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OXFORD T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M M c C U L L O U G H - H Y D E | T R I H E A LT H

WINTER 2019 TRIHEALTH.COM

MARRIED TO MEDICINE ORTHOPEDIC INJURIES HELP FOR INCONTINENCE

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DeWayne Garrod enjoys a complimentary haircut from Patient Care Assistant Jen Mollett.

A LITTLE STYLE GOES A LONG WAY

PATIENT CARE ASSISTANT JEN MOLLETT DONATES EXTRA HOURS EACH WEEK PROVIDING COMPLIMENTARY HAIRCUTS TO PATIENTS. THE CLOCK ON THE WALL in room 2120 at TriHealth’s McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital strikes ten on a sunny Friday morning. As the sunlight pours into the room, a smile crosses the face of 76-year-old DeWayne Garrod. The reason for the smile is two-

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fold. After having spent the last four nights at the hospital, today is the day DeWayne returns home healthy and looking as good as he has in a while. Healthy because of the exceptional care DeWayne has received at McCulloughHyde | TriHealth; looking good because of

the kindness and talent of Patient Care Assistant (PCA) Jen Mollett. Mollett has been a PCA at McCullough-Hyde | TriHealth since 2011. Aside from her three 12-hour shifts during the week, Mollett finds time to donate several hours each week to ensure hospital patients are not only feeling better, but also looking better by providing complimentary haircuts. In a previous life, Mollett cut hair in a salon. Even today, she spends many weekends styling hair for bridal parties. Over the last several years at the hospital, she came across many patients who were longing for either a trim or a full cut. “I love doing it for them, but it’s very rewarding for me as well,” says Mollett as she tidies up DeWayne’s long hair. “I remember my grandmother getting her haircut once a week when I was young and how nice she always looked because her hair looked great. I often think of her while cutting the hair of some of our patients who have either been here a long time, or might be looking at a longer stay.” DeWayne is a regular at the Westside Barbershop in Hamilton, but because of poor health, he has been unable to get to the shop over the last few months. A haircut and beard trim are exactly what he needed. A little later in the morning, DeWayne’s wife would be coming to pick him up and take him home. “She may not recognize you now that we have you all fixed up,” jokes Mollett. “She might walk right past your room, glance in and say, ‘Who’s that good-looking guy in DeWayne’s room?’” “They sure take good care of me here, both inside and out,” says DeWayne.

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Dr. Faisal Adhami and Dr. Sheerin Shatavi (left) and 33 other hospital staff members ran in the “Trick or Trail” 5K run, raising funds for Luna Cares.

GIFTS OF SUPPORT

FOR WOMEN FIGHTING CANCER, LUNA CARES PROVIDES BOTH MUCH-NEEDED PERSONAL CARE ITEMS AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. KRISTINA MARCUM remembers a woman who had just lost her hair after cancer treatment. “She was sobbing,” says Marcum, office coordinator at McCullough Hyde Memorial Hospital’s Leder Oncology Clinic. “She was having a hard time with losing her hair and knew she could not afford a wig.” Enter Luna Cares, a charitable organization that helps Oxford area women who are struggling with cancer. Luna Cares gave this troubled patient a free wig and styling session, together worth about $200. A professional stylist ordered a wig that matched the patient’s natural hair color, then styled the wig and showed her how to maintain it. “The next time she came in wearing the wig, she was beaming,” Marcum recalls. “We could see that a weight had been lifted off her shoulders.” Founded in 2010, Luna Cares has helped many female cancer patients

at McCullough-Hyde | TriHealth lessen the disease’s financial and emotional challenges. “Women with cancer have so many everyday needs to take care of,” says Allyson Cecil, Vice President and Treasurer of Luna Cares. These needs, however, get pushed to the back burner because the patient’s time, energy and finances are sapped by chemotherapy and other cancer treatments. Between 40 and 60 patients each year receive a Luna Cares “wellness basket.” In addition to a coupon for a free wig and styling, it contains everything from lip balm, skin cream and toothbrushes to silk pillowcases and ginger candies to help reduce post-treatment nausea. Luna Cares also provides gift cards for groceries and gasoline, and helps with health insurance premiums, rent or mortgage payments and outstanding treatment bills. “We appreciate the work that Luna

Cares does,” says Marcum, adding that McCullough-Hyde | TriHealth shows its gratitude by participating in Luna Cares fundraisers. In October, 35 hospital staff members ran in the Halloweenthemed “Trick or Trail” 5K run through Oxford, which raised $6,000. The staff, which ran costumed as construction workers (a nod to ongoing renovations at the oncology unit), took the best group costume prize. “We all wore hard hats, safety glasses and safety-yellow T-shirts,” Marcum recalls. “One team member even had the overalls and tool belt.” The weather that day was warm for running, but it was nothing compared with the long, difficult journey a woman with cancer faces. “Women with cancer often feel like they’re walking this road alone,” Marcum says. “Luna Cares lets these patients know that the community cares.”

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TAKE CHARGE OF

INCONTINENCE YOU DON’T HAVE TO LIVE WITH URINARY INCONTINENCE, A COMMON PROBLEM FOR WOMEN.

LET’S BE HONEST. Leaking urine can spoil a lot of moments, from a heartfelt laugh to a personal-best athletic feat. Among women, 25 to 45 percent report at least some urinary incontinence. The good news: It usually doesn’t indicate a serious disease, and excellent treatment options are available.

TWO CAUSES There are two primary types of urinary incontinence. Stress incontinence is when movement, such as coughing, jogging, sneezing or laughing, puts pressure on the bladder and causes leaking. This condition is often brought on by pregnancy or childbirth, which can damage the muscles that control urination. Urge incontinence (leaking) happens when you have a strong, sudden need to urinate. Abnormal bladder contractions caused by incorrect signals from the brain can force urine out of the body. The cause of urge incontinence often cannot be identified, but it can occur with conditions such as diabetes, stroke, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease.

TREATMENT OPTIONS Several treatment alternatives exist for urinary incontinence, depending on its cause. The first step is to see your doctor. He or she will take a medical history and may perform a physical examination and order diagnostic tests, such as blood tests and urine cultures. For stress incontinence, treatments include behavioral and lifestyle changes, Kegel exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor and bladder training. In the area of lifestyle, your doctor may suggest limiting fluids before bedtime or limiting caffeinated beverages, which can make incontinence worse. Excess weight can play a role, so exercise and a healthy diet are important. Medical devices, such as a urethral insert or pessary, can help to physically block urine leakage. Surgery may be an option, although it’s generally seen as a last resort. Treating urge incontinence is

slightly different. A technique called “urgency suppression” can help you manage the need to urinate by training your bladder to maintain control. Biofeedback can help you learn to recognize when your bladder is overactive. In addition, medications are available to relax the bladder. Botox, the drug used to decrease facial wrinkles, can be injected into the bladder to relax the muscle, resulting in a decrease in incontinence.

GETTING HELP The important thing to remember is that urinary incontinence is not something you have to live with. Your doctor can help you find the right treatment option to fit your specific situation and lifestyle.

NEED A PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN? OXFORD INTERNAL MEDICINE IS ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS AT ALL LOCATIONS. FOR AN APPOINTMENT, CALL 513.523.4195.

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LIFESTYLE CHANGES

THAT CAN HELP Maintain a healthy weight. Exercise and choose healthy foods to avoid or reduce excess weight, which can contribute to incontinence. Quit smoking. Smoking can cause coughing, which can make leaking worse. Perform pelvic-floor exercises, such as Kegels, to strengthen the muscles that support the bladder. Limit your intake of beverages containing alcohol and caffeine. Avoid lifting heavy things. Don’t drink a lot of fluids before you exercise or go to bed.

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SPICE

IT

UP!

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LEARN MORE ABOUT TURMERIC, AN ANCIENT SPICE THAT OFFERS INTRIGUING COLOR, FLAVOR AND HEALTH BENEFITS.

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YOU MAY HAVE HEARD about the benefits of turmeric, that yellow-orange spice found abundantly in curries and used for thousands of years in Ayurvedic—East Indian—and Chinese medicine. If you wonder what turmeric can do for you, Tara Kruger, RDN, LD, a dietitian at TriHealth’s McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital, explains why turmeric may be a nice spice to include in your healthy diet.

THE SCIENCE OF TURMERIC Here’s a quick biology primer on turmeric. Curcuminoids are active ingredients in the spice, responsible for that distinctive yellow color. They’re comprised of three compounds, of which curcumin is one. It’s a polyphenol, meaning it acts as an antioxidant to help prevent cellular damage that occurs in cancer and other diseases, as well as during the aging process. Turmeric’s potential medicinal applications have been appreciated for thousands of years. A 2017 review of the current medical literature around turmeric, published in the journal Foods, found that because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, it may help manage conditions such as metabolic syndrome, arthritis and high cholesterol. Caution is recommended when interpreting any findings about curcumin’s anti-inflammatory benefits, says Kruger. That sentiment is echoed by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), which says that studies claiming turmeric helps reduce

inflammation aren’t “strong.” Still, with so much flavor and no downside, you might want to give turmeric a chance.

and uncomfortable skin irritation from breast cancer radiation treatments.

NO MIRACLE CURE

There’s more you need to know about taking turmeric in pill form. “Taking it alone hasn’t been shown to improve health because of its poor bioavailability—very little actually enters your bloodstream,” explains Kruger. One-quarter teaspoon of pepper has been shown to increase the availability of curcumin to the body by 2,000 percent. That’s because of the major active ingredient in black pepper—piperine. Consuming turmeric in curries or in any meal that contains fat also improves its bioavailability.

“It is possible that turmeric might help in terms of decreasing inflammation and pain,” says Kruger. “However, to simply pop a turmeric supplement, continue eating a poor diet, and continue a sedentary lifestyle is not a sound recommendation.” Metabolic syndrome, arthritis and high cholesterol are more common in people who carry excess body fat. “We know that obesity is inflammatory,” says Kruger. “We know that a poor diet containing too much sugar, too much fat, and too many highlyprocessed foods is also inflammatory.” On the other hand, she points out, a healthy diet containing recommended amounts of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein and healthy fat is anti-inflammatory.

ARTHRITIS AND MORE When arthritis occurs, cartilage loss can cause joints to break down, resulting in stiffness, pain and loss of movement. “Some promising studies have shown that the curcumin in turmeric, used alone or in combination with current therapies, is effective in reducing pain and swelling,” says Kruger. In terms of additional applications, NCCIH reports that other preliminary studies have found that curcuminoids may reduce heart attacks after bypass surgery

‘HEAT UP’ CURCUMIN’S BENEFITS

MORE STUDIES NEEDED Kruger cautions that additional research is required before specific recommendations for curcumin intake can be given. “In the meantime, there is no harm and there may be some benefit from including turmeric in everyday food preparation,” she says. “If you plan to take turmeric in supplement form, make sure to tell all your health-care providers about this and any other complementary or integrative health approaches you use,” says Kruger. “Provide each physician a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.”

GET A TURMERIC BOOST

Turmeric Chicken Curry INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

1 tbsp canola oil 1. Chop the garlic and the onion in a food n 2 cloves garlic processor (or by hand) until fine. n 1 medium onion 2. In a large nonstick pan, heat the canola oil. n 1 lb boneless skinless chicken thighs (4 thighs) Add chicken and brown it on all sides for a n½ cup chicken broth few minutes. Add the garlic and onion and MAKES: 4 servings n 1 cup crushed tomatoes saute for about 5 minutes until soft and n 4 tsp ground turmeric fragrant. 1 serving = n ⅛ tsp ground cloves 3. Add the chicken broth, tomatoes, turmeric, 268 calories, n 1 tsp fresh thyme or ½ tsp dried thyme cloves, thyme, salt and pepper. Cover and carbohydrate, Recipe and photo are reprinted with permission from Levant by Rawia Bishara. Photos by Con Poulos. © Kyle12g Books. n ¼ tsp salt simmer for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. 25g protein, n ¼ tsp ground black pepper 4. Serve over rice and sprinkle with fresh 14g fat n 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley parsley if desired. (not including rice) n

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MARRIED TO MEDICINE

Maricor Docena, DO, a rheumatologist, and her husband, Travis Dugger, DO, a general surgeon.

TWO LOCAL PHYSICIANS SHARE THE CHALLENGES AND JOYS OF BEING MARRIED TO ANOTHER DOCTOR.

BEING A DOCTOR is such an allencompassing job that spouses often lament about the grueling schedules and the immersion that the profession demands. But this isn’t a problem for Maricor Docena, DO, rheumatologist, or Travis Dugger, DO, general surgeon, who found a solution to these challenges when they married each other. Dr. Dugger, who works along with his wife at TriHealth’s McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital in Oxford, says: “The hardest thing about being married to a doctor is the schedule; and the best thing about being married to a doctor is that you understand it.” The couple met when they both attended medical school at Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine in Athens, Ohio. While Dr. Dugger was the first in his family to enter medicine, Dr. Docena comes from a medical family. Her father had a small-town family practice, where her mother was his nurse and

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Dr. Docena served as the receptionist for several years while growing up. She was inspired by the close bonds and lifelong relationships that existed between her family and their patients. In fact, the warm community atmosphere of McCullough-Hyde | TriHealth, along with the patient-centered care that’s part of the hospital’s ethos, are key components that drew the couple there. Dr. Docena values building bonds with her patients, giving time and attention to those who’ve often suffered for years from the chronic pain of rheumatologic conditions, such as lupus and osteoarthritis. “My patients’ symptoms have sometimes been written off or ignored. I’m always touched when they thank me for listening to them and working hard to find a solution.” As a general surgeon, Dr. Dugger also prizes the satisfaction of making a difference in his patients’ lives. One of his most memorable encounters was

treating an out-of-state truck driver who fell ill from a life-threatening infection while passing through their area. After Dr. Dugger performed surgery to remove the infection, the man needed to remain in the hospital over Christmas. When Dr. Dugger realized that his patient would be alone, far from home and family, he joined him for Christmas in the hospital, watching LeBron James play basketball on TV at his bedside. Dr. Docena radiates pride as her husband recounts this incident: Who but another doctor could so deeply relate to the power of this kind of care and all it means for both patient and doctor? While being “married to medicine” both at work and at home can be difficult, Dr. Docena and Dr. Dugger agree: Any challenges are far outweighed by the benefits of sharing a dedication to compassionate care and an understanding of the many rewards of practicing medicine.

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G COOL

KEEPING LITTLE HANDS CLEAN ISN’T ALWAYS EASY. USE OUR TIPS TO TEACH KIDS HEALTHY HANDWASHING HABITS.

WASHING UP isn’t hard to do, though children may make it feel that way. Experts recommend cleaning hands for 20 seconds with warm water and soap. But how do you get little ones to stay at the sink that long? These ideas will help.

a fun scent, like gingerbread, grape or bubblegum. Once the routine is established, you can always go back to using a more economical soap.

MAKE IT INVITING

KEEP THEM WASHING

Equip the bathroom and kitchen with a handy step stool if needed. Then make sure soap and a towel are within easy reach of child-sized arms. Paint the kids’ bathroom a color they love or hang pictures of their favorite animals to make the space feel warm and welcoming.

To make sure kids spend enough time washing tops and bottoms of hands, as well as between fingers, have them sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice through at normal speed—it’s not a race! An egg timer can work, too.

FIND THEIR MOTIVATION Consider buying a liquid soap that caters to kids. Some children love foaming soaps; others are more motivated to wash if their favorite cartoon character is on the dispenser. Still others may love

ROCK THOSE ROUTINES Children like structure. Routines help them understand what’s expected and then remember to do it. Especially when started at a young age, routines will continue long after your reminding has stopped. One example: Create a routine that everyone washes their hands first thing after returning home, whether it’s from school, work or playing at a friend’s house.

SHOULD YOU USE

ANTIBACTERIAL SOAPS? According to the Centers for Disease Control, washing with plain soap and water reduces bacteria on hands by 82 percent and helps keep people from coming down with colds, flu and gastrointestinal illnesses. Is antibacterial soap even better? The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says no and has banned most of the antibacterial agents used in consumer soaps. Why? Because they haven’t been proven more effective than regular soap and there are questions about safety for both humans and the environment. You may still see antibacterial products on store shelves because a few antibacterial agents have not yet been banned—the FDA has given manufacturers another year to prove they’re more effective at protecting health than plain soap.

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ORTHOPEDIC INJURIES: WHEN TO SEEK CARE MOST OF US EXPERIENCE EVERYDAY INJURIES FROM TIME TO TIME. SHOULD YOU SEEK MEDICAL CARE? THIS GUIDE WILL HELP YOU DECIDE. EVEN THE MOST coordinated among us will likely experience injury at various times in our lives: an overzealous serve on the tennis court; a simple trip over an unnoticed obstacle; aching knees from…who knows what. Most often, these types of common injuries can be treated at home with rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE), and maybe an over-the-counter pain reliever. In some situations, however, it’s important to see an orthopedic doctor—a specialist who treats injuries and diseases of the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, nerves and tendons. Why? Because some conditions can get much worse if not treated quickly and properly. In the knee, one such condition is an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms can include hearing a “pop” during the injury, immediate inability to continue activity, knee swelling in the first 24 hours and knee instability. If you experience any of these symptoms, it’s best to see a doctor as soon as possible. Hip problems are also common and can lead to serious complications if not Bryan P. McCullough, DO treated. Always consult your physician

for personal medical advice, but a general rule is to seek medical help for hip pain that came on suddenly or is the result of a fall. Other red flags include hip pain that occurs at night or when resting; swelling, redness or warmth around the joint; not being able to put weight on the hip; and not being able to move the leg or hip. Eighty percent of people will experience back pain in their lifetime. Most cases resolve themselves with a day or two of rest, application of heat or cold to the painful area, and over-the-counter pain medication. However, see a doctor if you have tingling or numbness, if the pain is the result of a fall or injury, or if the pain is severe and doesn’t improve with rest. In addition, seek medical care if back pain occurs with unintended weight loss, with fever, with swelling or redness on the back, or if it spreads down one or both legs. Not every injury or pain requires a trip to the doctor, but in the situations outlined above, getting prompt treatment can mean the difference between a quick recovery and a lifelong problem. As always, these are guidelines, not rules. TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WITH ORTHOPEDIC AND SPORTS MEDICINE SPECIALIST BRYAN P. M c CULLOUGH, DO, CALL 513.856.5971.

WHEN TO

SEE A DOCTOR Make an appointment if you experience: • Chronic pain; anything lasting longer than 12 weeks • Range of motion that becomes more limited • Instability while walking or standing • Difficulty performing everyday activities, such as walking the dog or using stairs • A soft-tissue injury, like a sprain or twisted ankle, that doesn’t improve despite applying RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation)

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THE

AGE FACTOR After age 40, people are more likely to experience an orthopedic injury. These are most common: • TENNIS ELBOW Weak grip strength and pain or burning sensation outside the elbow • STRESS FRACTURES Minor hairline fractures caused by impact and overuse, common in runners • LOWER-BACK PAIN Caused by obesity, arthritis, loss of bone density and a sedentary lifestyle • ROTATOR-CUFF TEARS Sore shoulder or limited mobility caused by normal wear and tear in athletes and as people age • MENISCUS AND ACL TEARS Pain in the knee that can be caused by everyday activities like hiking, kneeling or walking down stairs

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TriHealth’s two Butler County hospitals have earned “A” safety ratings from the Leapfrog Group.* When patients come through the doors of our hospitals we know they not only deserve top-notch, quality care, they also need peace of mind. That’s why we’re committed to meeting the highest possible standards and providing the safest, most comfortable environments.

Discover all the award-winning care we’re bringing to Butler County. Visit TriHealth.com

* The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade uses 27 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to assign grades.

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Profile for Wainscot Media

Oxford Health & Life: Winter 2019  

The Good Living Magazine from McCULLOUGH-HYDE|TRIHEALTH

Oxford Health & Life: Winter 2019  

The Good Living Magazine from McCULLOUGH-HYDE|TRIHEALTH