Page 1

Farewell 2013! See more photos on page 8

ALASKA POST Home of the Arctic Warriors

an edition of the

Fort Wainwright, Alaska

Vol. 5, No. 1

RECYCLED Recycled material is used in the making of our newsprint

January 10, 2014

Fort Wainwright celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Allen Shaw, Fort Wainwright PAO The 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division and the Fort Wainwright Equal Opportunity Office will host the 2014 Fort Wainwright Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Physical Fitness Center Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. This year’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebration will feature Rodney Gaskins of the Fairbanks Rescue Mission as the guest speaker. Sgt. 1st Class John Bandy, event coordinator, said, “My reason for reaching out to Mr. Gaskins was inspired by Dr. King’s philosophy on helping fight poverty and focusing efforts on getting jobs to those who need them. I believe this one philosophy of many was significant in relation to its time. In a time where minority Americans volunteered and were drafted to fight overseas in Vietnam, there were still places, institutions and governments in the United States that refused

fair and equitable treatment for these Americans.” King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism in the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. “Dr. King was one of many who sought to ensure the civil rights act of 1964 was being enforced by the federal government in some states who refused desegregation of schools and federal entities, and still practiced inequity within their own state government,” Bandy said. “Dr. King also stated in a speech that any nation who would draft a minority Soldier into war but not protect their civil rights upon return required a change of domestic policy. Dr. King believed in the elimination of poverty and spoke often of his disbelief that it even existed in a nation that had so much to offer. His belief that Americans should have absolute love for one another was the driving force behind his nonviolent movement. He believed that only

through nonviolence could there be change in America without contempt or distrust of one another after change occurred.” The significance of this observance to is to educate Soldiers, Family members and friends and honor a leader who encompassed the values which are tantamount to Army values. “Dr. King provided an example of out-front, by-example leadership that all Soldiers should be inspired to emulate, Bandy said. “The Army has always been at the forefront of social change and eliminating exclusionary practices ahead of our nation, and expects nothing less from its members. Our force is one that expects leaders to choose the difficult right decision, to take action when action is required, and to courageously stand out front for those who need it. Celebrating Dr. King’s legacy is to celebrate the nation and the Army which we have become due to leaders like him.” The program for this year includes

(Courtesy graphic)

the 9th Army Band, Gaskins as guest speaker and a special solo musical performance by local recording artist Willa Watts of Fairbanks. For more information, email john. a.bandy4.mil@mail.mil.

Warpath exercise - Stryker Soldiers demonstrate resilient capabilities Maj. David Mattox, 1/25th SBCT PAO More than 80 members of the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division staff recently participated in the Warpath exercise in the Republic of Korea as a subordinate brigade to the 2nd Infantry Division. The brigade staff not only tested its ability to deploy within the Pacific region and employ mission-command procedures to accomplish tactical objectives from a higher headquarters, it was also the test bed for the Army’s future construct of the Army 2020 implementing the new Stryker Brigade Combat Team structure, as well

as the Reconnaissance and Security Brigade Combat Team concept. For the past two years the brigade has shifted its focus from regular rotations into Iraq and Afghanistan and realigned with what the commander in chief has said the security strategy would be: focusing on the Pacific Region, providing regionally-aligned units that are prepared to rapidly deploy and being capable of responding to conflict globally. The Warpath exercise was intended to test the 2nd ID’s mission command strategies. The scenario within the digital exercise involved the defense of the ROK. The exercise is a biennial event that often

Members of the brigade battle staff conduct mission command functions for the 1/25th SBCT and provide 2nd ID and subordinate battalions with a common operating picture of simulated combat operations during WARPATH III from the 1/25th tactical operations center, Camp Casey, Republic of Korea, Dec. 12, 2013. (Photo by Maj. David Mattox, 1/25th Public Affairs)

draws specialized units from outside the Korean Peninsula in to practice how the 2nd ID would integrate outside units should the need arise. Though the exercise is a digital simulations exercise, the scenarios are very real. “We are participating in an exercise we could very well have to fight,” said Col. Brian Reed, 1/25th commander, to his staff as they discussed

various courses of action throughout the training exercise. Though 1/25th did not actually have to defend against a real attack, the 1/25th staff showed its ability to adapt to the new organization of the Army Capabilities and Integration Center-proposed RSBCT, the complex challenges of conducting combined mission command with an international part-

ner, and the nuances of executing both the high intensity conflict and counter insurgency operations. “(The brigade) challenged mission-command elements by distance, coordination with coalition forces, and operating as an Army 2020 concept unit for the first time,” said Brig. Gen. Paul Laughlin, deputy commanding general maneuver 2nd ID, to the

members of the unit that worked to grasp ROK and 2nd ID operations while defining themselves as a new RSBCT during the 2013 Warpath exercise. “[And] you have enthusiastically embraced this.” The Army has announced its plans to prepare for the year 2020 and beyond by changing some of its formations

See WARPATH on page 3

Congratulations: Top officer

U.S. Army Alaska Commander, Maj. Gen. Michael Shields (left), congratulates USARAK Deputy Commander, Lt. Col. Adam Lange, on his promotion to colonel Tuesday at the Last Frontier Community Activity Center. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Trish McMurphy, USARAK PAO)

Weekend Weather

BRIEFs Mushing on Birch Hill

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Cloudy Highs: -5 to -15 Lows: -18 to -32 Light winds

Partly cloudy Highs: -15 to -25 Lows: -20 to -35 Night mostly cloudy

Mostly cloudy Highs: -15 to -20 Lows: -20 to -35 Night mostly cloudy

For a little northern exposure, try dog sledding. Rides will be available at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area, building 1172 from noon to 2 p.m. Sunday. The fee is $15 per ride. Rides will be canceled if temperatures are colder than 20-below. For temperatures and ski conditions, call the recorded information line, 353-7053.

Full and part-time jobs An orientation for substitute teachers is set for 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at Arctic Light Elementary School. For information and details about what to bring, visit the school district’s website at www.k12northstar. org/subtemp-employee-information. Explore full- and part-time civilian employment job opportunities by searching www.usajobs.gov.


news

 January 10, 2014

ALASKA POST

Army Emergency Relief scholarship application period now open Staff report, Fort Wainwright PAO Army Emergency Relief has opened its scholarship application period for the 201415 school year. Applications from authorized spouses and children of Soldiers will be accepted from now until May 1, officials said. This year, scholarships will be awarded based solely on financial need, said Tammy LaCroix, manager for Army Emergency Relief, and scholarship programs. In previous years, some scholarships were awarded based on scholastic achievement and leadership, LaCroix said. For instance, if students could demonstrate leadership - such as serving as class presi-

dent, leading a Scout troop or serving in an ROTC leadership position -- that in itself was worth a $500 scholarship. If their grade point average was above a 3.5, that could be worth another $500. Those types of $500 scholarships have been eliminated however, so that larger awards to needy Family members can be granted. “What we’re trying to accomplish is help the neediest of our Soldiers,” LaCroix said. Last year AER awarded 4,629 scholarships, totaling more than $10 million to spouses and children of Soldiers. That included scholarships to 1,148 spouses and awards to 3,481 children. Those scholarships are helping send students this year

to about 1,400 schools, ranging from Harvard to Alabama State to American Military University. Some of the students are attending university classes online and a few are going to vocational or cosmetology schools, LaCroix said. About 9,000 applications were received last year online, LaCroix said, adding that the number kept her and another staff member quite busy. “Last year was our first year using a new online application process,” LaCroix said. “By upgrading the scholarship application software, we were able to streamline the entire process and more efficiently serve our applicants.” “Applicants are able to create their own profile, submit their documentation online,

and check their status,” added LaCroix. “This proved to be a huge time saver for both the applicants and the scholarship staff.” The most common reason for applicants to be turned down was incomplete packets, LaCroix said. Application packets should include school transcripts, the Student Aid Report from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, known as FAFSA, and the Soldier’s Leave and Earnings Statement. More information on the application process and necessary documentation is available on the AER website at www.aerhq.org. The entire application package must be submitted by May 1, LaCroix said. Only spouses and dependent children of active-duty Soldiers

are eligible for the scholarships, LaCroix said, but added this includes dependents of activated Army Reserve and National Guard troops, as long as they will remain on active-duty for the 2014-15 school year. Army Emergency Relief is a private non-profit organization dedicated to providing financial assistance to Soldiers, active and retired, and their families. Since its incorporation in 1942, AER has provided more than $1.5 billion to more than 3.5 million Soldiers, families and retirees. For AER assistance and information, visit Russell Williams, Army Emergency Relief officer in the Welcome Center’s Army Community Service section, building 3401, or call 353-7453.

News – in brief LEGAL NOTICE Anyone having claims against or who is indebted to the estate of Lt. Col. Gregory V. Shumate of Medical Department Activity-Alaska may call 3615919 or 496-9406 or send mail to Capt. Andrew Smay, Medical Department Activity-Alaska, Fort Wainwright, Alaska 99703. MUSH Sled dog rides will be available at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area, building 1172 from noon to 2 p.m., Sunday. The fee is $15 per ride. Rides will be canceled if temperatures are colder than 20-below. For temperatures and ski conditions, call the recorded information line, 353-7053. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. OBSERVANCE The Martin Luther King, Jr. observance is set for Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Please see story, page 1. FLU VACCINES Fort Wainwright has 21 confirmed cases of Flu-Type A as of Monday, according to Bassett Army Community Hospital, Medical Department Activity-Alaska. The immunizations clinic is open from 7:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3:45 p.m. weekdays for authorized

patients and DoD civilians who want a vaccination. Anyone with questions about the flu or the vaccine can contact Preventive Medicine, 361-4148. WINTER LEAGUES New bowling leagues for men, women and youth start next week. Call 3532654 or stop by the Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702 to sign-up. FORT WAINWRIGHT COMMUTERS The Gold Line bus service is on Fort Wainwright. The bus runs weekdays starting at 5:45 a.m. and on Saturdays at 10:45 a.m. There is no service on Sundays. For fees and stop times at the hospital, main Exchange, Last Frontier Community Activity Center, education center and Welcome Center, download a schedule online at www.co.fairbanks. ak.us/busroutes/Docs/GoldLine.pdf. TAX SEASON STARTS Tax assistance is available starting Jan. 27 through April 15, at the Fort Wainwright tax center located in building 1051, unit 9. This service is free for active duty, Reserve components, retirees and dependents. Office hours will be Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 5 p.m.; Thursdays, 1 to 6 p.m. Appointment scheduling starts on Jan. 20, call 353-2613 to schedule an appointment.

MONEY FOR COLLEGE The Scholarships for Military Children Program offers $2,000 scholarships for DoD family members. Applications are available through Feb. 28. For information, contact your local commissary, school guidance counselor or visit the program website at www. commissaries.com. For more information, call 353-7310. HELP FOR QUITTERS A tobacco cessation class is set for Jan. 23, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., at preventive medicine, building 4077. To sign up for classes or to get more information, call Arctic Health Link, 3614148. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF Commanders, take advantage of group classes provided by the Arctic Health Link office. Classes can accommodate groups of up to 100 Soldiers at a time, in acquiring their Take Care of Yourself card. After completion, Take Care of Yourself cardholders can obtain a select group of non-prescription medications, at no cost, from the pharmacy. Call 361-4148 to set up a class.

ROAD CONDITIONS Changes to road conditions and alerts are recorded on the post’s information line: 353-INFO. Smart phone users can also text the installation’s zip code to 888777 or sign up at http://local.nixle. com/zipcode/99703/ to receive text information alerts of installation status. FINANCIALLY READY 2014 Individual financial counseling, classroom and unit trainings are available through Financial Readiness, a program within Army Community Service. FRP topics include: Budgeting, savings, debt liquidation, consumer education, understanding, building and repairing credit; bank account management; and lifetime financial planning. A mandatory financial readiness training for all first term Soldiers takes place monthly. Family members are encouraged to attend. Call to schedule an appointment or register for training at Fort Wainwright 353- 7438 or Fort Greely (907) 873-2479. VOLUNTEERS WANTED Call or drop by the post Thrift Store for details on becoming a volunteer. Open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information call 356-1211.

Warm up that body before you exercise Staff Sgt. Christopher Klutts, Western Region Medical Command The Army substituted static stretches for the more dynamic Preparation Drill with the introduction of the Physical Readiness Training program. Now, the Performance Triad -- a holistic approach to well-being that incorporates sound sleep and nutrition practices with safe physical activity -encourages Soldiers to prepare to perform every time they hit the gym, not just during unit physical training. Maj. Daniel Rhon, a physical therapist at Madigan Army Medical Center on Joint Base Lewis-McChord, said preparing properly puts the body in “prime condition” for strenuous physical activity.

Rhon related preparing your body for physical performance to starting a car on a cold day. “You wanna get your engine going,” he said. “If you just get up in the morning, for example, and try to run down your stairs, you might feel a little stiff or a little sore.” The Performance Triad Leader’s Guide and Planner recommends tailoring your preparatory routine to each workout session. The Physical Readiness Training program provides structured preparatory exercises that prepare specific muscle groups for activity. Before physical training with a unit, Soldiers complete movement drills to prepare for runs and conditioning drills before strength training. People should use the same concept

of preparation when working out on their own. Rhon recommended taking a light jog before a long run or doing a few pushups before lifting weights. Preparation is not limited to warming up before a single training session. By creating a workout plan that incorporates cardiovascular training with resistance training, Soldiers can prepare their bodies to perform under the harshest conditions for extended periods of time. Rhon said a balanced workout plan might include three days of cardiovascular training and two to three days of resistance training per week. The need for preparation extends beyond the gym and to the battlefield. Sprinting 50 meters to cover under fire while wearing 60 pounds of body armor

and ammunition demands cardiovascular endurance. Carrying an injured buddy who bears the same load demands strength. Soldiers are unable to do either if they’re injured. “Preparation for anything can be helpful,” Rhon said. “We train, we go through a preparation process for missions and for procedures at the hospital. The same thing comes into play when you’re getting ready to perform physically.” A physical trainer can provide individual, targeted fitness plans to help anyone meet his or her goals. Visit the Melaven Physical Fitness Center or call 353-1994 or 353-1999. For more information about preparing to perform and the Performance Triad, visit http://armymedicine.mil.

ALASKA POST Home of the Arctic Warriors

EDITORIAL STAFF

Fort Wainwright Garrison Commander Col. S. C. Zemp U.S. Army Garrison Fort Wainwright PAO Linda Douglass Command Information Chief Connie Storch Editor Trish Muntean Staff writers Brian Schlumbohm Allen Shaw Contributors

A fighter warms up behind a U.S. flag before a combatives bout at Fort Hood, Texas. (DoD file photo/EJ Hersom)

Staff Sgt. Christopher Klutts, Western Region Medical Command Maj. David Mattox, 1/25th SBCT PAO Sgt. Michael Blalack, 1/25th SBCT PAO

The ALASKA POST is authorized by Army Regulation 360-1 and is published by the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Army, and is under exclusive written contract. Contents of the ALASKA POST are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison Ft. Wainwright Public Affairs Office. The ALASKA POST welcomes responsible comments from its readers and will publish letters, articles or photos submitted at least one week prior to the next publication. The ALASKA POST reserves the right to edit or reject submissions. All submitted material will become official Army property unless otherwise indicated. To advertise call (907) 4597548 Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The Editorial office is located on Ft. Wainwright in Building 1047 #1; Mailing address is Public Affairs Office, 1060 Gaffney Road, 5900, Ft. Wainwright, AK 99703. Call 353-6779 or 353-6701, or send emails to pao.fwa@ us.army.mil The ALASKA POST – Home of the Arctic Warriors


army

ALASKA POST

 January 10, 2014

Warpath: Training in Korea Continued from page 1 beginning in 2015 in order to balance costs in equipment and manpower with the ability to bridge maneuver and mobility gaps in the formations. As a trial run for the proposed configuration, the brigade was asked to align its missions and task organization for the Warpath exercise as an RSBCT and execute 2nd ID missions as such, then provide feedback to ARCIC on both the shortfalls and benefits with the new conscript. “The training exercise allowed us to simulate and test our ability to conduct collection activities, enhancing intelligence assets at the division and higher echelons while still having the ability to engage and win against an enemy force,” said Lt. Col. John Brown, Capabilities Development Integration Directorate chief of Concepts Development Branch. In addition to raw data generated by the exercise itself, staff members from the 1/25th and 2nd ID provided ARCIC representatives with an after-action review and comments in measurements, as well as, candid feedback throughout the Warpath exercise. Efforts of 1/25th staff during the exercise and comments may very well help shape the Army of 2020. In addition to helping the 2nd ID achieve mission success on the Korean Peninsula and shaping future battlefields for ARCIC, the staff members of 1/25th were able to learn as

The training exercise allowed us to simulate and test our ability to conduct collection activities, enhancing intelligence assets at the division and higher echelons while still having the ability to engage and win against an enemy force.

a group and take some lessons learned back home to Alaska. “This was a great learning opportunity for staff,” said Reed. “By day two, the staff was already growing by leaps and bounds, conducting mission command within the brigade as well as coordinating and integrating with our partners’ mission command efforts.” Not only did the brigade’s leaders and planners gain some insight and experience from the overseas exercise, but the junior Soldiers who help make a functioning operations center also had the opportunity to learn and grow from the new experience. Pfc. Michael Otey, an indirect-fire coordination specialist from St. Louis, Mo., said, “After going through this exercise, I have a better understanding of the Army’s structure in a combined-arms conflict and how it fights.”

Members of the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division staff take in Korean culture at the Gyeongbokgung Royal Palace, Seoul, Republic of Korea. The staff members recently completed a digital simulation mission command exercise at Camp Casey, ROK. (U.S. Army Photo by Maj. David Mattox, 1/25th Public Affairs)

Fort Wainwright career counselors build toy boxes for local children Sgt. Michael Blalack, 1/25th SBCT Public Affairs A group of Fort Wainwright, career counselors really got into the spirit of

giving this holiday season and went a little beyond the usual Christmas toy drives. Master Sgt. Michael MacDonald, senior career

counselor for 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, organized and led a project to build and donate 24 toy boxes to organiza-

tions on Fort Wainwright and in Fairbanks. “Every year Soldiers all over the Army do toy drives to give back to the communities that they

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Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Fairbanks American Legion and Fort Wainwright Families. “The toys are going to change as the children get older,” said MacDonald, “but hopefully we’ve given them something that will last long enough that they can pass them down to their children.” MacDonald said he hopes next year they can start the process earlier, encouraging more people to donate both time and money to help them reach their goal of making 100 boxes. “At the end of the day it’s about community involvement,” said MacDonald, “about reaching out and giving back.”

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Soldiers from the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team 25th Infantry Division retention team, donate handmade, wooden toy boxes to the fire department. The Soldiers built 24 toy boxes and donated them throughout the Fairbanks community during the holiday season. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Mylinda DuRousseau, 1/25 SBCT Public Affairs)

psa here

belong to,” said MacDonald. “I got the idea a few years ago to build and donate boxes for the children to keep their toys in.” MacDonald and eight other Fort Wainwright career counselors built the boxes in his garage after work. “This was initially supposed to be 15 or 16 boxes,” said MacDonald, “but we got such a great response when people started seeing what we were making we decided to make more.” The boxes, which are made out of oak and maple and took about five hours each to build, were donated to the fire department, the Fairbanks

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News

January 10, 2014

ALASKA POST

Army libraries – content without walls, shelves Staff report, Family and MWR Directorate Army MWR Libraries offer free access to over 25,000 eBooks and audiobooks through the Army Digital Media Library. The libraries are continually expanding their collection of ebooks, audiobooks , music, and video available to enjoy. Registered MWR library patrons can borrow popular digital media anytime, anywhere by visiting the Army Digital Media Library (http://army.lib.overdrive.com). Patrons may browse the Army Digital Media Library, borrow titles with a library account, and enjoy them on all computers and major devices, including e-book reading devices, smart phones and tablets. Titles will automatically expire at the end of the lending period. There are no late fees. “Now it’s easier than ever to download ebooks from the

Library. We want to make our great collection available, and as easy to use as possible, so I hope that people take advantage of this tremendous resource,” said Michael Steinmacher, supervisory librarian at Barr Memorial library, Fort Knox, Ky. The Army Digital Media Library uses the Overdrive Media Console app which offers the ability to sync bookmarks and reading progress across devices, variable listening speed for audiobooks and guidance for first time users. To get started enjoying eBooks, audiobooks and more, patrons registered at MWR Libraries can visit (http://army.lib. overdrive.com) or download the Overdrive Media Console app for their device. When using the Overdrive app for the first time, click on “add a library” and type “Army” in the search box. Then select “Army Digital

Media Library”. You will need a library account web login and PIN from your library to check out an ebook or audiobook. “Europe Army MWR Library patrons have been able to access the Army Digital Media Library through their library’s website since 2010 and now MWR library patrons in the United States and Pacific are able to enjoy this service without logging into Army Knowledge Online (AKO),” says Carla Pomager, librarian at HQ IMCOM G9. Contact the Fort Wainwright library by calling 353-2642 for access to the Army Digital Media Library through the General Library Information System (GLIS) (http://mylibrarvus.armybiznet.com). Visit the library, building 3700 Santiago Street, Monday through Friday between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. for personal one-on-one assistance.

Fort Wainwright and U.S. Army Libraries offer digital books, audiobooks, music and video - best-selling and classic titles - anytime, anywhere – no late fees. (Courtesy illustration)

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News

ALASKA POST

January 10, 2014

Search is on for Army’s best hockey talent Allen Shaw, Fort Wainwright PAO If you’re a Soldier and you can skate, you need to be at the Physical Fitness Center Saturday at 8 a.m. for preliminary tryouts. This is an opportunity to represent United States Army Alaska in the Commander’s Cup Championship. The game is scheduled to be played at the Carlson Center Feb. 28, and the mission is to beat Air Force.

“We are trying to recruit the best hockey talent and experience from across the Army in Interior Alaska, including Soldiers from Fort Wainwright and Fort Greely,” said Lt. Joshua Miller, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division. Players selected for the team will practice during physical training hours from 6 to 7:30 a.m. Miller said this has

been authorized by the USARAK deputy commanding officer. The game itself will be played before the University of Alaska Fairbanks Nanooks take on Ferris State. “The intent is to showcase the spirit of competition within the Department of Defense in Alaska and to reinforce the culture of hockey within the Army, Air Force and surrounding community,” Miller said.

An informational meeting and initial assessment will be held Saturday. Those interested should bring pen, paper, skates, stick and helmet. The final assessment is scheduled for Monday at 6 a.m., and all players should bring their gear, Miller said. “Goalies should bring all their gear both days.” For more information call Joshua Miller at (907) 888-5490. Pvt. Aaron Cashen, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division delivers food products to the ASYMCA Pantry Dec. 23, 2013, to benefit Soldiers and Family members. Soldiers of the 1-5th delivered a truckload of goodies for the holidays. (Photo by Allen Shaw, Fort Wainwright PAO)

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Members of the U.S. Army Alaska hockey team cheer as the puck goes in the net during the 2013 Army versus Air Force Commander’s Cup Championship at the Big Dipper Ice Arena in Fairbanks. USARAK is currently recruiting the best hockey playing Soldiers in the Interior to play in the game scheduled for Feb. 28 at the Carlson Center. The mission is to beat Air Force. For more information call Joshua Miller, 888-5490. (File photo)

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 January 10, 2014

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

WINTER BOWLING LEAGUES The Blue Nose bowling leagues are three new 10week bowling leagues at the Nugget Lanes Bowling Center. Women’s Doubles league will meet Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m., starting Jan. 15. Nine-Pin NoTap league will meet Thursdays, 6:30 p.m., starting Jan 16. Youth Bag and Ball league will meet Sundays at 1 p.m., starting Jan 19. Teams are one adult and one youth. Youth receives bag and ball when league is paid in full. Measuring and drilling fee not included. League participation is $10 per week and includes three games and shoe rental. Call 3532654 or stop by the Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702 to sign-up.

Friday – 10th COMMUNITY CPR AND FIRST AID, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Youth Center, building 4109. Call 353-7713. FALL FAME FITNESS SESSIONS, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. and 10:45 to 11:45 a.m., Melaven Fitness Center, building 3452. Child care sessions begin 15 minutes prior to Fame Fitness times and are $35 per month, per child, per session. Pre-registration begins the 20th of the month prior to the next month’s sessions. Call 353-7713 for more information. LUNCHTIME PIN PLATOON BOWLING, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-2654. AFTERNOON FUN WITH HEAD-PIN BOWLING, 1 to 6 p.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-2654. STORY HOUR AND CRAFTS: Polar Bear, Polar Bear, 4 p.m., library, building 3700. No cost. Call 353-2642. OPEN RECREATIONAL SKATING, 5:30 to 7:45 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223. MOVIE NIGHT (GRADES 3-6), 7 to 9 p.m., School Age Center, building 4166. Call 361-7394. COSMIC BOWLING, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-4137.

Saturday – 11th ICE CLIMBING, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Outdoor Recreation Center, building 4050. Cost is $30. Call 361-6349. GROUP CYCLING, 10 to 11 a.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223. ZUMBA, 11 a.m. to noon, Physical Fitness Center ice rink, building 3709. Call 353-7223. OPEN RECREATIONAL SKATING, 1:30 to 4 p.m., Physical Fitness Center ice rink, building 3709. Call 353-7223. TEXAS HOLD’EM TOURNAMENT, 7 p.m., The Warrior Zone, building 3205. Sign-ups begin at 6 p.m., open to all DoD cardholders 18 and older. Call 353-1087. COSMIC BOWLING, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-4137.

Sunday – 12th MUSH! Dog sled rides will be available at the Birch Hill Ski and Snowboard Area, building 1172 from noon to 2 p.m., Sunday. The fee is $15 per ride. Rides will be canceled if temperatures are colder than 20-below. For temperatures and ski conditions, call the recorded information line, 353-7053. RECREATIONAL SKATING, 1:30 to 4 p.m., Physical Fitness Center ice rink, building 3709. Call 353-7223.

WINTERIZATION CLINIC, 3 to 6 p.m., Auto Skill Center, building 3730. Call 353-7436. RECREATIONAL HOCKEY, 4:15 to 6 p.m., Physical Fitness Center ice rink, building 3709. Call 353-7223.

Monday – 13th ROMP AND STOMP PLAYGROUP, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Last Frontier Community Activity Center, building 1044. No cost. Call 353-7372. FALL FAME FITNESS SESSIONS, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. and 10:45 to 11:45 a.m., Melaven Fitness Center, building 3452. Child care sessions begin 15 minutes prior to Fame Fitness times and are $35 per month, per child, per session. Pre-registration begins the 20th of the month prior to the next month’s sessions. Call 353-7713 for more information. LUNCH HOUR RECREATIONAL SKATING, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Physical Fitness Center ice rink, building 3709. Call 353-7223. GROUP CYCLING CLASS, noon to 1 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223. AUTO SAFETY CLASS, 6 p.m., Auto Skill Center, building 3730. Call 353-7436. ZUMBA, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223.

Tuesday – 14th GROUP CYCLING CLASS, 6:30 to 7:30 a.m.; 9:15 to 10:15 a.m., 5 to 6 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223. LUNCH HOUR STICK HOCKEY, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Physical Fitness Center ice rink, building 3709. Call 353-7223. HOUR OF POWER GROUP STRENGTH CLASS, noon to 12:45 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223. INTRO BELAY/CLIMBING CLASS, 5:30 to 7 p.m., Outdoor Recreation Center, building 4050. No fee. Call 361-6349. TURBO KICK, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223.

Wednesday – 15th MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. OBSERVANCE

ALASKA POST

LUNCH SKI AND SOUP, noon to 1 p.m., Outdoor Recreation Center, building 4050. Cost is $10. Call 3616349. GROUP CYCLING CLASS, noon to 1 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223. AFTERNOON FUN WITH HEAD-PIN BOWLING, 1 to 6 p.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-2654. GAMING, 4 to 5 p.m., Ages 11 to 18, Youth Center, building 4109. Call 361-9897. FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT, 5:30 to 7 p.m., Last Frontier Community Activity Center, building 1044. Call 3537755. ZUMBA, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223.

Thursday-16th GROUP CYCLING CLASS, 6:30 to 7:30 a.m.; 5 to 6 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 3537223. BABY SIGNS: SIGN, SING, AND PLAY CLASSES, 9 to 9:30 a.m., Last Frontier Community Activity Center, building 1044. No cost. Call 353-7372. ROMP AND STOMP PLAYGROUP, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., Last Frontier Community Activity Center, building 1044. No cost. Call 353-7372. LUNCHTIME PIN PLATOON BOWLING, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-2654. LUNCH HOUR STICK HOCKEY, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Physical Fitness Center ice rink, building 3709. Call 353-7223. HOUR OF POWER GROUP STRENGTH CLASS, noon to 12:45 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223. AFTERNOON FUN WITH HEAD-PIN BOWLING, 1 to 6 p.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-2654. BASIC CAR CARE FOR WOMEN, 6 p.m., Auto Skill Center, building 3730. Call 353-7436. REGISTRATION DEADLINE: SUPER SATURDAY CARE, Sign up and pay to reserve space for the Super Saturday child care event (set for Jan. 25 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.). Cost is $16 per child; lunch is provided at CDC I, building 4024. Call 353-7713.

The 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division and the Fort Wainwright Equal Opportunity Office welcome all to the 2014 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Observance “Remember! Celebrate! Act! A Day On - Not a Day Off.” Join in celebrating his legacy at the Physical Fitness Center building 3709, Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m.

ZUMBA, 6:15 to 7:15 p.m., Physical Fitness Center, building 3709. Call 353-7223.

FALL FAME FITNESS SESSIONS, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. and 10:45 to 11:45 a.m., Melaven Fitness Center, building 3452. Child care sessions begin 15 minutes prior to Fame Fitness times and are $35 per month, per child, per session. Pre-registration begins the 20th of the month prior to the next month’s sessions. Call 353-7713 for more information.

FALL FAME FITNESS SESSIONS, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. and 10:45 to 11:45 a.m., Melaven Fitness Center, building 3452. Child care sessions begin 15 minutes prior to Fame Fitness times and are $35 per month, per child, per session. Pre-registration begins the 20th of the month prior to the next month’s sessions. Call 353-7713 for more information.

LUNCHTIME PIN PLATOON BOWLING, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-2654.

LUNCHTIME PIN PLATOON BOWLING, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-2654.

LUNCH HOUR RECREATIONAL SKATING, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Physical Fitness Center ice rink, building 3709. Call 353-7223.

FAMILY XC SKIING, 1 to 3 p.m., Outdoor Recreation Center, building 4050. Cost is $10. Call 361-6349.

Friday – 17th Training Holiday HALF- DAY SNOWMACHINE RUN, 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., Outdoor Recreation Center, building 4050. Cost is $25. Call 361-6349.

AFTERNOON FUN WITH HEAD-PIN BOWLING, 1 to 6 p.m., Nugget Lanes Bowling Center, building 3702. Call 353-2654. SOLDIERS AGAINST DRUNK DRIVING

353-6610

STORY HOUR AND CRAFTS, PENGUIN POWER: 4 p.m., library, building 3700. No cost. Call 353-2642.

Have a Plan, Call Someone.

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sports

ALASKA POST

January 10, 2014

Down to nitty-gritty gridiron predictions: That’s what I’m talking about Allen Shaw, Fort Wainwright PAO There have been some crazy football games over the holiday season and now the division championships are on the line. We’re down to eight National Football League teams with an opportunity to move on to Super Bowl XLVIII and our Fort Wainwright prognosticators

have made their predictions. Although A-Team has a sixpoint lead over Tate, that could change come Monday. We both think Denver and Seattle will prevail, but he’s choosing New England and Carolina, while I think the Colts and Niners will be victorious. BeerBQ thinks New England will “win by a bunch” and predicts Denver will go all the

way to a Super Bowl win. Mr. Fischer said, “The Colts will be out of [Andrew] Luck in New England. A [Phillip] Rivers of tears will flow for the Chargers as their season ends in Denver and the Saints will be martyred in Seattle.” Earp have been on a roll lately and hope to keep heading left by choosing New England and Denver, although they are ner-

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vous about this one. “I’ve been let down by the Donks so many times,” said the handsome brother. They are also picking San Francisco and Seattle (although wouldn’t be surprised if Drew Brees and Jeremy Graham shred the Hawks). Grandpa D and Bear are banking on the Patriots, Broncos, Panthers and Seahawks, while Pitbull agrees; although

they think San Diego can pull out a victory at Mile High. Even though PB and Urbi are battling to stay out of the bottom, they only disagree on one game. Urbi is taking San Francisco. It’s anybody’s game and the teams are all in it to win it. Playoff football is always exciting and that’s what I’m talking about.

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 January 10, 2014

alaska post

ALASKA POST

Fort Wainwright scrapbook page: Farewell to 2013 See more Fort Wainwright images from 2013, visit the official Flickr page at www.flickr.com/photos/fortwainwright/sets/. U.S. Army Alaska images of 2013 are online at www.flickr.com/photos/usarak/. The U.S. Army’s best photos of 2013 include USARAK images, see them online at www.army.mil/yearinphotos/2013/?from=hp_spotlight.

nt, supn Regime Kulluk o ti ia v A d , alion, 52n drilling rig ), 1st Batt utch Shell Arctic d and causing a a k s la (A son) e Royal D n Brigade laska islan at Aviatio operations after th rcing it onto an A Elmendorf-Richard b m o C th t Base The 16 military ’s Eve fo ilian and nson, Join New Year ported civ s hit with a storm Sgt. Aaron M. Joh a ff Salvage w ge. (Photo by Sta ta u o r e w o p

The Easte r Field Artil Bunny, Spc. Jame s Fillingam lery Regim Aitu durin e e g the batt nt, shares a mom with the 2nd Batta Freeman, lion, 8th alion Eas ent with te A 2nd Batta lion, 8th F r egg hunt. (Photo kata and Akanisi ield Artille ry Regim by 1st Lt. Danay ent)

Comman d Lt. Col. R Sgt. Maj. Harry W ay o read moo bert Eriksen, garr ne Jeffries, garris ison chie on comm se stories f of an at the libra ry. (Photo staff (right), donn d sergeant major, and ed critter by Connie h Storch, F ort Wainw eadgear to right PAO )

and eployed wad e r e ent for ssets w Force a and Managem See more k s a T . L k 2 fire Aviation eau of 85/. Alaska on of the Bur e Stuart Cree 76346531114 y m r A 5 ti at th irec /721 U.S. buckets under d rak/sets worked s using Bambi m/photos/usa inwright PAO) o a ter drop t www.flickr.c bohm, Fort W a m s photo y Brian Schlu b (Photo

, Maj. Gen. y in March ed, comit il c a F g in arriors Din ol. Brian Re the Arctic W general, along with C n, and Command f o g in n e p g o isio commandin m, 25th Infantry Div CT, participated in morate the a To comme ett, U.S. Army Alaska e SB T Combat rr the 1-25th Michael Ga e 1st Stryker Brigade missioned officer of 5th SBCT PAO) th oncom ck, 1/2 mander of is, senior n by Sgt. Michael Blala w e L y a R j. Sgt. Ma . (Photo of the cake the cutting

2nd Enginee rB meritorious se rigade’s Spc. Adam Chri stensen rece rvice medal fr ived a Ray Odierno o and SMA Ray m The U.S. Army Chief o f Staff mond F. Chan the Best Sold ie d Soldier of the r Competition and becom ler III for winning Year. (Courtes in y Army photo g the U.S. Army )

r on watches fo gt. Evan Sutt iS el ff h ta k S o o as in r h in his viso e CH-47 C ange reflects Alaska Aviation Task Forc a Glacier. See more The Alaska R n y ilt rm 5818/ way to Kah his U.S. A danger while g the Alaska Range on its sarak/sets/7215763336849 n u o s/ al to copter flies kr.com/pho e at www.flic images onlin Pennell, USARAK PAO) hn (Photo by Jo

Spc. Rebecca Ba ile nance Company y (left) and Sgt. Deshawn Foifua, , 25th Brigade Su Forward Maintepport Battalion, Combat Team, 25 1st Stryker Brigad th Infantry Divis e io at the brigade’s Quality Assuranc n, do a top-to-bottom inspectio n e Quality Contro to by Brian Schl l checkpoint. (Pho umbohm, Fort W ainwright PAO)


Alaska Post newspaper, January 10, 2014 Vol.5 / No.1  

What's Inside: Fort Wainwright celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Warpath exercise - Stryker Soldiers demonstrate resilient capabilities...

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