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The WAY ForWArD

2015 Issue 2

Logistics growing in Asia Inside this issue:

Ship management team strengthens Wallem India celebrate 30 Years Asset management: solutions in a down market

Delivering Maritime Solutions www.wallem.com


CEO’s Message Seafaring: the beginning of a rewarding career. This could be the next tagline for seafarer recruiters around the world. No matter which way we put it, the message is true – seafaring is the first step in a career full of possibilities. The experience on board can take you in all manner of directions, from commercial managers and ship brokers, to boarding agents and superintendents or safety inspectors and trainers. For too long we have sold cadets and new joiners on achieving the rank of captain or chief engineer, but then what? And it’s the “then what” that we must share with potential candidates to attract more young people to the maritime industry. These candidates crave variety and opportunity and the maritime industry has these in spades. The industry can also investigate new sources of crew to build and strengthen the available group of professional seafarers. Establishing new sources is not easy, but is rewarding for everyone. For three decades Wallem has been recruiting seafarers from India, which in 1985 was a pioneering move with only a handful of foreign owners recruiting from the region. The Indian government at the time was not supportive and wanted to ensure the local ship owners were protected. With lobbying from the foreign owners and ship managers, there was a meeting of minds about the opportunities which were available for Indian seafarers if the whole sector worked together. Thirty years on Wallem celebrated its anniversary in India in April this year, seeing 4500 seafarers walk through the doors annually bound for Wallem crewed vessels or on their way home after a job well done. In India the seafarers are supported from six key offices, several welfare centres and training centres with state-of-the-art equipment including bridge and engine room simulators. The next crewing frontier could be Africa, which is on the move in world trade and has a large population looking for opportunities to follow a profession. Captain Navin Passey, a Wallem crewing expert, joined discussions on Africa’s future as a seafaring nation at a

True North The Way Forward

conference in March this year. He has some practical suggestions of where the maritime sector both locally and internationally can develop the professional African seafarer. (Read more at page13) Although new seafaring sources may be moving away from Asia in the long term, we are finding the opposite when it comes to other parts of our business. The logistics sector is continuing to grow as supply and demand in intra-Asia increase on the back of infrastructure investment from oil exploration and platforms to port development and generator installation. Wallem’s logistics teams across Asia are also finding containerised trade is booming with many consumers and producers in East Asia and Oceania moving raw materials for garments and electronics, and returning the finished products to the growing mass consumer markets of Asia. But it’s not all roses for every maritime sector, but when is it? With the bulk shipping market sitting in the doldrums, and many ship owners and Asian banks feeling the pain in their back pocket, asset protection again comes to the fore as a serious option for financial institutions finding themselves with ships on their books. At a recent seminar in Shanghai Nitin Mathur, Managing Director Wallem Commercial Services, was cornered by several financial establishments after his presentation on asset protection as a profitable and sustainable option during a down market. Many companies will need to seriously reconsider how they manage their assets and balance sheets in the face of challenging and unstable markets. (Read more at page 15) Safe sailing to all,

Simon Doughty Wallem Group CEO


NEWs

A ship management team for today and tomorrow David Price started in the role of Managing Director Wallem Ship Management in May, taking a key position in Wallem’s continued growth. David has worked in all senior levels of ship management and has a high degree of experience in technical management, manning, procurement and quality and safety. He began his life in shipping as a deck officer, leaving his sea career at the rank of captain. Wallem Group CEO Simon Doughty said David will lead the ship management team in working with the broader services of the Wallem Group, offering clients a unique service unavailable elsewhere in the maritime market. “Shipping is a constantly changing world, and a very competitive one, so to continue to deliver what our clients and stakeholders want today and predict their future needs, we have combined the right people and expertise,” explained Mr Doughty. “David will continue to develop the depth of our maritime professional expertise across the ship management team, and will introduce his own perspectives and ideas on how we can continue to grow as a successful Group,” said Mr Doughty. “We have a diverse set of services across the Group and combined with our experts in almost every maritime sector, we can and do meet the needs of our clients, whether they use one of our services or all. “With David’s knowledge and understanding of technical ship management, with a particular focus in quality and safety, our clients and seafarers can be assured that these essential ship management traits will continue to underpin Wallem’s services.”

david Price, Managing director Wallem ship Management

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FEATURE

Consumers and producers drive logistics business growth in Asia

Heavy machinery arrives in Vietnam

Freight forwarding and containerised cargo is a shipping sector with particularly bright prospects in Asia. Long term industry predictions are that in 2030 China will continue to be the leading country in primary container trades, and the largest container tranship loaded lifts will be happening in South East Asia, as it does today. (Source: Global Marine Trends 2030)

“Forwarders think broadly when it comes to services, lines, geography and cargo, making us the ‘can-do’ people of the logistics industry,” explained Johan.

Asia, including the Asia Pacific and Indian Ocean, will have the highest volume of seaborne container trade in 2030, with significant growth in trades between Asia and Latin America. (Source: Global Marine Trends 2030)

“We are seeing our business growing on the back of trade in South East Asia, China and Oceania, with both high volume consumers and producers based in the region. There are many garment factories in South East Asia; the raw materials are delivered from China, and the final product is returned to China for the consumer market. Other containerised cargo growth is in components for electronics, health equipment, chemicals and automotive parts delivered to production lines for companies such as GM, Ford and Toyota.”

In this environment Wallem’s logistics business has been blossoming with a foundation in freight forwarding which is giving the team a good reputation in the market. Wallem Logistics Managing Director Johan Vermeiren is leading the team to build forwarding capabilities across Asia, including an entity in China, and establishing project and offshore logistics services to meet growing demand.

“Asia...will have the highest volume of seaborne container trade in 2030.”

Wallem now has a Regional Project Logistics Manager in Singapore, Jess Lee, with staff based in Thailand,

True North The Way Forward

Vietnam, Myanmar, Japan and Malaysia, and all six locations are now members of the XLProjects Network (XLP).

Rig platforms drive project logistics South East Asia and China yards are busy building platforms, driving project logistics services for the delivery of raw materials, and moving platforms to the final destination. “Our project logistics team managed a rig tow from Guangzhou, China, to the Gulf of Thailand in 2014,” explained Johan, “making arrangements for the towing, customs, support vessels on arrival and supply vessels. “We are fortunate to have access to the support and technical expertise from our colleagues across the Wallem Group from ship agency specialists to technical managers and procurement professionals, who are a gold mine of knowledge and networks that ensure our logistics services are delivered with all bases covered.”


Heavy lift not affected by oil price drop

Infrastructure affects movement of oversized cargoes

Upbeat of the heavy lift sector, Johan says offshore, mining and power will continue to drive the heavy lift moves in South East Asia.

Jess Lee, Regional Project Logistics Manager says port infrastructure can be a handicap in some countries.

“The drop in oil prices and slump in commodities are only temporary. Going forward all countries across South East Asia will continue to have their share in the construction and fabrication of drilling & exploration units as well as mining related equipment and facilities.” Most of these fabricated units and facilities will continue to be shipped into South America, Middle East, Africa and Australia, amongst other places. Power supply is still unstable or lacking is some areas in South East Asia and will have to follow the further demographic and economic development in the region. Building of power plants is ongoing and increasing, generating inbound cargo movements.

“Even in Singapore concerns such as draft and strength of a jetty will limit the type of cargo being handled,” said Jess. “Lifting capacity such as cranes or even special equipment like multi axles can be used to facilitate the lift but that comes with extra costs and risk. “In addition to mobilisation and demobilisation costs, additional time is needed to schedule the relevant equipment for pre-clearance to be in position for the loading or discharging operation. “Thus the port infrastructure dictates the size and weight of the heavy lift projects it can handle.”

*continued over

The logistics team delivered soil to the race track in Singapore after it was imported from the UK.

Wallem Vietnam’s Rosa Ho with a heavy lift delivery.

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FEATURE

Guillaume Gilleron, Logistics Manager, with generators being loaded in Indonesia bound for Bahrain.

Offshore a natural development The vision for the logistics business includes growing the service into the offshore sector, which, as Johan outlines, has many synergies with Wallem’s existing services. “We have technical managers, commercial managers and procurement experts who form part of our knowledge bank in the offshore sector and, with our logistics professionals, will be a solid team for high quality service delivery. We see this as a growth area in South East Asian nations such as Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar and eventually Vietnam.” In an analysis brief on the South China Sea, the US Energy Information Agency (EIA) estimated “there to be approximately 11 billion barrels (bbl) of oil reserves and 190 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of natural gas reserves in the South China Sea.” (www.eia.gov)

The report also commented on the demand and supply of energy for the region: “The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects total liquid fuels consumption in Asian countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to rise at an

annual growth rate of 2.6 percent, growing from around 20 percent of world consumption in 2008 to over 30 percent of world consumption by 2035. Similarly, non-OECD Asia natural gas consumption grows by 3.9 percent annually, from 10 percent of world gas consumption in 2008 to 19 percent by 2035. EIA expects China to account for 43 percent of that growth. “With Southeast Asian domestic oil production projected to stay flat or decline as consumption rises, the region's countries will look to new sources of energy to meet domestic demand. China in particular promotes the use of natural gas as a preferred energy source and set an ambitious target of increasing the share of natural gas in its energy mix from 3 percent to 10 percent by 2020. The South China Sea offers the potential for significant natural gas discoveries, creating an incentive to secure larger parts of the area for domestic production.” (www. eia.gov)

Johan Vermeiren Johan is a Belgian national who has worked in logistics throughout his career. Based in Wallem’s Bangkok office, he travels extensively to connect with clients and suppliers. Johan started his career with management positions in logistics companies in Western Europe and the Ukraine, focusing on road transportation, warehousing and port operations before moving to Asia in 2000. He has strong experience in automotive logistics and supply chains, freight management, warehousing and ship agency. Johan also has a keen interest in oil & gas and project logistics.

“Technical managers, commercial managers and procurement experts form part of our knowledge bank.”

True North The Way Forward

Johan Vermeiren is the Managing Director of Wallem Logistics


FEATURE

Wallem India celebrates three decades of crew management 1985 was a year of landmark events. Microsoft Corporation released the first version of Windows – Windows 1.0 – British Telecom announced it would phase out its famous red telephone boxes, and Wallem Ship Management was established in India. Although it may not have stood out on the world stage, Wallem in India was a landmark event for seafarers seeking opportunities to sail on ocean-going vessels with international ship owners. The office was established to focus on the recruitment, retention and training of professional seafarers. Today that remit has not changed, and every year the team supports more than 4500 seafarers walking through the doors to join ships or on their way home. Over the past 30 years Wallem India has grown from a handful of people in an office in Mumbai handling about 270 seafarers, to today’s six offices, four welfare centres, and training centres across India. They now support about 40 per cent of Wallem’s pool of 12 000 seafarers. Joining the team from day one was Ashfaq Ali, who remains a significant leader at Wallem India as a Director and leading the finance team and celebrated his 30th year with Wallem in April 2015. “I wondered if I had done the right thing,” explains Ashfaq “I moved from a big company to only seven staff, establishing Wilco [the original name of the company] but it wasn’t long before I never looked back again. My job was everything but the recruitment; setting up the company, legalities, finance, administration.”

Ashfaq Ali, Director

“There were many highlights, such as when the government clamped down on the employment of Indian seafarers by foreign companies. We established FOSMA* with about seven other companies, representing the interests of seafarers working on foreign flagged vessels and representing the views of the industry to the government.” *Foreign Owners Representatives and Ship Managers Association

A key factor in Wallem’s success in India has been the steady hand of Captain Navin Passey, who has led the company for the past ten years. Navin joined Wallem in 1978 as a seafarer, and achieved the rank of captain in 1982. Over the next 15 years he specialised in new takeovers for Wallem at a time when ship owners were looking to buy and sell quickly. His team’s role was to improve the value of the ship for the client to achieve a profitable outcome.

Navin Passey, Managing Director Wallem India

In 1997 Navin came ashore and, in his own words, was an “ambassador at large” and “Mr Fix It” going wherever the company needed him. His six years in this role gave him a solid grounding for much of ship management’s interests which was good training ground for his next position as director at Wallem India, and then managing director. Issue 2 2015

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FEATURE

Captain Srirang Manjeshwar, Director Training, India

Wilco beginnings Wallem has been recruiting seafarers from India since the early 1970s, but it was not until 1985 that we established a formal presence in Mumbai. It was known then as Wilco Shipmanagement & Travels. In 2009 the company name was changed to Wallem Shipmanagement (India) Pvt Ltd. In 1987, the Delhi office was established, and was followed in 1996 by Kolkata, Chennai in 1997, Chandigargh in 2008, and Kochi in 2012. We have been opening more local centres – or welfare centres – to be closer to our sea staff, including Dehadrun, Lucknow, Navi Mumbai, and Patna.

Life-long learning Training has been an important feature of Wallem’s presence in India, providing world-class facilities for seafarers to improve their skills and knowledge to grow their own careers. Captain Srirang Manjeshwar has been a key driver behind the success of the training centres across India. He also often takes his knowledge to smaller Wallem recruiting centres in other countries to personally deliver training. In 1994, Wallem was one of the first shipping companies to establish a training centre in Mumbai for seafarers – a Wallem Maritime Training Centre. With increasing demand, the Training Centre was expanded and relocated in 2004.

The engine control room simulator at Wallem Maritime Training Centre Mumbai

When it first opened, the Centre offered about 30 courses, and today that has increased to more than 40. The Mumbai Training Centre is one of the few in the city which is equipped with state of the art simulators, both navigational as well as engineering.

The four India chapters of WOW, in Mumbai, Kolkata, Delhi and Chennai, provide moral support to members and the families of seafarers. They are an important support network, providing friendship, information and understanding.

In 2014, Wallem seafarers took 8200 courses at the Centres across India.

The groups meet monthly to share their experiences and listen to guest speakers discuss topics such as children, insurance policies, managing their finances and health issues.

The offices in Kolkata, Chennai, Chandigargh and Delhi also offer non-simulator training courses, providing an easily accessible location for seafarers to improve their skills and knowledge without extended travel times.

The future The next generation of Indian seafarers is important for Wallem’s growth, and each year exceptional cadets are recognised with awards presented at maritime training facilities. These include trophies and a cash prize for the Best All Round Pre-Sea Cadet of the Year at Tolani Maritime Institute, TS Rahaman, and the International Maritime Institute. Every year Wallem sponsors cadets at institutes in India and provide on board training positions. In 2014 more than 100 Wallem Cadets from India graduated from their shorebased training, and are now training on board Wallem-managed ships.

Women of Wallem (WOW) Established in 2004, Women of Wallem (WOW) are support groups for the families of Wallem seafarers.

True North The Way Forward

WOW also carries out regular activities to support their local communities through material support to orphanages and aged care homes.

The Women of Wallem chapter from Navi Mumbai visiting a boys orphanage, making a donation to support the home.


30 years of Wallem India Wallem Shipmanagement Ltd starts operations in India. Initially using agents for recruiting, Indian officers accounted for nearly 45 per cent of Wallem's seafarers.

1977

Delhi office opens.

1987

delhi celebrates 30 years of Wallem India

A training centre is established in Mumbai – one of the first.

Chennai office and training centre established to serve India’s southern states.

Wallem Maritime Training Centre in Mumbai is expanded and relocated to Andheri. Women of Wallem (WOW) established.

Chandigarh office opens to serve India’s northern regions.

1985

Wilco Shipmanagement & Travels Private Ltd is established as the sole manning agent for Wallem Shipmanagement.

1990

Indian crew members increased to more than 85 per cent of Wallem’s seafarers. Kolkata celebrates 30 years of Wallem India

1994 1996

Kolkata office opens.

2000

New Mumbai office and training centre are opened in Andheri in response to increased responsibilities and office employees.

1997 2004

Mumbai celebrates 30 years of Wallem India

2007

Received the 44th National Maritime Day 2007 Award for Most Compassionate Employer of Indian Seafarers. Received the 7th Sailor Today Annual Seafarers 2007 Award for Seafarers’ Welfare.

2009

Wilco Shipmanagement & Travels Pvt Ltd changes its name to Wallem Shipmanagement (India) Pvt Ltd.

2013

Full compliance with Maritime Labour Convention(MLC)

2008

Opening of welfare centres in Dehadrun, Lucknow, Navi Mumbai, Cochin and Patna

2012

Received the Most Compassionate Employer of Indian Seafarers Award

2014

dehadrun welfare office celebrates 30 years of Wallem India

2015

Wallem Ship Management’s fleet is made up of approximately 400 ships and we currently employ about 5000 Indian seafarers. 140 people are employed in shore-based positions across the various offices and training centers. Issue 2 2015

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NEWS

Ship yard expert leads ship management in China

Shanghai Shipyard

Mingfa Liu, Managing Director Wallem Ship Management China

True North The Way Forward


FEATURE

Shipping in 2025 Wallem’s experts provide insight into the next decade acceptance and positive support from many leading employers that will bring the element of elegance to the previously male dominated industry.

Achieving predicted Asian cruise growth – Dickson Chin, Ship Agency Cruise analysts are predicting Asia will be producing four million cruise passengers a year by 2020 – but only if the local industry can meet the needs of visiting passengers and immigration procedures are streamlined. As ships call to more remote and ‘unexplored’ ports, cruise lines are more dependent on knowledgeable operators who can facilitate maximised shore visits. In many Asian destinations trained, knowledgeable, English-speaking guides will be needed along with comfortable and safe tour buses. Varied and difficult immigration procedures, and complicated visa requirements can hamper growth. No cruise destination exists on its own and it takes several destinations to make an itinerary. The more ports, the more attractive an itinerary is. Today’s situation often means delays, higher operating costs for cruise lines and an unsatisfactory cruise experience. The region must work together to establish an Asian single-visa (similar to the European Schengen visa) to encourage multiple visits by cruise passengers.

Changing face of crew – Fared Khan, Fleet Personnel

Psychometric testing for seafarers during recruitment, and at key milestones in their careers, will provide employers with insight into the suitability of an individual for a role. Officers will also be required to pass simulator assessments at regular intervals in their career.

It takes ten years for a cadet to become a master or chief engineer, so by 2025 we will have a new generation of seafarers operating our vessels. These new seafarers will be from non-traditional seafaring nations. This will result in a more diverse work place, with many nationalities, but all qualified, experienced and better versed in technology than ever before. Maritime training centres will be steered by the industry, demanding focus on safety and environmental issues towards more relevant training, which will be efficient, specific, evaluative and applicable to real-life scenarios with help of simulators and new technology. With MLC maturing, there will be a trend towards parity in terms and conditions. With basic living and conditions covered, focus will shift to occupational safety, ergonomics and better integration of technology to improve efficiency and performance on board. Social media will play a significant role in life at sea and maritime management ashore.

LNG bunkering the norm – Ioannis Stefanou, Technical Management By 2025 most vessels will be running on LNG and the industry must prepare for it. Ship owners are today ordering vessels which are LNGready, and coastal vessels including ferries are using it. There is also an increase in bunkering ports which are providing LNG, including Singapore which is investing heavily in this area. In 10 years’ time it will be used widely across our industry.

The percentage of female seafarers on board may double with more

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NEWs

wallem.com Chinese landing page

Wallem’s website – wallem.com – now has a landing page in modern Chinese. The page was launched to introduce prospective clients and stakeholders to Wallem’s services. The address of the page is: http://www.wallem.com/cn-page

Seafarers: Have your voice heard Send your feedback, comments or concerns to:

seavoice@wallem.com

This email is not to be used for operational matters

True NorTh ThE Way FOrWard


NEWs

Star signs with SeaSafe Marine Vasanth srungavarapu, seasafe Technical Manager, carries out an inspection and service of safety equipment.

SeaSafe Marine, the expert life boat maintenance service company of the Wallem Group, recently won a contract from the major Asian cruise line, Star Cruises, supplying and installing new lifeboat hook systems to the cruise vessel Star Pisces which included two tender boats, four lifeboats and two rescue boats. Andrew Lemmis, Managing Director of SeaSafe Marine, said with a team of eight engineers on site the job was completed according to schedule with no delays to the vessel. In terms of volume and logistics, this was the biggest project that SeaSafe Marine has undertaken to date. "This was a challenging project as the lifeboats were built to older regulations and the new hooks required a lot of turnkey engineering to install,” said Andrew. “In conjunction with the hook replacements, our team also refurbished two rescue boats, performed service to the lifeboat davits, overhauled life raft davits and complete load testing all during the two week docking schedule." SeaSafe Marine’s current client list includes companies from across the maritime sector such as cruise, tankers and bulk carriers, and all are looking for a service which ensures they provide crew and passengers with reliable and compliant safety equipment at realistic pricing.

“This was a challenging project... the new hooks required a lot of turnkey engineering to install.” “We have engineers based in Hong Kong and China, who regularly travel around the world to deliver our services. We are soon to add engineers based in Singapore, the UK, Mainland Europe and USA,” said Andrew. “Our clients have a need for maintaining lifeboats, but we offer much more than just standard services. Once on board, we also service gangways and accommodation ladders at no additional cost. Other benefits include predocking surveys, condition assessment checks on newly added tonnage and two visits a year on each vessel. “We also consider it important that crew are proficient in using the equipment, which may well save their lives one day, so we also assist crew in performing drills and provide equipment-specific familiarisation training all in the attractive flat fixed service fee.” SeaSafe Marine is an Independent Lifeboat Servicing and Testing Organisation (ILSTO). It is an authorised representative of major lifeboat and davit manufacturers, with Class and Flag approvals.

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feature

Africa’s potential as a seafaring source A group of eager Angolan cadets ready to board the Sonangol Namibe in 2007. (l-r) Francisco Miranda, Antonio Ribeiro Paim, Antonio Pita, Orlando Vandick and Frederico Pereira.

“Invest in yourself” was the message from crewing specialist and Wallem India Managing Director Navin Passey at the Africa Manning and Training Conference held in Cape Town in February this year. Captain Passey emphasised the potential for Africa to become a leading source of seafarers for the international maritime industry, with the right investment in training and achievement of international standards. “Africa has a vast coast line, numerous coastal states and natural resources, but limited maritime infrastructure and is an untapped human resource when it comes to seafarers,” Navin said. With 26,000km of coastline, Africa is the world's second-largest and second-most-populous continent. It has a population of 1.1 billion as of 2013 - about 15% of the world's human population – and the youngest population among all the continents; 50% of Africans are 19 years old or younger. (Harry, Njideka U. (11 September 2013). "African Youth, Innovation and the Changing Society". Huffington Post.)

Every year Africa produces 40,000

university graduates, a majority within the engineering and pre-professional disciplines. Many African nations have a similar story: graduates struggle to find careers and average domestic salaries are relatively low. This provides an economic incentive to pursue a career in shipping where wages are much higher. Most African seafarers have been developed for domestic employment. State-owned commodity companies train and hire them for their own fleets. Only a few countries develop seafarers with the ambition to provide them to foreign fleets.

Seafarer shortage solution? There is a shortfall in the supply of quality seafarers to meet industry demand. For example, there is a current shortfall in Officers that is expected to exceed 21,700 by 2018 (Drewry Manning Report 2014). Ship operators are challenged by rising seafarer wages despite the industry’s prolonged recession, particularly in the dry-bulk and container sectors. This is largely due to the growth in the new build order books, creating increased demand for crew.

True North The Way Forward

Africa could make a large contribution to addressing the seafarer shortage, and create long term career paths for its population.

Sonangol and Wallem crewing partnership There have already been some achievements in the training and recruitment of African seafarers for international trading vessels. Wallem Ship Management’s partnership with Sonangol USA Co., a member of the Sonangol Group, which oversees petroleum and natural gas production in Angola, is one example. In 1999 Sonangol and Wallem partnered to develop a programme to recruit and train seafarers, establishing a dedicated seafaring pool for Sonangol vessels. From selecting the candidates to delivering an international standard of training both on shore and at sea, the seafarers have grown through their careers to now hold positions as captains, chief engineers and superintendents. Today Wallem maintains a pool of more than 200 seafarers for the Sonangol vessels managed by


Wallem, and continues to maintain a cadet programme for the long term interests of the Sonangol fleet.

Addressing the challenges Africa possesses exceptional macrolevel fundamentals to develop into a substantive crewing source for the global merchant fleet. However, it will take cooperation between all stake holders, public and private, to unlock and fully harness this potential.

Captain Navin Passey, Wallem India Managing Director, speaks about Africa’s potential to fill the industry’s seafarer demands.

“There is a perception that Africa is new to the “seafarer” culture,” explains Navin, “Africans do not have generational experience in the industry. The seafarer culture must be developed, and Africans educated on their potential as seafarers based on their limited exposure to the industry.

values, operating procedures, policies and regulations.

“The validation of training institutions needs to be advanced to provide potential seafarers with access to the right education for their careers. Only a select group of countries and training institutions have been validated by industry authorities. For example, the European Maritime Safety Authority (EMSA) has only audited three Sub-Saharan countries (South Africa, Ghana, and Senegal) and will audit Ethiopia in 2015.

Navin also points out the maritime industry needs to consider its perception of African seafarers.

“Quality standards need to be established which includes ensuring all vessels are manned by professional, qualified, certified, experienced, medically fit seafarers in accordance with national and international laws meeting customers’ requirements and satisfaction.

With growing seaborne trade in African ports, ship operators can lower their crewing transportation costs by utilising African seafarers who are in closer proximity to vessels during crew changes.

“In addition, a commitment to the safety and welfare of seafarers is of utmost importance to an industry that entrusts these women and men the responsibility to operate and maintain vessels according to the International Safety and Quality Management System. “And I can’t emphasise training enough. Continually train sea staff towards understanding business needs, corporate objectives, culture,

“Encourage and provide resources to sea staff to continuously upgrade their skills to improve performance to enhance safety, quality, and efficient operations.”

“The industry is unfamiliar with African seafaring and some ship managers and operators still negatively associate the continent with corruption, war, and piracy. The industry at large has, regretfully, not taken the African crewing potential seriously.”

Where to start Shipping companies can partner with African governments to develop crewing capacity with Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). African governments can incentivise ship and crew managers to invest in African seafarer training. Almost all African countries have the requirement of Local Content Development - making it mandatory for foreign companies operating on the African coast to recruit and develop local manpower under its cabotage laws. A more

strict and consistent application of this requirement, accompanied by effective training facilities, would encourage investment in local manpower.

Public Private Partnership success story One example of a PPP in action is the Ethiopian government’s partnership with a private entity to develop the Ethiopian Maritime Training Institute (EMTI) in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. The Government provides infrastructure support and makes financial contributions to the Institute, while the entity provides technical industry expertise. The Government encourages highly skilled university graduates to attend the EMTI training program, and the private partner delivers the curriculum and connects cadet graduates with reputable international ship operators and managers. This allows ship managers to recruit high quality crew, while Ethiopian seafarers benefit from globally competitive salaries that are dramatically higher than the domestic onshore standard. By investing in themselves the African maritime and education industries have the potential to fill the industry’s shortfall in crewing personnel.

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FEaTUrE

history repeats as banks look for solutions in a down market “a paralysis of indecision and a focus on the short term is leaving vessels unmaintained and deteriorating…” With the dive in the dry bulk market, Asian shipping banks are facing a similar scenario as the European banks experienced after the financial crisis; re-possessing assets from clients who cannot furnish their loans. A large proportion of Asia-based banks and fund managers are lending to ship owners, particularly in China. In 2010 China had a 10 per cent share of the world’s fleet, and predictions are that this will grow to between 19 and 24 per cent by 2030. (Source: Global Marine Trends 2030) Asia-based banks will play a key role in funding this growth, which, as Nitin Mathur, Wallem Commercial Services Managing Director explained at the Asia Shipping Fortune Summit in Shanghai recently, is why it is particularly important the financial institutions make wise choices today to position themselves well for the future. “A supramax ordered at USD 40 million a few years ago is today valued at USD 20 million, and ship owners who are finding it difficult to meet their OPEX requirements are simply not in a position to make payments to the banks,” said Nitin. “Today’s capesize is earning about USD 4000 a day, but it is costing USD 5500 to run, and on top of loan repayments only cash-rich ship owners

True NorTh ThE Way FOrWard

with deep pockets can keep this up for any length of time. “In many cases financial institutions are forced to re-possess the assets, and are left with no choice but to hold onto the vessels due to no buying interest, sometimes passing it to a leasing company to consider leasing options, neither of which are strategic decisions, nor profitable ones. “A paralysis of indecision and a focus on the short term is leaving vessels unmaintained and deteriorating, losing value faster than ever before, and resulting in a higher expense when the vessel needs to be traded again. “No other alternatives are being considered, which is where experience from the European banks should be a guide for a strategic and profitable way out.” Nitin is advocating a long term view and the use of asset protection, which was widely used with positive results in the wake of the financial crisis in 2008. “When financial institutions partner with a shipping asset management resource, they raise the standard of the ship to an employable state, trade the ship, build a good trading history, and develop an exit strategy. “With little to no in-house shipping expertise in some financial institutions, calling on asset managers is a sustainable and profitable option. “In the last five years Wallem has provided asset protection services to more than 60 vessels. The ships are with us trading profitably while riding out the market lows and preparing for the upturn


which inevitably comes. In that time the vessels are well maintained, trading and earning money, and are ready for sale with a positive trading history. We provide an exit strategy, including finding buyers and advising when to exit based on the market.

“..we expect more default situations, increasing the pressure on lenders to find a solution which can generate returns.” Ships under Wallem Commercial Services consistently trade at rates above market benchmarks as a result of tighter commercial operations, good relations with charterers, efficient planning and good co-ordination with technical managers. Our commercial management team works closely with colleagues in the technical and procurement teams to coordinate vessel needs and balance them with the commercial success of a vessel. “When it comes to selling up, the key is trust and patience. Although ship value depreciates, it may be better to wait for a rising market before selling. A recent example is a tanker which was brought into Wallem’s asset protection in 2010, was well maintained and traded very profitably, and was sold in 2014 for 20 per cent more than what it would have attracted in 2010. “Whilst dry bulk markets look depressed for the next three years, we expect more default situations, increasing the pressure on lenders to find a solution which can generate returns. Laying the assets up for better times to come may not be a solution. We recommend taking a strategic view so that the problem is addressed instead of kicking the proverbial “can” further down the road.” Nitin Mathur, Managing director, Wallem Commercial services

Issue 2 2015

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NEWs IN BrIEF Seafarers attend Society fundraiser

Cadets do themselves & Wallem proud

South Africa supports royal tour

Wallem seafarers Captain Yan Song, Olesii Torgan, Ghanshymdas Balmiki and Captain Jover Lacerna were Wallem’s guests at the Sailors’ Society Shipping Dinner held in Hong Kong. The seafarers were joined at the event by Wallem CEO, Simon Doughty, Director of Safety & Insurance, Vijay Soman, Fleet Personnel Director, Fared Khan the local maritime community coming together to support the annual fundraising event.

150 cadets graduated from the University of Cebu as part of the IMEC (International Maritime Employers Council) program in March, including four of Wallem’s cadets. The cadets did extremely well and graduated with honours, and Cadet Dellica was the Valedictorian student and gave the closing speech.

Wallem South Africa handled the Royal Norwegian Air Force C-130 aircraft which carried Harald V, the Kind of Norway, on his recent visit to the Troll base in Antarctica.

Well done to all four cadets and we welcome them to the Wallem family.

We managed the refuelling and supply to the aircraft in Cape Town and took care of nine crew and three security staff. Our team also handled the aircraft on its return en route to Ascention Island.

The dinner raised more than one million Hong Kong dollars for the Sailors’ Society. The donations will contribute to Sailors’ Society work in Asia and across the world. It will provide chaplains, minibuses and support services to help transform the lives of many seafarers and their families. Dellica, Joshua L. Magna cum Laude; IMEC Best in Shipboard Award - Engine Marquez, John Carlos C. Cum Laude IMEC Industrious Award Ogang, Quirjhon B. Cum Laude

Ships receive green Award MV Belo Horizonte and MV Blumenau successfully passed their Green Award audits in February 2015. The Award promotes extra safe and extra clean vessels. We would like to thank all involved for their support and achievements.

Tahadlangit, Mandio Jake A. Cum Laude IMEC Best in Shipboard Award – Deck

True NorTh ThE Way FOrWard

Cargolux team flies around uS port congestion DB Schenker enlisted the Wallem Thailand Cargolux team to assist with two charters to Los Angeles which would normally have been shipped by sea but required air transport due to port congestion on the West Coast of the US. Our flight operations team, attended by Khun Danai and Khun Pichet, did a great job and the client was very complimentary of their support on getting the shipment sent on time.


18

Wallem joins ABS regional committee Ioannis Stefanou, Group Technical Director, has been selected to join the annual ABS (American Bureau of Shipping) Hong Kong Technical Committee. The first meeting was held in March. Wallem Group CEO, Simon Doughty, is also a member of the ABS. The membership recognises Simon as a person eminent in his marine field of endeavour. The society’s purpose is to further safety of life and property at sea. The Regional Technical Committee looks to improve the mutual understanding of the ongoing technical challenges the industry is facing. The Committee will ensure that the ABS research and development program remains aligned with industry needs, in response to employment of new technologies and regulatory compliance. It is an added benefit to our clients that Wallem has a voice in this forum and is able to voice opinions on new regulations and creation of new class rules.

information on the positions and characteristics of vessels near a reported distress.

Japan team supports delivery of materials for port upgrade The Spliethoff Team of the Wallem Japan office, led by Yuya Tsukishiro, handled 4,000FT of Official Development Assistance (ODA) cargoes to Honiara in the Solomon Islands. This ODA project is for the improvement of Honiara Port Facilities. Steel products, construction machinery and structural materials were loaded successfully on board at Yokohama in April.

Intermarine’s 25th Anniversary Hanami Party at Tokyo Intermarine celebrated its 25th Anniversary in April in Tokyo, inviting more than 60 of their valued customers to the party. Wallem Japan is Intermarine’s general agent in Japan and had the honour of joining in the celebration. The party was held at a Yakatabune (Japanese old-fashioned home-style boats) on the Tokyo waterfront. Intermarine Operating Chairman Andre Gritikis welcomed everyone on board, and the guests spent the evening dining on Japanese cuisine with the wonderful skyline of Tokyo. Dickson Chin, Managing Director of Ship Agency, and staff from the Wallem Japan office joined the party. Thank you to Arne Schieb, Sales Manager of Bulk and Masakazu Konishi, VP of Wallem Japan for organising the event.

Wallem vessels receive Amver awards Five of Wallem Singapore's-managed vessels were the proud recipients of Amver Awards during a ceremony in March. EGS Crest, Hoegh Chiba, Hoegh Kunsan and Hoegh Pusan all received recognition for their participation. Particular recognition went to the Birch 5 which has achieved 11 consecutive years in support of the Amver rescue system.

Amver is sponsored by the United States Coast Guard and is a unique, computer-based and voluntary global reporting system, used worldwide by search and rescue authorities to arrange assistance to persons in distress at sea. Amver's mission is to quickly provide search and rescue authorities on demand, accurate

Singapore rows to raise funds for Mission to Seafarers The Wallem Singapore office held an indoor rowing competition to raise funds in parallel with Mission RASI (Row Around Singapore Island) for the Mission to Seafarers charity in April. People from Agency, Ship Management, Logistics, Broking, Sales and Hoegh-Wallem competed for medals and a cup by rowing over a sprint course. But the biggest achievement was raising SGD 2500 for the charity. Well done to all who took part!

Singapore staff in musical fun run Human Resources Wallem Singapore has been supporting the Workplace Health Promotion Program, initiated by the Singapore Health Promotion Board. As part of the program, staff from the Singapore office participated in The Music Run: an un-timed and non-competitive 5km fun run on 11 April at Sentosa. The running course is split into five 1km music zones, each representing a different genre of music. The staff enjoyed their day with awesome music, great weather and an out of the ordinary running experience! Issue 2 2015


NEWS

Solid as the rock of Gibraltar: Chief Engineer Arun Phogat’s photo of the Hafnia Atlantic taking bunkers at Gibraltar.

Clear ahead: Captain Padsadnikov’s photo of the NPS Century.

Wallem in photos Sundowner: photo courtesy of Vivek Kg

Ship to shore: Tofteviken at a Shanghai ship yard with (l-r) Chief Officer Ravi Rai, Captain Deependra Pradhan, Superintendent Gavin Dsouza, Third Officer Sahil Sethi and Deck Cadet Avinash Kumar

True North The Way Forward


Light show: Parangua anchorage, Brazil. Photo courtesy of Captain Kawsar Mostafa

The E-Team: akjay Kulkarni’s photo of the engine team on the Voge Trust, posted on the Wallem Facebook group

sailors can jump: the crew of the Troviken enjoy their new basketball court. Photo thanks to Baquar Ismail.

artists in residence: the crew of the Troviken painted an impressive mural to create a fun space for basketball games. Photo thanks to Baquar Ismail.

Issue 2 2015

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NEWS Piping: photo counrtesy of Niranj Niru

Rear view: Hoegh Chiba at Abu Dhabi. Photo courtesy of Kenneth Ellens.

True North The Way Forward


14 deck and 13 engine cadets graduated from the Wallem training centre in the Philippines in February 2015

Celebrate good times: Crew of the Takachiho II in celebration mode. Photo courtesy of Vivek Kg

Nature's beauty: great Tit (Parus Major) visits the Intrepid harvest. Photo courtesy of Kawsar Mostafa.

Captain's view: Captain Ujiwal ray on board the KsL santiago. Photo courtesy of Captain ray.

Issue 2 2015

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News

Wallem at Breakbulk China Wallem exhibited at Breakbulk China in Shanghai in March, establishing good contacts and building Wallem’s name in the market. Visitors to the Wallem stand enjoyed their souvenir photo sailing on the Huangpu River. Pony Chen, General Manager Wallem Shipping China, and Denzyl Allwright, Managing Director Wallem Shipbroking, were joined by Mingfa Liu, Managing Director Wallem Ship Management China, Jacob Van Vliet Managing Director Wallem Myanmar, and Stewart Perrin, Chartering Director. Breakbulk China is a major industry event and visited by many breakbulk professionals.

Wallem at Cruise Miami Our cruise management team, Dickson Chin and Frankie Tan, hosted the Wallem booth at Cruise Shipping Miami for the second year in a row. Cruise Shipping Miami is a major industry event, with international cruise lines attending the exhibition and conference. Wallem continues to be the first choice of leading cruise lines calling in Asia.

True North The Way Forward


NEWS

FAME recognises Wallem’s contributions to Filipino seafaring

Wallem Ship Management and Wallem Maritime Services, Inc. (WMSI) were honoured to receive a FAME Award. (l-r) Erik Pedrosa, WMSI Head of Crewing, Fared Khan Wallem Ship Management Fleet Personnel Director, Cristina Oben-Nazareno, WMSI President, and Reginaldo A. Oben, WMSI Chairman.

Wallem Ship Management and Wallem Maritime Services, Inc. (WMSI) were honoured recipients of the Award of Recognition for their contributions to the Filipino seafarer industry, and for their continuing support in the country’s role as a leading seafaring nation. In March the Filipino Association for Mariners’ Employment, Inc. (FAME) – Philippines’ leading group of crew managers and manning agents – celebrated 40 years of providing the world’s merchant fleet with qualified and competent seafarers. The 40th celebrations included giving recognition to local and international social and industry partners who have contributed to the association and the industry’s success in the past 40 years. FAME also recognised long-time FAME members and long-serving FAME leaders.

The Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) Undersecretary for Employability of Workers and Competitiveness of Enterprise Enhanced Cluster, Honourable Reydeluz D. Conferido was the Guest of Honor of the evening. In his speech he said “the Filipino Association for Mariners’ Employment, Inc. is undeniably one of the potent agents of good change in the Philippine Maritime Industry. Since its creation, FAME has gone a long way as an organisation that sought to unite ship manning agencies towards the goal of establishing a prime foothold as a supplier of competent, qualified and competitive seafarers to the world's shipping industry. “Through its pioneering leadership and sustained commitment to high standards of professionalism in the ship manning business, it has contributed to the attainment of the Philippine’s market standing as a major supplier of seafarers to the international shipping industry.”

Issue 2 2015

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PEOPLE

Promotions and Appointments David Price, Managing Director, Wallem Ship Management David Price started in the role of Managing Director Wallem Ship Management in May, taking a key position in Wallem’s continued growth as a leading ship management and technical services provider. David has worked in all senior levels of ship management and has a high degree of experience in technical management, manning, procurement and quality and safety. He began in shipping as a deck officer, leaving his sea career at the rank of captain. For more details on David, see article on page 2: A ship management team for today and tomorrow

que Anh Truong, general Manager, Wallem Shipping Vietnam Que Anh Truong was promoted to General Manager in Vietnam in May. She was a very strong candidate for the role with clear knowledge of Wallem Shipping Vietnam's operations, which will allow her to confidently and competently take on the position. She joined Wallem Vietnam in March 2012 and has led the liner agency (CCNI) since it was established. Que Anh converts her knowledge and network in the liner sector to logistics, a great asset for identifying growth opportunities.

Nataliia Shevchuk, Wallem representative, odessa Nataliia Shevchuk was appointed to the position of Wallem Representative, Odessa, in April. Seafarers play a central role in our business success. Nataliia will be a key person in ensuring we attract and retain professional seafarers from the East European and Russian region. Natallia comes with extensive experience in fleet personnel management in conventional dry, wet as well as the offshore sector to meet current and future Wallem business needs.

True NorTh ThE Way FOrWard


Lee Whiteoak, Manager, Safety & Insurance Department and DPA Europe In March Lee Whiteoak joined Wallem Europe as Manager, Safety & Insurance Department. Lee will be taking responsibilities as DPA and CSO, and working closely with the Technical and Fleet Personnel Teams to deliver continual improvement in our safety and quality culture. Safety of our managed fleet is of primary importance to Wallem, and this is a key position in leading and driving the safety and quality culture of our operations across the fleet. Lee has first-rate experience in both the shipping and offshore oil & gas industries. His most recent experience was as the operations manager of offshore production units, and his sailing experience was with an oil major fleet.

Jan Hinnerk Block, Human Resources Manager, Europe Jan Hinnerk Block has joined Wallem Europe as the Human Resources Manager. This is a newly created role responsible for the recruitment and development of shore personnel. Jan Hinnerk will closely work with the Human Resources and Training team in Hong Kong to ensure that the Group policies and initiatives are implemented in Hamburg.

Anti-corruption membership Wallem Shipping Agency is now an associate member of the Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN). This is a commitment of Wallem Group to support anti-corruption programs to reduce risks in the maritime industry. MACN is a global business network working towards the vision of a maritime industry free of corruption that enables fair trade to the benefit of society at large. The mission of the Network is to promote good corporate practice in the maritime industry for tackling bribes, facilitation payments and other forms of corruption by developing and sharing best practice, creating awareness of the challenges and collaborating with key stakeholders to develop sustainable solutions.

The Network is comprised of like-minded companies dedicated to promoting compliance with anti-corruption laws and committed to the elimination of corrupt practices. To this end, MACN members will work to implement the MACN Anti-Corruption Principles. These principles should be a part of each Member’s overall compliance program: •Compliance Program Requirements •Risk Assessment •Proportionate Procedures •Training & Communication •Monitoring and Internal Controls •Due Diligence •Reporting, Diligence and Incentives Wallem has a strong anti-bribery policy in place and as a member of the Network we can further strengthen our activities and assist others.

Issue 2 2015

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PEOPLE

Long Service Awards Congratulations and a big thank you to the following crew and shore-based staff celebrating a milestone year of service with Wallem. The sea and shore staff listed have achieved their milestone from January to May 2015.

30

YEARS

10

YEARS

CPO/BSN

Balmiki Ghanshymdas C

GP MTM

Kapde Badruddin A

2/Cook

Deodato Carlos A

15

YEARS

Director

Ali Ashfaq

Joint Manager

Shaikh Mohammed Ashfaq

Deputy Manager

Poojary Gangadhar

25

YEARS

20

YEARS

LoNg SerVIC True NorTh ThE Way FOrWard


30

10

ARS

20

YEARS

25

ARS

YEARS

15

YEARS

30

5

25

YEARS

YEARS

2/Off

Mahata Bishnu C

C/Eng

Ullatil Mukundan

3/Eng

Fernandes Glen M

20

YEARS

E/Eng

Yadav Sumer S

6EF

Pawar Rajesh M

GP MTM

Thekkedath Madhavan Nair Devarajan Nair

GP MTM

Tandel Harilal D

MMAN

Escala Zenen C

Manager, Safety & Insurance

Dias Jude

YEARS

Captain

Padmalayam Rajesh

Bosun

Jaluag Marcelino E

Fitter

Buencuchillo Joel Y

MOTMAN

Belga Eric O

C/Cook

Manalang Nelson M

C/Cook

Mariquina Randy R

C/Cook

Verame Jonathan M

PCO

Keravala Kaiyosh F

PMAN

Suizo Modesto U

MMAN

Mondero James R

Director

Manjeshwar Srirang

Manager

Sharma Pawan

Deputy Manager

Somna Soni

Senior Executive

Suwarna Ranaware

Executive

Prassanna Nair

ICe AWArDS Issue 2 2015

28


10

15

YEARS

YEARS

GP AB

Tandel Rajeshkumar A

GP MTM

Jogi Ramaiah

GP MTM

Manimunda Mohammad R

GP MTM

Solanki Sureshchandra N

20

YEARS

Captain

Garcia Castro Orlando E

GP MTM

Tandel Ashishkumar D

C/Off

Ghosh Roy Parag

PCO

Kolavayal Suresan

C/Off

Rodrigues Eustace Savio A

GP STWD

Gomes Dickson

2/Off

Ajoc Benjamen A

GP STWD

Puthan Purayil Anees

2/Off

Biswas Md Abdul Wassay

GP STWD

Solanki Ashokkumar J

2/Off

Cardoso Lyndon M

Senior Secretary Angullia Sarah

C/Eng

Kumar Anil

C/Eng

Metri Shirish

C/Eng

Thenpalani Madhavan

2/Eng

Dhakshinamoorthy Nagasubramaniyam

Bosun

Galope Manolito A

Bosun

Tecson Allan T

CPO/BSN

Khalil Mazar Arif

6EF

Das Lambodar

6EF

Koley Atanu

6EF

Tandel Hitendrakumar K

AB

Cruz Romeo P

AB

Vamenta Roel B

GP AB GP AB

10

YEARS

Captain

Dutta Bhupendra K

Captain

Krishnan Senthil Kumar

Captain

Song Yan

C/Off

Dhillon Yashwant S

Fulbaria Virji J

C/Off

Saravanan Gokula

Khanche Abdur R

C/Off

Rathore Saurabh

True NorTh ThE Way FOrWard

30

YEARS

15

YEARS


C/Off

Singh Tarvinder

CPO/BSN

Hashim Mohammad

C/Off

Menothparambil Pushpan Naveen

CPO/BSN

Parakatta Abdul S

2/Off

Modak Samir M

CPO/BSN

Ali Ashraf

2/Off

Puthuppilladath Saji C

AB

Aclan Benjamin Jr. R

2/Off

Sharma Kartikeya S

GP AB

Fernando Johnson L

2/Off

Parti Abhay

GP AB

Chulliparambilpushpangada Sijith

2/Off

Kapoor Varun

GP AB

Mulla Shehbaz H

2/Off

Singh Amanpreet

FITTER

Shi Bao Song

3/Off

Joseph Dony D

6EF

Arnoco Prescillano T

3/Off

Rahi Ravi

6EF

Talag Rheyan P

3/Off

Kundu Sucharu

GP MTM

Tandel Dayaram M

C/Eng

Natarajan Velalar Chinnappa

MOTMAN

Bascao Joseph M

C/Eng

Varippy Reddy Saibabu Kamalkumar

MOTMAN

Guo Chang Hai

C/Eng

Ayyappan Ajith

MOTMAN

Lotivio Dennis B

2/Eng

Pullaniparambil Asokan Deepesh

MOTMAN

Villaflor Silas R

2/Eng

Mistry Ashutosh

MOTMAN

Dela Cruz Artemio T

3/Eng

Zhang Guang Xu

PCO

Sheikh Abdul R

3/Eng

Madhusoodhanan Ajay

Accounts Clerk

Hu Zoe

E/Eng

Singh Satnam

Accounts Supervisor

Xu Sonia

E/Eng

Rajkumar

Deputy Manager

Pandit Sarita

E/Eng

Choudhary Bashistha

Executive

Manna Ashok

Bosun

Friales Larry M

Messenger

Shedekar Dattaram

Issue 2 2015

30


NEWS training sessions. Climbing the stairs was part of my daily routine and helped me a lot.

Gurleen Dhir and Mayur Sheth at Laban Rata.

Team raises more than USD12k for Sailors’ Society Thanks to the generosity of shore staff, seafarers, suppliers, clients and friends, the Wallem Asian Challenge team raised more than USD12,000, a 125 percent achievement on their goal of USD8800. Gurleen Dhir, Associate Manager, Fleet Personnel, Mumbai, Mayur Sheth, Executive, Finance & Administration Mumbai, and Pinaki Das, Superintendent Hong Kong, were behind the fund raising achievement. The three were the members of the Wallem 2015 Sailors’ Society Asian Challenge team which would climb Mount Kinabalu (4095 meters) in Borneo along with teams from across the maritime industry to raise funds and awareness for the Sailors’ Society. Gurleen Dhir penned her story of the experience, sharing with us her inspiration and motivation to be involved: “I volunteered for the Asian Challenge for three main reasons: 1) Our (fleet personnel) team had taken over 20 PCCs in 2014 and had gone through challenging times in the beginning of 2015, leaving very limited time for myself.

2) My brother is a sailor, so this cause is close to my heart. I have seen the seafaring life from both sides; as a company representative and as a seafaring family. 3) I have always been passionate about exploring nature and challenging my limits. I was a last minute addition to the team when one of the original members had to withdraw, and I grabbed the opportunity with both hands. This could not have been possible without the support of senior management in Hong Kong and India, A BIG thank you goes out to you. I manage the car carrier crewing for Wallem India along with Wallem India events. I had only one month to prepare and manage my hectic schedule. I knew this was the best challenge of my life and I had to give 100 percent. It would have been easier for me to use work as an excuse, not going for training or considering this as a paid vacation, but my conscience would not allow it. My Wallem India team stood by me and showed immense faith. It was my turn to make them proud and ensure I do not let them down. We started raising funds by contacting our family members, seafarers, agencies and colleagues around the world. We were proud to raise more than the minimum for the Sailors’ Society. I have always been into fitness but this challenge was massive and I had to work on my endurance, stamina and mind control. I started jogging, running, doing lunges and squats on the beach. On weekends, I went to Sanjay Gandhi Park for four hour

True North The Way Forward

Our challenge was to climb 3272 metres / 6 km to Laban Rata and the mountain guides would then decide which teams would continue the final 2 km to the peak (4095 metres). On 18 April our team started the climb. Mayur and I reached Laban Rata (3272 metres / 6 km) but unfortunately our third member Pinaki Das developed cramps and under medical advice withdrew from the climb. Sadly our team was not given the OK to continue the remaining 2 km to the peak. We were disappointed but were also proud to have made it to Laban Rata healthy, fit, and without any injury or aches. On the morning of the descent, Mayur and I, with encouragement from our third team member Pinaki, started the descent and reached base camp in 2 hours and 20 minutes. They always say (and it is true), the descent is more dangerous and challenging due to uneven paths and pressure on knees, back and ankle. However, Mayur and I took this as an opportunity to excel and we came down without any injury or aches. That evening the Sailors’ Society hosted a dinner and I met some amazing people from across the globe and we returned home with fond memories of the trip. I have always believed in one thing: Never stop yourself from dreaming about anything. The more you dream, they more energy you get to fulfil that dream and you feel alive. People always knew me as a good daughter, sister, aunt, worker, colleague and dancer. They now know me as a mountain girl and I am sure to surprise them with more qualities in the future.” Since the Asian Challenge, Sabah was hit by an earthquake and floods which have devastated the local villages. Our thoughts are with the residents and mountain guides in the region.


PEOPLE

WOW continues community support with blood donations, food distribution and outreach programmes WoW Philippines Office staff, seafarers, Women of Wallem (WOW) members and walk-in donors contributed to 14 bags of blood during a donation campaign in the Philippines in February. The WOW team in the Philippines organised the campaign together with Westminster Seafarer Management Philippines. The blood was donated to the Philippines Children's Medical Centre (PCMC), a government owned and controlled hospital providing paediatric care.

In March the WOW Outreach visited Kawit, Cavite, south of metro Manila, donating 70 plastic chairs to children taught by voluntary teachers. WOW officers and members and some seafarers who were on vacation joined in the visit.

In April the WOW team distributed 100 packs of goods including canned food, noodles and rice to the Aeta community, during their outreach at San Narciso, Zambales in the Philippines. The Aeta are an indigenous people who live in an isolated mountainous part of the Island of Luzon in the Philippines.

WOW Outreach also visited Barangay Wawa, Tanay Rizal, donating a projector to Tanay West National High School.

In January Tropical Strom AMANG made landfall over the Philippines area, the first tropical depression to hit the Philippines in 2015. It killed three people and damaged the local agriculture industry. WOW distributed 100 packs of good at Brgy. Vive Ponda Cebu for victims of the storms.

WoW India The Mumbai WOW team visited the Divya Prabha Girls’ Orphanage in April 2015, organising a lunch for the residents and donating essential grains to the orphanage. The funfilled day came to an end with a dance performance by the girls

Issue 2 2015

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PEOPLE

Professional Wallem Seafarers theme of officers’ meeting in India

The Wallem Fleet Officers’ Meetings kicked off in Chandigarh, India in April, followed by Kolkata. The meetings were attended by about 70 officers, together with the management teams from India and Hong Kong. With a theme of “Professional Wallem Seafarers”, the meeting covered topics including safety, Marpol issues and compliance, media management, anti-bribery and the Wallem Group 3-Year Plan. Both meetings celebrated India’s 30th anniversary on the family night.

Manjot Sandhu, Manager Chandigarh Region, does the honours with the champagne to celebrate Wallem India’s 30th anniversary.

True North The Way Forward


Captain Jaikar Singh Sohal with his family enjoying the family night, and the photos!

Issue 2 2015

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Headquarters (Hong Kong) T +852 2876 8888 E group@wallem.com Ship Management & technical services T +852 2876 8200 E wsmhk@wallem.com Ship Agencies & logistics T +852 2876 8500 E wshk@wallem.com COMMERCIAL SERVICES T +852 2876 8800 E commercial@wallem.com SHIPBROKING T +852 2876 8802 E chartering@wallem.com sandp@wallem.com Innovative Solutions T +852 2876 8050 E wishk@wallem.com

Delivering Maritime Solutions www.wallem.com

True North Issue 2 2015  

Logistics growing in Asia Wallem India celebrates 30 years Ship management team strengthensAsset management: solutions in a down market

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