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February/March 2017

All things land-based Horticultural and environmental careers A-Z of land-based Four key food industry roles Gas engineering apprenticeships

Smart money Swot up on pensions with Vivi Friedgut /MovingOnMagazine @MovingOn_mag FIND US ONLINE: MOVINGONMAGAZINE.CO.UK

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OPEN DAYS 2017 Be a part of the Loughborough family at one of our 2017 undergraduate open days. We’ve got so much to share with you – come and chat with current students and staff, take tours of our fantastic campus and discover more about our courses.

Friday 30 June Saturday 01 July Friday 22 September Saturday 23 September

Find out everything you need to know and book your place on our website

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WHAT’S INSIDE

FEB/MAR 2017

CONTENTS

10

16

20

04 CONTRIBUTORS

Meet our talented student writers and find out how you can get involved with Moving On too.

Jim Burton, chief executive of CASCAID introduces our land-based issue.

06 NEWS

Read all the latest news, views, amazing information and fascinating facts.

20 GREEN JOBS

Student writer Mel Snow tells us about the roles of cartographer, meteorologist, ecologist and oceanographer.

We take a look at some fascinating careers in horticulture and what they involve.

From animal boarding assistant to riding instructor we take a look at the huge array of land-based careers.

Hetty Mosforth tells us about some great careers in the food industry – from development chef to food photographer.

We explain a little about what’s involved in starting your own business, including where to go for help.

28 FUEL YOUR FUTURE

Find out all about the new GCSE grading system and about vocational qualifications.

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27 START YOUR OWN BUSINESS

14 QUALIFICATIONS EXPLAINED

Vivi Friedgut explains why pensions are so important, how they work and why you should get going as early as possible.

24 FROM KITCHEN TO SHELF

We hear from two young writers about their career aspirations, what they are doing to get there and what they expect.

11 DIG DEEPER

22 A-Z OF LAND-BASED CAREERS

08 STUDENT VOICE

28

16 SMART MONEY

05 WELCOME TO THE FEBRUARY ISSUE

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Luke Wakeling tells us all about the role of the gas engineer and explains the apprenticeship route into this.

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WELCOME

MEET THE

WRITERS Here at Moving On we like to offer young people the opportunity to gain some valuable experience researching and writing for the magazine. We also work very hard with experts to provide you with accurate, important and helpful information about careers, qualifications and other important matters.

STUDENT WRITERS: We’d like to introduce you to those people who have helped us bring this issue of Moving On to life.

BECKY HART

LEYAN YUCEL

SOPHIE BARNES

MEL SNOW

WITH SPECIAL THANKS TO: Vivi Friedgut for talking with us about the importance of pensions and saving for the future.

HETTY MOSFORTH

LUKE WAKELING

VIVI FRIEDGUT

We are always on the lookout for more writers and good news stories. If you would like to write for us please email us at movingoninfo@cascaid.co.uk and if you are an employer or a parent who would like to share a case study with us or some words of wisdom then get in touch with Lynette at ldaly@cascaid.co.uk

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FOREWORD

FOREWORD JIM BURTON,CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF CASCAID WELCOMES YOU TO THE FEBRUARY ISSUE OF MOVING ON.

C

ASCAID helps millions of people worldwide with their career choices every year and can trace its history back to 1969. Our career guidance services introduce hundreds of thousands of young people every year to career planning and deliver the impartial information and guidance they need to discover suitable career pathways. CASCAID’s services are always evolving in response to market need and opportunities to innovate and I am delighted that we have now added Moving On magazine to the products and services that we offer.

Publisher Lynette Daly Email: ldaly@cascaid.co.uk Tel: 01509226846 Graphic designer Anthony Brooks Business development director Sharon Walpole Email: swalpole@cascaid.co.uk Tel: 07972911706 Schools, colleges & sixth forms Annual subscription enquiries Email: movingoninfo@cascaid.co.uk Special thanks to the ECO Work-Shop CIC CASCAID Ltd 2 Oakwood Drive Loughborough Leicestershire LE11 3QF Tel: 01509226868

Moving On and CASCAID are a great fit as we have common strategic goals and values. We are both working to deliver the best possible information, advice and guidance to young people and to champion the positive economic and social impacts it has on individuals, their communities and the wider economy. The CASCAID team is made up of highly experienced and enthusiastic people who are dedicated to delivering services which inspire young people and adults to explore, discover what’s possible and make the right choices about their future career destinations and learning and training pathways. The Moving On team who have joined us are strengthening and extending our skills and experience. I am very pleased to be able to introduce to you the February issue of Moving On. You will find some great features on engineering, environmental, and food industry related careers as well as a very useful introduction to pensions to help you prepare for your financial future.

CASCAID Ltd. has made every effort to ensure that the information in this publication was correct at the time of going to press and hereby disclaim any liability to any party caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence or any other cause.

Jim Burton, Chief Executive of CASCAID

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NEWS

NEWS

CASCAID ACQUIRES MOVING ON MAGAZINE UCAS UPDATE It’s that time of year and if you are in year 13 and you’ve applied to university you should be getting your offers through. Once you have received all of your offers, it’s time to select your first choice, which is your firm acceptance and your second choice, which is your insurance acceptance – all other offers must be declined.

CASCAID proudly announces its collaboration with Moving On magazine to broaden its career information services to schools and young people. “We are delighted to be part of CASCAID. Moving On reaches schools, colleges and sixth forms providing quality independent information about careers and qualifications. Being part of CASCAID will give a wider reach in a new environment where our brands will complement and strengthen each other. If you want to reach young people and get your message into schools, there will be no better way!” – Sharon Walpole, business development director Moving On. CASCAID firmly believes that career guidance should be tailored to each individual and the journey that their education and career exploration takes them on. It should be about discovery, opportunity and dreaming big. You don’t need to worry that your favourite careers magazine is going to change – Moving On continues to be produced under the guidance of the publisher, Lynette and we still have young writers throughout schools, colleges and universities helping us with feature writing at the same time as gaining some valuable work experience.

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Most universities will make you a conditional offer, which means that you are guaranteed a place as long as you get the grades that they want – this is the condition. You may find that you receive an unconditional offer from a university. If this happens and you make that university your firm acceptance, then the place is yours no matter what. The benefit of an unconditional offer is that you can relax, stop worrying about whether you’re going to get in and concentrate on your final year and exams. The downside to an unconditional offer – some students relax in the wrong way, they take their eye of the ball and they start skipping classes and not really bothering about exams. This is a real source of frustration for teachers!

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TOP FIVE VIEWED CAREERS

THE TOP FIVE VIEWED CAREERS ARE:

CASCAID HAVE BEEN TAKING A LOOK AT THE MOST VIEWED CAREERS WITHIN THE CAREERS GUIDANCE PRODUCT, KUDOS. These careers, whilst providing excellent opportunities for young people, are very much traditional careers; career choices that would keep parents/guardians happy. Does this list reflect the influence of parents/ guardians or teachers? Does the media also portray these traditional careers in a more positive light – as solid career choices? The

viewing figures for lawyer and accountant are particularly high, with lawyer getting over twice as many views as the third placed accountant. These are also careers for which the competition for places is very high – these are tough careers to get into!

1

Lawyer

2

Doctor

3

Accountant

4

Police Officer

5

Architect

prenticeship Week 2017 hools, colleges and training providers

LADDER OF OPPORTUNITY This year is the 10th anniversary of National Apprenticeship Week. The celebration this year takes place 6th-10th March and the theme is ‘ladder of opportunity’. The week will see employers, training providers, schools and colleges and, of course apprentices celebrating their successes and career progression. National Apprenticeship Week is coordinated by the National Apprenticeship Service and is an annual celebration of the positive impact that apprenticeships and traineeships have on individuals, businesses and the wider economy. Events take place all across England. To find out about events that are taking place you can visit https://nawevents.co.uk/ Sue Husband, director of the National Apprenticeship Service said, “The 10th year of National Apprenticeship Week will be a huge celebratory event, reinforcing that apprenticeships can deliver #NAW2017 for all employers, no matter what size their business is.”

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STUDENT VOICE

I WANT TO BE A

JOURNALIST WHEN YOU HAVE A DREAM, GO FOR IT. THAT’S WHAT MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS STUDENT BECKY HART IS DOING.

A

s young people, leaving school is one of the most wonderful and significant achievements in our lives, when we are finally being granted the well-deserved freedom to take whichever pathway we desire. However, we are soon faced with a rather difficult but exciting challenge of choosing one career out of a potential thousands. Once we have selected a career, which can take months or even years, we tend to ask ourselves an overwhelming number of questions such as is this the right career for me? Will I be able to excel in this career? Am I good enough for this career? However, there is always one question which tends to stand out above the rest and this is, what actions do I need to take in order to achieve such a career?

“I expect that having a career in journalism will not always be easy or stress-free” Whilst at times this can be a very daunting scenario, rest assured that you are not alone in wondering about such things, as I too am currently going through such a process.

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As a media communications student at university, there are various career pathways that I could follow once I graduate, however, I am particularly interested in the competitive and creative career of a magazine journalist. I have done my research and such a role consists of researching and writing about either a general topic or perhaps, a more specialist subject area depending on the genre of the magazine and the target audience. I might also be given the opportunity to conduct interviews, edit stories and attend seminars and conferences. I first became interested in magazine journalism when I wrote a website style article on gender issues for a university assignment. Although it may seem peculiar to some, I have always appreciated researching and writing essays. However, when given the chance to write in a more casual and chatty manner, I discovered that it was a writing style that I both thoroughly enjoyed and was good at. I expect that having a career in journalism will not always be easy or stress-free, despite the fact that I love writing so much. Rather, it will be challenging, competitive and sometimes even stressful. This doesn’t put me off though, it encourages me to push myself to take the necessary steps to, one day, achieve my dream of becoming a journalist.

SALARY For magazine journalists entering the profession at graduate level typical starting salaries range from £15,000 to £26,000.

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STUDENT VOICE

I WANT TO BE A

FEATURES WRITER LEYAN YUCEL ASPIRES TO A CAREER AS A FEATURES WRITER FOR MAGAZINES. SHE TELLS US HOW SHE IS PREPARING FOR HER FUTURE CAREER.

“I

f you’ve ever watched The Devil Wears Prada you might think that working for a women’s magazine would be a terrifying and extremely stressful job. Maybe it is, but that’s not putting me off.

Olympics. This range of topics means I am always learning something new and am constantly being inspired by the people I meet to interview.

“I’m not one of those people who always knew what they wanted to do.”

“I am currently half way through studying multimedia journalism at Bournemouth University and my dream job would be a features writer for a glossy women’s magazine. I’m not one of those people who always knew what they wanted to do. I was halfway through my A-levels when I realised that writing was a passion of mine – not the kind of writing that involves 2500 word essays but creative writing. Reading magazines is also something that I always enjoyed doing and that’s when I realised I could combine the two into a career doing something I love. “Even though I want to write for magazines, my course is setting me up for a variety of jobs in the industry; as well as feature writing for print and online, I learn about news writing, television and radio broadcast, and blogging. There is also a theoretical side, learning about media law, journalism ethics and public affairs, which is essential if you want to be a journalist. “The best bit about the course is that I can choose the topics that I write about or produce documentaries on and I have written articles about forced marriage, produced radio documentaries about the fashion industry and presented group radio shows about the

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“It is estimated that magazine journalists entering the profession at graduate level can have starting salaries of £15,000 to £26,000 and with more experience and working as a feature editor I could be earning between £18,000 and £35,000. An editor-in-chief can earn up to £65,000. Going freelance is also an option for many journalists where the average paid for 1000 words for a large magazine is £700. “I’m expecting it to be a busy career which involves meeting lots of people and seeing a lot of new places. The only way I’m going to get my dream job is by working hard, doing my best and aiming for the top. I can’t wait.”

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NOVEMBER 2017

FIND YOUR PERFECT CAREER IN AGRICULTURE

FEATURES • Seminars Programme • Innovation Theatre • Leading Industry Speakers • Careers Hub • Mentor Corner • CV Clinic • Jobs Wall • Multiple Exhibitors and More!

REGISTER TO ATTEND FOR FREE fwi.co.uk/agcareerslive

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HORTICULTURE

DIG DEEPER SOIL IS VITAL FOR PRODUCING FOOD, GROWING PLANTS AND AS A FOUNDATION FOR BUILDING. SOIL SCIENTISTS USE THEIR KNOWLEDGE TO HELP WITH ALL THESE THINGS. SOPHIE BARNES TAKES A CLOSER LOOK…

T

he role of a soil scientist goes beyond analysing and interpreting soil. Soil scientists are responsible for knowing the ground we walk on and this includes understanding the history and origins of soil, sustainability impacts, human health, and agricultural production. A soil scientist studies the properties of soil and provides information that helps to find solutions to issues such as crop production, pollution control and soil degradation.

“The work of a soil scientist is diverse” The work of a soil scientist is diverse and covers pedology, soil physics, soil chemistry, soil biology, soil mineralogy and soil survey and land evaluation. Whilst a soil scientist will study and understand all of these different areas they will usually specialise in one or two of these. Soil scientists are often in demand from government departments because the role is so specific. Departments that require input from a soil scientist include land management, ecosystems and the environment agency. As consultants in their field of expertise soil scientists can advise engineers, ecologists, geologists and hydrologists on landscape, sustainability and environmental processes that may have an impact on a project.

You will need a degree to work as a soil scientist and universities will ask for maths and science subjects (biology, chemistry and physics) as part of the entry requirements so you need to choose your A-levels carefully. The only UK university that offers specific undergraduate degree courses in plant and soil science is the University of Aberdeen but the other option is to choose a more generic undergraduate degree such as biology, geology or chemistry and then specialise by studying for a master’s degree, which is postgraduate, in soil science. Soil scientists play an important role in surveying suitable land for windfarms and often consult with government departments on the installation of pipelines and power cables. The profession is growing and in a time of climate change and limited sustainable resources, the experience and expertise of soil scientists is valued and in demand more than ever before. As a soil scientist you could expect to earn an average starting salary of £16,000-£22,000. Working hours can be long and laboratory and field work might require working at the weekend.

Pedology is the study of soils in their natural environment. To find out more about horticultural careers including apprenticeships visit www.growcareers.info/go/horticultural_apprenticeships/

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TOMORROW’S ENGINEERS

Save lives as an engineer

ENGINEERS HELP PEOPLE REBUILD THEIR LIVES

ENGINEERS FIND AND RESCUE PEOPLE

Training local people in building, farming and other skilled jobs, when there is a shortage in disaster-struck areas.

Using equipment such as telescopic lenses, drones and radar devices that detect victims’ heartbeats, as well as cockroaches fitted with microphones, which can detect sounds coming from underneath rubble.

ENGINEERS REDUCE THE IMPACT OF FUTURE DISASTERS

ENGINEERS HELP PEOPLE SURVIVE Providing immediate shelter and transport networks and getting emergency water and sanitation services working, helping to prevent disease outbreaks.

Alice Bond, (MEng), Structural Engineer, Ramboll (Typhoon Haiyan, Philippines, 2013)

Make a difference to the world

Designing and making artificial limbs, wheelchairs and other devices to help people who have suffered serious injuries.

Improving warning and detection systems for tsunamis, volcanoes, earthquakes, typhoons and other natural disasters. Creating apps to better co-ordinate the distribution of resources and relief.

ENGINEERS GET THINGS UP AND RUNNING Restoring electricity and communications, critical for providing humanitarian relief in affected areas.

Real life engineers working in disaster relief

rence a diffe e k a M world to the

Designing and using materials that can perform better in extreme conditions.

DESIGN - CREATE - INNOVATE Use maths, science, design and technology to help engineer a better future.

Joshua Macabuag (CEng), Search & Rescue Engineer, SARAID (Nepal Earthquake, 2015).

Find out more at

What is engineering?

Vocational and apprentic eship routes into engineering

ity ivers at Un ring e e in Eng Engineer

tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/savelives

Nepal earthquake aftermath, 2015. Will Oliver, EPA

DESIGN, CREATE, INNOVATE

E

ngineers are currently tackling some of the world’s most pressing problems – from dealing with cyber security and maintaining clean water and energy supplies to finding sustainable ways to grow food, build houses and travel. Developing life-saving medical equipment, minimising the damage from earthquakes, helping charttopping musicians record songs, developing computer games and making better, greener transport – engineering is part of everyday life. There are a huge number of job opportunities in UK engineering, in fact engineering companies need around 182,000 people each year Through resources and online tools, Tomorrow’s Engineers gives you an idea of what it’s like to be an engineer, highlights some of the exciting engineering career options available and outlines how to get into engineering. If you want to know more about what engineers do, find out about the world of engineering and get help in finding your ideal career visit the Tomorrow’s Engineers website (www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/career-finder). Developed with input from teachers and professional engineering institutions, Tomorrow’s Engineers’ free resources are designed to give you a better understanding of engineering and the range of career opportunities it offers those with the right qualifications. The resources include information on vocational and apprenticeship routes into engineering, benefits of studying engineering at university and booklets around what engineering is.

ything is behind ever hair and Engineering r smartphone ts you – from you ligh ucts to the styling prod the shoes on your and on ch and swit enjoy maths feet. So, if you ol, you too could be scho gy science at e technolo cutting-edg designing for drought er wat g or providin ntries. plagued cou

IN THEIR OWN WORDS Want to know what it’s really like to be an engineer? Tomorrow’s Engineers gives industry professionals the chance to tell you about their jobs. And they do amazing things – from working on the Mars Rover and creating 3D scanners to chewing gum trials and flood risk management. www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk/intheirownwords Follow us on Twitter and Facebook @Tomorrows_Eng TomorrowsEngineers

TIPS FOR TEACHERS Classroom resources cover a range of areas, including a ‘Save lives as an engineer’ poster and activity and an interactive presentation exploring the range of engineering careers and where the jobs will be in the next 10 years. Teachers and careers advisers can get the full suite of printed materials by ordering a FREE resource pack.

Download or order your free resources today: www.tomorrowsengineers.org.uk

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g in cit s... x E job


THE BIG BANG @ SCHOOL

BRING THE BIG BANG TO YOUR SCHOOL! The UK needs many more engineers and scientists and equipping young people with skills in science, technology, engineering and maths is key to their future employability. The Big Bang Near Me programme plays a vital role in inspiring the UK’s future scientists and engineers at a regional, local and school level. The Big Bang @ School supports schools to deliver events to excite pupils about STEM subjects, inspire them to consider science or engineering careers and let them talk to engineers and scientists face-to-face. A Big Bang @ School Fair can be as big or as small as you like. You could invite local businesses to take part, involve STEM ambassadors, bring in activity providers or do it all by yourself. The important thing is that pupils have fun finding out where their STEM studies can lead them. Last year, more than 130,000 students and over 900 employers visited regional and local Big Bang Fairs.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF HOSTING A BIG BANG @ SCHOOL? • • • •

• • • • •

It’s FREE Enhance the STEM curriculum, showing students how their science, technology, maths and design technology subjects apply to the real world of work Showcase your facilities by inviting other schools to participate and aid uptake by holding workshops for feeder schools in the area Improve student motivation and attainment, showing students where their qualifications could take them helps them focus on taking the right GCSE courses and achieving the necessary grades Highlight the achievements of your students, showcasing your school STEM Club or project work Raise the profile of your school in the local area through building and strengthen links with local businesses, MPs and the media Offer an opportunity for peer assisted learning – encourage and strengthen students’ ability to present demonstrations to their peers and younger students Contribute to achieving a positive Ofsted report Contribute as evidence towards school or teacher CPD and STEM quality marks and awards

“Societies, companies, learned institutions - they’re all out there wanting to help; everyone has heard of the Big Bang Fair. It’s a brand that’ll help you open doors and bring people into your school that your pupils will be thrilled to meet.” Teacher, Sutton Grammar “I’m amazed at what the students are capable of – they constantly impress me with their work and commitment outside of the classroom.” Teacher, Sir William Borlase’s School

To find out more and apply to run your own Big Bang @ School Fair, visit www.thebigbangfair.co.uk/nearme or email agoodchild@engineeringuk.com

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QUALIFICATIONS

FOUR AND ABOVE GCSE GRADING HAS CHANGED – MAKE SURE THAT YOU UNDERSTAND YOUR RESULTS.

O

n August 24th many of you will receive your GCSE results in a new format. Rather than the usual A*-F grade range you will now receive a grade from 9-1, with grade 9 being the highest grade that you can get. GCSEs, particularly in English and maths are very important to your progression to higher level courses of study, entry to university and also for future employment. At the moment a grade C is the standard for many sixth forms, colleges and universities when it comes to accepting students onto A-level and other level 3 programmes as well as degree courses and you will need a minimum grade C (now grade 4) in maths and English for many jobs. The new grading system has been introduced by Ofqual (Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation) in order to better show the difference between pupil performance, particularly between the A*-C, or as it will now be, 9-4 grades.

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The new system allows the old grades C and B to be covered by three grades – 4, 5 and 6, with grade 5 being equivalent to the top third of marks for an existing grade C and bottom third of the current grade B.

“The new system allows the old grades C and B to be covered by three grades” This change is expected to provide employers and educational professionals with a clearer idea of your potential and is intended to be helpful in identifying those learners who have achieved the grade required for progression, but who may still require some support in developing those skills further in order to achieve their potential.

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HERE’S HOW THE NEW GRADING SYSTEM MAPS ACROSS TO THE OLD ONE 9

is the new ‘elite’ grade to identify exceptional performance.

8

is equivalent to A*

7

is the new A grade

5/6

will straddle the high C grades, low B grades and high B grades allowing for better differentiation

4

is the equivalent to the existing C grade

3

is equivalent to the old D grade

2

is equivalent to the old grade E

1

F and G grades are covered by grade 1

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QUALIFICATIONS

LET’S GO

VOCATIONAL MOST OF YOU WILL BE FAMILIAR WITH ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS LIKE A-LEVELS AND GCSES. HERE WE TAKE A LOOK AT VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS – WHAT THEY ARE AND HOW THEY WORK.

V

ocational courses are directed toward a particular occupation or career sector, for example construction and the built environment or business, whereas academic qualifications are subject specific such as History A-level. Vocational qualifications are offered at different levels and in different sizes including awards, certificates and diplomas. All enable you to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required by the specific sector and to gain general employability skills.

DON’T I HAVE TO DO A-LEVELS? There is more than one way to skin a cat as they say and there are both vocational and academic routes into all sorts of careers. Instead of taking three A-levels for example you might choose to take a Level 3 BTEC in Engineering or a Level 3 NVQ in Professional Catering. Neither the vocational or the academic route is better than the other, they simply offer different ways of developing your skills and knowledge and both are a pathway to university study if that’s what you

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want to do. Generally, if you want to learn how to use equipment and ‘do the job’ so to speak, you will have more opportunity to do so if you choose the vocational pathway than if you choose the academic route.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A BTEC AND AN NVQ? NVQs (National Vocational Qualifications) are competency-based qualifications. This means that you will demonstrate your skills in a practical way like cooking or using a power tool, for example. BTECs (Business and Technology Education Council qualifications) are knowledge-based through which you will develop and evidence your understanding. At the end of the day, it is up to you whether you choose to take a vocational or an academic route toward your future goal. An awful lot will depend on how you like to learn and which pathway offers you the best way into the career that you are interested in. Your decision shouldn’t be influenced by whether anyone else thinks that the only way is the academic A-level way - this is right for some students but not for all.

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“Your decision shouldn’t be influenced by whether anyone else thinks that the only way is the academic way”

Some BTEC qualifications only allow progression onto certain degree courses. Always check the entry requirements on individual university websites. Vocational qualifications start at Entry Level and go all the way up to Level 8, which is the same level as a PhD.

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FINANCE

SMART

MO “Whatever the plan there should be some plan.”

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ONEY V

ivi was inspired to start her own company after realising that many people didn’t have the kind of knowledge and understanding about managing their own finances that she did. After working in wealth management for nine years and at a time when student fees had been introduced Vivi founded Blackbullion. Vivi visited universities providing information for students, who loved it, and after this she took the service online to make it accessible to even more people. We asked her all your pensions questions.

Q.

WHAT IS A PENSION EXACTLY AND HOW DO PENSIONS WORK?

A pension is basically a pot of money that is built up and which provides you with an income when you retire. There are two types of pension, state and private. The state pension is distributed by the government – you contribute to the state pension money pot through national insurance payments and then when you reach retirement age the government provide you with a pension. The retirement age for the state pension can change. At the moment it is 65 but this may rise to 70 or 72. We do not know exactly what will happen but we do know that with the population rising and people living longer the state pension will not provide enough money to live comfortably.

Q.

WHAT IS AUTO-ENROLMENT?

Auto-enrolment is being rolled out over the next few years and it means that when you start working at a company and if you are aged 22 or older, that company will automatically enrol you onto their pensions programme. This means that you will start saving a little bit each month and your employer will put some in too and will invest that money on your behalf so that hopefully by the time you access your pension pot your money has grown.

Q.

WHEN SHOULD I START PAYING INTO A PENSION?

A pension is a very important tool that everyone should have because we will all stop working

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RETIREMENT IS PROBABLY THE LAST THING ON YOUR MIND BUT THE REALITY IS THAT AT SOME POINT YOU WILL STOP WORKING AND YOU WILL STILL NEED TO PAY THE BILLS AND EAT. VIVI FRIEDGUT GIVES US THE LOW DOWN ON PENSIONS.

eventually. Most young people underestimate how much they will need in their pension pot. It is estimated, based on the expected retirement age of 67 and life expectancy of 81 that you will need around £336,000 so the earlier you can start saving the better.

Q.

HOW MUCH SHOULD I PAY INTO MY PENSION?

As a rule of thumb you should look at saving an amount equivalent to half your age, so if you are 18 then 9 per cent, if you are 30 then 15 per cent. When it comes to workplace pensions put in as much as the company will match; if they will match 5 per cent then put in 5 per cent in.

Q.

WHAT HAPPENS TO MY PENSION IF AND WHEN I LEAVE ONE JOB AND GO TO WORK SOMEWHERE ELSE?

When you leave a company you do not lose the money in your pension pot. When you move to another employer you can move your pot of money with you. You will pay a small transfer fee to do this but the alternative is to end up with lots of pension pots all over the place that you need to keep track of. When you move to another employer speak to someone in the HR department and they will be able to point you in the right direction.

If you saved £336,000, retired at 67 and lived to 95 this would amount to £12,000 pa which isn’t a lot. When you are young you might have other things that you want to invest in, such as buying your own home. Putting money into a pension pot ties that money up for a long time so you can’t access it so it’s about balancing your long term needs with your short term goals. Other savings options include *ISAs where your money will be earning interest and be safe, but there will be no tax benefit like there is with a pension and you won’t get a proportion from your employer. You have to think about the fact that you will stop working at some point and you will still need to pay for things, so whatever the plan there should be some plan – for say 30 years of eating and heating – ease the pain. *An ISA is an individual savings account which is tax free

24%

20%

39%

ARE NOT SAVING FOR RETIREMENT AT ALL

THINK THEY WILL BE ABLE TO RETIRE AGED 60

THINK THEY WILL BE ABLE TO RETIRE AGED 65

Data source: The Young Money report which was produced by MRM. As part of this report, 1,000 18-25 year olds were surveyed by OnePoll between 29 June and 11 July 2016.

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FINANCE

Q.

WHY CAN’T I JUST PUT A BIT OF MONEY ASIDE EACH MONTH AND SAVE UP FOR WHEN I RETIRE? The short answer is that you can if you like but stashing cash under the mattress is not a good idea for many reasons, one being that you will not earn any interest.

Q.

WHERE DOES THE MONEY I PAY INTO MY PENSION GO?

Q.

HOW DO I GET MY PENSION WHEN I RETIRE?

“The retirement age for the state pension can change. At the moment it is 65 but this may rise to 70 or 72.”

A lot of pension will be invested in the stock market so it really is a good idea to get some understanding of the stock market and how it works.

The government will automatically let you know when you become eligible for your state pension

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ABOUT VIVI After years working in wealth management, Vivi Friedgut founded Blackbullion, an independent education company on a mission to help people become money smarter. Vivi works through schools and universities to help young people develop their financial literacy. www.blackbullion.com

and you will get it. Private pensions work differently. It used to be that you had to buy an annuity and this would pay you an amount per week, you don’t have to do this anymore – you can just take out the money – it is your money after all.

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An annuity is an annual retirement income that you purchase that is paid to you for the rest of your life.

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ENVIRONMENTAL

GREE DO YOU HAVE A PASSION FOR THE ENVIRONMENT, BUT YOU’RE UNSURE OF THE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE? KEEP READING TO DISCOVER JUST A FEW OF THE MANY ENVIRONMENTAL CAREER OPPORTUNITIES OUT THERE.

T

he study of science can open up many doors and make some fantastic and fulfilling careers available to you. Here we explore just a few that you may not have thought about.

CARTOGRAPHER If you have an interest in geography, representing data or maps, a career in cartography could be for you. A cartographer is somebody who develops and produces maps. They work to produce complex information in the forms of diagrams, charts, spreadsheets and standard maps. The use of IT now dominates this role as within map making almost all data is now collected electronically although some physical designs are also still used. The tasks of a cartographer include designing maps and illustrations, using computers to produce graphs, researching map source data, working with clients and operating specialist equipment and technology. For a career in cartography you will typically need a degree in a subject such as geographical information systems (GIS), geography, earth sciences or similar. An

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HND (higher national diploma) or foundation degree in one of these subjects may also be accepted. The starting salary for a cartographer may be around £18,000 per year, but at a senior level could be up to £47,000 – a very wide range! This is typically an officebased job, but at a senior level there may be travel involved as there will be more communication with clients.

METEOROLOGIST Meteorologists study the Earth’s atmosphere in order to forecast weather conditions. Meteorologists need good analytical, teamwork, communication and problem solving skills, as well as an interest in weather systems. The main duties of a meteorologist include recording and analysing data from weather satellites or systems, providing customers with weather reports and forecasts, using specialist computer programmes to make predictions, researching climate change and writing reports. The role of the meteorologist is specialist and you will typically need a good degree, such as a 2:1

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2:1 refers to the classification of degree that you get; in this case upper second class honours. Postgraduate courses include master’s degrees and PhDs. These are qualifications that you can take after completing your first / undergraduate degree, which is what you do after A-levels or equivalent level 3 qualifications.

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EN JOBS

WORDS: MEL SNOW

in a subject such as meteorology, mathematics, physical sciences or environmental science. A postgraduate qualification such as a master’s degree or PhD is also beneficial, and may be required by certain employers.

On average, a meteorologist earns between £20,000 and £60,000 per year. As a forecaster, you’ll usually work 30-40 hours per week, with shifts at the weekend too. Mainly work is conducted in an office setting, but you may get the chance to travel around a bit too.

ECOLOGIST Ecologists study different environments and the organisms within them, often choosing to specialise in a specific environment (i.e. marine or coastal areas) or study specific animals or plants. Typical duties include carrying out fieldwork, researching human impact on environments, managing wildlife conservation areas and predicting the changing effects of different climates. You might even develop plans for sustaining a healthy climate for local authorities. To become an ecologist, you’ll usually need a degree in a subject such as conservation biology, ecology, ecological science, environmental science, marine biology or zoology. Some employers may also expect you to be working towards a masters or a PhD in a relevant subject. To increase your employment opportunities, work experience or volunteering may also be worth considering.

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An ecologist can earn between £19,000 and £45,000 per year. They typically work between 37-40 hours per week, in a field setting, a laboratory and an office. There’s certainly a wide variety of working environments available! In an office, working hours may be regular – but fieldwork may include longer, more irregular hours.

OCEANOGRAPHER Oceanography is all about discovering how oceans work and how to make the use of its resources most effective. You’ll use science and mathematics to study and explain many different aspects of the ocean. You could choose to specialise in physical oceanography, chemical oceanography, which is the study of chemicals of the sea; biological oceanography, which is the study of marine organisms or geological oceanography, which involves examining the seabed.

“An ecologist can earn between £19,000 and £45,000 per year”

As an oceanographer, you could earn between £18,000 and £55,000 per year. Working hours can vary greatly, depending on the company that you work for. Hours working at sea will be especially irregular, and you could find yourself working at sea for a long time! Duties include collecting data from the sea, analysing samples, using specialist computer models, attending conferences, writing reports and possibly lecturing at universities. Usually, a degree in physics, mathematics, chemistry or biology is needed, as well as a postgraduate degree in oceanography. You will also be expected to have studied science or maths at A-level. Entry with an HND or foundation degree may be possible.

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LAND-BASED

A-Z OF LAND-BASED CAREERS PICK-YOUR-OWN PERFECT JOB FROM THE FERTILE FIELD OF LAND-BASED CAREERS

A

Animal boarding assistant – works in kennels, catteries and quarantine establishments.

G

Arboricultural Consultant – advises clients on the selection, health and maintenance of trees.

B

C

D

E

F

Basic operative/labourer – works outdoors as part of a fencing team, supporting qualified fence installers with manual tasks.

Dog/animal groomer – grooms domestic pets by shampooing, clipping and trimming them.

J

L

Jockey – is a trained professional, contracted by a licensed trainer to ride their horses at public races.

M

Master technician – work on a wide range of general and specialist vehicles and machinery used in farming, forestry, horticulture, ground care and sports facilities including golf courses and parks.

V

Veterinary surgeon – is a qualified, medical professional who works with animals.

Landscape manager – specialises in planning, designing, supervising and managing projects relating to the green space environment.

P

Ecologist – studies the complex relationships between animals, plants, people and their environment.

Pet shop assistant – works in retail outlets, caring for live animals and sells them as pets and companion animals.

R

Riding instructor – plans, delivers and reviews safe riding lessons for all ages and competency levels.

Farrier – prepares a horse’s foot and fits the horseshoe.

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Trek leader – runs horse and pony-riding activities, particularly treks and hacks across open countryside.

Herdsperson – feeds and looks after livestock on a farm to meet health and welfare requirements and growth targets.

Ranger – manages areas of countryside, focusing on environmental conservation, wildlife management, education, advice, access and maintenance.

Farm director – oversees all farm management activities to make sure the farm runs smoothly.

22

T Horticultural technician – specialises in a specific area of horticulture or is part of a team working in a laboratory.

Estate worker – helps maintain and manage the environment for the benefit of people and wildlife.

Florist – uses creativity and knowledge of plants and flowers to design and assemble floral displays.

Social forester – uses trees and woodland to deliver social benefits to groups within society and works with groups of people to improve well-being and mental health.

Groom – cares for horses so they remain healthy, happy and in good condition.

H

Community forester – revitalises derelict land, encourages urban regeneration, providing new opportunities for leisure and recreation.

Grounds manager – is a skilled professional who maintains sports grounds to a high standard.

S

Stalker – efficiently culls deer on country estates and aids the conservation and management of the natural habitat.

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Veterinary nurse – provides skilled, supportive care for sick animals and undertakes minor surgery, monitors during anaesthesia, and administers medical treatments and diagnostic tests to animals under veterinary supervision. Vaccinator – ensures that vaccinations can be administered to birds to prevent diseases occurring.

Y

Yard manager – is employed by equestrian business owners to make sure the yard runs efficiently.

Z

Zoo keeper – is responsible for the day-to-day care and welfare of animals in a zoo, a wildlife or safari park, an aquarium or a special collection of rare animals.

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Would working in an office be your worst nightmare??

You don’t have to! Find out about Apprenticeships in the Horseracing industry. You don’t have to be able to ride but loving horses or animals and the great outdoors will help. Racing and Thoroughbred breeding offers a range of exciting and challenging roles and training opportunities. You could be involved with breeding or racing some of the best horses in the country or even the world, or pursue a career in another part of this diverse industry. Lauren Hatch is a Trainee Stud Hand at Shadwell Estate. I decided to become a Trainee Stud Hand after …. spending 9 weeks completing my Pre-Apprenticeship Course at the National Stud, learning to care for and handle mares and foals. I then started working on another Stud Farm to complete my Apprenticeship. Best bit about my job …. working with the foals and gaining experience. Surprising fact about me is …. nothing, I’m just an average girl living the dream. In 10 years I would like to be …. managing a Stud Farm. Ryan Colley works for Racehorse Trainer Ruth Carr as Stable Groom. I became a member of Stable Staff after … spending 12 weeks doing my Level 2 Diploma in Racehorse Care at the Northern Racing College where I learnt how to handle and ride racehorses, then I started working for a trainer, to complete my Apprenticeship. Best bit about my job is … doing my favourite two things every day, riding and going racing. Surprising fact about me is … until I went to the Northern Racing College I had never ridden or touched a horse! In 10 years I would like to be… working as a Starter on a racecourse – setting off the races instead of riding in them.

For more information on careers, jobs and training in horseracing visit

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23


FOOD AND DRINK

FROM KITCHE

TO SH THE FOOD INDUSTRY OFFERS A WIDE RANGE OF CAREERS. AS WELL AS THE MORE OBVIOUS JOBS, LIKE WAITER OR CHEF, THERE ARE NUMEROUS ROLES INVOLVED IN CREATING, MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTING FOOD PRODUCTS.

A

ll of the jobs below require ingenuity, dedication and enthusiasm. They are perfect for those who are willing to work hard and who love food!

DEVELOPMENT CHEFS Development chefs create new food products by conducting experiments to find the best flavours and textures. They ensure new products meet food safety standards and that they are long-lasting, which is especially important if products are going to be transported and sold far away. Development chefs also research who their products might be sold to by carrying out consumer testing. Development chefs are employed by highend restaurants and chain restaurants, hotels and supermarkets. The kind of people these organisations look for are creative and have strong communication skills (development chefs have to work with marketing and technical

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teams, to determine how their products will be mass-produced and sold). Development chefs are expected to have a passion for food and previous experience working in restaurant kitchens (ideally in senior positions). A degree in food product development would also be helpful. The benefits of the job include having regular hours and an average salary of £25,000 to £40,000, depending on your level of experience.

FOOD PHOTOGRAPHERS Food photographers take photos for cookery books, advertising campaigns and food packaging. They aim to make food look enticing, so that shoppers want to buy it. Some get degrees or diplomas in photography, but most start out by working as assistants to established food photographers. Knowledge of different kinds of cuisine is important as it helps you understand what each client wants and having a passion for food makes work more fun for the photographer!

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The job of food photographer does not involve being on the move; instead, it involves spending a lot time on a shoot, adjusting the composition of each photograph to get it as good as possible. Food photographers work alongside food stylists, prop stylists and art directors, so it is important to have good communication skills. Because most food photographers work freelance and they are hired by different clients for short periods of time – pay varies greatly. To attract new clients most food photographers maintain a portfolio of their work. While this job

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EN

HELF WORDS: HETTY MOSFORTH

does not necessarily provide a steady income, it offers amazing opportunities for being creative and meeting lots of different people.

FOOD PACKAGING DESIGNERS Food packaging designers create the packaging that food is sold in, making it appeal to shoppers and attract their attention. Packaging designers have to complete market research in order to understand what appeals to a particular target market. This sort of job is perfect for creative people, with visual minds and a love of food. Food packaging designers must be able to use design software like Adobe Illustrator and having a degree in graphic design or marketing is vital. As well as being creative, food packaging designers must be able to conduct research and communicate well. Designers work with other professionals, like material engineers, to make sure their packaging protects its product. They have to be happy pitching their ideas to clients or other company members like food

photographers. It is a good idea for food packaging designers to maintain portfolios of their work and be willing to do freelance jobs to build up their experience. They can either freelance short-term for particular companies or they work permanently for large companies, like supermarkets and department stores. Permanent employees can expect regular hours and an average salary of £27000-£35000.

“Having a passion for food makes work more fun.” WAREHOUSE MANAGERS Warehouse managers organise the reception and delivery of products in a warehouse. On a dayto-day basis, warehouse managers have to track

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stock levels and manage the warehouse space. They work with suppliers and manage their own team of warehouse operatives. It is a job that suits hard working, highly organised people. There are no formal requirements for the job, however qualifications in distribution work (such as a foundation degree in logistics) can help with getting onto a management training scheme. Experience working in retail or as a warehouse operative is also very useful. Warehouse managers must be good at using databases and planning, as well as managing and motivating their teams of staff. Warehouse managers often work shifts, taking on 35-45 hours per week. They can expect to work evenings and weekends, especially during busy periods like Christmas. Starting salaries average £18,000 to £22,000 but more experienced warehouse managers can earn up to £40,000. This is a good job for those who want to progress up the career ladder, as good warehouse managers can be promoted to become regional or national operations managers.

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Your first step to launching a business starts here.

Free ongoing support. One-to-one mentoring. Low interest loans. Over 80,000 people started a business with our support. We can help you be next. Aged 18-30? Explore now: Search ‘Enterprise Programme’ Text ‘Call me’ to 07983 385 418 Standard network charges apply for text messages. Call for free on 0800 842 842 FIND US ONLINE: MOVINGONMAGAZINE.CO.UK FACEBOOK.COM/MOVINGONMAGAZINE 26 MOVING ON FEB/MAR 2017

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DSN3090 © The Prince’s Trust 2017 – all rights reserved. The Prince’s Trust is a registered charity, incorporated by Royal Charter (RC000772). Principal office: Prince’s Trust House, 9 Eldon Street, London, England EC2M 7LS. Registered charity number in England and Wales (1079675) and Scotland (SC041198).


BUSINESS

START YOUR OWN

BUSINESS IF YOU HAVE THE RIGHT CHARACTER AND YOU’VE GOT A GREAT IDEA, MAYBE YOU SHOULD START YOUR OWN BUSINESS.

S

tarting your own business would be exciting and also challenging. Have you got what it takes to make a success of it?

The first thing to do is to think hard about whether you have the sort of attitude that will lead to success. Running your own business can be hard and you might face tough times, particularly when you are starting out. You will need to be resilient.

“you will need to think about your target market.” IS YOUR BUSINESS IDEA REALLY GREAT? You will need to develop your idea. Once you have a clear idea of what service or product your business would provide you need to test how plausible it is. This means doing some research to find out whether anybody would want your product and importantly whether they would pay for it. Next you will need to think about your target market, how much it will cost you to set up and run the business and how much money you expect to make. This will tell you whether your business idea is viable. If you don’t have

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the money to set up the business yourself, you will need to find an investor or secure a start-up loan.

WHAT KIND OF BUSINESS WILL YOU HAVE? All businesses need to be registered. Here are some options: Registered sole trader – this means that you will be personally responsible for any debts. Registered limited company – this means that the business finances will be separate from your personal finances. Registered partnership – this means that you will share the responsibility for any debts. If you run your own business you will have responsibilities. You’ll have to sort out any licences or permits that you need for trading, either in a shop or online. You’ll need to sort out insurance and you may need to meet legal requirements for storing and using customers’ personal information. If you take on employees you’ll also have to sort out things like health and safety, payroll, employer national insurance and pensions.

START-UP LOANS AND SUPPORT Start-up loans are between £500 and £25,000. You need to be over 18 years old and will need to submit a business plan and a financial forecast as part of the application. To find out more visit: www.startuploans.co.uk/ and to find out about support for 18-30 year olds take a look at www.princes-trust.org.uk

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GAS ENGINEERING

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FUEL YOUR FUTURE

GAS ENGINEERS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INSTALLATION, REPAIR AND ONGOING SERVICE OF GAS APPLIANCES. STUDENT WRITER LUKE WAKELING TAKES A LOOK AT THE GAS ENGINEER APPRENTICESHIP FOR US.

G

as engineers can work with a number of appliances including central heating boilers, cookers, unvented hot water storage, alternative fuel, meters and boosters, and testing and purging for industrial pipework.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

• Undertake and document rigorous risk assessments to ensure the safety of all affected by the work activities • Perform tightness testing, purging and relight procedures on gas installations • Undertake pipework installations, pipework sizing and meter installations • undertake ambient air testing/carbon monoxide/ dioxide atmosphere testing.

As an apprentice gas engineer you will learn about the following things: current health, safety and environmental legislation; safe gas and electrical installation, commissioning, decommissioning and ongoing service and repair procedures, gas and electrical theories, relevant electrical/mechanical principles, energy efficiency, regulatory compliance and current gas safety regulations, combustion, combustion analysis, gas properties, carbon monoxide (CO) and types of burners, flues and ventilation principles, flue types for appliances and smart controls, green technologies, the properties of Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) and fuel storage – tanks and bottles.

THE SKILLS THAT YOU WILL DEVELOP INCLUDE HOW TO: • Carry out safe isolation and essential electrical safety checks • Carry out flue testing • Undertake the necessary safety checks following gas work • Work in compliance with building regulations, water regulations and electrical regulations • Access and comply with technical guidance, bulletins and safety alerts • Identify gas safety controls and prove their safe operation • Complete records and maintain records accordingly • Identify faults • Undertake the installation and/or repair and maintenance of appliances • Reinstate following completion of work cleaning up and making good

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Gas engineers often find themselves lifting heavy equipment, working at heights and in confined spaces whilst working with the potentially dangerous fuel that gas is. It is therefore unsurprising that gas engineers operate under strict health and safety guidelines, and must achieve Gas Safe® Registration.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GAS ENGINEERING Apprenticeship include a minimum of 3-5 GCSEs at grade 9-4 or equivalent, preferably English, mathematics and a science. The apprenticeship is Level 3 and lasts for 18 months, at the end of which if you successfully complete all elements you will be eligible to apply for membership with the Institution of Gas Engineers and Managers (IGEM) as an engineering technician.

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SUBSCRIBE

ANNUAL

SUBSCRIPTION Moving On magazine is a free publication devoted to delivering information on careers and qualifications to 16 to19 year-olds, their parents and teachers. Moving On is published five times a year to coincide with the academic timetable. The Moving On editorial team works closely with educational experts, including UCAS, the main Sector Skills Councils, the Student Loan Company and the National Apprenticeship Service, in order to arm our readership with up-to-date information on education and employment. Students from subscribing schools write many of the articles for Moving On and undertake work placements in our offices, which provides them with invaluable experience and a unique insight into the world of journalism and publishing. We are extremely proud of our gifted young contributors and we strongly encourage interest from potential student writers.

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Aimed at students aged 13-19, Kudos delivers personalised guidance to discover their career destination.

CASCAID Manager tracks students’ progress in Kudos, and also...

Evidences impact & outcomes of the school’s careers programme Provides reports for Ofsted & SLT

Aligns your school’s programme with the Gatsby benchmarks

Helps plan meaningful interventions

CASCAID Manager is free with every subscription

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Capel Manor College Discover a world of exciting career opportunities in our outdoor classrooms and stand out from the crowd…

We are London’s largest land based college with five centres across the Capital. Find out more at one of our advice sessions.

Capel Manor Enfield Capel at Forty Hall Farm

The best decision I ever made was going to Capel Manor College to get my qualifications.

Capel at Brooks Farm Capel at Regent’s Park

Capel at Gunnersbury Park

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Capel at Crystal Palace Park

For further information on our courses and centres call:

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Leading the field in animal management, arboriculture, balloon artistry, conservation, countryside management, floristry, garden design, horticulture, landscaping, leatherwork, outdoor adventure, saddlery, tree surgery and wildlife courses at centres across London.

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