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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM TOURS ITALY

BECOMING A

LEADER Senior Willie Yarbary develops into force on defensive front

OCTOBER 2018

OPEN GOAL Former soccer player scores with program to help youth in D.C.

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VOL. 28 // ISSUE 2 (USPS 014-373) EDITOR

Jim Buice PHOTOGRAPHERS

Brian Westerholt, WFU Athletics and others as noted WRITERS

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Gold Rush is published eight times a year in August, October, November, December, February, March, May and June by IMG College in conjunction with Wake Forest Athletics. Periodicals postage paid at Winston-Salem, NC 27102 and at additional mailing offices. The price of an annual subscription is $20. Members of the Deacon Club receive a one-year subscription as part of their membership. Persons wishing to subscribe to Gold Rush should send a check or money order (credit cards not accepted) to:

CONTENTS

// O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

NO. 1: Bruno Lapa has emerged as one of the top offensive players for the Wake Forest men’s soccer team, which climbed to No. 1 in the nation in the first weekly poll of the new season. The Deacons have been ranked in the top five every week since the middle of the 2016 season.

4 20 22

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW? COMPLIANCE CORNER

INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

// 6 GROWING INTO A NEW ROLE Senior Willie Yarbary has made significant strides since his arrival at Wake Forest, now serving as a team captain and leader on the defensive line.

IMG College 540 N. Trade St. Winston-Salem, NC 27101 All material produced in this publication is the property of Wake Forest University and IMG and shall not be reproduced in whole or in part without permission. POSTMASTER: Please send all address changes to the attention of Stephanie Hudson, Wake Forest Athletics, 519 Deacon Blvd. Winston-Salem, NC 27105. The appearance of advertising in this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the advertiser and/or the advertiser’s product or service by Wake Forest or IMG. The use of the name of the University or any of its identifying marks in advertisements must be approved by WFU and IMG.

// 12 TOURING ITALY The women’s basketball team enjoyed the trip of a lifetime in August, traveling to Italy for 11 days and playing three exhibition games in preparation for the 2018-19 season.

// 16 A WORTHY GOAL

ON THE COVER ON THE COVER: Head coach Dave Clawson on senior defensive tackle Willie Yarbary (pictured): “Willie is just a guy who has worked and willed himself to be a good football player.”

Former men’s soccer player Amir Lowery’s nonprofit endeavor brings soccer to underprivileged youth in Washington, D.C.

OCTOBER 2018

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FROM THE A.D.

// R O N W E L L M A N

BB&T Field is hub of activity this fall Dear Demon Deacons,

RON WELLMAN DIRECTOR O F AT H L E T I C S

4

At the time I am writing this column, we are awaiting the impacts of Hurricane Florence to arrive. Our coliseum is serving as the state’s largest emergency shelter available to all those from our state that are impacted by the storm. The evacuees who will reside at the coliseum the next few days will be given tickets to our football game against Boston College as well as a voucher, provided by Spectra, for a free hot dog and drink. Weather has certainly impacted our fall sports schedules this year but has not deterred the Deacs from performing at the highest level. In addition to watching our teams perform this fall, there is another event coming up in a few weeks that has us excited. The Billy Joel concert on Saturday, Oct. 13, promises to be a fantastic evening at BB&T Field. Billy Joel is playing in only five outdoor stadiums this year. We are pleased that he chose BB&T Field along with Wrigley Field, Fenway Park, the Kansas

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

City Royals ballpark (Kaufman Stadium) and the Philadelphia Phillies ballpark (Citizens Bank Park). It is quite a compliment to our fans and patrons that he chose to play at our football stadium along with those major league ballparks. Many of you attended the Guns ‘N Roses concert last August. That concert drew over 35,000. We anticipate Billy Joel packing the stadium as well. There are still tickets available. I encourage you to buy your tickets quickly as it will certainly be a memorable and funfilled night. A few years ago, we decided to partner with the Greensboro Coliseum staff to attract quality events to our venues. That partnership has resulted in two major concerts at BB&T Field over a 14-month period. Our Greensboro partners are currently pursuing other major concerts for our football stadium. Another sellout crowd for the Billy Joel concert will undoubtedly be noticed

by the promoters of future concerts. BB&T Field is the hub of activity this fall. With five consecutive home football games followed by the Billy Joel concert, the stadium is hosting a major event every week for six straight weeks! We are fortunate to have a dedicated, competent and committed staff that is able to produce major events on this demanding schedule. The staff has proved many times that they are not only capable of performing at this high level, but do it very well. Making your visits to all of our venues a fabulous experience is our goal, and our staff will do all they possibly can to not only meet but exceed your expectations. You are our top priority… and I trust that your experiences at all of our events will be fun-filled and memorable. I look forward to seeing you at our games…and the Billy Joel concert! Go Deacs!

Ron Wellman


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5


FOOTBALL

// W I L L I E YA R B A R Y

GROWING INTO HIS

ROLE

SENIOR WILLIE YARBARY DEVELOPS INTO A LEADER AND FORCE ON DEFENSIVE LINE By Sam Walker

S

enior defensive tackle Willie Yarbary hails from Augusta, Ga., a place cemented in the minds of most sports fans as the home of the Masters golf tournament. It’s one of the four “majors” and arguably the most coveted prize in all of professional golf. But football is also big in Georgia, and just because professional golf takes center stage

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each April provoking images of pristine fairways, blooming azaleas and professional golf’s immortal champions doesn’t mean a young man passionate about football can’t make his way to the ACC and create his own legacy. “Of course, Augusta is a golf city,” Yarbary said, “but there’s also good quality football there.” Yarbary, by the way, doesn’t play golf. He has come to WinstonSalem to wreak havoc on opposing offenses with tackles for loss, sacks and become a run-stopping force in the trenches.


OCTOBER 2018

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FOOTBALL

// W I L L I E YA R B A R Y

maturation as a leader and selfHe was part of head coach Dave Clawson’s first recruiting class at confidence level all have improved, and he’s just really become a good Wake Forest, providing help on football player for us.” the defensive front. He has gotten Yarbary was elected one of better every year, committed to POSITION: Defensive Tackle the team captains this season the process of growing both his HEIGHT: 6-2 physical presence and his mental and opened his senior year by matching career highs in tackles game. Now, he is one of the most WEIGHT: 280 (five) and tackles for loss (two) respected members of the 2018 CLASS: Senior in the season-opening 23-17 Demon Deacon team. He credits MAJOR: Health and Exercise Science overtime victory over Tulane in his redshirt freshman season as New Orleans. He followed that up a very valuable period as he got HOMETOWN: Augusta, Ga. bigger, stronger and had time to with five tackles (four solo), a half FAVORITE BOOK: “The Millionaire Next Door: The a sack for five yards and one-andmaster the defense. Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy” by Thomas a-half tackles for loss for seven “Honestly there weren’t any J. Stanley and William D. Danko yards in the 51-20 victory over defined expectations other than FAVORITE FOOD: Cereal - Fruity Pebbles, Captain Towson in the first home game, getting stronger, learn how to play Crunch and Honey Nut Cheerios football and develop as much as I and then six tackles (two solo) in FAVORITE ATHLETE: LeBron James the 41-34 loss to Boston College in could,” Yarbary said. the ACC opener. In his redshirt freshman year, FAVORITE WAKE FOREST MOMENT: Wake Forest's Yarbary’s story isn’t one of he appeared in 11 of 12 games 55-52 victory over Texas A&M in the 2017 Belk Bowl instant success, but one of and played 221 snaps, but by his hard work and determination. sophomore season, Yarbary started Although he has rarely missed twice, played in all 12 games and action due to injury, he’s played through his fair share of them, showed the ability to produce game-changing plays. and he didn’t become the force he is today on the defensive line “Willie is just a guy who has worked and willed himself to without learning to take care of his body and becoming a student of be a good football player,” Clawson said. “His physical growth,

WILLIE YARBARY

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the game. Yarbary is now leading the defense up front and making the most of his senior campaign. “My redshirt freshman season didn’t go as planned because I was playing behind some great players, and we were playing good teams all the time,” he said. “So that season was all about growing pains. The speed of the game was different, and they just basically told me to go in and play to the best of my ability. I pretty much developed my identity because I feel like I’m a pretty good pass rusher and good at getting to the quarterback, so stopping the run was where I had to grow and get better over the years. By my sophomore year, I was so much better prepared and understood what I had coming in front of me.” As a sophomore, Yarbary was on the field for 323 plays and fought through an injury sustained in the first game to establish himself as a regular on the defensive front. He twice sacked eventual Heisman Trophy winner Lamar Jackson of Louisville in a late-season loss, but he was finally healthy by the time the Deacons faced off with Temple in the 2016 Military Bowl. He made the most of his pass rushing skills in perhaps the game’s biggest play.

Yarbary and teammate Duke Ejiofor helped seal Wake Forest’s first bowl win since 2008, and the first victory over a ranked team since 2011. On a second-and-goal play, the duo sacked the Owls’ quarterback Phillip Walker for a 22-yard loss. Yarbary totaled a season-best four tackles that day, and that sack changed momentum as Wake Forest defeated Temple 34-26. It was the first of back-to-back bowl game victories. By the time Yarbary was a junior, he had risen to the top of the two-deep chart, started all 13 games and was third on the team with four sacks, sixth in tackles for loss and 12th in tackles. Yarbary had four tackles and made a big play in the fourth quarter with a sack in a 30-24 victory over N.C. State. And in an early-season league loss to Florida State, he had perhaps the best statistical game of his junior season with four tackles, two sacks and two tackles for loss. Yarbary played through several injuries, but one in particular to his shoulder demanded attention. He said it was the result of wear and tear over the years, but he refused to fully attend to it until the end of the season.

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OCTOBER 2018

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FOOTBALL

// W I L L I E YA R B A R Y

YARBARY WAS ELECTED ONE OF THE TEAM CAPTAINS THIS SEASON AND OPENED HIS SENIOR YEAR BY MATCHING CAREER HIGHS IN TACKLES (FIVE) AND TACKLES FOR LOSS (TWO) IN THE SEASON-OPENING 2317 OVERTIME VICTORY OVER TULANE IN NEW ORLEANS. HE FOLLOWED THAT UP WITH FIVE TACKLES (FOUR SOLO), A HALF A SACK FOR FIVE YARDS AND ONEAND-A-HALF TACKLES FOR LOSS FOR SEVEN YARDS IN THE 51-20 VICTORY OVER TOWSON IN THE FIRST HOME GAME, AND THEN SIX TACKLES (TWO SOLO) IN THE 41-34 LOSS TO BOSTON COLLEGE IN THE ACC OPENER. 10

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

“I didn’t want to miss half the season and bowl game because there was a lot of football to be played, a lot of guys I wanted to play with, and the bowl game which you know I didn’t want to miss that,” Yarbary said. So he missed spring practices recovering from off-season shoulder surgery, which has allowed him to start this year healthy and hungry to get back to a third consecutive bowl game. That feat has only been accomplished once before at Wake Forest from 2006 to 2008 when Jim Grobe led the Deacons to the Orange Bowl in Miami, Meineke Car Care Bowl in Charlotte and EagleBank Bowl in Washington, D.C. Overall, Yarbary feels like he’s paid his dues, invested in himself and his team, and been humble enough to learn from those who have come before him. There is a symbolic passing of the torch from one group of team leaders to the next, and Yarbary takes seriously his role in being one of those leaders. There is also the constant goal of Wake Forest wanting to prove season after season that it can compete with any team on the schedule. “I feel like I’ve had good role models in front of me, and I hung around leaders like my roommates Jaboree Williams and A’lique Terry, and John Wolford and Cam Serigne were my neighbors,” Yarbary said. “There was Wendell Dunn, too, so I had great leaders to show me how to be a leader. I don’t want to just delegate everything so others can become leaders, too. I want them to take responsibility and ease them into being leaders. That’s what the leaders I had been around had done for me.”


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WOMEN'S BASKETBALL

// T O U R D ' I TA L I A

TOUR

D’ITALIA

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GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE


Playing tourist was a fun and educational time for everyone. Here, team members pose outside the Basilica di Santa Croce in Florence.

OCTOBER 2018

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WOMEN'S BASKETBALL

// T O U R D ' I TA L I A

Everyone was all smiles prior to boarding a 10-hour flight from Atlanta to Rome.

ON AUGUST 11, THE 2018-19 WAKE FOREST WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM, COACHING STAFF, SUPPORT PERSONNEL AND A SMALL TRAVEL PARTY EMBARKED ON AN 11-DAY ADVENTURE THAT WOULD TAKE THEM NEARLY 10,000 MILES (ROUNDTRIP) AND LEAVE EACH PARTICIPANT WITH MEMORIES THAT WILL LAST A LIFETIME.

T

he initial destination was Rome, Italy, but numerous side trips would be made throughout that beautiful and historic country.

Basketball, of course, was the catalyst for the experience and the travel schedule included three games against international competition as well as a clinic for youngsters in Bergamo, hometown of Demon Deacon senior and 2018 All-ACC performer Elisa Penna. There were plenty of humorous sidelights to what was listed

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on the official itinerary according to senior Ariel Stephenson and sophomore Raegyn Branch, who kept a journal for Gold Rush. “Bird baths” in the airport, transportation challenges with a bus getting stuck on a mountain ascent, swimming in a lake with a rocky “beach” – all added to the memories. Partaking of the delicious pasta and pizza was a given, of course. And then there were some outstanding shopping opportunities! The end result was a strengthening of the camaraderie that is always so vital to a successful team. The achievements that Coach Jen Hoover and her squad anticipate during the upcoming season began here. (Special thanks to Video Coordinator Chase Vaden for the photos and his assistance.)


You never know who you might see in a major airport. Ariel Stephenson, Ona Udoh and Ivana Raca (from left to right above) made a new friend in NBA all-star DeMarcus Cousins.

Many new Deacon fans were made during the basketball clinic in Bergamo as sophomore Gina Conti found out. Junior Tyra Whitehead ponders the beauty of an Italian lake.

Elisa Penna (above left) and the Deacons won two of three exhibition contests in her native country, including a victory over a Tuscan all-star team that included Elisa’s sister Jessica (right). OCTOBER 2018

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SOCCER

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// A M I R L O W E R Y

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE


A

WORTHY GOAL

AMIR LOWERY’S NONPROFIT BRINGS SOCCER TO UNDERPRIVILEGED YOUTH IN D.C. By Jay Reddick

A

s a soccer coach near his native Washington, D.C., Amir Lowery saw a need.

He knew what the sport had helped him accomplish in his own life. It had given him the competitive drive to earn a business degree from Wake Forest while playing four years for one of the nation’s best teams. It had helped him open his own freelance photography business while also serving as a mentor to the youth of Bethesda, Md. But Lowery knew that just a short distance away, in Washington’s inner city, were other kids who loved the sport and played it well, but didn’t have the opportunity to learn from elite coaches or compete for travel teams. That’s why Lowery helped to found the Open Goal Project in 2015 – to help those youths without the profile or resources to get noticed. Today, the nonprofit has helped more than two dozen athletes link up with elite D.C. programs, and more students are being helped every day. “Soccer has become inaccessible for a lot of people,” said Lowery, 34. “There aren’t a lot of good coaches who will stay in the inner city and cultivate talent to become better players and

better people. We wanted to show that if we put the right people in the right environment, we can produce results.” When Lowery graduated in 2005, he didn’t expect his business acumen to dovetail so well with his athletic background. He spent seven years playing pro soccer at various levels all the way up to MLS, but when he returned to D.C. and became a youth coach, he saw the gap between the haves and the have-nots. He said it was “blatantly obvious” that the traditional “pay-to-play” system was failing a large segment of the population. He started small, recruiting a few lower-income players to his own club and helping with travel and expenses. “When other kids and people in the community saw what we were doing, they realized a lot of people needed help, needed that opportunity,” Lowery said. So he began to think bigger. Along with coaching colleague Simon Landau, he took on local nonprofit DC SCORES as a fiscal sponsor, and the Open Goal Project was born. “We work with some kids and families who can’t afford equipment or transportation,” Lowery said. “Some of the parents are immigrants who have trouble navigating registrations online, or they’re single-parent families who don’t have time to bring their kids to practices and games. We help them do that.” Open Goal started with five players, Lowery said. Some have OCTOBER 2018

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SOCCER

// A M I R L O W E R Y

gone to college or other pursuits. This year the program is helping about a dozen players from age 9-16. “We found some great kids and great players, but if you don’t challenge them, they lose the passion for it,” Lowery said. “Once that mission came across and more people asked about it, we had no choice but to keep building.” Soon, Lowery the soccer coach became Lowery the entrepreneur. “When I majored in business, I didn’t envision starting a nonprofit, but that’s what I did,” Lowery said. “More and more, that (business) side has taken more of my time as we’ve progressed. We’ve raised a significant amount to fully fund this project.” Lowery left club soccer to concentrate on Open Goal duties, but stays connected to the sport on the field as a volunteer coach

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at Washington’s Cardozo High School, where he is entering his third season. What is the ultimate goal for Open Goal? On a local level, Lowery said he would like to start his own club team, full of lower-income players, to prove that a successful franchise can be built without US Soccer’s traditional “pay-to-play” model, which Lowery calls limiting. “We can navigate everything in house, give these kids what they should have access to in the inner city,” Lowery said. “There’s another way to make it happen.” For the first time, Lowery is starting to take the Open Goal message beyond the Washington area. He’s finalizing plans for a similar program in Fresno, Calif., with soccer clinics for boys and girls and a sponsored free tournament. He points to other inner-city programs such as FC Harlem as examples he hopes to emulate – and perhaps join forces with – to help make the sport more accessible to all. “It’s a really valuable experience,” Lowery said. “I’m not sure where to take it from there – we’ll just take things as they come.” Wherever the project takes him, there’s sure to be a group of young soccer players waiting to see what’s next. For more information on the Open Goal Project, visit www.opengoalproject.org.


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100% COTTEN

// S TA N C O T T E N

Skipping the Weather

S TA N COTTEN VOICE OF THE DEMON DEACONS

Football is, for the most part, a game played outside. To me, part of the game’s ‘charm’ is having to deal with the elements for players, fans and media alike. To this day, unless the rain is being blown into the radio booth jeopardizing expensive equipment and damaging notes and charts that took hours to prepare, the windows remain open and up exposing us to many of the very same things that the game we’re attempting to describe is. Of course, when the game is played inside, all of the above is ‘out the window,’ and that’s a topic for another column. There’s just something wrong about football indoors, but that’s just me. The first game I remember being a part of where the weather meant more than just

playing in the rain or cold was in 1983 when Carson-Newman and Mesa State played for a NAIA national title in Grand Junction, Colo. The field was frozen, and crews had to break up the ice on the field and then blow it all away with a helicopter before the game could be played. I’d never seen anything like it. In my time at Wake and from my perspective, the ‘weather game’ that really stood out before this season’s pre-Hurricane Florence date with Boston College was the 2006 road game at Ole Miss. The Demon Deacons had had an eventful first three games with Syracuse, Duke and Connecticut to get to 3-0, and the game at Oxford would make the Deacs’ 4-0 start even more interesting.

Proud to be a Demon Deacon! Member, Women’s Golf ACC & East Regional Championship Teams 1994&1995

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GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

Prior to kickoff with the Rebels out of the powerful SEC, the weather moved in. Heavy rain and lightning battered the stadium, forcing a delay of the kickoff by just short of two hours. The official delay came after we had already gone on the air, and usually when you take over the air on the broadcast of a game, you don’t give it back. So, our task was to ‘ride it out’ and fill and stretch until the game started. That’s a lot of air time to fill ‘on the fly,’ but I have to hand it to our crew. We did it, and we did it well. And you’ve probably forgotten why and because of whom we were able to do so. The late Skip Prosser. Skip loved football, and he had made the trip south to see the Deacons and his good friend Coach Jim Grobe take on the big boys. We pretty much deputized the head basketball coach and rode him like an unpaid intern having him come on the air with us, more than once, and using him to fetch us other folks to interview, get us water and anything else we could think of to help fill the void. Wake Forest, of course, won the game. And Skip continued to win our hearts. I could tell he genuinely wanted to help us do our jobs and get nothing in return. Sure, he got air time to talk about his team and his love for football, but that’s not why he did it. My recollection of Coach Prosser was he was a guy who just did things because they had to or needed to be done. He taught me so much about so many things. Now every time we deal with inclement weather during a football game, my mind wanders back to that game at Ole Miss. And to Skip and the things he left us with. I thought about him as we prepped for Boston College, early not late, because of weather. Just doing what needed to be and had to be done. Just like Skip.


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INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

Seeing Wake Forest Through the Eyes of a Parent

BA R RY FA I R C L O T H SENIOR A S S O C I AT E AT H L E T I C DIRECTOR, DEVELOPMENT

22

Wake Forest has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember, and I have always found it to be an incredibly special place. As the son of a football coach, then as a student, alumnus and eventually a staff member, I have seen and experienced Wake Forest from many perspectives. The blending of those differing perspectives has been a huge advantage in my role with the Deacon Club. For more than 17 years I have had the privilege to work on behalf of the Wake Forest student-athlete. My efforts are primarily focused on engaging and building relationships with our donors, educating them about the needs of our programs and helping connect them with opportunities that align with their individual interests and goals. Being able to speak to donors from the point of view of a life-long fan, former student, and proud supporter and employee of Wake Forest Athletics has been extremely helpful as we continue to try to address the ever-increasing needs of our coaches and student-athletes. But this year I have gained yet another new perspective on Wake Forest, and it is already having a tremendous impact on the way I view our department and the things that set us apart and make this place so special. I am now the parent of a Wake Forest student-athlete. This fall my oldest daughter, Spencer, became a third generation Demon Deacon and joined the cross country team. In just a few short weeks, this new experience has opened my eyes to the tremendous impact that so many people in our department have on our studentathletes on a daily basis. I’ve always known that the people at Wake Forest are what makes it such a special place, but I’ve quickly gained an even deeper admiration for the people who tirelessly support our student-athletes on and off the field and truly make a difference in their lives. Wake Forest has outstanding coaches – I’ve known this since I was a kid, and I talk about it with donors all the time. But now, as a parent, I have the opportunity to witness, first-hand, the significance of the studentathlete-coach relationship and the influence a coach has on shaping their team. Spencer’s coach, Michelle Chewens, has created a culture in which her runners look forward to 6:30 a.m. runs, five days a week, and they understand the importance of being committed – even on the days when they have two required workouts. Spencer is currently running 50plus miles per week, and that will most likely ramp up to 70 miles or more throughout her running career. It takes a special coach to keep the team inspired and motivated to not only wake up every morning before sunrise, but help them find the balance between training and academics while also encouraging them to get the necessary amount of sleep required to reach peak performance on the cross country trails and in the classroom.

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

But the coaches aren’t the only ones focused on helping student-athletes perform at their best. Strength training and conditioning is vital, not only for cross country runners like Spencer, but for all of our student-athletes. The cross country sports performance team is led by David Bass, who conducts formal strength training and conditioning sessions multiple times per week as well as 30-minute core workouts each day. These workouts are specifically designed for the individual needs of a distance runner, and are often tailored to the unique needs of each team member. This requires tremendous skill and expertise on the part of the sports performance coach, who spends countless hours researching, planning workouts and staying up to date on the latest news and innovations, and often must do that for multiple sports to which they are assigned. I am in awe of the passion and dedication of our sports performance coaches. Continued on page 29


INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

CLEAR BAG POLICY AT BB&T FIELD AND THE LJVM COLISEUM As a reminder, Wake Forest has instituted a clear bag policy for all events held at BB&T Field and the LJVM Coliseum. Fans should utilize clear bags that do not exceed 12" in height by 6" in depth by 12" in width. A one-gallon clear plastic bag, such as a Ziploc bag, is acceptable. Small clutch bags — 4.5" by 6.5" or approximately the size of a hand — will also be permitted. For more information, please visit WakeForestSports.com.

Keep up with the Deacon Club on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram! For the latest news and information from the Deacon Club and to connect with other members, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram! @WFUDeaconClub Facebook.com/DeaconClub @WFUDeaconClub | @DeacOnTheRun @BarryFaircloth

BASKETBALL SEASON TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE

IS WAKE FOREST ATHLETICS IN YOUR WILL?

Season tickets for the 2018-19 men’s basketball season are now on sale! The Deacs will host an exciting home schedule, including matchups with Duke, North Carolina, NC State, Syracuse and Louisville. For season ticket or package information, please visit WakeForestSports.com or contact the Wake Forest Sales Team at (336) 758-3322 ext. 1.

Planned giving ties your legacy with the future of Wake Forest Athletics. To learn more about the many ways you can support Wake Forest Athletics through planned giving, please contact Paul Kennedy at (336) 758-3875 or kennedpj@wfu.edu. OCTOBER 2018

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DONOR PROFILE

// P H I L & L I Z N E U G E B A U E R

Neugebauer family embraces, supports Wake Forest in short time Just a few short years ago, Phil and Liz Neugebauer (P ’20), were going through the college selection process with their oldest child, Ben (’20). Born and raised in Connecticut, Ben knew he wanted to experience a new area and gain a different perspective as part of his college experience, which led him to primarily look at schools located in the south. While Phil and Liz both graduated from Fairfield University, many of their family members attended Atlantic Coast Conference schools, leading Ben to grow up with a familiarity and sense of connection to the conference, as well as many of the colleges and universities associated with it. Once Ben established a list of desired criteria and pinpointed a number of schools that aligned in those areas, the family began setting up tours. While Wake Forest wasn’t at the top of Ben’s list to start, that quickly changed once he arrived in Winston-Salem. “He knew within minutes of driving onto campus that Wake Forest was where he wanted to be,” Phil reminisced. “Wake went from being a school he didn’t know enough about, to being his number one choice by far.” Realizing that Wake Forest possessed everything Ben was looking for in a university — great academics, a welcoming campus environment and an abundance of school spirit — the Neugebauers fully supported Ben’s decision. “As a parent, I had the same feeling as Ben when I walked onto campus and interacted with the people,” Phil shared. “It’s such an inviting atmosphere and you immediately feel like you’re part of the Wake Forest family.” After Ben was officially accepted, it wasn’t long before Phil and Liz realized they wanted to get involved within the Wake Forest community. “When Liz and I thought about getting engaged with

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Wake Forest, we wanted to align our involvement and support with Ben’s connectivity to the school,” Phil stated. As a family of avid sports fans, it was a natural progression for Phil and Liz to become Deacon Club members. Phil first became aware of the Deacon Club during Ben’s first semester on campus after being connected with Mike Piscetelli, Associate Athletic Director for Development. On top of being football season ticket holders, the Neugebauers have supported a variety of Deacon Club initiatives, including the Annual Fund and the Athletic Nutrition Fund. The family’s biggest connection, however, is through the soccer programs. Phil, Liz and all three of their children — Ben, Will and Allie — played soccer, and Liz also coaches and has been involved on the board of their local soccer organization in Connecticut.

With such a strong personal connection to the sport, they recently made the decision to create the Neugebauer Family Soccer Scholarship, which will support the Wake Forest men’s and women’s soccer programs. The family made this decision in an effort to support deserving studentathletes who may not otherwise have the opportunity to attend Wake Forest. “We want to help continue bringing phenomenal student-athletes to Wake Forest who go on to become outstanding alumni,” Phil affirmed. “I truly believe these young men and women will ultimately return the investment, not only to Wake and its athletic programs, but to other causes they’re passionate about.” Seeing how much their own son has grown and benefitted from his Wake Forest experience, Phil and Liz feel fortunate that they’re able to play a role in helping others have a similar experience.


Aside from their generous financial commitments, the Neugebauers have also donated their time to assist in making Wake Forest an even better place. Knowing it would be a great way to further connect with the school and meet other like-minded individuals, Phil and Liz began their involvement by serving on the Parents’ Council, where they have been active members since Ben’s freshman year. In addition, Phil — who is the executive vice president and head of sales strategy for the U.S. global wealth management business at PIMCO — is a member of the Wake Forest University School of Business Board of Visitors. With Ben currently in his junior year, Phil and Liz look forward to continuing their involvement with the Deacon Club and the University, while building upon the many relationships they have established. “While we’re not alums and our connection stemmed through our son, we feel as close to the school as we can possibly be and are so honored to be part of the Wake Forest family.”

deacon club photos Deacon Club members are encouraged to submit photos for publication in the Gold Rush. Send your photos in digital format to DeacClub@wfu.edu. Submission of a photo does not guarantee that it will be published. Thanks for showing off your Demon Deacon pride!

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1 Coach Jen Hoover (’91) (left) and Ashby Cook (’71, P ’01) (right) celebrate Chris Paul’s generosity after his gift announcement at the Chris Paul Family Foundation Charity Golf Classic.

2 Hudson, the son of Deacon Club members Anthony (’11) and Megan (’12) Tang, shows off his Demon Deacon pride.

3 W  ayne and Kathy Myers host a Deacon Club event at Oakwoods Country Club in Wilkesboro with current women’s golf coach, Kim Lewellen, and former coach, Dianne Dailey.

OCTOBER 2018

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

//

AMY MINER

I

n each issue, Where Are They Now showcases a former Wake Forest student-athlete. Amy Kowalski Miner (’94) was a member of the Wake Forest field hockey team during her freshman (’90) and junior (’92) years. As a freshman, Miner played in 12 games as both a midfielder and defender and recorded 12 shots on goal. After a year off, she returned to the field in 1992, Jen Averill's first year at the helm of the program. During her junior season, Miner played in nine games and posted one shot.

AMY MINER When did you graduate from Wake Forest? 1994 What was your major and/or minor? Psychology What does being a Demon Deacon mean to you? It means so much to me because my time at Wake Forest holds such a special place in my heart. During my four years at Wake Forest, I met some of the greatest people and made many lifelong friends. I learned how to think on a higher level and gained invaluable life skills. Why are you still involved in Wake Forest Athletics? Athletics were an important part of my time at Wake Forest. I have great memories of playing field hockey and going with friends to support other Wake Forest athletic teams. I also met my amazing husband at Wake Forest, so there is a lot of Demon Deacon energy in our house! We love cheering on the Deacs with family and friends. It’s been really fun to have our sons attend soccer camp at Wake and take them to Wake games. Why do you feel it is important to give back to the University? I am so thankful to Wake Forest and its athletics program for helping me become the person I am today. In giving back, I hope to help other student-athletes share in that life-changing experience. What is your current occupation? Attorney What is your favorite memory of your time at Wake Forest? It’s hard to pick just one favorite! I have so many amazing memories from my time at Wake. I think one of my favorite athletic-related memories was during my sophomore year when the basketball team beat Duke. After the game, we

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didn’t just roll the Quad but we were all mud sliding on it. Such a fun, awesome, muddy celebration! What makes you most proud of Wake Forest? I am so proud to be part of a special community of people who have a shared passion for Wake Forest. It is a university that represents excellence in both education and athletics. Given the size of Wake Forest, I think our accomplishments speak volumes about the commitment of all involved in the process. Go Deacs! When you come back to Wake Forest, you always… Go up and walk around the Quad.

I was there when… Tim Duncan played; Jen Averill coached her first Wake Forest field hockey team (which was my junior year playing); and societies became sororities. Who is your favorite coach at Wake Forest, current or past? Jen Averill — of course!


SUN

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TUE 02

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FRI 05

Men’s Soccer vs. UNCG 7pm

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OCTOBER // NOVEMBER 2018

WAKE FOREST ATHLETICS

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06 Football vs. Clemson TBA

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Men’s Soccer vs. High Point 7pm

Field Hockey vs. App State 1pm

SAT

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Field Hockey vs. New Hampshire 1pm

Women’s Soccer vs. Louisville 5pm

Field Hockey vs. Syracuse 1pm

Volleyball vs. Georgia Tech 6:30pm Men’s Soccer vs. Boston College 8pm

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Volleyball vs. Clemson 1pm

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Volleyball vs. Duke 6:30pm

Women’s Soccer vs. Clemson 7pm

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Women’s Soccer vs. Syracuse 1pm

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Volleyball vs. Pittsburgh 5:30pm Men’s Soccer vs. Louisville 7pm

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NOV 01

Field Hockey vs. Davidson 1pm Volleyball vs. Virginia 1pm

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Women’s Basketball vs. Towson 7pm

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Men’s Basketball vs. Belmont Abbey 7:30pm

Football vs. Syracuse TBA

HOMECOMING

HOMECOMING

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Volleyball vs. Miami 6:30pm

Men’s Basketball vs. North Carolina A&T TBA

Women’s Basketball vs. Mercer 7pm

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Volleyball vs. Louisville 1pm

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17 Football vs. Pitt TBA

Women’s Basketball vs. Richmond 1pm

SPORTS MARKETING (336) 758-5011

2018 VARSITY CLUB AND HOMECOMING WEEKEND

TICKET OFFICE (336) 758-3322

We hope you’ll be able to join fellow Varsity Club members, alumni, Wake Forest coaches and staff on Friday, November 2 and Saturday, November 3. The Deacs will play Syracuse at the Homecoming football game on Saturday (game time TBA). Visit homecoming.wfu.edu for more information and the link to register.

GROUP TICKETS (Football & Basketball) (336) 758-4030 DEACON CLUB (336) 758-5626 www.DeaconClub.com DeacClub@wfu.edu


PA GE D EA C OHNESA IDNE R THE PROS BASEBALL

MEN’S BASKETBALL

COACHES/SCOUTS Ross Atkins Neil Avent TJ Barra Danny Borrell Adam Bourassa Dave Bush George Greer John Hendricks Michael Holmes Bill Masse Matt Price Mike Rikard Eric Schmitt Adam Wogan

MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB

Toronto Blue Jays Oakland A’s New York Mets New York Yankees Pittsburgh Pirates Boston Red Sox St. Louis Cardinals New York Mets Oakland A's Seattle Mariners Kansas City Royals Boston Red Sox New York Yankees Chicago Cubs

General Manager Area Scout Director of Baseball Research & Development Rehab Pitching Coordinator Area Scout Pitching Development Analyst Hitting Coach National Pitching Supervisor Asst. Scouting Director/National Crosschecker Area Scout Area Scouting Supervisor Vice President of Amateur Scouting Director of Minor League Operations Area Scout

MAJOR LEAGUES Mac Williamson

San Francisco Giants

MINOR LEAGUE RANKS Johnny Aiello Ben Breazeale Will Craig Parker Dunshee Stuart Fairchild Chris Farish Aaron Fossas Connor Johnstone Garrett Kelly Nate Mondou Jonathan Pryor Griffin Roberts Donnie Sellers Gavin Sheets Rayne Supple

Toronto Blue Jays (Rookie) Baltimore Orioles (A) Pittsburgh Pirates (AA) Oakland Athletics (AA) Cincinnati Reds (High A) Detroit Tigers (Rookie) Cincinnati Reds (High A) Atlanta Braves (AA) Chicago Cubs (A) Oakland Athletics (AA) Washington Nationals (Short Season A) St. Louis Cardinals (Rookie) Toronto Blue Jays (A) Chicago White Sox (High A) Colorado Rockies (Rookie)

WOMEN’S GOLF Laura (Philo) Diaz Nannette Hill Olafia Kristinsdottir Cheyenne Woods Jean Chua Marissa Dodd Allison Emrey Natalie Sheary Sierra Sims

LPGA LPGA (conditional LPGA for 2018) LPGA LPGA Symetra Symetra Symetra (conditional LPGA for 2018) Symetra Symetra

MEN’S SOCCER Luis Argudo Jon Bakero Corben Bone Sam Cronin Austin da Luz Chris Duvall Steven Echevarria Sam Fink Akira Fitzgerald Michael Gamble Ian Harkes Jack Harrison Jacori Hayes Tolani Ibikunle Collin Martin Mark McKenzie Ben Newnam Jared Odenbeck Ike Opara Sean Okoli Michael Parkhurst Hayden Partain Kevin Politz Jalen Robinson Brandon Servania Emu Twumasi Jared Watts

Columbus Crew Toronto FC FC Cincinnati Minnesota United FC North Carolina FC Montreal Impact New York Red Bulls II Saint Louis FC Tampa Bay Rowdies Tulsa Roughnecks D.C. United Manchester City/Middlesbrough FC Dallas Ekenas Sport Club (Finland) Minnesota United FC Philadelphia Union San Antonio FC Charlotte Independence Sporting Kansas City Landskrona BoIS (Sweden) Atlanta United FC Sacramento Republic New York Red Bulls D.C. United FC Dallas FC Dallas Houston Dynamo

COACHES/MLS FRONT OFFICE James Riley Kurt Schmid Zack Schilawski Stephen Keel Ryan Martin

MLS Director of Player Relations Seattle Sounders (Head Scout) North Carolina FC U23s (Assistant Coach) MLS Social Media Manager DC United Academy Director

Al-Farouq Aminu John Collins James Johnson Codi Miller-McIntyre Doral Moore Chris Paul Ishmael Smith Jeff Teague Andre Washington Austin Arians Bryant Crawford C.J. Harris Jamaal Levy Travis McKie Nikita Mescheriakov Dinos Mitoglou Aaron Rountree Devin Thomas David Weaver Mitchell Wilbekin Coron Williams Eric Williams L.D. Williams

NBA NBA NBA NBA NBA NBA NBA NBA NBA G-League Lithuania Israel France Argentina Lebanon Belarus Greece Greece Israel Turkey Turkey Argentina Switzerland Finland

Portland Trail Blazers Atlanta Hawks Miami Heat Dallas Mavericks Memphis Grizzlies Houston Rockets Detroit Pistons Minnesota Timberwolves Raptors 905 Prienai Galil Gilboa Pau-Kacq-Orthez Bahia Blanca Louaize Tsmoki-Minsk Panathinaikos Koroivos Hapoel Eilat TED Kolejliler Sakarya La Union Geneva Lions ToPo

Ass’t Coach

Milwaukee Bucks

COACHES/STAFF Frank Johnson

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Dearica Hamby Sandra Garcia Alex Tchangoue Chelsea Douglas Amber Campbell

WNBA Puerto Rico France Romania Sweden

FOOTBALL Jessie Bates III Tommy Bohanon Michael Campanaro Brandon Chubb Duke Ejiofor Kevin Johnson Marquel Lee Joe Looney Nikita Whitlock Kyle Wilber

NFL NFL NFL NFL NFL NFL NFL NFL CFL NFL

Chad Alexander Charlie Dayton Pat Flaherty Joe Kenn John Spanos Brad White Jeff Triplette James MacPherson Teryl Austin

Ass’t Dir Pro Personnel Vice President Offensive Line Coach Strength Coach Executive VP of Football Operations OLB Coach Referee Scout Defensive Coordinator

MEN’S GOLF Bill Haas Webb Simpson Billy Andrade Jay Haas Gary Hallberg Scott Hoch Curtis Strange Len Mattiace Kyle Reifers Will Zalatoris

PGA PGA Champions Champions Champions Champions Champions Web.com Web.com Web.com

FIELD HOCKEY Lauren Crandall Michelle Kasold Melissa Gonzalez (Coach)

MEN’S TENNIS Noah Rubin

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

Cincinnati Jacksonville Tennessee Free Agent Houston Houston Oakland Dallas Hamilton Oakland

NFL Baltimore NFL Carolina NFL NY Giants NFL Carolina NFL Chargers NFL Indianapolis NFL NFL Chargers NFL Bengals

Aubrey Bledsoe Katie Stengel Sarah Teegarden Ally Haran Maddie Huster

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COACHES/STAFF

WOMEN’S SOCCER Washington Spirit (NWSL) Utah Royals FC (NWSL) NC Courage (NWSL) UMF Selfoss (Pepsi Deildin League – Iceland) Kvarnsvedens IK (Swedish Premier League)

Las Vegas Aces and Italy Indias De Mayaguez Cavigal Nice Basket 06

USA National Team (Retired Fall 2016) USA National Team (Retired Spring 2017) USA National Team (Captain) ATP

NASCAR PIT CREWS Kevin Harris (football) Spencer Bishop (football)

No. 19 No. 15

Joe Gibbs Racing (Daniel Suarez) Premium Motorsports (Ross Chastain)


INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

Continued from page 22 As a parent, the health of my child is of the utmost importance, and I’m grateful to know that Spencer is in excellent hands with our Wake Forest Sports Medicine team. She makes regular visits to the beautiful, state-of-the-art new sports medicine facility, which is directed by Greg Collins. Under the direct supervision of Dave Chandler, Assistant Athletic Trainer for Cross Country/ Track & Field, Spencer is cared for with ice baths, ultrasound treatments and various other treatments necessary for an athlete running 50-plus miles a week to recover and remain healthy. Knowing that there is such a skilled and committed group of people available to coordinate any medical needs that arise for our student-athletes, day or night, is a huge comfort to parents like me. When I was in college, it’s safe to say that proper nutrition was not necessarily a big focus for me. But for Spencer, it will be much more important. Proper nutrition provides the fuel required to run 50-plus miles a week, train, study and stay alert in class. Fortunately, Spencer will benefit from the support and expertise of Kate Ruley, Director of Sports Nutrition. Student-athletes are encouraged to have one-on-one visits with Kate as well as team counseling to learn how to properly fuel their bodies. Several times per week Kate and her staff of interns even prepare a breakfast for the team since they have little time to eat between morning workouts and class. These nutritious meals at key recovery times are carefully planned and thoughtfully delivered in their locker room. Like the sports performance coaches, Kate spends countless hours planning, researching and staying educated about the latest trends and advancements in sports nutrition. Nutritional programs must not only be tailored for each sport, but within teams, there can be a multitude of dietary needs that must be considered, from food allergies to weight loss and weight gain goals. Kate works tirelessly to insure our student-athletes are properly fueled and well-educated on how to best take care of their own nutritional needs. The newest addition to the support team is Sport Psychologist Rachel Conway, who is dedicated to helping student-athletes perform at their best. Spencer’s team recently had a group session with Rachel, as well as individual sessions during which Rachel

provided tools to aid in the mental part of running. Running is not only physically taxing, but distance athletes have to be mentally tough to endure long runs in difficult conditions in order compete at the highest level. After only a couple of months on the job, Rachel’s impact is already being felt departmentwide, and I am excited that Spencer has the opportunity to take advantage of her expertise. As with many of the other people or groups I’ve mentioned, Rachel’s work requires amazing commitment. The intracies of each sport mean that the mental challenges vary widely from sport to sport, so whether she is doing individual counseling, conducting team building exercises or advising coaches, she must continuously adapt her approach to best suit the needs of her clients while also staying abreast of new exercises, techniques or trends that could positively impact our programs. Academics are incredibly important to Spencer, and I know how challenging those can be at Wake Forest, but once again, I am seeing, first-hand, that there is a team of outstanding people ready to help her excel. The academic services team led by Jane Caldwell and the academic counselor for cross country/ track & field, Kristin Weisse, provide careful leadership on the academic front. They assist student-athletes like Spencer in selecting courses that not only accommodate specific sports schedules, but also align with their individual interests and goals. Jane and her staff also coordinate more than 80 tutors to support our student-athletes. Spencer, like all other freshmen studentathletes, is required to attend eight hours of study hall per week. This helps ensure that the freshmen are keeping up with their studies and learning to balance athletics and academics while trying to navigate that challenging first year of college. It is hard to imagine the level of coordination involved in providing quality tutors equipped to meet the needs of more than 400 student-athletes, but Jane and her staff have proved, year after year, that they are up to the task, and I am confident that, with their help, Spencer and her fellow student-athletes will have the resources they need to succeed in the classroom. But the support doesn’t stop there. There is yet another group of people who are focused on Developing Champions off the field/track. Student-Athlete Development, led by Ashley Wechter

and Brooke Thomas, offers a wide array of programming centered around leadership development, team building and career planning. Ashley and Brooke are also instrumental in coordinating community service opportunities that help our student-athletes make a positive impact in our community. As parents we are always trying to prepare our children for the next stage in life and help them develop the skills necessary to be successful, so it’s reassuring to know that even though our children may be off at college, there are still passionate and talented people with those same goals in mind, helping our children develop, not just as athletes, but as well-rounded people and leaders. As I said before, I’ve always known that it’s the people that make Wake Forest special, and for years I’ve sung the praises of the people and groups mentioned in this article. But now that I have seen these people through the eyes of a parent, knowing the countless hours they put into their jobs, and witnessing the blood, sweat and tears they put into supporting my child and more than 400 other student-athletes like her, there is no doubt in my mind that they are the real secret to our department’s success. To the other student-athlete parents reading this, know that your children are in good hands here. Rest assured that there is a truly amazing group of people who are supporting them day in and day out, and the rest of the staff who may not get to interact with your children as much, are just as committed to their success. To the other donors and fans reading this, I hope this gave you a glimpse into incredible “team behind the teams” who help make it possible for our studentathletes to go out there and compete and give you something to cheer for. And to everyone reading this – thank you! It is your generous contributions to the Deacon Club that have not only enabled the recent transformation of our facilities, but also make it possible to provide the resources and dedicated personnel that are instrumental in developing our student-athletes into champions on and off the field. As a lifelong Demon Deacon, alumnus, athletic department administrator and now, most importantly, as Spencer’s dad, I thank you for everything you do to support our Wake Forest student-athletes. Go Deacs! OCTOBER 2018

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COMPLIANCE CORNER

// T O D D H A I R S T O N

ELITE ATHLETE PROTECTION INSURANCE

TODD HAIRSTON SENIOR A S S O C I AT E AT H L E T I C DIRECTOR, COMPLIANCE

For a number of years, elite studentathletes have had the opportunity to protect their future earning potential by purchasing insurance policies that cover various catastrophic injuries. Recent NCAA legislative changes, however, have made it possible for institutions to assist student-athletes by paying the premiums for these policies on their behalf. The two most common types of insurance for student-athletes are Permanent and Total Disability (PTD) and Loss of Value (LOV). As the name suggests, PTD insurance covers student-athletes against debilitating injuries that would render them unable to participate in their sport professionally. LOV insurance allows student-athletes who have suffered an injury that impacts their draft status to recover lost income. For example, a student-

athlete who was projected as a first-round pick, but suffered an injury that caused him or her to be selected in a later round, could potentially file a claim under a LOV policy. Wake Forest has retained the services of an insurance consultant who advises our student-athletes on the various policies in the marketplace and provides them with the appropriate information to make the best decision for their situation. Several current student-athletes now have policies that have been provided by the Athletic Department, as is the case at many schools around the country. With the earning potential that now exists in professional sports, this is clearly a legislative change that has been a tremendous benefit to the well-being of our student-athletes.

THE “WFU QUAD BELT” AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AT NORMAN STOCKTON 249 S STRATFORD RD WINSTON-SALEM | 336-997-9012 WWW. NORMANSTOCKTONCLOTHIER.COM

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Gold Rush - October 2018  

The official publication of Wake Forest Athletics

Gold Rush - October 2018  

The official publication of Wake Forest Athletics