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October/November 2016

Travel in style Our guide to careers and qualifications in the automotive industry

A day in the life Find out what a career in construction is like

Sponsored by

Hard work pays off Get some inspiration from engineer Faye Banks

/MovingOnMagazine @MovingOn_mag FIND US ONLINE: MOVINGONMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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VTCT is a specialist awarding organisation offering vocational and technical qualifications in a range of service sectors VTCT will be at the Skills Show on 17-19 November at the NEC, Birmingham to support our sponsorship of the Beauty Therapy WorldSkills UK finals. Come and visit us on our stand to discuss how we can help training providers and learners to continue to increase standards in our sectors.

We will also have demonstrations covering hairdressing, barbering, media make-up and bar skills.

Key VTCT TLQ Features are: • Content specifically designed to maximise career opportunities • Flexible delivery options for centres • Unique selection of optional units • VTCT TLQs are graded; Pass/Merit/Distinction/Distinction*

Our staff will have the latest information on our qualification offer, including Apprenticeship support and our new Technical Level Qualifications

• Two exams per qualification

See you at the NEC - Hall 9

• Two supportive EQA visits per year

• Practical unit grading throughout the qualification • Synoptic assessment in the final third of the course • Fantastic support materials and workshops

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact VTCT Customer Support on customersupport@vtct.org.uk or call 44 (0)23 8068 4500.

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CONTENTS

OCT/NOV 2016

CONTENTS 20 An engineering inspiration

Faye Banks tells us her inspirational story of how she became head of North East operations at National Grid.

24 Elements of success

We take a look at engineering careers that span the earth, sea, air and cyberspace.

34 Cutting edge careers

8 News

Keep up to date with what’s happening to university costs and apprenticeships, and discover our recommended apps for students in our news section.

11 Gorgeous careers

Take a look at how you could become a beauty therapist.

15 On the road

Find out about some of the different job roles involved in the design, production, sale and maintenance of vehicles.

17 The finishing touches

The manufacturing process is the final stage of automotive production, discover four important roles involved.

19 Studying for a job in automotive

We take a look at the variety of qualification routes available from entry level to degree, technical and academic.

23 A cool career

We talk to Darren about how he became an applications design engineer.

26 In the spotlight – Project managers

Student writer, Nathan Redford tells us about some cutting edge technological careers.

Find out all about the role of construction project manager.

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27 A construction revolution

Find out how new technologies are creating exciting careers within the construction industry.

30 Meet the workers

What’s it like to work in construction? Find out from people actually doing the job.

32 Front of house

Student writer, Luke Wakeling takes a look at front of house careers in the hospitality and catering sector.

37 Good to know – University applications

Get key information about the university application process, including dates, costs and writing your personal statement.

38 The UCAS tariff system

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The UCAS tariff points system has changed. Find out what each grade is worth here.

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CONTRIBUTORS

MEET THE

EDITORIAL TEAM

Moving On wouldn’t be the same without its young writers and we are very grateful to them for all the hard work that they do researching and writing to a brief. It gives us great pleasure to provide an opportunity for our writers to develop their skills in researching, writing and working to deadlines.

OUR OCTOBER WRITERS WERE: ERICA BARNES

NATHAN REDFORD

Erica has been a regular contributor to Moving On since 2014 when she spent a week in our Stratford upon Avon office learning what it’s like working in publishing. She returned to us this August for another week and to learn about online content writing.

Nathan is an A-level student and has just gone into his second year of study. Nathan spent a week with us in August doing work experience in the office and has also researched and written articles for the magazine remotely.

LUKE WAKELING

MEL SNOW

Luke, an A-level student from Surrey is interested in a career in journalism. He is using his experience writing for Moving On to build a portfolio of work that he can use in the future.

Mel is a second year university student who has been writing regularly for Moving On since she was at school. Keen to develop a career in journalism, Mel has her own blog called The Bookworm Fantasy where she discusses her work experience and also reviews literature.

WITH SPECIAL THANKS TO: FAYE BANKS

DARREN MAY

Erica interviewed Faye in order to write an inspirational feature on how hard work really does pay off. Faye went from leaving school with no qualifications to being Head of North East Operations for National Grid. You can read her story on page 20.

Darren kindly allowed us to interview him about his route via an apprenticeship into a successful career as an applications design engineer with Thermacore Europe.

A BIG THANK YOU!

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Here at Moving On we understand how important it is for the student voice to be heard. Over the years we have had the opportunity to offer work experience to over 100 young people in schools all over England and we thank them all.

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FOREWORD

LETTER FROM THE

PUBLISHER W

elcome to the first issue of Moving On for the new academic year. I hope that those of you who collected exam results this year saw all of your hard work pay off. October is a great time to get some careers inspiration and in this issue we take a look at some of the great career possibilities in the key employment areas of construction, engineering, manufacturing and automotive. Publisher Lynette Daly Editor Email: editor@walpolepublishing.co.uk Production Manager Anthony Brooks Social Media Co-ordinator Tom Clover Advertising James Warrender, Account Manager Email: james@walpolepublishing.co.uk Tel: 01789 509004

We’ve also got some inspirational feature interviews for you. On page 23 you can read Darren’s story of how he found the perfect engineering apprenticeship for him and on page 20 our student reporter Erica interviews Faye Banks who, after leaving school with no qualifications worked her way into her dream role of head of North East operations at National Grid.

Schools, colleges & sixth forms Annual Subscription Samantha Beishon, Distribution Manager Email: samantha@walpolepublishing.co.uk Tel: 01789 509006

One of our favourite things to do is to provide you with information about careers that you may not have heard of or thought about and along with this issue of Moving On we are including a special property careers supplement. In this you can find out about career options including roles like estate or lettings agent and auctioneer.

Walpole Publishing Ltd. Union House 7-9 Union Street Stratford-upon-Avon Warwickshire CV37 6QT Tel: 01789 509001

We are always on the lookout for new student writers so if you are interested in writing for us then get in touch. Simply email editor@ walpolepublishing.co.uk attaching a copy of your CV and an example of something that you have written and are proud of.

Walpole Media Group Limited Walpole Publishing Ltd is part of Walpole Media Group Ltd. Walpole Publishing Ltd. has made every effort to ensure that the information in this publication was correct at the time of going to press and hereby disclaim any liability to any party caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence or any other cause.

Lynette Daly, Publisher

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THE SKILLS SHOW

Start your sh by taking our picture quiz. Thi what careers could which show zones to

17-19 NOVEMBER 2016

worldskillsuk.org/c

SIGN UP TODAY

SkillsShow 6

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y som

For a preview of T

worldsk

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Still trying out what you’d like to do when you finish school but getting nowhere fast? A good way to start is by talking to employers and training advisors who are keen to talk to you - about you. The Skills Show on 17-19 November at the NEC Birmingham is the place where young people can meet their opportunities face-to-face. Have a go at over 50 skills, some of which will surprise you… Visit Spotlight sessions on specific industries to get insights into different career paths. Watch apprentices in skills competitions show what they’ve learned.

Talk to people doing the jobs you’re thinking about and get me new ideas too.

how experience right away r fun and free online is will help you identify d appeal and tell you visit:

careers-cloud

The Skills Show visit:

illsuk.org

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NEWS

TOP FIVE APPS FOR STUDENTS UPDATE ON UNIVERSITY FUNDING

Studying, whether at university, college or school presents many students with challenges. Here are our top five recommended mobile apps to help you make the most of your study time and they are all free.

EVERNOTE

Get your class notes organised and stay ahead of the game. Evernote allows you to take notes, capture images and make a to-do list.

IF YOU ARE STARTING UNIVERSITY THIS YEAR THERE HAVE BEEN CHANGES TO THE FUNDING THAT IS AVAILABLE TO YOU. In previous years, if your household income was £25,000 or less you would have been able to apply for a maintenance grant of up to £3,387 per year. This grant did not need to be repaid and it was intended to support students from less well-off backgrounds with the general costs of going to university. These grants have now been replaced with loans, which do have to be repaid alongside your tuition fees. This means that although there is financial support available, you will have a greater debt at the end of your study, a change which some people have argued is unfair because it means that the poorest students will end up with the largest amount of debt after university.

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MY STUDY LIFE This student planner eliminates the need for a paper copy of your timetable. You can store all your classes and other school activities colour coded and receive notifications too.

EASY BIB Including a bibliography at the end of your work is a must and Easy Bib allows you to choose the style that you need and then either type in the name of the book or scan the barcode from the book cover and create a bibliography.

DROPBOX MOBILE Store all your documents, videos and pictures in one secure place so that you always have them and share with other people easily – great for group work.

DRAGON DICTATION This voice recognition app converts your speech into text; a handy tool for all but especially those with learning difficulties or disability which makes typing difficult.

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CRAFTY APPRENTICESHIPS

There are some new apprenticeships in development that are well worth looking out for. Although there has been a lot of talk recently about how apprenticeships are not just for those who want to learn a trade, it’s worth mentioning that an apprenticeship can offer the best way of beginning a career in a skilled trade. The following are new apprenticeship standards that are being developed.

BLACKSMITH Working with metals such as steel, iron, copper and bronze, blacksmiths make everyday and decorative items.

HAND ENGRAVER Engravers are creative and they engrave or cut lettering or designs into materials such as glass using hand tools.

GCSE RESULTS DAY This year saw an overall reduction in the number of students in England gaining A*-C grades in their GCSEs (66.9 per cent). This was not the case in Northern Ireland, where a slight increase was recorded or in Wales, where the number of students receiving A*-C grades remained the same as last year.

ORGAN BUILDER Organ builders work as part of a team and need to master things like pipe making, tuning and leathering, which is the process of using sheepskin to make the moving parts in the organ bellows.

SPECTACLE MAKER Making eye glasses to improve people’s eye sight and their quality of life must not only be very skilled but also a very rewarding as a career.

Girls continue to achieve better results than boys at GCSE and 71.3 per cent of girls receiving at least grade C in comparison to 62.4 per cent of boys.

BEECOMING A BEE FARMER It’s not just honey that bees provide us with. Did you know that one third of the food that we eat relies on bee pollination? According to the British Beekeepers Association around 70 different crops depend on visits from bees. Have you ever thought about a career as a beekeeper though? If you are aged 16-24, you like the thought of working outdoors and love nature, maybe you could think about becoming a beekeeping apprentice. Bee A Beefarmer is a three-year apprenticeship which could see you working alongside experienced beefarmers and completing the Excellence in Beefarming Diploma. You don’t need any qualifications but you do have to love bees. To find out more about the Bee A Beefarmer apprenticeship scheme visit www.beefarmers.co.uk/ apprenticeships/

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FREE ENTRY

VISIT A CAREERS, JOBS AND SKILLS EVENT NEAR YOU! CARDIFF

LLANDUDNO

NORTHERN IRELAND

YORKSHIRE AND THE HUMBER

YOUR FUTURE STARTS HERE

5 & 6 October 2016

12 & 13 October 2016

19 & 20 October 2016

8 & 9 November 2016

Venue Cymru, Llandudno

Motorpoint Arena, Cardiff

Titanic Exhibition Centre, Belfast

skillscymru.co.uk

skillscymru.co.uk

Centenary Pavilion, Leeds United FC, Leeds

skillsnorthernireland.co.uk

skillsyh.co.uk

Skills Scotland

Skills Scotland

Skills Scotland

GLASGOW

ABERDEEN

EDINBURGH

26 & 27 October 2016

1 November 2016

8 November 2016

SECC, Glasgow

AECC, Aberdeen

skillsscotlandglasgow.co.uk

skillsscotlandaberdeen.co.uk

Royal Highland Centre, Edinburgh skillsscotlandedinburgh.co.uk

For Spring events, please visit: www.regionalskillsevents.co.uk and www.nationalcareerguidanceshow.com

BRINGING TEACHERS, PARENTS, STUDENTS AND YOUNG PEOPLE FACE-TO-FACE WITH CAREERS AND SKILLS OPPORTUNITIES

LEARNING EXPERIENCES

GET SKILLED STANDS

Putting careers into context

Bringing the world of work to life

CAREERS ZONE Staffed by experts

LIVE OPPORTUNITIES BOARD Bringing you apprenticeships, job vacancies, volunteering and training possibilities

THESE EVENTS ARE ORGANISED BY

ORGANISATIONS Bringing you face-to-face with people who can help you follow your dream

There is a travel bursary available for school groups. www.prospects.co.uk

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HAIR AND BEAUTY

A GORGEOUS

CAREER IF YOU ENJOY HELPING PEOPLE TO LOOK AND FEEL THEIR BEST THEN A CAREER AS A BEAUTY THERAPIST MIGHT BE THE CAREER FOR YOU.

B

eauty therapists carry out a range of face and body treatments for clients. These might include facials, makeovers, eyebrow shaping, manicures and pedicures, hair removal and tanning treatments. A big part of the job involves customer care and customer service skills are important. In addition to carrying out treatments you would be expected to take phone calls, sort appointments for customers and greet clients on arrival. It is also important that you are able to put people at ease with a friendly and tactful approach. There are lots of different places that you might work as a beauty therapist, for example, in a salon on the high street, in a clinic, in a spa or hotel or even on a cruise ship. You could work either as an employee or as a freelance beauty therapist. A vocational course of study is an ideal entry point into a career as a beauty therapist

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and lots of colleges have specialist facilities, some including their own salons. The kind of vocational qualifications that you could choose to study are the Diploma in Beauty Therapy Services, the Diploma in Beauty Techniques,

“A vocational course of study is an ideal entry point into a career as a beauty therapist.� the Diploma in Hair and Beauty Services, the Certificate in Beauty Salon Reception, and the Level 4 Diploma in Management Practice and Advanced Techniques in the Hair and Beauty Sector. It is also possible to develop specialist skills such as epilation techniques, piercing and laser and light treatments by undertaking additional short courses.

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It is possible to study for a vocational qualification full time or to gain a qualification whilst on an apprenticeship. You can search for apprenticeship vacancies on websites such as Not Going to Uni or you can look on college and training provider as well as employer websites to see what apprenticeships they offer. An apprenticeship will take a minimum of 12 months to complete and you will be paid whilst you are an apprentice. Ordinarily you will be required to have GCSE English and maths to do an apprenticeship and if you do not have these qualifications at grade A*-C you will be asked to complete them while you are on your apprenticeship programme.

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To search for beauty apprentice opportunities visit www.notgoingtouni.co.uk/all/filter/sectorFilter/ beauty

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PLAN YOUR CAREER

Visit us at The Skills Show stand H18-C-14

Becoming a member of the Institute is a great way of kick-starting your career in logistics and transport

Student Members receive · access to the Knowledge Centre library and research databases · latest industry news alerts · specialist Careers Service and job search Special Student rate £25 per year

Join today: ciltuk.org.uk/join View our Careers Guide: ciltuk.org.uk/careersguide Call us on: 01536 740104 12

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CASE STUDY

EMMA ROSS

M

y early career took a few twists and turns even though supply chain management and The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT(UK)) quickly became a focus for me. I originally planned to study musical theatre, but I soon realised that a career in logistics would suit me far better. After completing my undergraduate degree in Retailing and Management, I decided to do my Masters in Logistics and Supply Chain Management at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. The primary reason for choosing this course was that it was accredited by CILT and it was an excellent springboard to launch my career. On graduation, I was awarded CILT Logistics Student of the Year 2012 Scotland – and my more official role within the Institute began. I quickly joined Tesco distribution’s Graduate Trainee Scheme and was invited to join CILT’s Young Professionals Forum (YPF) and Scottish Regional committees. For the next two years I helped to organise the YPF Annual Conference and attended many fascinating events where I could discuss issues with professionals working in all sectors, including those working in transport, road planning and rail. As a result of my work within CILT, I was also

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invited to join CILT’s International Young Professionals committee. This allowed me to represent the UK, Europe, North America and Africa at an international level. I have recently attended conventions in Montreal and Dubai where I have furthered my knowledge of retail distribution and gained an invaluable insight into how the sector operates in different countries. I have also been able to actively support the next generation of Young Professionals - ensuring that they too get the most out of their studies, the Institute, and the various networks that support our members. I have enjoyed a varied career so far, starting out with Tesco distribution before moving into supply chain consulting with Crimson & Co. and now running a multi-temperature warehouse for WM Morrisons. If I look back to my early days, directing musicals with over 200 individuals, it is not so different to my existing role where I lead 400 colleagues within the warehouse! CILT has helped me realise my career opportunities by seeing other areas of our profession, learning from senior influencers and utilising that knowledge throughout my career.

For more information on The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport visit www.ciltuk.org.uk

I was appointed to the UK board for the CILT at the start of 2016, and I am proud to be able to give back to the Institute that has done so much for me.

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IMI AUTOCITY

CAREERS TOOLS AND RESOURCES FOR THE MOTOR INDUSTRY

#MotorCareers THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY EMPLOYS SOME OF THE BRIGHTEST MINDS AROUND, SO WE’VE DEVELOPED A WHOLE HOST OF FREE RESOURCES TO HELP YOU.

Sign up, log in and discover more at www.theimi.org.uk/autocity 14

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AUTOMOTIVE

ON THE

ROAD

GETTING A CAR FROM INITIAL IDEA TO THE OPEN ROAD – WE TAKE A LOOK AT SOME OF THE AUTOMOTIVE CAREERS THAT YOU MIGHT WANT.

T

he journey of a car, motorcycle or any other vehicle for that matter is a long one and it takes lots of different people working at different stages to complete that journey. This means that there are lots of job roles within the automotive industry, one of which might suit your skills. At the initial stages there will be people working on research and development and design engineers who take the initial ideas and turn these into technical drawings so that the vehicle can be produced.

FROM DESIGN TO PRODUCTION Automotive engineers work at the design, development and production stages. For example, as a design engineer you would use computer aided design (CAD) software to produce technical drawings either in 2D or 3D. These drawings will then be used by development engineers to build and test prototypes.

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BEYOND PRODUCTION Once the vehicle has been manufactured according to design somebody has to market that vehicle so that people want to buy it and after this, it takes sales people to assist customers in their purchase. Marketing and PR careers involve varied work and include online as well as in print promotion in addition to larger scale campaigns that can include launch events and TV and radio advertising, all of which are vital to the success of a product. Once you’ve created an interest it takes excellent sales people to promote and sell the vehicle to members of the public.

AFTER SALES

We have only covered a few key roles here; there are plenty of other jobs within the industry too from business and office managers to jobs in finance and accountancy and even specialist lawyers and cyber-security experts. The route that you take into a career in the automotive industry will depend on what you want to do and each role requires a different set of skills and qualifications. There are many apprenticeship options, starting at level two and going up as far as a degree apprenticeship as well as vocational and academic options so it’s worth you looking into all of these.

Jobs in automotive don’t stop once a customer has bought a vehicle. Every car that is more than three years old needs an MOT and mechanics are needed for servicing, maintenance and repairs. This means that there is a need for MOT testers, mechanics and technicians.

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For more information on careers in automotive visit www.theimi.org.uk/careers or take a look at our automotive careers section online.

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

MOTOR VEHICLE TECHNICIANS

M

otor vehicle technicians service and repair cars, lorries, motorbikes and coaches. As a technician you would be expected to identify any faults with the vehicle, calculate the repair costs, communicate these to the customer and carry out the repairs.

HOW TO BECOME A MOTOR VEHICLE TECHNICIAN

As a motor vehicle technician you would need to have good problem solving skills as well as good customer service skills in addition to the technical skills required to carry out repairs.

You can search for apprenticeship opportunities on the government website, through a training provider or college website or by checking employer’s websites for vacancies.

You could start your career in a variety of places – a car, motorcycle or truck dealership, in a body repair workshop or in a small, independent garage. With experience you could train to be an MOT tester or become a senior technician. If you want to become an MOT tester you would need to be aged 20 or over, have a full driving licence for the type of vehicle that you want to test, have no unspent criminal convictions and have at least four years’ experience repairing the type of vehicle that you want to test.

Many colleges offer full time courses at level one right up to HNC in vehicle maintenance and repair and other related subjects. Another common route into a career as a motor vehicle technician is through an apprenticeship.

JOB PROSPECTS AND EARNINGS Average salaries for motor vehicle technicians can be around £15,000 to £20,000 per year and senior technicians can earn more than £25,000. According to a recent report by City and Guilds only three per cent of young people consider working in the wholesale and retail or repair of motor vehicles trade even though the sectors are expected to employ 15 per cent of the labour market in 2022.

The Institute of the Motor Industry hosts live apprenticeship opportunities and provides information on a variety of careers in the automotive sector www.theimi.org.uk/autocity

For more information on how to become an MOT tester visit www.gov.uk/become-an-mottester.

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Ju1978 / Shutterstock.com

AUTOMOTIVE

THE FINISHING

TOUCHES

ACCORDING TO THE SOCIETY OF MOTOR MANUFACTURERS AND TRADERS A NEW CAR IS BUILT EVERY 16 SECONDS IN THE UK. LET’S TAKE A LOOK AT FOUR KEY JOB ROLES IN CAR MANUFACTURING.

T

he assembly plant is where the final stage of car production takes place. Here the component parts, which might have been produced in a variety of locations are all brought together to manufacture the final product.

and products. Tool and die maintenance technicians interpret technical drawings and they use hand, machine, and automated machine tools. They test and adjust systems and ensure that quality is maintained.

Working at an assembly plant will normally involve working as part of a team even though you would have your specialist area of work. Many of the roles require you to have good problem solving skills and attention to detail and the nature of the work means that adhering to health and safety regulations and maintaining quality controls is a must.

It’s all very well having an assembly line and lots of workers, but if the machinery breaks down or goes wrong then productivity will be slow. Technical support engineers are needed to ensure that the manufacturing activity runs smoothly. They will diagnose faults and maintain equipment to keep everything going.

TOOL AND DIE MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN

Modern cars make use of a lot of electronic equipment. An automotive electrician will fit and test electric and electronic equipment and systems such as electronic ignitions, electric windows, air conditioning systems and in-car

We wouldn’t get very far without people to manufacture and maintain the engineering tooling which is used to produce components

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TECHNICAL SUPPORT ENGINEER

AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICIAN

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stereo equipment. This will involve taking readings using a laptop or hand held device and testing wiring.

PAINT SPRAYER At the end of the day, customers want a car that looks good. Paint sprayers apply the finishing touches to the vehicle using a manual spray gun or automated equipment. They will prepare the surface for spraying, set up equipment, make sure that the colour is correct, and apply primers, main coats and a finish. Many of these roles in automotive manufacturing are available through the apprenticeship route. After completing your GCSEs it may be worth taking a look at motor vehicle college courses that may be available locally, which will enable you to train in a workshop environment and gain valuable technical and practical skills as well as a recognised qualification.

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Aim high!

Are you going to university or planning to take a higher education course at college?

Do you have a disability and have you been awarded Disabled Student Allowance (DSA) support?

If yes... then you may be receiving some specialist assistive technology equipment. Following on from this you should be entitled to some one-to-one training support, ound to your home. wher t taken up your training and need help understanding how the equipment can help you with your course and disability, then Vocendi can help. Vocendi has a dedicated team of assistive technology trainers and study skill tutors, who have developed tried and tested methodologies to enable you to do better on your course, through the use of assistive technology strategies. holistic teaching approaches, which are adapted around your needs and course requirements: ยง Adapting the technology around your disability and course requirements ยง Developing an Assistive Technology learning plan for your learning needs

OCENDI T e, please visit our website, or contact us on: www.vocendi.com | E: dsa@vocendi.com | T: 01789 509008

ยง Introducing study skill strategies to help you perform course related

tasks including: essay writing, gathering and managing research, exam planning and revision, managing course and learning information, taking effective notes in lectures/seminars, proof reading and reviewing your written work

www.vocendi.com

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Phone: 020 8909 6000 | Web: harrow.ac.uk | #JoinHarrow

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AUTOMOTIVE

STUDYING FOR A JOB IN

AUTOMOTIVE

THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY IS HUGE AND THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT CAREERS AND JOB ROLES WITHIN IT. THE CAREER THAT YOU WANT WILL DETERMINE THE TRAINING AND QUALIFICATIONS THAT YOU NEED BUT HERE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE OPTIONS.

L

earning and qualifications for a career in the automotive industry begin at entry level and go all the way up to degree level and beyond, so there really is an option to suit all learners.

IF YOU HAVE NO QUALIFICATIONS Entry level qualifications in automotive include the Entry Level Award and the Entry Level Diploma for the Introduction to Vehicle Technology. Entry level courses are suitable for anyone aged 14-19 and you don’t need any qualifications to do these courses which can allow you to go on to do further courses at a higher level.

VOCATIONAL / TECHNICAL COURSES Technical qualification courses, which offer an alternative to academic ones such as GCSEs or A-levels, are available at different levels. There are courses in body repair and paint refinishing, light and heavy vehicle maintenance and motorcycle at levels one, two and three.

APPRENTICESHIPS There are lots of apprenticeships available in

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automotive and engineering, ranging from level two, to degree level and these include apprenticeship roles such as mechatronics maintenance technician, product design and development technician and electrical/electronic technical support engineer, which is a degree apprenticeship.

“Entry level courses are suitable for anyone aged 14-19 and you don’t need any qualifications to do these courses.”

your career in the automotive sector there are many to choose from including automotive engineering, automotive or product design, mechanical engineering and motorsport or automotive technology. You’ll find foundation degree courses, bachelor’s degrees and master’s degrees in many automotive related subjects and if studying is your thing and you want to carry on beyond a bachelor’s degree you’ll find lots of specialist degrees such as robotics at master’s level. Alternatively, if you want to develop further with an employer after you finish your degree you could look for a graduate scheme where you will have the opportunity to learn technical skills and to develop other work related skills.

HIGHER EDUCATION Beyond level three there are higher national certificates and diplomas (HNCs and HNDs) which can be a good route into employment. If you are sure that you want to go to university full time and gain a degree before you start

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If you want to find out what it’s like to be an intern at Bentley Motors visit our website and read Eddie’s story at www.movingonmagazine.co.uk/carmanufacturing-interview-bentley-motors-intern/

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INTERVIEW

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AN ENGINEERING

INSPIRATION WORDS: ERICA BARNES

FAYE BANKS LEFT SCHOOL WITH NO GCSES. NOW FAYE IS HEAD OF NORTH EAST OPERATIONS FOR NATIONAL GRID. WE SENT STUDENT REPORTER ERICA TO FIND OUT HOW FAYE DID IT.

F

aye discovered engineering at the age of 16 whilst working at a local manufacturing plant. Since then she has achieved academic success and earned herself a career that she loves. A true inspiration to others, Faye spent her childhood in local authority care and in secondary school really was not engaged in learning. For Faye, life was about day-to-day survival rather than the future. With no GCSEs under her belt Faye was advised to join the military as she was ‘not academic enough’ to go to college. Feeling as though she had few career options and with low confidence, Faye picked up casual work as a line operative in a local manufacturing plant, and it was here that everything changed. Working on the production line, Faye became frustrated when she had to wait for an engineer to fix her machinery when it broke down, so, she asked the engineers to show her how to do this herself. From this point on, there was no stopping her. She enrolled on evening classes and retook her GCSEs, achieving excellent grades. Then, with her GCSEs done, and feeling confident, Faye applied successfully for an Advanced Electrical Engineering Apprenticeship. At a time when she was thinking ‘I don’t want a job, I want a career’ Faye felt that doing an apprenticeship, gave her a structured career plan that she could follow. On completion of her apprenticeship, through which she gained an HNC in Electrical Engineering, Faye was taken on as a systems engineer, which was the beginning of a great career path which would see Faye become an electrical engineer and quickly promoted to team leader. With a passion for engineering and a drive to succeed, Faye took every opportunity available

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to her and continued to educate herself, achieving several degrees, including a Master’s Degree in Engineering, Master’s Degree in Technology Management and an International Triple Accredited MBA. Not content with this, Faye is currently studying for a Master of Laws Degree.

go thinking that engineering is for boys either. Even though, when I started out I was pretty much the only female working in a factory of over 500 men, I have seen an increase in the number of women working in engineering over the years, and I am living proof of a successful female engineer.”

As Head of North East Operations Faye leads a team of over 100 engineers and her work involves managing a number of high voltage stations and planning maintenance. She works across departments, dealing with different things every day and finds that there is a ‘great depth of role’.

Additionally, one of the benefits of an engineering apprenticeship is training on the job. In hindsight, Faye said that she would have liked to have understood her options for vocational study and apprenticeships while she was still at school as they enable students like her a good way of learning practically whilst gaining qualifications.

“I am living proof of a successful female engineer.” Faye says that the best part of her job involves helping others to become professional engineers and having won the Young Woman Engineer Award, and being the youngest fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), Faye works hard as an engineering ambassador to inspire the next generation of engineers. Faye has been involved in lots of engineering initiatives and has worked alongside the Open University and the BBC to produce inspirational STEM documentaries as well as working as part of a team to develop an apprenticeship framework.

Faye’s advice, “Look at what possibilities are out there; this includes looking for a career with a variety of work, where you will not be bored. Furthermore, if you feel you are on the wrong path, it is never too late to switch or start a career. “I encourage young people to find work experience. It is easily accessible and a ‘winwin’ for both young people and the businesses but students don’t always look in the right places, you need to be ‘proactive rather than reactive’. Additionally, volunteer work can be a good option, for example, the HR department of National Grid offers voluntary work throughout the summer holidays that then helps those who want to go on to do the apprenticeship.”

Faye couldn’t be more enthusiastic about engineering as a career and told us that demand for engineers in the UK is high, including female engineers, telling us that “If you are a girl, don’t

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To discover more about engineering careers, including engineering apprenticeships, visit our website, www.movingonmagazine.co.uk/engineering/

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Where will the world of surveying take you? Begin your our journe y 4 1

3

MAP

2

DESIGN A ND BUILD

From the ocean floor to the tallest skyscraper, surveyors shape the world around us #changinghorizons 22

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V A LUE

M A N A GE

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F IN D O U T M O R E A B O U T S U R V E YI NG :

ri cs .o rg /c ha ng in gh or iz on s FACEBOOK.COM/MOVINGONMAGAZINE

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ENGINEERING

A COOL

CAREER DARREN JOINED THERMACORE EUROPE AS AN APPRENTICE. EIGHT YEARS ON, HE’S AN APPLICATIONS DESIGN ENGINEER AT THERMACORE’S EUROPEAN HEADQUARTERS. FIND OUT HOW DARREN FOUND HIS WAY TO A CAREER THAT HE LOVES.

A

t 16 I did a two year A-level programme focused on engineering. After this though, I had a couple of different jobs which I didn’t really enjoy. I was very lucky and when I came across Tyne North Training and told them that I wanted to be a design engineer. They sent me to interview for an apprenticeship at Thermacore. I was successful at interview and at the age of 20, started my career as an engineering apprentice.” “I would recommend an apprenticeship to anyone and if the apprenticeship option had been promoted more to me when I was 16 I might have started out on the career that I love earlier. “Whilst doing my apprenticeship I have gained a BTEC National Certificate in Mechanical Engineering, a Level 3 NVQ, a BTEC Higher National Certificate and a BEng Degree in Mechanical Engineering, all on day release and without building up any nasty debts.

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“Although I sometimes found balancing study, assignments and exams with working a challenge, I found that having real experience in the workplace meant that I could apply this knowledge to my studies, which helped me a great deal. When I was 16 or even 18, I never thought that I would get a degree, but now look – I’ve got a great job that I love, a degree and no tuition fee loans to pay back.

“Having real experience in the workplace meant that I could apply this knowledge to my studies.”

whatever your interests are, there is an area of engineering that could suit you. Thermacore Europe develops, designs and manufactures custom thermal management solutions, used in applications from computer systems to satellites and I am involved in every stage of the process from initial concept to the finished product. “I love my job because I get great satisfaction from seeing a project through from the design stage to the final product. I also like the fact that I can be working on something that might be used in medical equipment that saves lives or some other product that makes a real difference in the world; as an engineer, I get to be a part of that.”

“Engineering as a career option is great; there is so much variety, which means that

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To find out more about Tyne North Training, specialists in engineering and manufacturing apprenticeships, visit www.tynenorthtraining.co.uk

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ENGINEERING

ELEMENTS O

SUCC

ENGINEERS ARE ABOVE ALL PROBLEM SOLVERS THAT APPLY SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE TO FINDING SOLUTIONS TO DESIGNING AND BUILDING THINGS.

A

lthough engineering is technical it also requires creativity and whilst most engineers enter into their career from a science and maths background they can also develop a career from a creative arts field of study. Previously we have written about a variety of engineering disciplines, covering careers in electrical, acoustic, civil, chemical and mechanical engineering. In this issue we take a look at four engineering career options that span land, sea, air and cyberspace with environmental engineering, marine engineering and aerospace engineering careers, as well as engineering roles in the field of IT systems, specifically the Internet of Things.

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING The problems that environmental engineers solve are related to how we can minimise the damage done to the environment by human activity and how to protect humans from

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A specialist career within environmental engineering would be that of an ecological engineer working on the preservation of specific ecosystems.

MARINE ENGINEERING

the effects of the environment. Engineers of this type develop solutions to environmental problems such as waste treatment and disposal, climate change, air pollution and water management and sanitisation. As an environmental engineer you might be employed by an environmental consultancy firm, an engineering company, a local authority or by central government to carry out investigations and audits and to plan and design solutions in collaboration with other professionals.

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Marine engineers develop, operate and maintain marine vessels, which include boats, ships, underwater craft and off-shore platforms. They work on both mechanical and electrical systems including fuel systems, ventilation and air conditioning systems, power generation and propulsion. A career as a marine engineer could see you working for a private company, in the leisure industry or for the Merchant or Royal Navy. As a marine engineer you might need to work at weekends or shifts. You might also be working away from home for long periods of time and some marine engineering roles that involve working on underwater craft require diving skills in addition to engineering skills.

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Fancy a bit of inspiration? Read our inspirational interview with successful engineer Faye Banks, one of the youngest fellows of the Institution of Engineering and Technology on page 20.

OF

CESS AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

IT ENGINEERING

Aerospace engineering can be divided into two sub-disciplines, aeronautical engineering and astronautical engineering.

The internet of things (IoT) refers to the networking of physical objects over the internet. These objects have embedded electronics and sensors which allow them to collect and share data and for them to be controlled remotely.

Aeronautical engineering is concerned with how aircraft that travel within the earth’s atmosphere, such as helicopters and aeroplanes are designed, constructed and powered. Astronautical engineers, on the other hand work on the design, construction and power behind aircraft that operate outside of the earth’s atmosphere, which includes rockets, satellites and other spacecraft. Aerospace engineers research, design, develop, test and maintain the performance of civil and military aircraft, missiles and weapons systems, satellites and space vehicles. Specialisms include aerodynamics, avionics, propulsion, and systems integration.

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“The UK will need one million more engineers by 2020, so good job prospects.” In an increasingly connected world, where we have smart parking and home systems that include smart fridges the internet of things is big business and the UK will need lots of engineers to design, develop and maintain devices and systems.

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There are four new internet of things apprenticeship standards in development and a further apprenticeship in smart systems information and security. These apprenticeships will cover both technician and engineer roles at levels three to level seven. There are many different engineering careers that exist in just about every sector that you can think of, from paper to nuclear energy. It should come as no surprise then that the Royal Academy of Engineers has suggested that the UK will need one million more engineers by 2020, so good job prospects. One of the greatest challenges facing the UK engineering industry is that of encouraging more females to see the benefits of a career in engineering; only six per cent of the engineering workforce is female at the moment and according to UCAS only 15 per cent of engineering students are female.

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGERS

P

roject managers in construction are responsible for making sure that projects are started and completed on time, within budget and to the highest standards. They will plan work, manage staff and resources, communicate with clients, contractors and suppliers and basically ensure that everything that needs to be done gets done.

degree in construction project management. Some degree courses last for four years and include a year in industry and gaining this experience is a very good method of boosting your chances of employment. There are other viable degree options too, such as a business related project management degree or civil engineering with project management.

Given the role that a project manager plays there are certain skills that are essential to have. These include fantastic planning and organisational skills and the ability to communicate and negotiate. In addition to this, project managers can be called upon to resolve issues as they arise and support construction staff, therefore problem solving skills, the ability to motivate people, and sound construction knowledge are needed.

The construction industry is known for being the kind of industry where you can learn new skills and progress well and many construction managers started their careers as apprentices, gaining skills, experience and qualifications along the way.

HOW TO BECOME A CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGER There are two main routes to a career as a project manager within construction – progression through experience and qualification through higher education. If you are thinking of taking the full time university route then you could study for a

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JOB PROSPECTS AND EARNINGS The earning potential for construction project managers is good with newly trained project managers earning between £28,000 and £34,000 and senior project managers earning salaries of around £50,000-£60,000. Job prospects are good too and according to Go Construct the construction industry will need 330 new project managers every year until 2020 to meet demand, mainly in the North East and East of England and Northern Ireland.

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The Go Construct website showcases the many career opportunities available in construction and the built environment: www.goconstruct.org

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CONSTRUCTION

A CONSTRUCTION

REVOLUTION

WORKING IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY IS NOT LIMITED TO DIGGING HOLES. TAKE A LOOK AT SOME OF THE EXCITING CAREER POSSIBILITIES ASSOCIATED WITH NEW TECHNOLOGIES BEING USED IN THE SECTOR.

T

raditional skilled trades are still a vital part of the construction industry and bricklayers, carpenters, roofers, plumbers and electricians are always needed. New technologies and techniques are set to revolutionise the construction industry however and with these comes the need for the development of new skills.

3D PRINTING TECHNOLOGY

Here are a few of the new technologies that are expected to play an important part in the construction industry.

It is hoped that 3D construction printing will help meet new housing demands and increase efficiency. It could also allow for building projects to take place even if weather conditions are bad. Possible career – robotics engineer

VIRTUAL REALITY We normally think of virtual reality technology as something used for gaming but in the construction sector, translating two dimensional technical drawings into a virtual reality experience will allow for the visualisation of structures in a new and totally immersive way. So, if you are studying on a creative IT or media course covering things like 3D modelling, there are more career possibilities than games design. Possible career – 3D visualizer / developer

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3D printing really is at the cutting edge of development in the construction industry. A digital model of the component needed is created using software such as CAD (computer aided design), this model is read by the computer which then creates and prints the object, normally in a series of layers.

AERIAL DRONES Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) can be used in the construction sector to capture data for surveys, help with planning, to track progress, produce marketing material and even to guide bulldozers. The benefit of using an aerial drone in the construction industry is that they are able to access

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otherwise difficult to reach areas like rooftops. Possible career – aerial drone pilot

BIM (BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING) Possibly one of the most important developments in the construction industry, BIM technology brings together all information about a structure, whether it is a road, track, bridge or building in one digital representation. Rather than having lots of different drawings BIM provides one combined view for use. Importantly, as of March 2016, all government construction projects must make use of BIM technology. Because BIM provides a combined view to be used by many different people involved in all stages of a construction project it requires collaborative work and relies on sharing of information and a coordinated approach. Possible career – BIM model manager

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THE BIG BANG

GO ON A JOURNEY INTO

SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING EXPLORE WHERE YOUR FUTURE CAN TAKE YOU AT THE UK’S LARGEST CELEBRATION OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATHS (STEM) FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

T

he Big Bang UK Young Scientists & Engineers Fair (15-18 March, NEC Birmingham) is full of exciting theatre shows, hands-on activities, interactive workshops, excellent careers information, leading businesses, scientists and engineers and much more! The Fair aims to show all the exciting and rewarding opportunities out there for those with the right experience and qualifications.

“Science in all its natural beauty – with a big dollop of fun!” Metro

Could you see yourself rebuilding disaster-struck communities, creating dazzling special effects for film, inventing apps that transform our lives or making sure there’s enough food for everyone in the world? At The Big Bang Fair, you can find out from real-life scientists and engineers about the incredible jobs they do and see how you could use the subjects you do at school – like science, maths, D&T, computing, art – to set you off on a journey to landing your dream job. From sport, fashion and food to medicine, space and music, The Big Bang Fair helps you explore the amazing opportunities out there in science, technology, engineering and maths and the routes into them.

THE BIG BANG UK YOUNG SCIENTISTS & ENGINEERS COMPETITION

“I think it’s important so you can look at what you want to do when you’re older and things that might inspire you.” Student

is the UK’s leading STEM competition; it’s open to you if you’re in years 7-13, celebrating and raising the profile of your achievements. If you get through to the finals, you get to showcase your project to scientists, engineers, students, employers, and celebrities at The Big Bang Fair. As well as lots of team and individual prizes, entrants in the senior category have the chance to be crowned UK Young Scientist of the Year or UK Young Engineer of the Year.

Book your FREE tickets at www.thebigbangfair.co.uk Follow us on Twitter and Facebook @BigBangFair TheBigBang4U

TIPS FOR TEACHERS Teachers also find the experience a positive one. Not just in terms of what their students learn and experiment with but also with regards the information and resources they gather during the day.

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Online applications for the national finals close on 20 November 2016, so there’s still a bit of time to apply with your science or engineering project: www.thebigbangfair.co.uk/competition

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TOMORROW’S ENGINEERS

Save lives

Make a difference to the world

as an engineer

ENGINEERS HELP PEOPLE REBUILD THEIR LIVES

ENGINEERS FIND AND RESCUE PEOPLE

Designing and making artificial limbs, wheelchairs and other devices to help people who have suffered serious injuries. Training local people in building, farming and other skilled jobs, when there is a shortage in disaster-struck areas.

Using equipment such as telescopic lenses, drones and radar devices that detect victims’ heartbeats, as well as cockroaches fitted with microphones, which can detect sounds coming from underneath rubble.

Alice Bond, (MEng), Structural Engineer, Ramboll (Typhoon Haiyan, Philippines, 2013)

sity niver g at U in r e e Engin

Creating apps to better co-ordinate the distribution of resources and relief. Designing and using materials that can perform better in extreme conditions.

Restoring electricity and communications, critical for providing humanitarian relief in affected areas.

Real life engineers working in disaster relief

Vocational and apprentic eship routes into engineering

Improving warning and detection systems for tsunamis, volcanoes, earthquakes, typhoons and other natural disasters.

ENGINEERS GET THINGS UP AND RUNNING

DESIGN - CREATE - INNOVATE Use maths, science, design and technology to help engineer a better future.

Joshua Macabuag (CEng), Search & Rescue Engineer, SARAID (Nepal Earthquake, 2015).

Find out more at tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/savelives

g in cit ... Ex jobs

What is engineering?

ENGINEERS REDUCE THE IMPACT OF FUTURE DISASTERS

ENGINEERS HELP PEOPLE SURVIVE Providing immediate shelter and transport networks and getting emergency water and sanitation services working, helping to prevent disease outbreaks.

ce fferen i d a Make world to the

Nepal earthquake aftermath, 2015. Will Oliver, EPA

Engineer

ything is behind ever hair and Engineering r smartphone ts you – from you ligh ucts to the styling prod the shoes on your switch on and enjoy maths and feet. So, if you ol, you too could be scho gy science at e technolo cutting-edg designing drought g water for or providin ntries. plagued cou

DESIGN, CREATE, INNOVATE

E

ngineers are currently tackling some of the world’s most pressing problems – from dealing with cyber security and maintaining clean water and energy supplies to finding sustainable ways to grow food, build houses and travel. Developing life-saving medical equipment, minimising the damage from earthquakes, helping chart-topping musicians record songs, developing computer games and making better, greener transport engineering is part of everyday life.

TOMORROW’S ENGINEERS WEEK, 7-11 NOVEMBER 2016.

There are a huge number of job opportunities in UK engineering, in fact engineering companies need around 182,000 people each year

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook @Tomorrows_Eng TomorrowsEngineers

Through resources and online tools, Tomorrow’s Engineers gives you an idea of what it’s like to be an engineer, highlights some of the exciting engineering career options available and outlines how to get into engineering. If you want to know more about what engineers do, find out about the world of engineering and get help in finding your ideal career visit the Tomorrow’s Engineers website (www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/career-finder). Developed with input from teachers and professional engineering institutions, Tomorrow’s Engineers’ free resources are designed to give you a better understanding of engineering and the range of career opportunities it offers those with the right qualifications. The resources include information on vocational and apprenticeship routes into engineering, benefits of studying engineering at university and booklets around what engineering is.

Tomorrow’s Engineers Week shines a spotlight on engineering careers in a way that young people may have never considered before. We want schools, teachers, students and everyone in engineering to get involved in some way, even if it’s a simple tweet of support using #TEWeek16. www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/TEWeek

TIPS FOR TEACHERS Classroom resources cover a range of areas, including a ‘Save lives as an engineer’ poster and activity and an interactive presentation exploring the range of engineering careers and where the jobs will be in the next 10 years. Teachers and careers advisers can get the full suite of printed materials by ordering a FREE resource pack.

Download or order your free resources today: www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk

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CONSTRUCTION

MEET THE

WORKERS WE SPOKE TO THREE YOUNG PEOPLE TO FIND OUT WHAT IT’S REALLY LIKE TO WORK IN CONSTRUCTION.

LIAM SARGEANT, TRAINEE ASSISTANT MANAGER

perform a variety of tasks, such as ordering materials to site or organising trades. What education route did you take from secondary school to where you are today? “I enrolled onto a bricklaying course in college, where I achieved my Level 1, 2 and 3 Diplomas and NVQ. What is your favourite thing about your job? “I like how I am continually learning on the job, such as learning how to use the company computer system and how to manage a building site.

Hi, I’m Liam Sargeant. I am a trainee assistant manager for Redrow Homes NW. I provide help for the site manager on a day-to-day basis and

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What is the highlight of your day? “I enjoy being able to help resolve a problem on-site for another operative.

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Where do you want your career to take you? “I would like one day to own my own company in property development. What would you say to someone thinking about a career in construction? “I would highly recommend it as there are endless opportunities in construction. There are opportunities to learn, work as part of a team and be rewarded for the work you do. Is there anything else you would like to share which would inspire others? “While working in construction I have been fortunate enough to be invited to 10 Downing Street to meet the Prime Minister after winning a national apprentice award. If you are willing to put the effort in, you will be rewarded.”

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CHRISTABELLE PARADZAI, APPRENTICE SITE TECHNICIAN

“After completing this, instead of going to university I searched for a construction apprenticeship in order to gain work experience while earning money. What is your favourite thing about your job? “I like how every day is different when working in construction. There are occasionally new challenges which I am learning to manage and, as a result of this, I think I can deal with stressful situations better.

Hi, I’m Christabelle Paradzai. I’m an apprentice site technician working for Eric Wright Construction, which is the founder division of the Eric Wright Group. They manage a variety of contracts including design and build, and traditional.

“This role requires a lot of analysis and planning to ensure that things are done correctly the first time, and I feel that these skills are constantly being developed.”

JAKE HOROSZCZAK, APPRENTICE BRICKLAYER

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“I’ve gone from knowing almost nothing to mastering my trade – even coming first in the North West SkillBuild competition and securing a place in the national finals. What do you like about your job? “The best thing about being an apprentice bricklayer is that I enjoy it! I really don’t mind getting up in the mornings for work. In fact, I’m actually excited to get my gear on and get on to site to do what I love most. It’s so rewarding to see something you’ve contributed to; I can point out buildings in the area I’ve worked on to friends and family and have a little boast! What’s your working day like? “I get onto the site I’m working on early, get the kettle on and then catch up with the guys. Although we’re always busy, working with friends makes the job even more enjoyable. I’ll then be given a task for the day and then I like to get on with it; although mentors are always around if you need them. There’s a great balance of independence and teamwork on the Seddon sites.”

My construction role mainly involves surveying and setting out on site. I am being trained to use different surveying equipment, such as total stations and surveying software. I also deal with the quality assurance aspects of a project, which involves checking completed work to ensure it has been completed as designed. What education route did you take from secondary school to where you are today? “From secondary school I studied A-levels in business, maths and ICT at Cardinal Newman College in Preston. I then went on to study HNC in Project and Quality Management at Preston College, while working part time in a retail role.

unique and I’ve been lucky to experience a load of difference schemes, from building schools to housing developments.

Hi, I’m Jake. I work for Seddon Construction as an apprentice bricklayer. What does your role involve? “I’m an apprentice bricklayer – the backbone of the industry and the trade everyone thinks of when you say ‘construction’. It’s a lot more varied than it sounds though. Every project is

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The Go Construct website showcases the many career opportunities available in construction and the built environment: www.goconstruct.org

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HOSPITALITY AND CATERING

FRONT OF

HOUSE WORDS: LUKE WAKELING

OFTEN THE PUBLIC FACE OF RESTAURANTS AND HOTELS, FRONT OF HOUSE ROLES ARE CRUCIAL TO SUSTAINING A GOOD SERVICE AND BUSINESS. STUDENT WRITER LUKE EXPLORES SOME OF THE KEY ROLES FOR US.

T

he term front of house typically means the area of a restaurant or hotel that is open to the public, where employees interact with guests. Jobs that are included are waiters and waitresses, receptionists, hotel and restaurant managers, bartenders and hosts and hostesses. Someone with good social skills would be perfect for these roles. Attributes employers usually look out for are patience, the ability to take initiative, organisation and strong interpersonal skills. Team working skills, tact and diplomacy would also be vital for all of these roles as well as high standards of personal hygiene. Working hours for all roles will include evenings, weekends and public holidays and may include shift work. You will not usually need any specific qualifications to work as a waiter or waitress, but a good standard of maths and English will

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Principles: Food and Beverage Service, Level 2 NVQ in Food & Beverage Service or the Level 3 Certificate in Food and Beverage Service Supervision. If you are looking for a career as a hotel receptionist, strong administration and customer service skills are primarily what employers would look for. IT skills will also be useful to operate computerised booking and payment systems. serve you well. A previous customer service job would give you an advantage over others – experience is the best qualification for this career. You may be able to get into waiting through an apprenticeship scheme such as the Level 2 Hospitality and Catering: Food & Beverage Services Apprenticeship. On-site training is usually provided, and you may be encouraged to work towards qualifications such as the Level 2 Certificate in Hospitality and Catering

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One route to becoming a hotel receptionist is through an apprenticeship scheme such as the Level 2 Apprenticeship in Hospitality & Catering: Front of House Reception and possible qualifications you could work towards include the Level 2 NVQ in Front of House Reception or the Level 3 Advanced Diploma in Reception and Front Office Services. With experience, you could gain promotion to front desk manager or head receptionist.

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If you want to be a hotel or restaurant manager, a Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship in Hospitality or the Higher Apprenticeship in Hospitality Management could provide you with a solid foundation. You could also work your way up to a management position from a junior position, taking on more responsibility as you gain experience and qualifications. If working your way up from a more junior position, after gaining some experience and possibly some related qualifications you could apply for a head of waiting staff or assistant manager post. The kinds of qualifications that relate to supervisory roles include the Level 3 Award in the Principles of Supervising: Customer Service Performance in Hospitality, Leisure, Travel and Tourism and the Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Hospitality Supervision and Leadership.

TAKING THE DEGREE ROUTE There are over 30 other universities in the UK

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that offer hospitality and tourism degrees and if you are certain that the university route is for you then A-levels like geography or business studies are good options. Many hospitality and tourism degrees offer the opportunity to do a sandwich year as part of your studies, during which you’ll spend a year working in the

“The UK will need one million more engineers by 2020, so good job prospects.” hospitality and tourism industry, applying what you’ve learned in the classroom to real-life work situations. Time spent at work means that your degree will take four years to complete but you’ll have gained a huge amount of experience in that extra year.

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WHAT KIND OF SALARY CAN YOU EXPECT TO EARN IN A FRONT OF HOUSE ROLE? Full time salaries for waiting staff can be around £12,000 to £16,000 a year. It is possible to earn between £17,000 and £20,000 with greater experience, and income will depend on where you work and may also be increased by tips. A hotel receptionist could start with a salary of between £12,500 and £14,500 a year and supervisors can earn starting salaries of between £15,000 and £19,000. Managers of small hotels or deputy managers of larger ones might earn from £20,000 to around £35,000. In London, general managers earn, on average, £85,000 with a range of £50,000 to £200,000 for the most prestigious hotels, so there is scope for great earnings for the very best in their field working in a prestigious hotel or restaurant.

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33


TECH

CUTTING EDG

CARE

A RECENT REPORT CREDITS TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENTS FOR CREATING JOBS OVER THE LAST CENTURY. HERE ARE JUST A FEW THAT ARE SURE TO TEMPT YOU.

N

SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT (VIDEO PROCESSING)

ew technology has created whole new industries and expanded older ones. Newer and bigger industries create a larger demand for workers; put simply – more gadgets equals more jobs.

mHEALTH Standing for mobile health, mHealth is medical practice supported by mobile devices. The fastest growing of mHealth’s sub-sectors is app development. Fitness apps are already popular with the health conscious and smart devices now come with in-built pedometers that track your daily exercise. If you’re interested in mHealth app development, there are a number of junior roles you can begin with. For example, you could start at a salary of roughly £16,000-£18,000 a year as a junior creative media designer. The job offers valuable experience and simply requires experience with the software used, although related academic qualifications would certainly help.

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VIRTUAL REALITY Virtual reality (VR) is a great new technology with seemingly endless applications. Newly founded companies have dedicated themselves to helping clients use this tech in order to maximise profit. You could get a job as a junior creative technologist researching VR and briefing clients on the newest VR innovations. You could also get a job demonstrating VR in a public space in order to advertise for a developer. This can be a great way of building your CV if you hope to work towards a higher role in this area.

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Video processing is a market that is often changed by incoming technology. Nowadays it’s VR, but not long ago the world of video processing was shaken up by stereoscopic 3D. However, being able to use new technology in the workplace does come with steep entry requirements. Many video processing companies ask for their applicants to have a 1st or 2.1 degree in a numerate subject (maths, engineering, physics etc.), though if you work hard for these qualifications, it’s clearly rewarding. You could also be earning £27,000 - £45,000 when you start, and then there should be space for moving up within the field.

DATA ANALYTICS New technology in this department means that most of the actual data gathering is performed by complex software. Requirements for a data analysis vacancy are usually experience in the

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GE

EERS WORDS: NATHAN REDFORD

area and knowledge of coding. Corporations, especially major ones, use data analytics to see how consumers behave and how the business can improve using this information. For example, a video streaming service might analyse how long people take to turn off certain shows or how long it takes for consumers to find something to watch. When starting off, you can apply for an apprenticeship in data analytics or perhaps do a numerate degree at university to build your CV before applying. Data analytics is already an integral part of many businesses and you could be the next to join this ever-growing market.

BLOCKCHAIN ENGINEERING Blockchain is a distributed ledger most famously used by Bitcoin. Many companies have begun research this year into developing it for other purposes. The important thing to consider with blockchain engineering is that it’s an investment. It’s important not to specialise, otherwise any issues found in the tech become issues with your

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particular skill. Strong software development and engineering skills are required as well as a core understanding of the complex blockchain system. It’s essential that you know multiple

“There is high demand for people who can operate new technology and a low supply of these people.” coding languages such as Java and C++ as well as having a general understanding of cryptography. There is high demand for people who can operate new technology and a low supply of these people. This means companies are willing to pay a premium for workers who understand blockchain.

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CYBER SECURITY Cutting edge technology means businesses have to be responsible with security. Companies often hire a team of cyber security consultants to give advice on how to keep information secure and software safe from hackers. Cyber security departments will often hack the business’ network in order to point out any faults that allowed them to do so. Employers want experience in security architecture, as well as core disciplines of IT such as risks and controls, vulnerability and compliance. There are apprenticeships in cyber security to get you started or you could study for a BSc in cyber/computer security from select universities. These are a handful of the jobs created by new technology. Inventions are being thought up every second and are sure to bring with them exciting opportunities. So remember to pay attention, because the next gadget to arrive could be carrying your dream job.

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35


LOVE HORSES ?

DO YOU WANT TO WORK WITH HORSES? HOW ABOUT BECOMING A RACING GROOM...

Laura Winstanley

WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT SKILLS IN A ROLE LIKE YOURS? Being a Racing Groom offers a range of exciting and challenging roles and opportunities. You could be involved with grooming some of the best racehorses in the country or even the world, or pursue a career in another part of this diverse industry. Laura Winstanley is a Racing Groom in Newmarket.

HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON A CAREER WITH HORSES... I was applying for University at the time but something about it didn’t feel right, so I decided to pursue a career with horses. I wanted to wake up and do something I loved every day! I found the intelligence and athleticism of Thoroughbreds fascinating and I really admired the incredibly high standards of welfare and care that they receive on a racing yard so that’s the route I chose.

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED?

I completed a nine week course at the British Racing School in Newmarket gaining my Level 2 Diploma in Racehorse Care. I then started my current role two years ago after leaving the Racing School.

WHAT WAS IT ABOUT THE JOB THAT MOST APPEALED TO YOU?

Everything about it appealed to me. The discipline, the high standards and getting to work with these amazing horses. They’re so intelligent and strong – they’re absolute athletes. I just couldn’t pass up the opportunity. 36

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The most important thing is to love horses – it makes the early mornings and the bad weather easier! If I had to pick three main qualities I think they would be dedication, passion and patience.

WHAT ONE PIECE OF ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR ANYONE WANTING TO BE A RACING GROOM? Keep your head down and work hard because if you’re determined enough you’ll get to where you want to go.

WHAT’S A TYPICAL DAY LIKE?

We muck out first, then at 7:00 AM we ride one horse before breakfast and between two and four horses afterwards. As riders we are responsible for helping to keep the horses fit and happy in their work as well as providing our trainer with feedback on how the horse is moving, how well they are going and how prepared they may be for a race. Racing yards tend to have a few hours off in the afternoon then we return at around 4:00 PM to brush our horses over and take them for a pick of grass if the weather is good. Evening stables is a good opportunity to bond with the horses we look after as well as keep them looking and feeling well. Start your career in racing now! Visit www.careersinracing.com/apprenticeships for information on Apprenticeships available to you. There’s also more information on Jobs and Training in the horseracing industry.

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UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY

APPLICATIONS KEY INFORMATION FOR GETTING THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY APPLICATION PROCESS, INCLUDING DATES, COSTS AND WRITING YOUR PERSONAL STATEMENT.

I

f you have just collected your AS-level results then you may be getting ready to make your university choices and apply for entry in 2017.

KEY DATES Applications can be submitted from the 6th September but the chances are, you are applying though your school and so they will guide you through the process at their pace. There are some key dates that you must meet though and these are:

YOUR PERSONAL STATEMENT For many students the hardest part of the application process is writing a personal statement. Your personal statement needs to explain why you are applying and what makes you a good candidate. It’s a good idea to check the course descriptions as these will reference the qualities and skills they look for; you can then highlight the interests, skills and achievements that you have which match these. Make sure that your personal statement is your own and proofread it carefully to check the grammar, punctuation and spelling are correct.

“Make sure that your personal statement is your own.”

• If you are applying to Oxford, Cambridge or for a medical, dentistry or veterinary course you will need to meet the October 15th 2016 deadline • The deadline for the majority of undergraduate courses is the 15th January 2017 • The deadline for many arts courses is the 24th March 2017

COSTS When you begin your application process you will need to pay a fee. This will be £13 if you only apply for one course and £24 if you are applying for more than one (you can choose five).

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FIRM AND INSURANCE PLACES

When you get your offers in, you will select your firm or first choice and also choose an insurance place. Make sure that you don’t choose five courses that all have the same entry requirements otherwise, if you miss out on the grades for your first choice you won’t have anywhere to go. It’s a good idea when selecting your choices to include one that is your best case scenario choice alongside others that will allow for perhaps a slight dip in your expected grades, this way you’ll have everything covered. For example, if you are predicted BCC you might want to include courses with entry requirements that range between BBC and CCC.

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37


UNIVERSITY

UNDERSTANDING THE NEW

UCAS TARIFF SYSTEM IF YOU ARE ABOUT TO START LOOKING AT UNIVERSITY COURSES THEN YOU’LL NEED TO UNDERSTAND THE ENTRY REQUIREMENTS.

S

ome universities ask for specific grades but others will request tariff points and these have changed for the 2017 entry. The table below shows the tariff points for different grades achieved for A-levels and the most common diplomas.

FULL A-LEVEL TARIFF POINTS

AS-LEVEL TARIFF POINTS

A*

56

A

48

A

B

40

C

BTEC EXTENDED DIPLOMA TARIFF POINTS

BTEC DIPLOMA TARIFF POINTS

BTEC SUBSIDIARY DIPLOMA TARIFF POINTS

D*D*D*

168

D*D*

112

D*

56

20

D*D*D

160

D*D

104

D

48

B

16

D*DD

152

DD

96

M

32

32

C

12

DDD

144

DM

80

P

16

D

24

D

10

DDM

128

MM

64

E

16

E

6

DMM

112

MP

48

MMM

96

PP

32

MMP

80

MPP

64

PPP

48 ENTRY REQUIREMENTS You need to be realistic when you are applying for university places. If you are predicted to achieve CCD at A-level this would give you 88 tariff points so you don’t want to apply only to universities that require tariff points of 144 because to meet this you would need to achieve a grade profile such as AAA, A*AB or A*A*C. We haven’t covered the tariff points attached to every qualification here. If you want to find out what points are awarded for a different qualification to those shown above, visit www.ucas.com and search for the tariff calculator.

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