............ 1)allas l)auugherty, Horace ...........................Private 2 150 250 45 3 months ........ Apr. 28............ Salem t)amuglmerty..Jaumu's... ...................... .Private 5 35 175 3 months ....... Apr. 28 ........... .Salem Private Daugherty. Walter 22 50 months..........Wash. Ter ...... Apr. 28 ........... Salem Private Davin, Anthony .................... 47 60 Wash. Ter ..... 3 months 28............ Salem Apr. Private Drumheller, Jesse ................. 396 75 3 months......... Wash. .Ter...... Apr. 28........... Salem Done, Peter A.................................. Private 25 20 943 80 3 months......... Wash. Ter ...... Apr. 28............ Salem Private Eaton, Daniel 7J 60 3 months......... Wash. Ter ....... Apr. 28............ Salem Private Engart, Marquis 25 3 months..........Wash. Ter............................68 Apr. 28............ Salem Faith, John...................................... Private 25 3 months..........Wash. Ter................................. Apr. 28........... Salem Private Fisk. William 15 32 73 months......... Wash. Ter .......... Apr. 28............ Salem Griffin, Squire.................................. Private 14 8 75 Wash. Ter ..... Apr. 28 ........... .Salem 3 months Private Gentry. James B

I

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SI ...................... ........... ........... .................................. L ........................... .................................. ..............................

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. ................. ................. 11 ........... ................. ................. ................ .. ................. ........... ............... ..... ................. ..... .................. ................. .................. .................. . ................. ................. ................. ................. .................. . ................ ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. ................. .................

.. ... ... .. .. ...... .. .................... .. .. .. .................... .. .. .................. ...................... .. .. .. .............. ................... ................... ................... ................... ................... .1 ................... ................... ................... ................... ................... ................... ................... ...................

b


MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN FRANCIS M. P. GOFF'S COMPANY K —CONTINUED, Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Valuation.

Rank.

When.

Where.

Period.

31

Horses.

Arms.

'9

.

Hill James M................................... Private ................. Mar. 8............ Dallas ..... ............. 6 months.......................................................... 8 $500 Holt, James 50 .................................. Private ................. Mar. 12........... ..Portland .............. 6 months...........Wash. Ter...... ...................$60 50 23 85 Holmes, William............................ ..Private ................. Apr. 15.............Wash. Ter............ ..4 months...........Wash. Ter...... ..............$15 75 200 60 Hagey, Peter H ............................... Private ................. Apr. 28............ Salem .................. .. months...........Wash. Ter..............................15 13 27 56 Hutton, John P............................... Private ................. Apr. 28........... ..Salem .....................months........................$300 80 15 44 ........ Hunter, William H.......................... Private ................. Apr. 28........... ..Salem .....................months..........................500 ..............100 20 34 Hansal, John........................... ........ Private ................. Apr. 28.............Salem .................... months..........Wash. Per....................................2a0 60 31 78 Haines, Francis A............................ .Private .................May 15.............Vancouver............. months ...........Wash. Ter...... .................18 ............10 Hays. John ...................................... .Private ................. Apr. 28 ............ Salem .................. Months...........Wash. Ter.......................18 ........... 100 ........ ........ George ................................Private ................. Apr. ............ Salem .................. .. .. months...........Wash. Ter.......................21 50 3060 ....... 6 00 HHaddix, yde, Samuel ...................................Private ................. June 281 ........... . Dallas .................. .. months ........ ................. Jamison, Ephriain ............................Private ..................Apr. 28............ Salem ....................3 months...........Wash. Ter............................60 00 18 00 Jones, James P ................................ Private ..................Apr. 28............ Salem ....................3 months ......................250 40 Jones, Joseph P .............................. ..Private ..................Apr. 28............ Salem ....................3 months .......................250 22 1010 121212 192628 350000 Johnson, Anderson F...................... Private .................. Apr. 28............ Salem ....................3 months..........Wash. Ter,..... ..................70 Johnson, John L ............................. Private ..................Apr. 28 ............ Salem ....................3 months...........Wash. Ter...... ...............66 Kelly, Patrick ....................................Private ................. May ..Portland ............... 3 months...........Wash. Ter...... ......................48 100 156075 2687 253492 Kinsella, Arthur ............................... Private ................. Apr. 281 ........... .. Salem ................... 3 months .....................200 48 Lingenfelter, William E .................. Private ................. Apr. 28 ........... .............Salem .....................3 months...........Wash. Ter........................82 50 60 ........ Lilly, David ......................................Private ................. Apr. 28............. Salem ...................3 months........ ..............460 64 ...............25 ........ Lacy, Lewis ......................................Private ................. June 1 ........... Dallas .................... 3 months ........ Wash. Ter .................................... 12 ........ McCracken, Christopher C................Private ................. Mar. 8 ..............Dallas................... 6 months...........Wash. Ter...... ............. .................. 84 McCarty, William .............................Private ..................Apr. 28 ........... Salem .................. 3 months...........Wash. Ter...... ...............................507 35 35 68 MMoore, cConnell, Jones............................ Private ..................May 1 ........... ..Vancouver.............3 months...........Wash. Ter............................7 ............10 ......... Francis M ............................ Private ..................Mar. 8 ............ Dallas................... 6 months..............................................25 22 02 Week, Courtney \V ............................Private ..................Apr. 28............ Salem ....................3 months...........Wash. Ter............................16 90 60 ....... aught, Francis M ............................Private ................. Apr. 28 ............ Salem.....................3 months..........Wash. Ter............................48 75 15 31 94 Prot'o, Nareisse ................................Private ..................June . Dallas ................... 6 months ........................................... 18 Parkhill, John...................................Private..................Apr. 211 ........... Wash. Ter .............. months..........Wash. Ter....................................50 ......... 15 34 Richardson, John Q. A................... Private ..................Apr. 28 ........... ............ Salem................... months..........Wash. Ter.................................. 15 41 22 Richards, John A .............................Private ................. Apr. 28............ Salem .................. ... months ......... Wash. Ter ...... ............. .................... ........ 25 Riggs. Cyrus K ..................................Private ................. Apr. 28 ............ Salem .................. .. months......... Wash. Ter............................4,5 Rogers, George.. .......... .................. Private ................. Apr. 28............ Salem .....................months..........Wash. Ter ............................54 1007553 101018 3436 300034 Rabren, John W............................... Private ................. Apr. 28 ............ Salem .................... months..........Wash. Ter ............................20 Ringo, Hamilton H ........................ Private ................ Apr. 28............ Salem ..................... ...months..........Wash. Ter............................75 65 12 ........ imnith, Samuel ...................................Private................. Mar. 27 ...........Cowlitz ................... Wash. Ter ..........................................200 36 18 Imith, Abner I ................................ . Private ................. Apr. 28............ Salem .....................months.......... months ......... Wash. Ter ...... .............. 41 60 8 27 IImith, mith, Daniel................................... Private ................. Apr. 28 ........... Salem .................... months..........Wash. Ter...... ..............48 80 12 ....... Charles.................................. Private ................. Apr. 28 ............ Salem .... ......... ....... months..........Wash. Ter ....................7 .................... 100 ......... lilsil, George ............. ..................... . Private ................. Apr. 28 ........... .................... months......... Wash. Ter .................... ........................19 25 icott, Thomas .................................. Private ................. Apr. 28 ............ Salem Salem .................. .. months......... Wash. Ter ......I ............. 18 60 110 10 20 ItO

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN FRANCIS M. P. GOFF'S COMPANY K - CONCLUDED. Valuation.

Enlisted. Names, present and absent.

Rank.

When.

-

He es—By

Where.

Period.

I

Horses.

Arms.

I: Wash. Ter .........................15 $35 61 Simmons, Edward M ...................... . Private .................. Apr. 28 ............ Salem ................... 8 months........... 25 ....... .......................$450 $67 $100 Sommerville, Henry B .................... . Private ...................Apr. 28 ............ Salem ....................88 months Wash. Ter ..............................18 44 70 months.......... ................... .................. Apr. 28 ........... Salem Private Sheasgreen, James J ....................... . 18 ...... 125 ........ Sachse, Louis ................................... . Private .................. Apr. 28............ Salem ................... 8 months...........Wash. Ter ....................... 50 ........ Wash. Ter ...... .......................65 Smiley, Sylvester ............................ . Private ................. June 1............ Dallas................... 8 months........... ........ .......................................3 ........ Townsend, Jesse B ......................... Private ................. Mar. 8 ........... . Dallas ................... 36 months .......................... 25 43 10 months.......... Wash. Ter ...... .................. 28............ Salem .................. Apr. Trimble, John .................................. Private ................... 3 months...........Wash. Ter ...... ...........................3 ............. . Vanderhoof, Lewis ......................... . Private ................. June 1 ........... .Dallas ................. ........ 5 ............. Wash. Ter ...... 35 3 months........... 28............ Salem. .................. ................. Apr. Vance, Thomas ............................... . Private 5 .. Whiteaker, David J ............ .... ...... . Private ................. Mar. 8. .......... . Dallas ................... 6 months........ ........................................ ......... 5 .. ..................................... 3 months ........ ........... . Dallas ................... ................. June 1 Whiteaker, Joseph.......................... . Private Ward, William ................................ . Private ................. Welch, Edwin ................................. . Private ................. Welch, George ..................................Private ................. Worsham, Sampson ........................ . Private ................. Watts, Evan .................................... Private ................. Williams, James.............................. Private ................. Williams, Nathaniel....................... . Private ................. Wilks, Samuel................................. Private ................. Wilks, James................................... .. Private ................. Walker, Samuel.............................. Private ................ Whitcomb, James........................... . Private ................. Wright, William .............................. . Private ................. Bolter, George ................................. .Private .................

Mar. 8............ Dallas ................... 6 months...........Wash. Ter...... ........................ ......... Mar. 8.......... Dallas .................. . 6 months........ ..................................... ......... Wash. Ter ...... ......................... ......... Apr. 28............ Salem ................... 3 months Apr. 28............ Salem ....................3 months......... Wash. Ter ...... ....................34 100 Apr. 28............ Salem ................... 3 months......... Wash. Ter...... ....................71 Apr. 28............ Salem ................... 3 months..........Wash. Ter...... ............. .................... 37 Apr. 28 ........... . Salem ................... 3 months......... Wash. Ter ...... ............. .........19 145 Apr. 28............ Salem ................... 3 months......... Wash. Ter..... ......................66 100 Apr. 28 ........... . Salem ................... 3 months......... Wash. Ter ...... ............. ........ 81 60 Apr. 28 ........... Salem ................... 3 months......... Wash. Ter...... . ............ .........24 Apr. 28 ........... . Salem ................... 3 months......... Wash. Ter...... ............. ........................ . June 1 ........... . Dallas .................. 3 months......... Wash. Ter ...... ............. ..................... 200 Wash. Ter ...... ............. .21 May 15 ........... .Vancouver ........... .3 months

14 60 20 10 10 60 60 60 60 60 50 52 12

10 25 1850 ....... 42 50 ....... 30 31 32 44 .......... .......... 6 9 0( ............ ............

I certify, on honor, that this muster roll exhibits the true state of Captain Francis N. P. Goff's company (K) of Washington mounted volunteers, and that FRANCIS M. P. GOFF, the remarks set opposite the name of each officer and soldier are correct and just. Commanding the Company. Dated at Dallas, this 31st day of May, 1856. I certify, on honor, that I have carefully examined the muster roll and that I have mustered into the service of the Territory of Washington the above named FRANCIS M. P. GOFF. company of volunteers. Dated at Dallas, this 8th day of March, 1856.


MUSTER

-.. .. . .. . .. .. .

ROLL OF CAPTAIN F. M. P. GOFF, Company K, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 31st day of May, 1856, to the 31st day of July, 1856.

Names, present and

Enlisted.

Rank.

Residence.

When.

Where.

Period,

When discharged.

Horses, bywhoin owned.

Remarks.

1856. 1856. Polk co ................................................. Individual... Returned to company, June 13th; 4 blankets lost Unavoidably, appraised at $18. William H. Hunter ............ 1st lieut.... Jackson co .............. kpr. 28 Salem, 0. T........................$2 25 Individual... Elected June 25th, vice Israel Thomas B. Wait ............... 2d lieut...... Polk co ................... ..... 8 Dallas, 0. T........................5 67 Individual [Hedges, resigned. Samuel Wilkes .................. 3d lieut...... Jackson en .............. Mar. Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T.......................... 5 00 W. T ........... ..Elected June Cyrus K. Riggs ................. 1st sergt Polk co ................... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T............ 3 moB ......................67 W. P .............Elected June 25th. 25th, vice F. M. Daniels, resigned. Anderson F. Johnson ....... 2d sergt Marion en............... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T............ 3 MOB ..... ..................W. T .............Elected June 25th, vice John Keesee, resigned; lost IQ. M. horse. Peter H. Hagey.................. 3d sergt Marion en................ Apr. 28 Salem, 0. P............ 3 mos .......................7 00 W. P.............Elected June 25th, vice H. C. Githens, resigned. David H. Bowls ................ 4th sergt Marion co ............... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. P............ 3 mos.......................23 70 W. T........... Elected June 25th, vice C. H. F'raizer, resigned. Joseph P. Jones ................ lot corp'l Marion en ............... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. P............ 3 mos ..... .....................Individual Elected June 25th, vice J. M. Crowley, resigned. George Rodgers ................ 2d corp'l Polk co .....................Apr. 28 Salem, 0. P............ 3 mos...........................W. P ........... ..Elected June 25th, vice R. A. Eddy, resigned. Andrew J. Lovelady ......... 3d corp'l Polk en ................... June 28 Wasco Co., 0. P.... 3 mos............ .. ......................Individual Served from 28th June; transferred from Co. N to Co. K. June 28th; horse appraised at $275, saddle $50, N. gerters $15, bridle $6; blankets $25, pistol $100, saddlebags $9. William G. W. Orr ............ 4th corp'l Polk eo ................... June 28 Wasco en., 0. P.... 3 mos....................Individual Served from 28th June; transferred from Co. N to Co. K June 28th; horse appraised at $200, saddle $50, bridle Arbegast, Jacob .................Private .... Polk co .....................Mar. 8 Dallas, 0. P........... 6 moo ..... ...........5 00 Individual... $12, blankets $7, gun $75. Allen, Thomas .................. Private .... Marion co ............... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. P........... 3 mos.....................W. T ........... Accidentally killed June 1st by shooting himself on lost igun. Blodget, Henry ................. Private .... W. P ........................ Apr. 28 W. T .............. ...... 4 mos ..... ...........4 35 W. T............ 4 guard; blankets lost appraised at Baker, William.................. Private .... W. T........................ Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos...... ............... W. P [$26. Barnes, John M ................ Private .... Polk Co................... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos........June 23 35 99 W. P........... Blevins, Eli .. .................... Private .... Polk en ................... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos........June 8 .......... W. T........... Ruston, John .................... Private .... Washington co ....... Apr. 28 0. T........... 3 Inns ..... ................. 9 60 W. T........... Bolter, George ....................Private .... Washington co ....... May 15 Salem, Vancouver ........... 8 mos ..... ................ 4 67 W. T ........... .I

F. M. P. Goff.......................Captain....

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN F. M. P. 00FF- Con'rinuzn. Enlisted.

Names1resent and

Rank.

Residence.

When.

Where.

Period,

When discharged.

I.

Horses, by whom owned.

Remarks.

1856. 1856. Co. N to Co. K June 28 Wasco en., 0. T.... 3 mos...... $5 00 I Individual... Transferred June raIn; horse appraised at $550, saddle $50, meehears $30, bridle $20, gun $75, shot pouch $3. Individual... Transferred Co. N to Co. K Butler, Newton H ............. Private.... Polk en ........ ............ .. June 28 Wasco en., 0. P.... 3 mos........ June 28th; horse appraised at $250, saddle $50, bridle $20, pistol $20. mos.......... 250 Individual... Chrisman, Abner C ........... Private .... Marion co ................ Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T...........3 20 W. P.......... .......... Crane, Charles G. W ......... Private .... Marion eo ..................Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T............36 moB .......... 150 Individual... Gun broken and expended. Crouley, John M.................Private.... Polk co ......................Mar. 8 Dallas, 0. T............3moB 20 Individual... mos.......... ..Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T............ Cherry, James ................... Private.... Lynn eo..................... mos.......... 15 72 W T........... Cave, Bartlett.................... Private.... Polk no ................... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. P............3 W. T........... June 8 1660 3 mos........ Crockett, Thomas ............. Private ........................ 6 mos......... 595 W. T........... Daniel, Francis M ............. Private .... Polk en.................... Mar. 8 Dallas, 0. T........... 6 mos........... 250 Individual... Lost horse July 2d unavoidaDoughty, Preston E .......... Private .... Polk en ................... Mar. 8 Dallas, 0. P........... bly, appraised at $300; horse appraised into service July 10th at $165. Individual... ..... ...... Dougherty, Horace ........... Private.... Polk eo ................... Mar. 8 Dallas, 0. T .......... .6'mos 460 Individual... mos........... Dougherty, James ............ Private.... Polk co ................... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T........... 3 Individual... 20 3 mos........... Dougherty, Walter 56 ........ . . Private .... Polk co ......................Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos........... 18 35 W T........... Davin, Anthony ............... Private .... New York ............. ...Apr. 28 Salem, 0. P........... T ........... Revolver broke and turned W. 3 mos........... Drumheller, Jesse ............. Private .... Columbia en ............ ...Apr. 28 Salem, 0. P........... over to Q. M., appraised at $110; horse appraised into service July 10th at $250. 0. T........... 3 mos........... 8 60 W. P........... Transferred from Co. N to Co. Done, Peter A ......................Private .... Multnomah en......... Apr. 28 Salem, 20 W. T ........... Dole, Edwin L .................. Private .... Washington co........ June 28 Wasco en., 0. T.... 3 moB ..... ............... K June 28th; appraised blankets at $27, pistol $40. 1 gun lost appraised at $50; Individual... 839 ............... 6 moB ..... Eddy, Richard A .............. Private .... Polk eo ................... Mar. 8 Dallas, 0. T........... 1 blanket lost $9, unavoidably. mos........June 8 1000 W. P........... Engart, Marquis L ............ Private.... Washington co ....... Apr. 28 Salem, 0. P........... 33 mos.................... 6 15 W. T ... ........ .A 28 Salem, 0. P........... Eaton, Daniel ................... Private .... Yamhill co.............. .pr. ..... ....... ........ 2299 W. T........... 3 blankets lost, appraised $27. Emriek, Christopher T.......Private .... Washington co ....... June 1 Lafayette, 0. T...... 63 moB 25 42 W. T............ mos.................... Dallas, 0. T........... Frazier, David 0 ..................Private .... Polk en ................... Mar. 8 and bridle destroyed, Faith, John ........................Private .... Yasnhill en .............. .Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos.................... 2 17 W. T............ 1 saddle appraised $48; 1Q. M. horse unavoidably lost July 1st.

Bounds, John A ................ Private.... Polk

en ...................


MITSTER TSflT.T. (' (1A'mATTsT

Names, present and

Rank.

Residence.

When.

. .

1856 Fisk, William................... Private Lane co.................... Apr. 28 Ferris, Nicholas S ............. Private Douglas co .............. June 28 Githens, Henry C ..............Private Multnomah 00........ Mar. 13 G riffin, Squire ................... ..Private Polk co ............ ...... Apr. 28 Gentry, James B.................Private W. T ...........................Apr. 28 Hill, James M .....................Private Polk co ................... Mar. 8 Holt, James M .................. Private Multnomah co ........ Mar. 13 Holmes, William.............. private .................. Apr. 15

...

Hutton, John P ................. Private ansel, John ......................Private HHaynes, Francis A ............ Hays, John....................... .Private ..Private Ri1dix, George W ........... ..Private

Marion co................ Apr. 28 Washington co..........Apr. 28 Polk co.................... May 15 Portland ...................Apr. 28 Washington co Apr. 28

.

Hyde, Samuel ................... private ....... ...................... June 1 Hedges, Israel .................. ...Private .... Polk co.................... June 28

. . .. .

Hedges, Eli ........................ Private .... Polk co .....................Mar. 8 Sill, Eligah H ................... Private .... Benton co................ June 28

. .. .

Tastings, John C .............. private .... Polk co................... June 28 {astings, Archibald L ...... Famison, Ephriam............ Fones, James T ................. Fohnson, John L ..............

Private .... private .... Private .... Private....

Polk co ................... Lane eo ................... Marion co ............... Marion co ...............

June 28 Apr. 28 Apr. 28 Apr. 28

15 i5 0

'15O

-

Where.

Period.

When digcharged,

byHorses, whom owned.

Remarks.

1856. Salem, 0. T ............Smog ..... ....................$8 45 W. T...............1 horse lost unavoidably, "Q. M." Wasco Co., 0. T 3 mos ..........................60 T............. Transferred from Co. N. to Portland, 0. T....... 6 mos ..... ....................3 25 W. W. T [Co. K June 28. Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos.........................2 60 W. T............ Salem, 0. T .......... Smog ..... .........2 60 W. T............ Dallas, 0. T..............6 mos ..................... Portland, 0. T.........6 mos ..... ........4 02 Individual... T............ W. T ........................34 mos ..... ...........13 79 W. W. T...............Killed in action July 18th in Grand Round; 1 horse lost in action. Salem, 0. T............................14 00 Individual... 1 blanket lost, $9. Salem, 0. T............ mos........June 23 3 75 W. T............ Vancouver ............. 3 mos ...............25 82 W. T............ Salem 0. T............3 mos ...............15 82 W. T............ Salem, 0. T............ 3 mos ..... ...........4 00 W. P............. 4 blankets lost appraised at $30, 1 rifle broken and turned over, appraised at Dallas, 0. T........... 3 mug........June 23 18 00 W. T ..............Border of surgeon. Wasco Co., 0. T 3 mos ..... ......................1 15 W. T............. 1 gun lost $75, 1 horse lost unavoidably June 2d appraised at $450. Dallas, 0. P........... 6 mos ..... .........................W. T............. 1 horse lost June 2d appraised at $325, unavoidably. Wasco co., 0. T 3 mos ..... ..............................Transferred from Co. N. to Co. K June 28th; horse appraised at $400, saddle $50, meehears $30, bridle $2, blankets $25, gun $75, pistol $71, shot pouch $3. Wasco co., 0. T.... 3 mos ..... ......................1 50 ........................Transferred from Co. N to Co. K June 28th; horse appraised at $250, saddle $10, bridle $2, blankets $18, gun $75, shot pouch $3. Wasco co., 0. T 3 mos ..... ................................. ..Transferred from Co. N to Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos ..... .............2 50 W. T K June 28th. Salem, 0. T........... 3 3 mug ..... mos........................ Individual 1 pistol lost,[Co. $10; I bridle lost, Salem, 0. T........... Aug. 27 22 00 W. T ............ Lost 1 saddle, $50; I Q. M.

.

.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN F. M. P. GOFF'S COMPANY -CONTINUED.

--

Enlisted. Names, present and sent.

.. . .. .. . . . .. I. . . . .

Residence.

Rank.

When. Private .... Private.... Private .... Private ....

1856 Polk eo................... ..June 28 Washington co ....... ..May 1 W. T ........................ ..Apr. 28 Polk Co................... ..Mar. 8

Kellum, William ............... Private.... Lingenfelter, William E Private .... Lilly, David ...................... Private.... Lacy, Lewis ...................... Private .... McCracken,Christoph'rC Private.... McCarty, William ............. Private .... McConnell, Jones ............. Private .... McBride, Henry C............ Private.... Moore, Francis M............. ..Private ....

Polk en .....................June 1 Washington co....... ..Apr. 28 Linn en ................... ..Apr. 28 Polk co ..................... June 1 Polk en ................... Mar. 8 Multnomah eo......... Apr. 28 Polk tio ................... May 15 Polk co................... June 28 Linn co................... .Mar. 8

Private .... Private .... Private.... Private ....

Washington co ....... Apr. 28 Columbia en ............ Apr. 28 Polk en ................... ..Apr. 28 Polk co ................. ....June 28

Johnson, William............. Kelley, Patrick ................. Kinsella, Arthur ............... Keesee, John ....................

Meek, Courtney W ........... Morgan, George W ........... Naught, Francis M ........... Orr, John E .......................

.. .

. . W. T . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. W. T .co. .00. . .. ............. .

Private Private Private Private

Polk Benton Benton

Period.

Horses, by whom owne

Remarks.

1856. Individual... Transferred from Co. N to Wasco co., 0. T 3 mos ..... .. Co. K June 28th. $0 60 W. T ............ Transferred from Co. K to Portland, 0. T....... 3 mug ...... [Co. N June 29th. Individual... Salem, 0. P........... 3 mos ..... .. un. 3 09 Individual... Lost individual horse Dallas, 0. T........... 6 mos ..... .. avoidably July 18th appraised at $300. 1 15 W. T.............1 gun lost appraised at $30. Dallas, 0. T........... 3 mos ..... .. 3 10 W. T............ Salem, .0. T........... 3 mos ..... 33 75 Individual... Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos ..... .. 36 02 W. P............ Dallas, 0. T........... 3 mos ..... .. 27 00 Individual... On daily duty in hospital Dallas, 0. T........... 6 mug ..... .. W. T............. Salem, 0. T........... 3 mug ..... ..... [from July 9th 53 14 W. T Vancouver ............ 3 mos ..... .. from Co. N tc Wasco Co., 0. T 3 mos...........Transferred Co. K June 28th. lost appraised al 4 00 Individual 2 blankets Dallas, 0. T........... 6 mug ..... $12; 1 bridle and martin gales at $5. 32 80 W. T............ Salem, 0. T........... 3 mug.........32 omitted by mistake ir Salem, 0. T........... 3 inns ..... .... 55 W. T........... .. Name last report. broken and lost ap Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos ...........1 95 W. T ............ Gun praised at $75. from Co. N ti Wasco co., 0. T 3 mos ................20 Individual Transferred Co. K June 28th; horse ap praised at $225, saddle $5t bridle $12, blankets gun $75. N Transferred from 3 20 3 mug ..... Wasco K June 28th. horse appraised at Individual 12 3 mos ..... Dallas, .meehears $12, revolver 4, blankets $18. 3 mos........June 23 32 67 Q. M. horse mmnavoidabi 12 33 mug mos ..... Salem, [Ins t. Individual ..... Wasco N Transferred from. Individual 5 20 3 mos ..... K June 28th; horse aj praised at $200, saddle $54 $75, piste bridle $75.

. ....

. $l t b U Co. W. T . . . . . . .......... co. , 0. T Co. $ 4 2 1 1 1 0. T.. . . . . ......... 00 W. T.. . . . . . 1 . 0 W. T . .0.co.. . T.., .0.. .T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .00. . 1 y 0 Co. ......... Wasco Co. Co. $20, guns )l

.June 28 Osgood, William ............... Private Provoo, Narcis ...................Private.... Polk en ................... June Parkhill, John .................. Richardson, John Q. A..... Richards, John A .............. Richards, Newton

Where.

When digcharged.

.Apr. 21 Apr. 28 June 28 June 28


MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN F. M. P. GOFF'S COMPANY-CONTINUED. Enlisted.

Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Residence.

When.

... .................... .................. .................... ...................... B.... . . . . . . . . . . .. W....

................. Private .... .......... Private.... .................. Private .... .................... Private....

Rabren, John W Ringo, Hamilton H Smith, Samuel 3mith, Daniel

tmith, Abner I imith, Charles

Where.

Period.

When disCharged-

Horses, bywhors ow

1856. Polk Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T Marion co................ ...Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T Cowlitz, W. P Mar. 27 Cowlitz Marion eo Apr. 28 Salem, 0. T

co ................... ......... ...............

............ 3 mos..... ....................$8 25 W. P............ ........... mos..... ..................67 W. T............. 2 blankets lost appraised at ..... .......... .............33mos 6 mos..... .................3 20 W. T ..... .......................\V. T............ ..Killed inaction July 15;[$12.50. Irevolver lost appraised at $50;

..

....... Marion co................ Apr. 28 Marion Apr. 28

Private.... Washington Co ..Apr. 28 Private.... W. T. ....................... .Apr. 28

co.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ... ... W. T. co. . .. .. .. .. co.. .. ... ... ... ..... 1 .. .........

3inos 3 mos

26 60 34 13

Salem, 0. T........... 3 mos......................... 17 Salem, 3 mos...... 50 Salem, ..3mos 3380 Lafayette,

3 mos .....

lheasgreen, James J ......... Private laehse, Louis Private lmsley, Sylvester ............... Private

Polk

Washington

Apr. 28 Apr. 28 June

Salem, Salem, Dallas,

3 mos ..... 3 mos...... 311108

limpson, Marshall

Polk eo.

June 28

Wasco

3

B . . . . . .... .... . co .. . . . . co . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . coco... .. .. .............. 1 . . . co . . . . . . . . . . . . . co . . . . . . . .

Cownsend, Jesse ['rimble, John .................. Tanderhoof, David ........... Tanderhoof, Lewis ........... Tanderpool, Campbell M

Private Private Private.... Private Private....

1 gun, $10; Q. M. horse returned; 1 spy glass lost, Q. M.

.................. ............ . ....... ..... .................... .............. 10 W. T. 0.0. T.T.......... . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 1 W.W. TT. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 0. T.. . . ......................... 1 $1.50. .... . 1000 W.W. TT... .. .. ........On 0.0.0. T.T.T................ . . ............................. co., 0. T.. . I IOS . . . . . . . . . . . .........W.W. T.T............ .1 Co. $160,$15, 0.0.0.0. T.T.TT...................... ..6 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ....13..8 W. P.. . . . . $60. . W. T.. . . . . . Co., 0. P.. . . . . . . . . . ........... Co. 0. T.. . . . . . . . . . .... Co. K $325, 0. T.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . I W. T.. . . . . .

.......... .....................

Salem, 0. P W. T

ilisil, George Private .... ieott, Thomas .Private.... llmmonds, Edward M ...... Private.... Marion eo .................Apr. 28 lommerville, Henry Private.... Yamhill co Apr. 28

Private

Remarks

2 8 22 59

Polk eo ................... Washington Polk Polk Polk

Mar. 8 Apr. 28 Mar. 8 June June28

Dallas, Salem, Dallas, Dallas, Waseo

mos ..... 3 mos ..... 6 mos ..... 3 mos ..... 3 mos .....

2 25 50 20 31 02

randerpool, James ........... Private

Polk

June28

Waseo en.,

3 mos .....

20

rance, Thomas ................. Private

Marion

Apr. 28

Salem,

3 mos .....

13 75

W. P W. T

On detailed duty as company gunsmith from July 26th. On daily duty in hospital [from July 4th. 2 blankets lost, $18; Q. M. horse lost. Individual... horse lost unavoidably July 31st appraised at spur, sick list.

1 $450; 1 Co.1 N $50,$10,

horse lost unavoidably, "Q. M." Transferred from to K June 28th; horse appraised into service July 10th at saddle niechears bridle blankets $25, gun $75, pistol

Individual... Individual...

Co. $50, Co. $7,

Individual... Transferred from N to K June 28th; horse appraised at $350. saddle machears $20, bridle $12. Individual... Transferred from N to June 28th; horse appraised at blankets pistol $45.

. . .. MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN F. M. P. GOFF'S COMPANY-COWLUDED.

Names, N absent.

and

I . . . . . . .. .. . . .. .. ......... .. ... . ........ . .

Rank.

co . ..... .. .. .. .. .. .. .... 1 .......... co.. .. .. ................ ........ ... 1 . . . ... Co . . . . . . . . When.

.. ... ... ........ .. .. .. ..

Private.... Polk en Whitaker, David Polk Co Whitaker, Joseph ............. Private Ward, William M ............. Private Welch, Edwin................... Private Private Welch, George Washam, Sampson............ Private Private Watts, Evan Williams, Nathaniel ......... Private Wilks, James ..................... Private Walker, Samuel ................ .Private.... Whitcomb, James .............. Private.... Private Wright, William Wood, Samuel................... Private

1856. Mar. 8 June

Mar. 8 Polk Co Washington en........ Mar. 8 28 Marion Apr. 28 Polk Apr. 28 Polk en Washington en....... Apr. 28 Jackson eo............... Apr. 28 Apr. 28 Washington Co Apr. 28 Washington en Syracuse, N.Y....... June Polk eo.................... June 28

$ 0.0. P.T. .. .. .. .. .. nios...... 1 ........$0 $10,$14. ..... 17 70 W.W.W.T.T... .. .. .. .. .. 0.0.0.0.0. T.P.T.T.T.......................... sf05 . . ....... 1 $6. 0.0.0. T.T.T................ ....02 W.W.W.W. T.TT............... ... .. 1 W.W. T.T.. .. ..... .. . . .[$60; Co. 0.0. T.T.0... ..T... ..... W. 0. T.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 W. T . . . . . .. Co. K Co. W. 0. P.. . Co. K Co.

Enlisted.

Residence.

Where.

Dallas, Dallas,

Dallas, Dallas, Salem, Salem, Salem, Salem, Salem, Salem, Salem, Dallas, Wasco en.,

Williams, James ............... Private

Washington en

Apr. 28

Salem,

Jewitt, John ..................... Private

Marion

June 28

Wasco en.,

Period.

6 3 mos

Horses, by whom owned.

When discharged.

95

Individual... Individual...

Remarks.

horse appraised into service June 1st at $375, saddle $30, bridle and halter mechears $12, blankets

6 snoB ..... 6 mos........ 25 Individual... 3 mos.........6 T.............3 blankets lost, $24. 3 mos.........6 14 3 pair T2 blankets lost, $16; 7 3 mos ..... [spurs. 3 mos..........60 revolver lost appraised at 4 80 3 rnos............ 2 blankets lost, $16. 3 mos..............38 48 3 mos.....................27 39 N to T.............Transferred from 3 mos...........................20 June 28th. N June Transferred to 67 3 mos ..... 6th; 4 blankets lost appraised at $32. N to T.............Transferred from 3 mos................................... June 28th; name omitted by mistake in its proper place.


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Company J, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 31st day of March, 1856, to the 31st day of May, 1856.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN BLUFORD MILLER,

. . .. . . . .. . .

Names, present and sent.

Rank.

Enlisted. Residence.

Bluford Miller ................ Captain .... Marion

- .. .. . ceon..,,00..T. .

When. en.

Where. ere.

.. .. . . .. .

Period. l's

Remarks.

N. 8.-This column shows the total property drawn since the organization of the company.

Co., 0. T....... Mar. 8... Silvert.on .............. 6 mos...... Q. M. horse, rifle, revolver, etc., shoes $4, pants $21.50, blankets $18, tobacco SOc. Anthony W. Presley ...... 1st lieut...... Marion co. 0. T....... Mar. 8... Silverton .............. 6 mos...... Q. M. spurs, revolver, etc., Yeager, etc., boots $19, socks 75c, pants $15, shirt $3.50. Andrew Shepherd ......... 2d lieut Marion Co., 0. T ...... Mar. 8... Silverton .............. 6 mos...... Q. M. boots $10, pants $13, drawers $1.50, coat $20, tobacco 40c, rifle gun $20, horse. George W. Dolan ............ 1st sergt Marion en., O. T ...... Mar. 8... Silverton .............. 6 mos...... Q. M. horse, saddle, bridle, rope, revolver, etc., boots $13, socks 85c, pants $13, drawers $2, shirts $10, coat $15, blankets $44, gloves $3. Bluford Stanton .............. 2d sergt Marion co., 0. T ...... Mar. 8... Silverton ............... 6 mos...... Q. M. boots $11, shoes $5, pants $13, shirts $2, blankets $9, comb 50c, tobacco $2, rope, gun. Marion Co., 0. T ...... Mar. 8... Silverton ............. 6 mos...... Q. M. horse, rope, revolver, etc., shoes $7, pants $4.50, shirts $4, Lemuel Ileadrick........... 3d sergt blankets $12, tobacco $18. Louis 1. Wolford ............ 4th sergt Marion en., 0. T ........Mar. 8... Silverton .............. 6 mos...... Q. M. blankets $18, tobacco $36, rope, revolver, etc., flask lost. Marion en., 0. T ...... Mar. 8... Silverton .............. 6 mos...... Q. M. boots $10, pants $15, drawers $4.50 shirt $1.80, coat $15. Newton L. Todd ............ ..1st corpl socks 81.50, hat $4, blankets $36, comb l, tobacco $2.20, rope: horse, martingales, two belt knives. John Q. Adams ............... 2d corpl Marion co., 0. T ...... Mar. 8... Silverton .............. 6 mos...... Q. M. boots $12. pants $13, shirts $8.40, socks 75e, blankets $36. hat $4, tobacco $58, saddle, bridle, horse, rope, rifle, belt knife, Marion en., 0. T ...... Mar. 8... Silverton ............. 6 mos...... Q. M. shirts $2, blankets $24, tobacco SOc rifle. Jacob Westenfetter ......... 3d corpl ........... .6 mos...... Q. M. boots $7, shirt $4, blanket $24, hat $6, belt knife $1, cope. Lawrence Eisenhart ....... 4th corpl Marion co., 0. T........Mar 8... Silverton... Allen, Ira....................... Private Marion co., 0. P....... Mar. 8... Silverton............... 6 mos. ..... Q. M. shoes $4, pants $7, shirts $4.70, thread SOc, tobacco i8c, twc bridles, rope, horse, rifle, revolver, etc., two flasks, belt knife martingales, etc., $2. Marion en., 0. T ...... Mar. 8.. Silverton ....... ...... 6 mos..... Q. 36. boots $12, socks 75c, shirts $7.80, blankets $18, kerchief, Fuller, James 36............... Private $1.37, tobacco 18c, saddle,bridle,rope, martingales, revolver, etc Higginbothom, N.. ...... Private ...... Tillamook Co., 0. T Mar. 8... Silverton.. ........... 6 mos...... Q. M. boots $15, socks $1.50, pants $20, drawers $2.50, sbirh $10.80, hat $2, blankets $9, tobacco $2.40, rope, rifle, revolver etc., two flasks. Haynes, C. H .................. Private ...... Tillamook Co., 0. T.. Mar. 8... Silverton ...............6 mos.......Q. M. boots $5, shoes $3, socks $1.50, pants 810, sbirts-$10, eomts $1.50. Marion Co., 0. P ....... Mar. 8... Silverton .............. 6 mos.......Q. M. socks 75c, pants $17, shirts $5.50, blankets $36, kerchiefi Hamilton, William H..... Private 62c, tobacco $3.25, horse, saddle, bridle, rope, martingales gun and belt knife. Private Marion Mar. 8.. Silverton .............. 6 mos.......Q. M. shoes $2.50, pants$14, shirts $4.70, blankets $9, tobacco 80c Price, William horse, rope, gun, belt knife. Private...... Marion en., Kemp, John A Mar. 8... Silverton .............. 6 mos.......Q. M. $22, socks 75c, pants $17.50, shirts $8.20, blankets $12, ker chiefs 60c, tobacco 89c, rope, revolver, etc., day-book $1.50. Marion P ...... . Mar. 8... Silverton .............. 6 mos...... Q. M. boots $7, socks $2, pants $9, drawers $2.50, shirts bel Presley, Elias ................. Private knife, tobacco 18c, horse, saddle, bridle, two ropes, rifle, re volver, etc.

$2

$4, ito


MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN BLUFORD MILLER -CONCLUDED.

Names, present and I absent.

Fniisted. Rank.

Remarks.

Residence. When.

Where.

N. B.-This column shows the total property drawn since the organization of the company.

Period.

Parcel, Thomas L ...........Private ......Marion Co., 0. T .......Mar. 8... Silverton ............. .6 inos......Q. M. pants $15. socks $2.75, boots $7, drawers $2.50, shirts $9.50, kerchiefs 62e, tobacco $1, saddle, bridle, ropes, horse, rifle, flasks $21. Liefarth, Andrew ............Private Marion co., 0. T .......Mar. 8... Silverton .............. .6 mos......Q. M. shoes $5.50, socks 75c, pants $14, blankets $12, thread 50c, comb $1, kerchiefs 62c, tobacco $5.46, rope, rifle. Stanton, John A.............. Private......Marion co., 0. T .......Mar. 8... Silverton .............. .6 mos......Q. M. boots $10, pants $10, drawers $2, shirts $7, blankets $18, tobacco $2.33, two ropes, rifle, revolver, etc. Watkins, William ...........Private......Marion co., 0. T .......Mar. 8... Silverton .............. .6 mos......Q. M. boots $7, shoes $4, pants $4.50, shirts $11, blankets $18, hat $4, combs $1.50, saddle, bridle, etc., three ropes, horse, flask, rifle, belt knife, paper $1. Taylor, John W ...............Private Marion co., 0. T.......Mar. 8... Silverton .............. .6 Inos......Q. M. boots $12, pants $17, drawers $2. shirts $5.50, blankets $27, list $6, kerchiefs 62e, tobacco $1.43, horse, rope, rifle, shot pouch, powder horn, belt knife. Stanton, John ................. .Private Marion co., 0. T.......Mar. 8... Silvertoii .............. .6 mos......Q. M. boots $7, pants $7, shirt $3.50, tobacco $1, rifle, powder horn. Glisan, Albert ................ .Private Marion co., 0. T ...... .Mar. 8... Silverton .............. .6 mos......Q. M. boots $11, socks $2, pants $19, shirts $4, blankets $14, comb SOe, kerchief 62e, tobacco $2.20, horse, rifle, shot pouch, pistol holder. Short., Mend. ...................Private Marion co., 0. T .......Mar. 8... Silverton .............. .6 mos......Q. M. boots $9, shoes $3, pants $8, blankets $27, tobacco $1.20, revolver, etc., Yeager gun. Elliott, William ...............Private......Marion co., 0. T .......Mar. S... Silverton .............. .6 mos......Q. M. shirts $8.80, blankets $36, tobacco $3.23, saddle, gun. Shan, John M ................ .Private......Marion co., 0. T .......Mar. 8... Silverton .............. .6 mos......Q. M. boots $12, socks 75e, pants $6, drawers $4, shirts $4.90, blankets $18, tobacco 76c, saddle, bridle, rope, horse, rifle, revolver, etc. Walker, John ................. .Private......Marion co., 0. T.......Mar. S... Silverton ...............6 inos Q. M. boots $15, shoes $3, socks $4.25, pants $22, drawers $4.50, White, Columbus........... White, Joseph A ............ Parsons, Henry G..........

shirts $14.20, combs $1, kerchiefs 75c, tobacco $18, saddle, bridle, rope, horse, rifle, revolver, etc., shot pouch, powder flask. Thurston co .............May 24... Camp Miller ..........6 mos......Individual saddle $30, bridle $5, horse $300. Thurston co ............ .May 24... Camp Miller ......... .6 mos......Individual saddle $30, bridle $5, horse $200, revolver $10. Thurston Co ............ .May 24... Camp Miller ..........6 mos......Individual saddle $30, bridle $6, blankets $18, horse $200.

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MUSTER ROLL

OF CAPTAIN BLUFORD MILLER, Company J, of the Second Regiment of Washington Territory Volunteers, Army of the United States, from the 31st day of May, 1856, to the 31si day of July, 1856.

Names, present and absent.

Rank.

Residence.

Bluford Miller .................. ..Captain Marion Co., 0. T ........ Anthony W. Presley..........1st lieut.... Marion Co., 0. 71 Andrew Shepherd ..............2d lieut....... Marion en., 0. T ......... John A. Kemp ................ ...2d Ileut....... Marion Co., 0. T ......... George W. Dolan ............. ..1st sergt Marion Co., 0. T ......... liluford Stanton .................2d sergt Marion co., 0. T ........

_______

Enlisted.

When.

Where.

Mar. 8 Mar. 8 Mar. 8 Mar. 8 Mar. 8 Mar. 8

Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton..

Samuel Headrick ...............3d sergt.... Marion Co., 0. T ......... Mar. 8 Silverton.. Writ. H. Hamilton ............. 3d sergt Marion co., 0. P ..........Mar. 8 Lewis J. Wolford ...............4th sergt Marion en., 0. P ..........Mar. 8 James M. Fuller ............... 4th sergt Marion en., 0. T ..........Mar. 8 ewton S. Todd ........ ...... ..1st corp. Marion co., 0. T ..........Mar. 8 John Q. Adams ................. 2d corp..... ..Marion co. 0. T ..........Mar. 8 Jacob Westenfelter. .......... 3d corp..... Marion en., 0. P ..........Mar. 8 Larence Eisenhart ............ 4th corp Marion en.. 0. T .......... 8 tllen, Ira .......................... ..Private. Marion en., 0. T .........Mar. Mar. 8 Eligginbothom, N. J ..... ......Private Tillamook Co., 0. P Mar. 8 Elaynes, C. H..................... Private Tillamook co., 0. T Mar. 8 'rice, Wm ......................... Private .... Marion en., 0. T ..........Mar. 8 'resley, Elias .................... Private .... Marion en., 0. P ....... Mar. 8 'urcel, Thomas L ............. Private.... Marion en., 0. T ......... Mar. 8

Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton..

L.iefarth, Andrew .............. Private .... Stanton, John A ................ Private .... Watkins, Wm ................... Private .... taylor, John W................ Private .... Stanton, John ................... Private .... Gtisan, Albert ................. Private ....

Silverton.. Silverton.. Silverton.. Silvertomi.. Silverton.. Silverton..

Marion co., 0. P ........ Marion co., 0. T ......... Marion Co., 0. T. ......... Marion co., 0. P ......... Marion en., 0. T ......... Marion co. 0. T .........

Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar.

8 8 8 8 8 8

Period.

When discharged.

Remarks.

6 months ............Q. M. pants $7, shirts $6. tobacco $1.86; one rope, three pack horses lost in battle, one cap $3. 6 months ........Q. M. pants 87 6 months.. Jiiiie 3 Q. Al. tobacco 41c. 6 months .......... Two navy caps $6, tobacco $1.25, pants $7, socks $1.70, powder flask, 2 ropes. 6 months........Cap $3, tobacco $2.08, pants $7, kerchiefs 75c, one rope. 6 months........Q. 51. tobacco 41c, one rope, one Colt's revolver and accoutrements. 6 months.. June 3.. { Q. M. pants $7, socks 67c, one revolver and accoutrements (Colt's). 6 months ...........Q. M. socks 85c, shoes $6, one horse and one lost, one Colt's revolver and accoutrements. 6 months.. June 3... 6 muouths.................... ..Q. M. tobacco, 41c, boots $5. 6 months ... ............... Q. Al. tobacco $2.69, pants, $7, one blanket, rope. 6 months' .................. Q. M. pants $14, shirts $3, socks SSc, shoes $3, one rope. 6 months ... .................Q. M. pants $7, tobacco 41c. 6 months ....................Q. M. boots $5, one rope. 6 months .................... M. socks 85e, shoes $3, rope, one rifle gun lost, $50. 6 months ... .................Q. t. M. cap 3, tobacco $2.91. socks $1.70, shoes $3, one pair blankets. 6 months ..................Q. M. socks $1.70, shoes $3, one rifle gun, individual gun lost in battle. 6 months ....................Q. M. one cap $3, tobacco 20c, pants $7, rope. 6 months ..................Q. M. pants $7, shirts $3, socks 85c, boots $5, blankets individual, one horse valuedat $100 appraised. 6 months .........Q. M. tobacco 81.86, pants $7, shirts $3, shoes $3, powder flask, one rope, individual one horse valued at $175 appraised. 6 months ...........Q. M. tobacco $2.28, boots $5. 6 months.. June 3... 6 months...........Q. M. cap $3, tobacco $1.25, shirt $9, coat $15, shoes $9. 6 months...........Q. M. tobacco 81.2.5, pants 87, shirts $6, boots$5, sboes$3. 6 months.. June 3 Q. M. tobacco 41e. 6 months................... Q. M. cap $3, tobacco SIc, pants $14, shirts $6, shoes $3, I one nowder flask. shirt.s Ri.

MUSTER ROLL OF CAPTAIN BLUFORD MILLER'S COMPANY--

'lames, present and absent.

Rank.

Short, Meriel .....................Private .... Elliot, Wm ....................... Private.... thaw, John M................... Private .... Walker, John .................... Private.... White, Columbus .............. Private .... White, Joseph ................... Private .... .Private.... . Parsons. Henry G............ Lilly, Silas N ..................... Private .... Stratton, Thomas .............. Private .... Grimes, George W ............ .Private .... Trask, J. B ........................ Private .... Neal, Louis........................ Private.... Marlatt, Wm ..................... .Private .... Raises, Joseph .................. I Private ....

Residence. When. Marion Co., 0. P ......... Mar. 8 Marion en., 0. T ......... Mar. 8 Marion en., 0. T ......... Mar. 8 Marion co. 0.T ......... Mar. 8 May 24 Thurston en., W. T Thurston co., W. P May 24 May 24 Thurston co., W. T Thurston co., W. T July 14 July 14 Port Gamble, W. T Milwaukie .................. July 14 Oregon Territory....... Jone 2 Oregon Territory........ June 2 Oregon Territory ........ June 2 Oregon Territory...... June 2

Where.

H'hen dincharged. Period.

?ensarkn.

Silverton.. 6 mnontlis.. ...........Q. M. shirts $3. Silverton.. 6 months.. Juime... Âś5, one rope. 55. tobacco $1.67, ho )tS Silverton.. 6 months ...Q. M. cap $3, tobacci $1.75, pants $7, shirt $3, socks Silverton 6 months ... Q.$1.60, shoes $0, blank ets $12. M. tobacco $2.67, pa its *7, socks 85c, boots $5. Cp Miller 6 months ... Q. M. tobacco $1.85, pa its $7, shirt $3, socks 85c, boots $5, Cp Miller 6 months ... Q.one rope. M. pants $7. Cp Miller. 6 months ...... Q. Individual horse valued at $300, one saddle consMill Crk 6 months...... plete $45, one one saddle lost in action. Individual one horse valued at $200, one saddle cornMill Crk 6 months ............... plete $55, one gun $1 Individual one horse valued at $300. one saddle $60, ..................... Mill Crk ... rifle $10, blankets $4 one revolver $25. M. one powder fins one rifle gun. Mill Crk 6 months................... Q. $4.50, one halter. ................... Q. M. one shirt $3, shc m's Mill Crk 6 months obaeeo 62e, shoes $4.50, po