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WAKE WILL: THE CAMPAIGN FOR WAKE FOREST

LEGACY LEADER Senior Jaboree Williams looks to continue strong linebacker tradition

OCTOBER 2017

BUILDING A PROGRAM FROM SCRATCH Longtime coach Jen Averill creates championship family

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VOL. 27 // ISSUE 2 (USPS 014-373) EDITOR

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Donnie Roberts, Brian Westerholt WRITERS

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CONTENTS

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TOUCHDOWN MACHINE: Wide receiver Greg Dortch scored four TDs in the first three games as the Deacons opened 2017 with three convincing victories.

Gold Rush is published eight times a year in August, October, November, December, February, March, May and June by IMG College in conjunction with Wake Forest Athletics. Periodicals postage paid at Winston-Salem, NC 27102 and at additional mailing offices. The price of an annual subscription is $20. Members of the Deacon Club receive a one-year subscription as part of their membership. Persons wishing to subscribe to Gold Rush should send a check or money order (credit cards not accepted) to: IMG College 540 N. Trade St. Winston-Salem, NC 27101 All material produced in this publication is the property of Wake Forest University and IMG and shall not be reproduced in whole or in part without permission. POSTMASTER: Please send all address changes to the attention of Stephanie Hudson, Wake Forest Athletics, 519 Deacon Blvd. Winston-Salem, NC 27105. The appearance of advertising in this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the advertiser and/or the advertiser’s product or service by Wake Forest or IMG. The use of the name of the University or any of its identifying marks in advertisements must be approved by WFU and IMG.

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FROM THE AD 100% COTTEN INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW? CALENDAR COMPLIANCE CORNER

// 6 CONTINUING THE TRADITION Senior Jaboree Williams wants to be the next in a long line of standout linebackers for the Demon Deacons.

// 12 ALL ABOUT FAMILY Longtime head coach Jennifer Averill’s formula of success includes three NCAA field hockey titles and the many bonds formed over 25 years at Wake.

// 16 NATURAL FIT

ON THE COVER Linebacker Jaboree Williams hopes all of his hard work will pay off with his best season as a senior.

Lindsay Preston learns over the years that by being a goalkeeper, she has no choice but to be a leader.

OCTOBER 2017

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FROM THE A.D.

// R O N W E L L M A N

Deacon Leaders are vital to Developing Champions Dear Demon Deacons,

RON WELLMAN DIRECTOR O F AT H L E T I C S

Recently, I had the privilege of speaking to our new, incoming student-athletes and other student-athlete leaders at an annual event called the Walk of Champions. This is an incredibly meaningful event during which we welcome our newest student-athletes, commemorate the start of their journey as Demon Deacons, and hopefully, instill in them a sense of the passion, pride and responsibility that comes with being a Wake Forest student-athlete. We all know that being a Wake Forest student-athlete requires hard work, focus, dedication and a commitment to balancing athletics and academics, but we cannot overlook the importance of our student-athletes serving as leaders not only on their teams but also in the Wake Forest community. They represent our University on the fields and courts as well as off; they are role models; others notice what they do and what they say. It is crucial that they understand what it means to be a Demon Deacon leader, so as a department, we are striving to underscore the importance of developing leaders as we continue to pursue our mission of “Developing Champions.” To that end, last year we collaborated with the School of Business Center for Leadership and Character to develop and launch our own leadership development program. The Sports Leader Development System (SLDS) is a comprehensive program

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designed to identify, train and develop student-athlete leaders from their arrival on campus, through their senior year and beyond graduation. Prior to launching the program, meetings were held with coaches, student-athletes and athletic administrators to assess our department’s leadership needs and begin to design our own unique program that would provide the most benefits to our student-athletes while also integrating with the vision and mission of the University. With the “Deacon Leader” at the core of the program, five key attributes embodying what it means to be a “Deacon Leader” were identified: Character, Competitive, Positive Attitude, Committed, and Selfless. Following a successful pilot program this spring and summer, the SLDS is now being refined and plans are being made for wide-scale implementation, which will continue over the next few years. The impact of the program is already being felt throughout our department, and I was thrilled to hear that one of our senior captains who participated in the pilot program recently said, “This is the best, most useful experience I have had since being at Wake Forest.” One of my goals as I spoke to our newest student-athletes during the Walk of Champions was to convey to them the importance of being a “Deacon Leader” and let them know that the responsibility begins

now…not when they are upperclassmen. Leadership starts with leading themselves and doing what is right…in order to lead others, they must lead themselves in a manner that others respect. During the event, each new student-athlete was presented with a special medallion symbolizing their role as leaders in our department and University. The design of the medallion features the five key attributes of a “Deacon Leader” (Character, Competitive, Positive Attitude, Committed, and Selfless) and will hopefully serve as a reminder to take great pride in being a Demon Deacon and always strive to behave in a way that promotes those ideals. These efforts to develop leaders will not only help our student-athletes cultivate skills that will benefit them throughout the course of their lives, but they will no doubt be evident competitively as well. While it’s true that success is influenced by a myriad of factors, we cannot underestimate the incredible positive impact that strong student-athlete leaders can have on our teams. And speaking of competitive success, our teams are off to a great start this fall, and I couldn’t be more excited about what lies ahead for our program in the coming year. I hope you will join me in cheering on our “Deacon Leaders” at many of their games this season. Go Deacs!

Ron Wellman


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SENIOR

STATUS RELATIONSHIPS FUEL JABOREE WILLIAMS’ DESIRE TO CARRY ON LINEBACKER LEGACY By Sam Walker

J

aboree Williams wants to be the next player in the long legacy of outstanding linebackers produced by the Wake Forest football program. There are big shoes to fill, but the ardent Williams has prepared for a long time to be up to this task in his senior season.

All the offseason workouts, spring football practices and weight room visits have been the building blocks of the next standout Wake linebacker, and Williams seems to have no doubts. In recent history, there was Brandon Chubb, a two-time team captain and three-year starter at linebacker, who finished his career with 328 tackles, the 10th-highest total in school history. Chubb was a first team All-ACC selection by both the coaches and the media. Williams came to the program when Chubb was setting the gold standard. Last season, Marquel Lee was the senior linebacker who was elected a team captain, earned first team All-ACC honors (AP) and finished 12th in the ACC in tackles per game. The bar has been set high for linebackers who play at Wake Forest, but Williams wants to be the next in line. His first

accomplishment in establishing his legacy was being elected team captain by his teammates for the 2017 season. That requires a collective respect. “Jaboree has grown up so much, matured and become a leader for us,” Deacon head coach Dave Clawson said. “This is it (for him), and I think there are legacy leaders. Two years ago, they watched what Brandon Chubb could do, and he became obsessed with football. Marquel Lee did that a year ago. I think Jaboree wants to carry on the torch of being the next Wake Forest senior linebacker and both Jaboree and Grant (Dawson) want to be those linebackers, senior leaders.” Williams is coming off a season where he finished as the team’s seventh-leading tackler with 36, had 5.5 tackles for loss and two sacks. He started eight times and played 431 snaps, with his season-high (66) against Florida State. “Since I’ve been here, there has been a leader to charge and lead the defense, and Jaboree and I, as we grew up, we saw how they played and how they worked,” Dawson said. “And it’s kind of cool that this year we have two guys at that spot. It adds more defense to our team as a whole. Jaboree was doing a phenomenal job just pushing everybody this offseason. We did have a new defensive coordinator come in, so it did take some leadership to make sure everyone was on that.” Williams enrolled early to Wake Forest in January 2014 and participated in spring practice. He was part of Clawson’s first recruiting class. Before his junior season, Williams toiled to OCTOBER 2017

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earn that starting job. He played 133 snaps as a true freshman at linebacker and played on special teams. As a sophomore, he played in all 12 contests as a key reserve in the linebacking corps. But he was a player that was needed for depth and his athleticism as the program was starting to come together at the start of the Clawson era. Now it’s the final run as a Demon Deacon and looking back has helped him look forward and also stay in the present as a team leader. “It was pretty exciting out there having me and Grant starting (the first game against Presbyterian) and then having Justin (Strnad) come in,” said Williams after the Deacons’ 51-7 victory in their season opener. “I’m really excited about the corps this year with Coach (Brad) Sherrod leading us because we put in so much hard work in the offseason.” There’s a certain exuberance that the 21-year-old Williams exudes through his personality and by the way he plays. As a young man who admits to still watching the Power Rangers cartoon and reading “Green Eggs and Ham” by Dr. Seuss, there is certainly still a kid

JABOREE WILLIAMS POSITION: Linebacker HEIGHT: 6-0 WEIGHT: 245 CLASS: Senior MAJOR: Sociology HOMETOWN: Deerfield Beach, Fla. FAVORITE FOOD: Neckbones and collard greens with a little hot sauce FAVORITE BOOK: “Green Eggs and Ham” (Dr. Seuss) FAVORITE ATHLETE: Patrick Peterson (Arizona Cardinals - NFL) and Ryan Shazier (Pittsburgh Steelers - NFL) FAVORITE WFU MOMENT: “I was 17 years old, and it was one of my first workouts in January because I was an early enrollee. We were running 400s in the ice. Being from Florida, I had run a lot of 400s but not in ice. I was slipping, and it was tough, and it almost broke me down because I wasn’t used to the cold. I did it with Grant Dawson and Brandon Chubb, and they were leaders. I wanted to impress those guys. But I actually won all the reps that day even though there was ice, and it taught me a lot about what I could do.”

WILLIAMS’ MATURITY AS A PLAYER HAS BEEN BUILT THROUGH HARD WORK, ONGOING STUDY, RELENTLESS REPETITION AND THROUGH RELATIONSHIPS. in a giant of a man’s body. He speaks with a quick and personable banter, has a wide smile and is quite congenial. On the field, he plays intensely, but it is evident he’s somebody who is playing the game with passion and having fun through the process. “I followed Patrick Peterson growing up,” Williams said. “He is from

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// J A B O R E E W I L L I A M S

Pompano Beach, Fla., just around the corner from where I grew up and was the standout athlete from where I’m from. I followed him at LSU and then with the Arizona Cardinals. He was definitely an idol for every kid that was in Broward County. “And then I look up to Ryan Shazier who grew up in Lauderdale Lakes, Fla., and went to Plantation (High School) in Broward County. He went to Ohio State and plays for the Pittsburgh Steelers. It’s just exciting to see both of them play.” Williams’ maturity as a player has been built through hard work, ongoing study, relentless repetition and through relationships. And he has willingly taken on the responsibility of leading this team’s defense through action and word. “It all started with (former assistant coaches) Coach Warren Belin and Ray McCartney,” Williams said. “I love those guys. I was a 17-year-old freshman up here in January, wasn’t used to the cold, with no experience, and Brandon Chubb, that dude taught me the way of life. He taught me how to go about becoming a great player. I never

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IT ALL STARTED WITH (FORMER ASSISTANT COACHES) COACH WARREN BELIN AND RAY MCCARTNEY. I LOVE THOSE GUYS. I WAS A 17-YEAR-OLD FRESHMAN UP HERE IN JANUARY, WASN’T USED TO THE COLD, WITH NO EXPERIENCE, AND BRANDON CHUBB, THAT DUDE TAUGHT ME THE WAY OF LIFE. HE TAUGHT ME HOW TO GO ABOUT BECOMING A GREAT PLAYER. JABOREE WILLIAMS

really knew until he left and told me to continue to do what I was doing. He passed it to Marquel, and he showed me how to learn from experience, how to watch film and the little things that you do to make you better on game day. “Coach Clark Lea, who recruited me at Syracuse and became my coach here my junior year, taught me a lot about the fundamentals and made me a better man. He made me mature even more. Those guys taught me so much, and how to grow as a young man. And I can’t forget Mike Elko (former Wake Forest defensive coordinator). He taught me how to have the relentless mindset and focus at the same time. So now, I’m in the captain role, and it feels great to carry on that legacy.” Williams admits it’s going to be difficult to be better than Chubb or Lee, but he hungers for the opportunity to finish a season with more tackles than either of his predecessors. That, he said, would be the statistical reference he would love to bring up in conversations with his mentors once his Wake Forest football career is complete.


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WE DO STATE INSPECTIONS But he also realizes the intangibles of leadership. Making others better is part of what made Chubb and Lee great. “It’s hard to say how I can be a better leader than those guys because they were amazing,” Williams said. “So I want to live up to their leadership. I probably lead differently because every team is different, but statistically, I’m going to try to have more tackles, more sacks and more tackles for loss than they did. That’s one way I can measure my success by the players that have come before me.”

OCTOBER 2017

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FIELD HOCKEY

// J E N N I F E R AV E R I L L

JENNIFER AVERILL ALMA MATER: Northwestern, 1987 RECORD: 362-173-3 in 25 years at Wake Forest; 369-199-6 in 28 years overall NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS AT WAKE FOREST: 3 (2002, 2003, 2004) NATIONAL COACH OF THE YEAR: 3 (2002, 2003, 2004) ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS: 4 (2002, 2003, 2006, 2014) ACC COACH OF THE YEAR: 7 (1999, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2014) INDUCTED INTO NFHCA HALL OF FAME: 2010

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FAMILY. TRADITION. JENNIFER AVERILL’S LEGACY OF COMPASSIONATE COACHING GOES FAR BEYOND CHAMPIONSHIPS

By Jay Reddick the way. It’s the relationships, though, that Averill cherishes ith any great sports franchise – any along even more than the trophies. “In some ways we’re a lot like a family, with compassion and successful team endeavor, really empathy and tough love,” Averill said. “But most kids who come to – you will inevitably read stories Wake Forest believe that if we work toward something together, we can accomplish great things. For them, this is not just about these about how a team feels just like a family. four years, it’s a lifetime.” Many who have played for Averill take that notion of a lifetime Wake Forest field hockey is no different. But for Jennifer Averill commitment to heart. Many alumnae return to campus often to visit and the Wake Forest field hockey program, that word falls well short and spend time with the current Deacons, and even more express of describing the bonds formed over the past 25 years. their admiration and thanks for the lessons Averill taught them. The formula has obviously been successful, with three NCAA “It’s hard to put into words the impact that she has on you,” titles, four ACC championships and countless other milestones said Jenny Everett (class of 2001), the first field hockey star in the

W

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JENNY EVERETT (CLASS OF 2001) ON JENNIFER AVERILL:

“SHE TOOK A PROGRAM FROM SCRATCH TO CREATE A CHAMPIONSHIP LEGACY. IT’S EASY TO TAKE A TEAM WITH A HISTORY OF SUCCESS, BUT IT’S DIFFERENT TO TAKE A TEAM FROM SCRATCH TO THAT LEVEL. YOU CAN’T GET MORE HARDWARE THAN HER TEAMS HAVE WON, BUT SHE’S THE SAME PERSON WHEN SHE WON ALL THOSE CHAMPIONSHIPS AS SHE WAS WHEN SHE STARTED THE PROGRAM.” Wake Forest Hall of Fame. “She takes imperfect people and players, whatever broken pieces they come to her with, and puts them together where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.” In a sense the Wake Forest program, its players and Averill have all grown up together. Throughout the 1980s and early ’90s, the Deacons found success in the Deep South Association, then gained higher status within the athletic program with a new commitment that included ACC membership and additional funding for scholarships and facilities. Averill was a big part of that renewed push when she was hired in 1992, but she almost didn’t get into coaching at all. As a student, she went to Northwestern planning for a career in sports broadcasting.

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“As an athlete, you have to have a certain amount of ego to want the limelight,” said Averill, an All-American field hockey player who won the Honda Broderick Cup as the nation’s best player in 1986. “If I wasn’t playing, I still wanted that limelight. You know I love to talk, and if I could be paid to present sports, I thought that would be the grandest of all. “Unfortunately, I sounded like an idiot in front of the camera. So I switched my major to sociology and thought I’d figure the rest out in the long haul.” She was hired as an assistant coach at Dartmouth, and in less than two years there, her career path was set for life. “It’s ironic, because I didn’t hold coaching in the highest esteem,” Averill said. “That’s youth. But then I discovered an incredible amount of passion I never really understood about athletics – the values coaches have to embody and the responsibility and ownership of being a head coach.” She spent three seasons as head coach at Bucknell, then came to Winston-Salem ready for the challenge of building another winner. “I took the job because I thought it paralleled my experience at Northwestern, where we put the team on the map in the Big Ten and nationally,” Averill said. “I came to Wake Forest and thought it concentrated a lot on the student-athlete, as Northwestern did. I figured, why not give it a shot? I’m a dreamer, or I’ll die trying.” When she first came to WFU as a young coach, Averill says now, she seemed less like a mentor to her players and more like a peer. “In the early 1990s, we all had more in common,” Averill said. “[My players’] parents were like my parents. Now, I sometimes see the kids I coach as I look at my own children. Whether you’re a parent or a coach, it’s still about instilling true principles and values.” Averill said raising a family has changed her perspective on coaching and on life. She and her partner, Karen, have two children – Nicolas, 12, and Gianna, 10. “[Before I had a family] too much of my self-worth was wrapped up in wins and losses,” Averill said. “It wasn’t until Karen came along that I could appreciate those moments for what they were and realize that it’s about so much more than coaching. She helps me check in and realize when it’s time to be with my team or time to be a mom.” She called Gianna “wide-open, organic and witty,” and said admiringly of Nicolas that “the apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree.” “Kids are an incredible lifeline,” Averill said. “I have two beautiful, gifted, unique individuals. They constantly teach me lessons and have ever since they were born.” Both children are athletic – both participate in track and field and play basketball, and Nicolas also plays volleyball. Averill said she’s not one of those parents who pushes too hard or tries to coach from the stands. “I think I have certainly mellowed over the years,” Averill said. “If I engage in something, I put everything into it, but if I’m not involved in it myself, I’ve learned how to witness something without engaging in it as much. I watch my own kids’ games now, and they have so much joy. I’m just watching with my eyes and realizing how happy it makes me as a mom.” That’s not to say Averill doesn’t have a competitive streak beyond coaching. For example, she points to a French Alps excursion three years ago when Karen – an avid cyclist – signed both of them up to replicate five classic climbs from the Tour de France. “I wanted to beat her up that hill so badly, even though there was no chance of that happening,” Averill said. “I wanted that yellow jersey for myself. My cadence was probably double what hers was just to keep pace. I was in it to win it.” Averill didn’t win the races up the mountain, but she has won plenty of other battles on the field and off for Wake Forest. She has created an environment where her players know she’s willing to go the extra mile for them – and as a result, they’re willing to give their utmost effort for the common good.


“You never want to be in a position to disappoint her,” Everett said. “Her expectations are so high of herself and by default, so high of you and of the team. It’s beyond coaching. It’s who she is.” That mixture of passion and compassion also serves Averill well in recruiting, where she attracts players willing to stretch the boundaries of what they can accomplish, including fifth-year senior back Shannon Eby. “When I came here on my recruiting visit I was almost definitely going to Maryland,” Eby said. “I got on campus and thought, ‘I kind of like this place.’ Then I met [Averill] and it just solidified it. She was straight up with me, encouraging, motivational – exactly what I needed at the time.” Eby said the team-first focus of the WFU program is something she has appreciated more as she has matured. “In high school sports, like it or not, it’s really all about you,” Eby said. “Then you get here, and you’re training for your teammates, running for your teammates and working out for your teammates. It’s bigger than yourself. You’re attending a world-class university and you should represent it with class. I’ve taken that to heart ever since I got here.” Eby said she was also drawn in by the program’s longtime motto, “Play on Sundays.” Whether it’s the ACC Tournament, the NCAA

regionals or the Final Four, Sundays mean championships, and Wake Forest has competed for plenty. Averill said the three NCAA titles in 2002, 2003 and 2004, plus four ACC crowns, are a testament to the hard work put in not only by the players who hoisted the trophies, but all those who came before or since. “It’s validation. It’s why we’re here,” Averill said. “It shows you’ve reached the highest level. Only one team every year gets to walk off the field with that sense of accomplishment, and it’s special for Wake Forest, a small private school, to accomplish those great feats.” Everett didn’t get to hoist any of the trophies herself, though she was a leader of the Deacons’ first Final Four team in 2000, but as a youth coach herself, she has a special appreciation for what Averill and the Wake Forest field hockey program have built. “She took a program from scratch to create a championship legacy,” Everett said. “It’s easy to take a team with a history of success, but it’s different to take a team from scratch to that level. You can’t get more hardware than her teams have won, but she’s the same person when she won all those championships as she was when she started the program. “I would follow her to hell and back. She’s some kind of force of nature.” OCTOBER 2017

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ALWAYS A

LEADER SENIOR GOALKEEPER LINDSAY PRESTON CONTINUES TO LEAD THROUGH HER UNMATCHED WORK ETHIC

By Erin Meyer

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indsay Preston hasn’t always been a goalkeeper, but she has always been a leader.

Like most collegiate athletes, Preston began playing soccer at a young age. Age 4 to be exact. Her father was her coach while her twin brother was her teammate. “I played with my brother and the boys until I was 13,” Preston said. “It basically came down to my parents not wanting to deal with two soccer teams and my dad wanting to coach both of us.” Learning to play with the boys helped Preston get to where she is today – the starting goalkeeper for the Wake Forest women’s soccer team. “My dad understood that guys have a natural inclination to be faster,” Preston said. “The style of soccer is a little different, so developing my style of play through that speed and that lens helped me develop the skills I have now.” But even playing on a boys’ team, Preston was a leader. Perhaps not officially, but in the way that she played and her strong work ethic.

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“On the field, I can’t say I was a stellar player, I was just a hard worker,” Preston said about her early days of soccer. Though she may be the Demon Deacons’ starter these days, Preston wasn’t always a keeper. In fact, as a child she hated the idea of spending time in goal. “My dad would make everyone play in goal during the season,” she said. “One day I refused to be keeper. I told him I would rather sit on the bench and not play at all than play goalkeeper.” Preston maintained that attitude until she switched to an allgirls team. At age 15, actually 14 if you ask her mother, Preston’s playing days ultimately changed for the better when her team’s only keeper broke her foot. Out of desperation, her coach asked if anyone would step up and play in goal. Preston volunteered. “I really just wanted to help out in whatever way the team needed,” said Preston, demonstrating one of her key character traits: leading by example. But then Preston saved a penalty kick during the game, and that changed everything. “I thought to myself ‘maybe this is something I can actually do’ and I’ve played it ever since,” she said with a laugh.


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// L I N D S AY P R E S T O N

When Preston stepped in goal for the first time, she had no idea the responsibility that would come with the position. She simply wanted to help her team, a leadership quality that Preston has always possessed. Through the years, however, Preston has learned that by being a keeper, she has no choice but to be a leader. “In no way is being a keeper anything other than being a leader,” Preston said. “Not only do you have to be vocal because you’re the last person the ball has to get through, but it’s also you see the field in the opposite way that everyone else does. You have to communicate with your teammates what you see to play a successful game.” As she continued to develop her skills in goal, playing collegiately began to come into focus for the Oviedo, Fla., native. Originally, Preston visited local Florida schools until she took her first unofficial visit to Wake Forest. “The impression the school made on me was something I will never forget,” Preston said about Wake Forest. “When I unofficially visited other schools, I kept saying ‘it’s not Wake.’ My mom kept asking me to think about all of these schools, and I would always say ‘but mom, it’s not Wake.’ I was confident that I wanted to go here.”

Preston came to Wake Forest in 2014, in the shadow of the group of recent graduates that led the Deacons to their first-ever College Cup in 2011. Initially, Preston was nervous about fulfilling expectations that came with following a College Cup caliber team, especially filling the role that Wake Forest great Aubrey Bledsoe left behind. Bledsoe holds Wake Forest records in saves, shutouts, wins and multiple other categories. But Preston was pleasantly surprised when her collegiate career started. “I don’t think any of us can say we’ve felt the pressure of being just as good as the College Cup team,” she said. “Obviously, we have developed a mentality where we want to be that good, but no one has ever explicitly said ‘you’re not the College Cup team, you’re not Aubrey.’” When the opportunity arose for Preston to work with Bledsoe, her role model, Preston jumped on it and spent a summer training with Bledsoe and the Orlando Pride. She continued to do what she does best: leading others with her hard work and dedication. “Lindsay’s improvement as a goalkeeper since her freshman year has been tremendous,” said Jason Lowe, women’s soccer associate head coach. “She has evolved from just a great shot stopper to a

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drink

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Indulge in progressive, seasonally-inspired southern cuisine at Springhouse Restaurant, Kitchen and Bar. After your meal, relax with hand-crafted cocktails at the library bar.

info@SpringHouseNC.com | www.SpringHouseNC.com | 450 North Spring Street | Winston-Salem | 336.293.4797

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GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE


LINDSAY PRESTON CLASS: Senior HEIGHT: 5-9 POSITION: Goalkeeper HOMETOWN: Oviedo, Fla. HIGH SCHOOL: Oviedo High School CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Has started in 50 of 57 games played for Wake Forest for a total of 4,578 minutes and counting. She currently ranks second in program history with 196 saves and a 3.44 saves per game average. She has totaled 13 solo shutouts and 19 career total shutouts, while her .748 save percentage clocks in at fifth all-time.

THE GOAL THIS YEAR IS TO MAKE THE NCAA TOURNAMENT. PRESTON AND THE SENIOR CLASS HAVE YET TO MAKE THE POSTSEASON, SOMETHING THEY’RE WORKING HARD TO CHANGE. WHILE MOST PLAYERS HAVE INDIVIDUAL GOALS AS WELL, PRESTON’S TEAM-FIRST MENTALITY CONTINUES TO SHINE.

complete goalkeeper. She gives 100 percent to every rep in practice and trains like a true professional.” In fact, Preston’s hard work led her to officially be named one of three captains for the 2017 season. “Being a vocal leader wasn’t a natural gift for her,” Lowe added. “It has developed into one of her greatest strengths now. When you’re playing well, she lets you know. When you’re not, you’ll hear that loud and clear, too.” She leads alongside fellow seniors Maddie Huster and Ally Haran. While each student-athlete has her own style of leadership, the three mesh well together. Maddie is described as the “motivator” by Preston while Ally tends to “lead by example.” The combination of three different types of captains has had a positive impact on the team. The trio fostered a sense of trust that has created a culture that focuses on the team as opposed to individual success. That chemistry has translated to onfield success. The women’s soccer team is ranked for the first time since 2014, Preston’s freshman season. However, Preston, as well as the team and coaching staff, looks beyond the rankings. “The rankings reinforce the work we’re putting in but that doesn’t mean we’re going to win the next game or that someone will be afraid of us,” Preston said. “If anything, it makes our opponents hungrier to beat us.” The goal this year is to make the NCAA Tournament. Preston and the senior class have yet to make the postseason, something they’re

working hard to change. While most players have individual goals as well, Preston’s teamfirst mentality continues to shine. “I struggle with setting an individual goal,” she explained. “I want the team to win. I want the team to be ranked. I want the team to make both the ACC and NCAA tournament. I don’t really think about individual goals very much. I probably should, but I think if the team is playing well then an individual goal doesn’t matter.” As for life after Wake Forest, Preston is weighing her options for what happens next. She set herself up to graduate early so she can put her name into the National Women’s Soccer League draft. However, as of late, she’s considering attending graduate school. “I spend basically every hour of every day thinking about which one to do,” she said. “But it’s a good problem to have. I have two incredible options, but it will be a difficult decision to make.” But while Preston is pondering that decision, she continues to lead on and off the pitch. “She leads by example in the classroom,” Lowe said. “She’s proactive in forming relationships with our freshmen well before they get to campus and she has a connection with every member of the team. She’s a coach’s dream as a leader.” It’s safe to say that when she volunteered to play in goal no more than seven years ago, Preston had no idea this is where she would end up. “That day I stepped in goal is something I will always be proud of because it got me here,” she said. “That’s pretty crazy to think about.” OCTOBER 2017

19


100% COTTEN

// S TA N C O T T E N

Eyes Wide Open in Wake-BC series S TA N COTTEN VOICE OF THE DEMON DEACONS

The Wake Forest – Boston College football series in recent years has been an interesting one. ‘Squirrelly’ is the way I described it on the air recently as the fourth edition of Dave Clawson’s Deacons made its way to Chestnut Hill for an afternoon contest on the edge of one of the more picturesque campuses in the country, in my humble yet accurate opinion. My mind may be tricking me, but I honestly think there may have been a squirrel or some other kind

of animal interloper involved on the sidelines at Alumni Stadium during a game several seasons ago. I can’t swear to it, though. But I wouldn’t doubt it either. Games there have been, well, just down right weird at times over the years. The Deacons won in 2015 with more first downs (5) than points (3), and the home team ran out of time before snapping the ball on the doorstep of the end zone. Game over. But it hasn’t always gone well – like in 2009. The Eagles and Deacs battled to a 24-24 deadlock and were forced to go to overtime to decide the game. Wake’s defense forced a BC field goal meaning that a Demon Deacon touchdown would mean a win. On first down, Wake hit a big run down to the 2- or 3-yard line, and everyone in the stadium just knew the game would end on the next play or two with a Deacon touchdown in the north end zone. Instead, Wake Forest botched the quarterbackrunning back exchange, the ball popped to the turf and Boston College pounced on the fumble to win 27-24. Squirrelly. In the three games before our recent trip to Beantown (I hear the locals look down on this nickname), the Wake – Boston College series in the Dave Clawson era had been

Proud to be a Demon Deacon! 20

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decided by a total of 12 points. Twelve! There was a six-point loss in 2014 in Winston-Salem, the aforementioned 3-0 five first downs (for the Deacs) Wake Forest win two seasons ago, and last year’s 17-14 defeat that saw the Deacs miss a late, makeable field goal that would have most likely sent the game to overtime to produce another walk-off win for one of the two teams. But even though recent history has seen the two teams play virtually to the last second on the clock, the most recent game was decided well before the final play. The 25th meeting in the series played on Sept. 9 was over in the first quarter when quarterback John Wolford found redshirt freshman receiver Greg Dortch on the back line, literally, of the south end zone with 1:28 remaining in the first quarter for the first points of the game. Game over. Why? Well, it’s the ‘squirrel’ factor again. Looking more closely at the series’ fine print, over the last nine consecutive games between Wake Forest and Boston College leading up to the 2017 meeting the team that had scored first had won the game. Not most of the time. Every time. Make that 10 straight games, a decade’s worth. The recent game could have been called 13:32 into the game after the Wake touchdown, and the Deacs could have been home for dinner. Call it what you want. But when Wake and BC get together, it’s becoming something to watch with eyes wide open. You’re liable to see just about anything. Even a squirrel.


INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

Looking Ahead: Goals for the Remainder of the Wake Will Lead Campaign

BA R RY FA I R C L O T H SENIOR A S S O C I AT E AT H L E T I C DIRECTOR, DEVELOPMENT

22

In the blink of an eye, six years have passed and roughly $215 million has been raised for our deserving student-athletes since the start of the Wake Will campaign. Without the support of our loyal and passionate Deacon Club members, we would certainly not be where we are today, with 16 capital projects completed or under construction, 53 new endowments created and multiple programs initiated. Before we move on to another phase of the campaign, I’d like to extend our sincere appreciation for all that you have done to propel our programs forward. With just under three years remaining in the campaign, the Athletic Department has set its sights higher than ever. As we charge ahead, I want to take a moment to share our vision as it relates to our priorities for the remainder of the campaign. Over the course of the next three years, we envision our Annual Fund providing the resources required for us to recruit and train elite studentathletes to compete for championships and graduate into future leaders. In addition to funding opportunities for our student-athletes to receive a world-class education at Wake Forest, growth in the Annual Fund will initiate investments in summer school, nutrition and strength and conditioning. These enhancements not only serve as opportunities in the recruiting cycle, but provide opportunities for functional improvement and growth among our student-athletes. To provide our coaches and student-athletes with the resources we envision, our goal is to generate $24 million over the next three years. This would represent a 16 percent growth in our Annual Fund during this span, eclipsing the all-time high of $7.3 million contributed this past year. To spark this growth and inspire our studentathletes to reach the next level in the classroom, in competition, and personally, as leaders, we have launched the Next Level campaign, which encourages donors to increase their Annual Fund contribution to the next giving level. As you consider your gift for the 2017-18 giving year, we ask that you think about the positive impact that can be made through moving up your level of support. As we continue Developing Champions, it’s easy to see the emphasis our supporters have placed on providing state-of-the-art facilities for our teams to utilize. The investment in facilities that has occurred since the campaign began is truly incredible. It’s humbling to know that these grounds serve as a place where friendships form, lessons are learned and champions are made. Moving forward, we will continue to find ways to improve and enhance our existing spaces, where

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

we can train at the highest level, while also building a sense of community amongst our teams. On the horizon, we have a vision to focus on several major capital projects: the Pruitt Football Center, the men’s and women’s basketball locker rooms in Miller Center, the second phase of the David F. Couch Ballpark, and of course, the Coliseum. In addition to these facilities, we will look to further develop a top-notch sports performance program, which encompasses nutrition, sports medicine, strength and conditioning and sports psychology. By investing in these crucial areas, we will provide our student-athletes with the physical and mental advantages needed to bring home championships. The aforementioned facility improvements, combined with the special programming needs, total well over $75 million. With the help of our generous donors, we hope to check nearly every box by the conclusion of the campaign. It is also important to mention that the Wake Will Lead campaign has prompted the Athletic Department to think bigger and broader about the future and the sustainability of our program. With that said, we are looking to make an investment of approximately $75 million towards our endowment over the course of the next three years. The Deacon Club plans to engage with our donors to uncover their true passions, helping them to establish a legacy that will last a lifetime, while impacting future generations of student-athletes. In addition to scholarships, we plan to create coaching, program and other special endowment opportunities, which will provide significant relief to the department’s operating budget. Lastly, the Deacon Club’s Volunteer Army (Board of Directors, Athletic Advisory Council, Parents’ Athletic Council, sport steering committees) has played a critical role in our success thus far in the campaign, and we will continue to rely on this group moving forward. With that said, two new engagement groups will be added under the Volunteer Army umbrella during the campaign: the Deacon Connectors Leadership Committee and the Game Day Experience Committee. To learn more or to get involved as a volunteer, please call 336-758-5626 or email DeacClub@wfu.edu. As you can see, we’re aiming to take the momentum gained over the last six years and propel us into a new era, where trophies will be lifted and diplomas will be earned with the highest level of integrity and commitment. Thank you for all you have done, what you do today and what you will do moving forward in support of Wake Forest Athletics. Go Deacs!


INSIDE THE DEACON CLUB

BASKETBALL SEASON TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE Season tickets for the 2017-18 men’s basketball season are now on sale. The Deacs will host an exciting home schedule, including five opponents who made last year’s NCAA tournament. For season ticket or package information, please visit WakeForestSports.com or contact the Wake Forest Sales Team at (336) 758-3322 ext. 1.

Keep up with the Deacon Club on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram! For the latest news and information from the Deacon Club and to connect with other members, be sure to find us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram! @WFUDeaconClub Facebook.com/DeaconClub @WFUDeaconClub | @DeacOnTheRun | @BarryFaircloth

IS WAKE FOREST ATHLETICS IN YOUR WILL? Planned giving ties your legacy with the future of Wake Forest Athletics. To learn more about the many ways you can support Wake Forest Athletics through planned giving, please contact Paul Kennedy at (336) 758-3875 or kennedpj@wfu.edu.

2017 WAKE FOREST GOLF PRO-AM Come celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Wake Forest Pro-Am! The reception will be held at Haddock House on Sunday, Oct. 15, with the pro-am taking place at Old Town Club on Monday, Oct. 16. The cost of the event is $3,000. If you would like to attend the reception only, registration is $100. For more information or to sign up, please call (336) 758-6000.

OCTOBER 2017

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DONOR PROFILE

// C L A R A O S T E R H A G E

Clara Osterhage makes huge impact in short time

H

aving the ability to positively impact the lives of others is truly a gift. While Clara Osterhage (P ’18) is a firm believer in promoting opportunity and has been a lifelong giver to a variety of causes, her relationship with Wake Forest began in 2014. Having grown up in Ohio, Clara earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Ohio State University, where she studied social work. Upon completion of her studies, Clara transitioned into hospital social work. A consistent increase in responsibility over several years ultimately led Clara to the point where she was managing multiple departments within the hospital. As time went on, Clara was recruited by a larger hospital located in Lima, Ohio. She quickly took on a substantial workload, all while earning her MBA from Ashland University.

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GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

Then, in 1995, while flipping through a local newspaper, an advertisement about franchising caught Clara’s eye. Intrigued by the information presented, she ordered a VHS tape to learn more. The video, which happened to include an infomercial about Great Clips, would lead to a whole new venture for Clara. She began devising a plan, and shortly thereafter, Clara and her husband, Ray (P ’18), opened their first Great Clips franchise. They quickly developed an even greater passion for the company and valued their roles as franchisees. What they didn’t realize at that point, however, was that they would end up owning a total of 72 (and counting) Great Clips salons. Clara and Ray have four children: Molly, Alex, Patrick (’18) and Wyatt. Following in the footsteps of his two older siblings, who were both Division I athletes, when it came time for Patrick to choose a school,

he knew he wanted to play football. Patrick’s first offer came from Bowling Green State University, coached at the time by Dave Clawson. Although he had numerous offers to choose from, once Clawson became the head coach at Wake Forest, Patrick decided to accept an offer to play for the Deacs. Based on the interactions Clara had with Clawson throughout the recruiting process, she was elated that Patrick would be playing for someone who was so genuine. “He’s the kind of guy you want leading the locker room that your kid is in because he places an emphasis on things like integrity, honesty and generally having good values,” Clara affirms. When Patrick officially started his Wake Forest career in the summer of 2014, Clara immediately set out to determine how she could get involved. She got in touch with the


Athletic Department and began supporting the Deacon Club. Aware of how gifts to the Deacon Club directly impact our student-athletes, Clara and Ray enjoy helping to provide opportunities to individuals who may not otherwise have the ability to attend a school like Wake Forest. “It’s pretty special to know you are helping to change lives,” Clara states, “and I’ve seen sports change people’s lives.” Since Patrick’s arrival at Wake Forest, Clara has seen the excitement surrounding athletics continually grow. “It’s been fun to be a part of and witness that transformation,” she shares. As that enthusiasm has continued to build, so has Clara’s involvement with Wake Forest Athletics. She and Ray have recently increased their annual support of the Deacon Club, moving up several giving levels, which helps us continue Developing Champions by providing

critical resources for our studentathletes, including tuition, academic support, strength and conditioning, and sports medicine. Aside from the financial impact, Clara has also donated her time to the Deacon Club as a member of the Parents’ Athletic Council (PAC). “It’s an honor to be part of such a group,” Clara states. Whether it is providing suggestions and helping to plan, or simply reaching out to families of

incoming student-athletes, Clara has found joy and fulfillment as a PAC member. Through her efforts on the Parents’ Athletic Council, Clara has strengthened her bond with the University and created meaningful relationships. In addition, while attending every football game, she has established friendships with fellow fans and staff members, truly demonstrating what it means to be part of the Wake Forest family. “Every time we visit, it’s like we’re coming home,” Clara said. As a proud Deacon supporter, Clara has created a lifelong connection with Wake Forest, where she continues to have an impact on current and future student-athletes. Bringing things full circle, Clara states, “It’s all about giving people opportunities and making the University stronger. Together, we can continue to make that a reality.”

deacon club photos Deacon Club members are encouraged to submit photos for publication in the Gold Rush. Send your photos in digital format to deacclub@wfu.edu. Submission of a photo does not guarantee that it will be published. Thanks for showing off your Demon Deacon pride!

1

3

2 1 The Owen family celebrates the dedication of the Spry Stadium video board, which was funded through generous donations in honor of the late Jack W. Owen II (’85, P ’11, P ’14).

2 A group of Deacon Club young alumni gather prior to the Wake Forest football opener against Presbyterian.

3 D  eacon Club members Richard and Brenda (’62) Chiott (center) hosted a small group for dinner, including Richard (’88) and Michelle Butt (left), and were joined by Director of Football Recruiting, Taylor Redd (MALS ’16), and his wife, Erica (right).

OCTOBER 2017

25


WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

I

//

JOHN BADOUD

n each issue, Where Are They Now showcases a former Wake Forest student-athlete. John Badoud (’64) was a three-year letterman for the Deacon football team from 1960-62. A right guard, the 5-11, 195-pound Badoud was an All-City player at Woodrow Wilson High School in Washington, D.C., before heading to Wake Forest. He was a starting end on the 1959 freshman team, then switched to guard prior to the 1960 season.

John J. Badoud Jr. When did you graduate from Wake Forest? January 1964 What was your major and/or minor? Accounting What does being a Demon Deacon mean to you? Being a Demon Deacon provides an endless source of pride and energy. When people ask me where I went to school, the reaction is always the same, “Wow! What a great school.” If I wear something with the Wake Forest logo, I inevitably get unsolicited comments about what an elite place Wake Forest has become. The most amazing thing about this recognition is how dramatically it has grown. Today, no matter what the setting (i.e., sports, business, medicine), Wake Forest is known as an elite university that graduates outstanding talent. Why are you still involved in Wake Forest Athletics? For about 45 years, Wake Forest Athletics was pushed off my radar by young children and an exciting career. However, in the last dozen or so years, I have become reengaged to the point where it is almost an obsession. Wake losses in any sport bring out the “grumpy old man” in me. In many ways, the losses seem harder to take now than they did when I was playing. I think what ignites my emotions is that today’s games stir memories of how I felt getting ready for a big game, or how it felt to force myself to forget about a tough loss and be prepared to win the next one. Why do you feel it is important to give back to the University? My involvement in Wake Forest Athletics is driven by a deep appreciation for the fact that Wake Forest alumni and friends provided the resources to fund my scholarship. I attribute a substantial portion of my business success to the phenomenal education I received at Wake Forest. I support Wake so that other young men and women are provided with

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the same opportunity that was given to me. What is your current occupation? I am retired. For 25 years, I had my own newspaper and printing business. Prior to starting my own company, I was Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Worrell Enterprises. In my early career, I was a CPA with Price Waterhouse & Co. in New York and Atlanta. My ROTC commitment was spent at Fort Bragg with XVIII Airborne Corp. What is your favorite memory of your time at Wake Forest? Beating Clemson in Death Valley in 1961. Although, I must say beating North Carolina in 1960 and 1961 was very special since I had two high school teammates playing for Carolina. What makes you most proud of Wake Forest? The fact that, more often than not, the faculty worked at least as hard as I did to ensure I received the best possible education. Professor Hylton, who led the Accounting Department, was unyielding in demands in an effort to see that Wake Forest accounting graduates were the top performers on the North Carolina CPA exam. I also have great memories of the individual attention I received from many professors, especially in the areas of math and English. When you come back to Wake Forest, you always… Walk around the Quad and visit Wait Chapel and the Post Office.

In the early 1960s, we still had chapel on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and there were no cell phones or email. I was there when… I was a teammate of two of our most famous football players. In the days when freshmen could not play varsity sports, I was a sophomore when Norm Snead was a senior, and I was a senior when Brian Piccolo was a sophomore. Who is your favorite coach at Wake Forest, current or past? In 1961, Ray Malavasi was brought in to coach the interior line. Back in the days before TV revenue, Ray coached the line, tackle to tackle on both offense and defense. In the early 1960s, all players had to play both offense and defense because of NCAA limited substitution rules. In one season, Ray took us from worst to first in several categories within the ACC.


SUN OCT 01

MON 02

TUE 03

WED 04

Field Hockey vs. Liberty 1pm

THUR

FRI

SAT

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Women’s Soccer vs. Virginia Tech 7pm

Women’s Tennis WF Invitational

Women’s Tennis WF Invitational

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Volleyball vs. Florida State 6:30pm

Men’s Soccer vs. Virginia Tech 7:30pm

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OCTOBER // NOVEMBER 2017

WAKE FOREST ATHLETICS

Volleyball vs. Syracuse 1pm

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Women’s Soccer vs. North Carolina 5pm Women’s Tennis WF Invitational

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SPORTS MARKETING (336) 758-5011 TICKET OFFICE (336) 758-3322 GROUP TICKETS (Football & Basketball) (336) 758-4030 DEACON CLUB (336) 758-5626 www.DeaconClub.com DeacClub@wfu.edu

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Field Hockey vs. Boston College 6pm

Volleyball vs. Miami 1pm Women’s Soccer vs. Florida State 1pm

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Women’s Soccer vs. Miami 7pm

Field Hockey vs. American 6pm

Football vs. Louisville TBA

Men’s Soccer vs. Syracuse 7pm

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NOV 01

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FAMILY WEEKEND

FAMILY WEEKEND

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Volleyball vs. Louisville 3pm

Men’s Tennis WF Invitational

Men’s Basketball vs. Queens 7:30pm Men’s Tennis WF Invitational

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Men’s Basketball vs. Georgia Southern 7:30pm

Volleyball vs. Duke 6:30pm

Volleyball vs. Notre Dame 1pm

Deacon Club members at or above the Deacon Bench level may present their 2017-18 membership cards for free admission to Olympic Sport events (immediate family only). Olympic Sport single game tickets and season passes are available at WakeForestSports.com or by calling (336) 758-3322.

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Men’s Soccer vs. Longwood 7pm

Field Hockey vs. Richmond 1pm

Men’s Tennis WF Invitational

12 Women’s Basketball vs. Seton Hall 2pm

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Men’s Basketball vs. Liberty 7pm

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18 Football vs. NC State TBA

2017 WAKE FOREST GOLF PRO-AM Come celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Wake Forest Pro-Am! The reception will be held at Haddock House on Sunday, October 15, with the pro-am taking place at Old Town Club on Monday, October 16. The cost of the event is $3,000. If you would like to attend the reception only, registration is $100. For more information or to sign up, please call (336) 758-6000.

FAMILY WEEKEND - OCTOBER 27-28, 2017 Wake Forest football vs. Louisville - Saturday, October 28


PA ER DEG AE C OHNESA D IN THE PROS BASEBALL Coaches/Scouts Ross Atkins Neil Avent TJ Barra Development Danny Borrell Dave Bush George Greer John Hendricks Michael Holmes Crosschecker Kevin Jarvis Bill Masse Matt Price Mike Rikard Eric Schmitt Adam Wogan Tommy Gregg

MLB MLB MLB

Toronto Blue Jays Oakland A’s New York Mets

General Manager Area Scout Manager of Baseball Research &

MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB

New York Yankees Boston Red Sox St. Louis Cardinals New York Mets Oakland A’s

Rehab Pitching Coordinator Pitching Development Analyst Minor League Offensive Strategist National Pitching Crosschecker Asst. Scouting Director/National

MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB MLB AAA

Los Angeles Angels Seattle Mariners Kansas City Royals Boston Red Sox New York Yankees Chicago Cubs Kansas City Royals

Special Assignment Scout Area Scout Area Scouting Supervisor Vice President of Amateur Scouting Director of Minor League Operations Area Scout Omaha Storm Chasers Hitting Coach

MAJOR LEAGUES Mac Williamson

San Francisco Giants

MINOR LEAGUE RANKS Ben Breazeale Tim Cooney Will Craig Parker Dunshee Stuart Fairchild Aaron Fossas Connor Johnstone Connor Kaden Garrett Kelly Nate Mondou Joe Napolitano Jonathan Pryor Donnie Sellers Gavin Sheets

Baltimore Orioles (A) Cleveland Indians (AAA) Pittsburgh Pirates (High A) Oakland Athletics (A) Cincinnati Reds (Rookie) Cincinnati Reds (A) Atlanta Braves (Rookie) San Francisco Giants (High A) Schaumburg Boomers (Ind.) Oakland Athletics (High A) New York Mets (A) Washington Nationals (A) Toronto Blue Jays (A) Chicago White Sox (A)

WOMEN’S GOLF Laura (Philo) Diaz Nannette Hill Olafia Kristinsdottir Cheyenne Woods Jean Chua Marissa Dodd Allison Emrey Natalie Sheary Sierra Sims

LPGA Played in 6 events in 2017, T-20 at Marathon Classic LPGA Played in 3 events in 2017 LPGA Played in 18 events in 2017, T-13 at Scottish Open LPGA Played in 18 events in 2017 Symetra Played in 4 events in 2017 Symetra Played in 14 events in 2017 Symetra Played in 16 events in 2017, including five top-10s Symetra Played in 17 events in 2017 Symetra Played in 9 events, including four top-20s

MEN’S SOCCER Corben Bone Brian Carroll Sam Cronin Austin da Luz Chris Duvall Alec Ferrell Sam Fink Akira Fitzgerald Ian Harkes Jack Harrison Jacori Hayes Tolani Ibikunle Andy Lubahn Collin Martin Justin Moose Ben Newnam Ike Opara Sean Okoli Michael Parkhurst Jalen Robinson Jared Watts

FC Cincinnati Philadelphia Union Minnesota United FC North Carolina FC Montreal Impact Minnesota United FC Oklahoma City Energy FC Tampa Bay Rowdies D.C. United New York City FC FC Dallas Ekenas Sport Club (Finland) San Francisco Deltas Minnesota United FC Wilmington Hammerheads San Antonio FC Sporting Kansas City New York City FC Atlanta United FC D.C. United Colorado Rapids

COACHES/MLS FRONT OFFICE James Riley Kurt Schmid Zack Schilawski Ryan Martin

MLS Director of Player Relations Seattle Sounders (Head Scout) North Carolina FC U23s (Assistant Coach) DC United Academy Director

WOMEN’S SOCCER Aubrey Bledsoe Katie Stengel

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Orlando Pride (NWSL) Boston Breakers (NWSL)

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

Sarah Teegarden Annick McBryar Kelsey Zalimeni

Kopparbergs Goteborg (Swedish Premier League) Boston Breakers (Reserves) Crystal Palace Ladies FC First Team

MEN’S BASKETBALL Al-Farouq Aminu John Collins James Johnson Chris Paul Ishmael Smith Jeff Teague Coron Williams Austin Arians Justin Gray C.J. Harris Jamaal Levy Travis McKie Nikita Mescheriakov Codi Miller-McIntyre Dinos Mitoglou Aaron Rountree Devin Thomas David Weaver L.D. Williams Eric Williams

NBA Portland Trail Blazers NBA Atlanta Hawks NBA Miami Heat NBA Houston Rockets NBA Detroit Pistons NBA Minnesota Timberwolves NBA G-League Maine Red Claws Ukraine Khimik Romaina UBT Cluj Napoca Turkey Sakarya BSB Argentina Weber Bahia Lebanon Louaize Belarus Tsmoki-Minsk Russia Parma Greece Panathinaikos Greece Koroivos Turkey TED Kolejliler Turkey TED Kolejliler Finland ToPo Switzerland Lugano Tigers

COACHES/STAFF Frank Johnson

Ass’t Coach

Milwaukee Bucks (8/12/17)

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Dearica Hamby Sandra Garcia Milan Quinn

WNBA San Antonio Stars Puerto Rico Indias De Mayaguez Germany SV Halle Lions

FOOTBALL Josh Banks Tommy Bohanon K.J. Brent Thomas Brown Michael Campanaro Brandon Chubb Chris Givens Josh Harris Kevin Johnson Marquel Lee Joe Looney Brad Watson Nikita Whitlock Kyle Wilber

NFL NFL NFL NFL NFL NFL NFL CFL NFL NFL NFL NFL CFL NFL

DT FB WR LB WR LB WR RB CB LB OL CB DL LB

New York Giants Jacksonville Free Agent Free Agent Baltimore Detroit Free Agent Saskatchewan Houston Oakland Dallas Free Agent Hamilton Tiger-Cats Dallas

COACHES/STAFF Jim Caldwell Charlie Dayton Pat Flaherty Joe Kenn John Spanos Brad White Jeff Triplette James MacPherson

NFL Detroit Head Coach NFL Carolina Vice President NFL NY Giants Offensive Line Coach NFL Carolina Strength Coach NFL San Diego Executive VP of Football Operations NFL Indianapolis OLB Coach NFL Referee NFL Chargers Scout

MEN’S GOLF Bill Haas

PGA Played in 24 events in 2017, with four top-10s, No. 39 in World Golf Rankings Kyle Reifers PGA Played in 32 events in 2017, No. 280 in World Golf Rankings Webb Simpson PGA Played in 26 events in 2017 with one runner-up, No. 41 in World Golf Rankings Billy Andrade Champions Played in 18 events in 2017, 16th in 2017 Charles Schwab Cup Jay Haas Champions Played in 16 events in 2017, 35th in 2017 Charles Schwab Cup Gary Hallberg Champions Played in 8 events in 2017, 78th in 2017 Charles Schwab Cup Scott Hoch Champions Played in 7 events in 2017, 76th in 2017 Charles Schwab Cup Curtis Strange Champions Played in 4 events in 2016 Len Mattiace Web.com Played in 7 events in 2017

FIELD HOCKEY Lauren Crandall (Captain) Michelle Kasold

USA National Team (Retired Fall 2016) USA National Team (Retired Spring 2017)

MEN’S TENNIS Noah Rubin

ATP


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COMPLIANCE CORNER

// T O D D H A I R S T O N

NCAA TRANSFER RULES: POTENTIAL CHANGES ON THE HORIZON

TODD HAIRSTON A S S O C I AT E AT H L E T I C DIRECTOR, COMPLIANCE

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Student-athletes transferring from one institution to another has become a rather common occurrence across all NCAA sports. In recent years, as transfer rules have become more relaxed, particularly for graduate transfer students, this migration has become even more prevalent. This is especially true in the sport of men’s basketball. During the 2016-17 academic year, there were 633 transfers in Division I men’s basketball, 87 of which were graduate students. As these numbers continue to rise, the NCAA has taken notice, and as a result, has commissioned a Transfer Working Group to study the recent trends and make recommendations for potential rule changes around the issue. The general rule requires that a transfer student must sit a year in residence following the transfer, during which he or she is not eligible for competition. Although intended to act as a deterrent, NCAA rules provide a one-time exception to this rule for all sports except baseball, basketball and football. However, the exception does apply to these sports if the transfer student is enrolling in a graduate program. Since this graduate student exception was implemented in 2011, the number of graduate transfers has tripled in men’s sports and doubled in women’s sports. More alarming than the numbers themselves, however, is the growing concern

GOLD RUSH MAGAZINE

around graduation rates for graduate student-athletes. In total, only 51 percent of graduate student-athlete transfers actually go on to earn a graduate degree. Those numbers are significantly lower in the sports of football and men’s basketball, whose graduation rates are 28 percent and 34 percent, respectively. The obvious reason for these low graduation rates is the fact that in most instances, graduate students transfer into a school with only a single season of eligibility remaining. This is not a sufficient amount of time to complete most graduate programs, therefore, once a student’s eligibility is exhausted, they simply move on without completing their graduate studies. One of the legislative proposals being considered would require institutions who recruit graduate transfers to provide athletic aid for a minimum of two academic years. This type of legislation would give some institutions pause due to the significant financial commitment of such a requirement. Another proposal would levy penalties against institutions whose graduate student-athletes fail to graduate within a certain period of time. The working group intends to solicit feedback from athletic directors, administrators, coaches and faculty members this fall, which could result in legislation that would be voted on in 2018. As the number of transfers continues to increase, so does the likelihood that significant changes may be on the horizon for intercollegiate athletics.

IN TOTAL, ONLY 51 PERCENT OF GRADUATE STUDENT-ATHLETE TRANSFERS ACTUALLY GO ON TO EARN A GRADUATE DEGREE. THOSE NUMBERS ARE SIGNIFICANTLY LOWER IN THE SPORTS OF FOOTBALL AND MEN’S BASKETBALL …


THE NEW FINISH LINE

THREE YEARS, $130 MILLION DEVELOPING CHAMPIONS TODAY, TOMORROW AND FOREVER


THE

ATHLETIC CAMPAIGN STO RY PARTICIPATION

15,761

$37,570,156

$81,464,102

2,827

donors with an average gift of $13,514

raised by non-alum parents

raised by former student-athletes, representing a 38% giving rate

new Deacon Club members

WAKE WILL TOTAL COMMITMENTS Yearly

Cumulative 2016-2017

$46 MM $25 MM $42 MM $48 MM $20 MM $13 MM $14 MM

$213 MM $167 MM $142 MM $100 MM $52 MM $32 MM $19 MM

2015-2016 2015-2016 2014-2015 2013-2014 2012-2013 2011-2012 2010-2011

$11 MM

32

commitments of $1 million or more

WHAT YOUR GIFT SUPPORTS Capital Projects $140 MM

5%

Annual Fund $51 MM

24%

Endowment $12 MM

66% 5%

Estate Gifts $9 MM

53

new endowments created since beginning of campaign with $12,012,269 raised

245

raised by gifts of $1,000 or less

commitments of $100,000 or more

OTHER PROJECTS & FACTS

778 scholarships funded through the Annual Fund & athletic endowment

$700K raised for the Nutrition Fund for a full-time nutritionist

$112 MM

30%

in capital projects completed or under construction in the last two years

of $704 MM University campaign total raised by Athletics

All numbers as of September 2017


VOLUNTEER ARMY THREE-YEAR GOAL CONTINUE TO GROW THE VOLUNTEER ARMY THROUGH THE ADDITION OF TWO NEW ENGAGEMENT GROUPS, WHILE KEEPING ITS MEMBERS INVOLVED, INFORMED AND MOTIVATED TO POSITIVELY IMPACT THE LIVES OF WAKE FOREST STUDENT-ATHLETES. Thus far in the Wake Will Lead campaign, the Deacon Club’s Volunteer Army has been vital to our success, helping to spark growth and take us to the next level. This group consists of over 100 active members who serve on either the Board of Directors, Athletic Advisory Council, Parents’ Athletic Council or a sport steering committee. Collectively, this group has contributed over $120 million since the campaign kicked off, in addition to inspiring 15 new initiatives to enhance the effectiveness of the Deacon Club’s fundraising operation. Now, as we focus on the final three years of the campaign, two new groups will be added to the Volunteer Army: the Game Day Experience Committee and the Deacon Connectors Leadership Committee. If you would like to learn more about the Volunteer Army and find out how you can get involved, please call the Deacon Club at 336.758.5626 or email DeacClub@wfu.edu.

GAME DAY EXPERIENCE COMMITTEE Vision Enhance the overall game day experience at Wake Forest athletic events Subcommittees Fill the House: Generate and implement ideas to sell tickets and fill seats Game Day Operations: Improve various aspects related to game day, including parking, security and concessions Game Day Production: Increase fan engagement and enhance the atmosphere

DEACON CONNECTORS LEADERSHIP COMMITTEE An Annual Fund Initiative

Vision Engage alumni and friends of Wake Forest with the Athletic Department, while keeping them updated and informed


ANNUAL FUND THREE-YEAR GOAL GENERATE $24 MILLION TO PROVIDE THE RESOURCES NECESSARY TO RECRUIT, TRAIN AND DEVELOP ELITE STUDENT-ATHLETES TO COMPETE FOR CHAMPIONSHIPS, GAIN A WORLD-CLASS EDUCATION AND GROW AS LEADERS. As the unprecedented building boom over the past three years has provided the infrastructure for coaches to recruit at a level not seen before at Wake Forest, the Annual Fund allows the Athletic Department to invest in areas that will provide Wake Forest a strategic advantage over peers, while also providing student-athletes with opportunities for leadership and success, both in and out of competition. Throughout the next three years, we aim to increase our Annual Fund by nearly 20% to allow us to invest in areas critical to the growth of not only our student-athletes, but each of our Athletic programs.

EXPAND ACADEMIC SUPPORT TO OVER 350 STUDENT-ATHLETES

ELEVATE TRAINING TO MAXIMIZE PERFORMANCE

Tutoring Career Resources Leadership Training Summer School

Strength & Conditioning Nutrition Sports Medicine

ENHANCE TEAM BUDGETS

FUND SCHOLARSHIPS

Recruiting Travel Technology

Tuition Meal Plans Housing


CAPITAL PROJECTS THREE-YEAR GOAL CONTINUE TO IMPROVE AND ENHANCE OUR EXISTING SPACES, WHILE PLACING AN EMPHASIS ON SEVERAL MAJOR CAPITAL PROJECTS, IN ADDITION TO FURTHER DEVELOPING A TOP-NOTCH SPORTS PERFORMANCE PROGRAM TO BENEFIT THE WELL-BEING OF OUR STUDENT-ATHLETES. Since the Wake Will campaign first began in 2010, Wake Forest Athletics has experienced the most ambitious buildout in the history of our Athletic Department. This building boom, which has impacted all 16 varsity sports, was made possible through the generous support of loyal donors. While there has been $112 million in capital projects completed or currently under construction in the last two years alone, there is still work to be done to ensure the brightest possible future for Wake Forest Athletics. Over the next three years, there are four facilities that we will look to complete funding for, in addition to making substantial progress on fundraising for the Coliseum.

REMAINING CAPITAL PROJECT PRIORITIES FOR THE WAKE WILL LEAD CAMPAIGN $1.0MM

MIL L ER CEN T ER L OCK ER ROOMS Full remodel of men’s and women’s basketball locker rooms | Enhanced players’ lounges | Creation of “swag wall” at main entrance | Upgraded equipment room

F UNDING NE E DE D B Y: W IN T E R 2 0 1 7


$160K T ENNIS SCOREBOA RD New, state-of-the-art team tennis scoreboard to enhance the experience at the Leighton Tennis Courts

F UNDING NE E DE D B Y: W IN T E R 2 0 1 7

$5.0MM P RUI T T F OO T B A L L CEN T ER Expanded locker room space | Players’ lounge | Nutrition area | Relaxation zone | Renovation of Bill Faircloth Foyer | Upgraded football training and equipment rooms

F UNDING NE E DE D B Y: FA L L 2 0 18

$8.0MM DAV ID F. COUCH B A L L PA RK P H A SE II 100’ x 100’ indoor practice facility | Coaches’ offices | Video room | Team auditorium | Heritage area

F UNDING NE E DE D B Y: SP RING 2 0 18

TBD T HE COL ISEUM Entrance transformation | Updated premium seating areas | Renovated locker rooms and team spaces | Heritage display

MORE DE TA IL S C OMING SOON


NEW INITIATIVES Aside from the aforementioned priorities in regards to facilities, there are also special programming needs that we are aiming to fulfill within the final three years of the Wake Will Lead campaign. While a full-time performance nutritionist has already been hired, funds are still required to further develop our robust nutrition program. With that said, the immense impact already made through the nutrition initiative has caused us to seek out further opportunities that will benefit our student-athletes. This ultimately led the Athletic Department to pursue a full-time sports psychologist. In addition, we are also working to provide state-of-the-art equipment upgrades to support the Sports Performance Team, all of which are designed to help our student-athletes properly train, compete and recover.

NU T RI T ION P ROGR A MMING Full-time nutritionist | Counsel student-athletes on daily nutrition for performance & health | Develop & oversee training tables & fueling stations | Analysis of body composition & resting metabolic rate data

SP OR T S P S Y CHOL OG Y Assist student-athletes in achieving their goals & enhancing performance | Address issues that may affect sports performance | Provide student-athletes with tools to help maximize their performance and overall well-being

MISC . P ERF ORM A NCE T E A M I T EMS AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill | Keiser strength training machines with air resistance technology | Sleep study equipment | GPS machines for sports performance tracking | Ultrasound & fluoroscopy equipment | DEXA scanner


ENDOWMENT THREE-YEAR GOAL IMPACT FUTURE GENERATIONS OF WAKE FOREST STUDENT-ATHLETES BY MAKING AN INVESTMENT OF $75 MILLION TOWARDS OUR ENDOWMENT, WHILE CREATING NEW OPPORTUNITIES—IN ADDITION TO SCHOLARSHIPS —TO PROVIDE RELIEF TO THE DEPARTMENT’S OPERATING BUDGET. Since the campaign first began, our endowment has surfaced as an area of greater need. With that said, over the course of the next three years, endowment will be a focus of the Athletic Department as we look to increase the sustainability of our program. While our current endowment is approximately $35 million, we have an even larger goal of fully endowing the Athletic Department by 2040, requiring a total investment of $640 million. With that said, if we achieve the goal of contributing $75 million over the next three years, our endowment would reach a huge milestone of surpassing the $100 million mark. In striving to accomplish these goals, we will look to implement several new endowment opportunities that will be made available throughout the remainder of the campaign.

SOLIDIFY THE FUTURE OF WAKE FOREST ATHLETICS Coaches’ Positions Attract and retain the best coaches in the country Special Programs Endow events that help our student-athletes grow, both on and off the field, such as career treks, etiquette dinners, career nights and foreign travel Sports Performance Fund Prepare us to take advantage of future priorities and advancements in the areas of sports nutrition, strength and conditioning, sports medicine and sports psychology Team Budgets Bring sustainability and enhancements to each of our teams by assisting with recruiting, travel, training and summer school


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Gold Rush - October 2017  

The official publication of Wake Forest Athletics.

Gold Rush - October 2017  

The official publication of Wake Forest Athletics.