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OXFORD SUMMER 2018

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CANCER CARE: IT TAKES A TEAM GIVING THE GIFT OF LIFE SUMMER SKIN SAFETY

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

Giving the GIFT OF LIFE

WHEN ALAN OAK NEEDED A KIDNEY, HIS DAUGHTERS STEPPED UP TO SAVE HIS LIFE.

TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WITH A NEPHROLOGIST, PLEASE CALL NEPHROLOGY ASSOCIATES OF SOUTHWEST OHIO (DR. PIUS MANAVALAN) AT 513 863 8212.

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ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION exists in a realm somewhere between magic and science fiction for many of us. Even though transplants have become wellestablished procedures, we still marvel at the adaptability of the human body as well as the art of such surgery. Kidney transplants are one of the most common U.S. transplant surgeries. While most of us can live healthy, normal lives with only a single kidney, we are equipped with two. However, locating the right donor match for a patient who needs a kidney is often a difficult, time-consuming task. Alan Oak, a 71-year-old kidneytransplant patient from Oxford, is well aware how challenging it can be to locate a suitable donor, whether living or deceased. Born with undersized kidneys, Alan had been seeing his nephrologist for 12 years before it was recommended he be placed on the United Network for Organ Sharing in 2016 for a deceased donor organ. At that time, the national list had more than 100,000 patients and a five- to six-year waiting time for someone his age. For many years, Alan has played an active role at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth, so he

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understands both medical administration and the commitment and dedication that enables a hospital to provide quality, compassionate care. As a board member at McCulloughHyde, he has been instrumental in forging a partnership between the hospital and TriHealth, linking the small, caring hospital community with the power and scope of TriHealth’s robust healthcare system. Alan and his wife, Diane, were both long-term volunteers involved in the renovation and expansion of McCullough-Hyde. After a year on the donor waiting list, Alan’s kidney condition had declined. His doctors at a transplant center in Cincinnati suggested that he find a kidney from a living donor, which typically lasts longer and provides better function. But asking anyone, including a family member, to donate an organ is often a difficult task. Several family members were tested but ultimately disqualified. As a result, Alan and Diane’s daughter Darci began a national marketing campaign on her father’s behalf. It included a Facebook page, where she chronicled her father’s quest and raised awareness about organ donation

and what is involved. She and her team of “Alan’s Advocates” across the country posted flyers, yard signs, car magnets and contact cards in nearby communities, as well as messages and photos on Twitter and Instagram. Their efforts drew media attention and were shared on local television. Over time, their work bore tangible fruit. As Darci wrote to her followers: “Because of your efforts, the transplant team is receiving numerous calls a day from people stepping up to begin the donor evaluation process….” But they were still without a suitable match for Alan, and a port for dialysis was scheduled to be inserted. It was at this juncture that, amazingly, Alan’s younger daughter, Alison, who had previously been tested and disqualified, discovered that she was indeed a match. She had felt led to return to the transplant team and ask to re be rreevaluated. To everyone’s surprised delight, she was approved this time to delig be h her father’s donor. On April 10, 2018, Alison gave her O father the gift of life. The transplant was fath successful, and the entire Oak family is suc most thankful. mo

Alan and Diane Oak (seated) with their family, wearing “Share Your Spare!” T-shirts to help spread the word about the value of kidney donation.

KIDNEY DONATION FACTS • Each day, 13 people die while waiting for a kidney transplant. • There is no cost for a donor to donate an organ. Typically, insurance pays for transplant testing and surgery. • Living kidney donors usually range from 21 to 65 years old. • After donation, the life expectancy of a donor is the same as for someone with two kidneys. • For more information on becoming a kidney donor, visit the National Kidney Foundation online at www.kidney.org.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH } NEW OXFORD PEDIATRICIAN

OXFORD PEDIATRICS & ADOLESCENTS WELCOMES A NEW PHYSICIAN THE WELL-KNOWN and trusted practice Oxford Pediatrics & Adolescents recently joined with McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth. At the same time, the practice has welcomed a new pediatrician, Sofia Gofman, M.D., who is now accepting new patients. Dr. Gofman relocated with her family to Oxford from Forest Hills, N.Y., where she has been in private practice since 1995. She brings decades of experience and a lifelong passion for pediatrics to her patients at McCullough-Hyde and throughout the region. “I offer general practice, including everything from checkups to dermatology and behavioral assessments,” says Dr. Gofman. “I knew I wanted to be a pediatrician from the time I was three years old. I just love working with kids.” After deciding to move to the Oxford area, Dr. Gofman was excited to find a place at Oxford Pediatrics & Adolescents and MHMH. “I really like the atmosphere, and the staff is highly qualified and professional,” she says. “Everyone has been so friendly, welcoming and helpful, and I love all my patients.”

SOFIA GOFMAN, M.D. NEW OXFORD SURGEON

TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH OXFORD PEDIATRICS & ADOLESCENTS, CALL 513 523 2156.

NEW GENERAL SURGEON JOINING McCULLOUGH-HYDE McCULLOUGH-HYDE Memorial Hospital | TriHealth is welcoming a new general surgeon, Travis Dugger, D.O., to its general surgery team. Dr. Dugger is an Ohio native from Lima, and his wife is a rheumatologist from nearby Hamilton. “We love this area so much—it’s exactly the type of small town I trained in,” says Dr. Dugger. “We’re both excited to join the community.” Dr. Dugger attended medical school at Ohio University’s Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine in Athens, and he recently completed his general surgery residency at Western Reserve Hospital in Cuyahoga Falls. As a new general surgeon, Dr. Dugger brings a passion for the latest advances in surgical procedures. “A big focus in my training and residency has been minimally invasive and laparoscopic procedures,” he says. “I look forward to getting to know patients in the community and making a positive impact in their lives.”

TRAVIS DUGGER, D.O.

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BEGINNING IN AUGUST, DR. DUGGER WILL SEE PATIENTS AT: 5241 MORNING SUN RD., OXFORD, OHIO 45056. FOR AN APPOINTMENT, CALL 513 523 1844.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

IT TAKES A TEAM

FOR DAVID WILSON, CARE THAT WAS SEAMLESSLY COORDINATED BETWEEN SEVERAL PHYSICIANS IN MULTIPLE CENTERS RESULTED IN A FAST, ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS THAT ENABLED TREATMENT FOR HIS BRAIN CANCER TO BEGIN WITHOUT DELAY. THE NEUROPHYSIOLOGIST took stock of his neurological symptoms. Last September, while on a visit to Washington, D.C., he emerged from a tour of the Supreme Court and noticed what felt like a weather change. “It was no big deal, except that my right arm felt so different than my left arm,” recalls David Wilson, Ph.D., a retired professor of zoology at Miami University. “It felt as if it was being pelted by ice or sleet. And yet I knew it couldn’t be.”

MAKING SENSE OF SYMPTOMS He experienced numbness in his hand. He wondered whether he had carpel tunnel. The numbness spread to his elbow. Could it be a pinched nerve? Then, while working in his yard, Dr. Wilson felt the numbness spread up to his neck and face. “It scared me,” he says. “I thought I might be having a stroke.” Dr. Wilson’s wife, Susan, drove him to the emergency room at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital. The symptoms vanished, and he told the emergency room doctor that he needed to leave as he was expected at a function for a Dale Horne, M.D., Ph.D. Miami University Neurosurgeon

institution partially named in his honor, the Thomas H. Mallory and David F. Wilson Center for Healthcare Education. “It’s obviously a pinched nerve,” David Wilson, Ph.D. he told the doctor, Nicole White, M.D. “It doesn’t look as though you had a stroke,” she agreed. “But you thought you had a stroke, so we at least need to do a CT scan to make sure.” Dr. Wilson would later commend Dr. White for her thoroughness. Not even he, the neurophysiologist, could see what was coming. The CT scan revealed “something” in his brain, and an MRI was immediately ordered. Edward Crane, M.D., a TriHealth cancer expert, was working at McCullough-Hyde that afternoon. After analyzing the MRI, he made a preliminary diagnosis—brain cancer— and referred Dr. Wilson to Dale Horne, M.D., Ph.D., a neurosurgeon at Mayfield Brain & Spine, for a biopsy. An hour after a diagnosis of probable brain cancer, Dr. Wilson headed to Miami University’s Goggin Ice Center for the Mallory-Wilson function, thinking to himself: “What else am I going to do tonight?”

GETTING THE DIAGNOSIS RIGHT In cancer care, an accurate diagnosis means optimal treatment, including personalized targeting of the cancer variant. Dr. Horne did an open biopsy, making a one-inch craniotomy, exposing the tumor and extracting a tissue sample that a neuropathologist could examine. The diagnosis came back as a central nervous system lymphoma, a fastgrowing cancer whose cells form in the brain’s lymph tissue. Because the incision was small, Dr. Wilson was able to start chemotherapy the next week. Dr. Wilson is grateful for the expert care provided by Dr. Horne and the other physicians who have been part of his treatment team. “I’m convinced that I’m getting the best possible care,” he says. “I’m at a wonderful medical center. I have a wonderful team of doctors. I love the fact that the physicians are all talking to each other even though they work at different locations.”

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{ TASTES }

Granola BISCOTTI

PART BISCOTTI BUT MOSTLY GRANOLA, THESE BARS ARE FULL OF OATS, NUTS, COCONUT AND DRIED FRUIT. JUST BARELY SWEETENED, THEY’RE THE IDEAL COMPANION TO YOUR BEST BREAKFAST INTENTIONS. INGREDIENTS n

1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for your work surface 1½ cups plus 2 tablespoons rolled oats n 1 teaspoon baking powder n ¼ teaspoon baking soda n ½ teaspoon table or fine sea salt n 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, or virgin coconut oil, warmed until liquefied n ¼ cup granulated or raw (turbinado) sugar n ¼ cup light- or dark-brown sugar n 2 large eggs n ½ teaspoon vanilla extract (optional) n ½ cup thinly sliced almonds n ½ cup shredded unsweetened coconut n 1 cup dried fruit of your choice, such as raisins, cranberries, cherries, or chopped dried apricots or figs, or a mix thereof n 1 egg white n

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MAKES 36 BISCOTTI

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DIRECTIONS Mix the flour, rolled oats, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a small bowl. Whisk the melted butter and sugars in the bottom of a large bowl. Whisk in the eggs and vanilla. Stir in the dry ingredients, nuts, coconut and dried fruit. Expect a stiff batter. Position a rack in the center of the oven, and heat to 325 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. On a floured counter, using floured hands roll half the dough into a log a little shy of the length of your baking sheet, 12 to 14 inches. Transfer the dough log to the baking sheet, and pat lightly until it becomes more oval-shaped. Repeat with the second half of the dough. Beat

the egg white until foamy and brush it over logs. Bake the logs for 20 minutes, until they are lightly golden brown and beginning to form cracks. Let cool almost completely (it’s okay if the centers are still lukewarm), about 1 hour. With a serrated knife, cut the logs on the bias into ½ -inch-thick slices. They will be crumbly; cut as gently as possible. Transfer the slices back to the parchment-lined baking sheet, and lay flat in a single layer. Bake for another 20 minutes, until toasted and crisp. (If you like, you can flip them halfway for more even browning, but you will have good color on them either way.) Cool the biscotti on the baking sheet, or transfer to a rack.

DO AHEAD: Biscotti keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 weeks, and longer if well wrapped in the freezer. NOTE: This recipe should prove very tweakable; you could use cinnamon, or almond extract, add citrus zest, vary the fruits and sweeteners. You could swap half the flour for whole wheat or even oat flour. Or you could add some chocolate chips. Who could blame you?

Excerpted from Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant and Unfussy New Favorites. Copyright © 2017 by Deb Perelman. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission from the publisher.

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EXERCISE: Don’t Go It Alone RESEARCH SHOWS THAT SOCIAL SUPPORT FROM FAMILY AND FRIENDS CAN HELP YOU KEEP YOUR FITNESS ROUTINE ON TRACK. WE’VE ALL BEEN THERE—those days when your get-up-and-go went elsewhere, leaving you with a long list of possible excuses not to exercise, from “I have more important things to get done today” to “It’s raining” or “Skipping one day won’t hurt.” But getting off track on your fitness routine can impact your health. Regular exercise reduces your risk for a host of diseases, including diabetes, stroke, heart disease and cancer (see sidebar).

HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two hours and 30 minutes of aerobic activity that’s of at least moderate intensity (for example, brisk walking) per week. That’s about the amount of time you might spend watching just one movie. Another way to break it down is 30 minutes of activity five days a week. But you can exercise in increments as small as 10 minutes each, if that works better for you, and still reap health benefits. Recommended in addition to aerobic activity: two or more days a week of muscle-strengthening activities that work all the major muscle groups.

TEAM UP FOR SUCCESS Fortunately, research shows there’s a reliable way to help ensure that you exercise consistently: Get yourself some social and emotional support. When you exercise with a family member or close friend, you’re more likely to stick to your fitness commitment. If you can’t exercise together, just talking about your fitness

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activities, successes and challenges can help you stay the course. Even having someone to complain to when you don’t feel like heading to the gym or out for a walk is beneficial. Once you’ve started exercising consistently, practical support also can help. For example, teaming up with someone who is willing to give you a ride to the gym when you need it, or who remembers your fitness-accessory wish list when your birthday rolls around.

POTENTIAL PITFALLS Studies have found that it’s equally important to avoid negative support—those friends or family members who repeatedly remind you that you may injure yourself, for example. Another important caveat: Don’t let a spouse or anyone else take away your autonomy by telling you when to exercise or what you should be doing. Studies show that when people feel pressured to be physically active, they avoid it. Instead, set a plan that will work for you and ask others to support you and your chosen approach.

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PHYSICAL ACTIVITY & HEALTH REGULAR, MODERATE EXERCISE is one of the best things you can do to protect your health. The many benefits of consistent physical activity include reduced risk of: • Obesity • Cardiovascular disease • Type 2 diabetes • Cancer (some types) • Osteoporosis • Depression • Falls as you age

YOGA IN THE PARK Bring a friend or make a new one at Oxford Uptown Park’s Yoga in the Park, offered 9–10 a.m. every Saturday, June 9 to September 29. McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth is pleased to be a sponsor of this free program. All ages are welcome. Bring a yoga mat and some water. On August 4 and 11, class will be held at Lewis Place. No class September 1 (Labor Day), and class will be canceled if it’s raining.

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TIPS FOR SUMMER SKIN SAFETY TO REDUCE YOUR RISK OF MELANOMA, KEEP THE SUN’S HARMFUL RAYS AT BAY.

AFTER SHIVERING THROUGH this year’s hard winter, we all want to rush outdoors and enjoy summer’s warmth. Before you do, though, remember to protect your body’s largest organ: your skin. The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can damage your skin in as little as 15 minutes. “Too much exposure to the sun can put you at risk for melanoma, the most dangerous kind of skin cancer,” says Kathie Gilmore, R.N., M.S., C.N.P., of Premier Plastic Surgery and Dermatology. “It can also prematurely age the skin.” Fortunately, a few precautions can help keep your family safe outdoors:

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SLATHER ON THE SUNSCREEN. “Using

sunscreen is critical for protecting your skin,” says Gilmore. Sunscreen contains chemicals that, when absorbed by the skin, reflect or scatter sunlight’s UV rays. Their effectiveness is rated by a number called a sun protection factor (SPF): the higher the number, the more protective the product. Gilmore recommends a “broad spectrum” product with an SPF of at least 30. “Broad spectrum” means a sunscreen that protects against both kinds of ultraviolet rays, UVA and UVB. But the SPF isn’t the only thing

to check. “If your sunscreen is left over from last year, check the expiration date,” advises Gilmore. Sunscreen works best if you put it on 30 minutes before you go outside. And reapply it every two hours—hourly if you’ve been swimming or perspiring heavily. “I’m not a big fan of spray sunscreens,” says Gilmore. “Some people just spray them in the air and step into the spray as if it’s perfume. That doesn’t do the job.”

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DRESS FOR SKIN SUCCESS. “Anyone out in the sun should dress appropriately,”

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COULD THE ALPHABET SAVE YOUR SKIN?

DERMATOLOGY IN OXFORD Kathie Gilmore, R.N., M.S., C.N.P,. of Premier Plastic Surgery and Dermatology sees patients at McCulloughHyde on Fridays. Location: 110 North Poplar St., Clinic 2. To make an appointment, call 937 438 5333.

Kathie Gilmore, R.N., M.S., C.N.P.

Premier Plastic Surgery and Dermatology.

cap, protect your ears and your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, by using sunscreen with at least SPF 30 and/or by staying in the shade as much as possible.

MELANOMA:

THE STATS In 2017, there were

87,110

new cases of melanoma in the U.S. Melanoma accounts for only a small percentage of skin-cancer cases, but is responsible for most skincancer deaths. There were

9,730

deaths from melanoma in 2017. Source: National Cancer Institute

Gilmore advises. Clothing, especially loose-fitting, long-sleeved shirts and long pants made from tightly woven fabric, offers protection from the sun’s UV rays. When you’re at the beach, try to wear a T-shirt or a beach cover-up when you aren’t in the water. And remember that wet T-shirts are less protective than dry. Keep your head and face covered as well. You’ll get the most protection from a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, your ears and the back of your neck. Choose tightly woven fabrics such as canvas in preference to straw hats. And if you favor a baseball

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KEEP AN EYE ON YOUR EYES. Sunburned eyes are at increased risk for cataracts, so wear sunglasses that protect your eyes from UV rays. They also protect the tender skin around your eyes from sun exposure. Wraparound sunglasses are a great choice, because they prevent UV rays from sneaking in from the side.

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SHUN THE BRIGHTEST SUN. “Avoid the peak hours

from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. as much as possible,” says Gilmore. When you are out in the midday sun, you can reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by seeking shade under an umbrella, a tree or other shelter.

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The incidence of melanoma is on the rise, says Kathie Gilmore, R.N., M.S., C.N.P., of Premier Plastic Surgery and Dermatology. “Thankfully, though, that is largely due to better detection,” she says. “So although the absolute numbers are increasing, the lesions are often caught when they are thinner, which is a good thing. Thinner melanomas are easier to treat with less extensive surgery, and the chance of their spreading is lower.” See a dermatologist if any problem area on your skin worries you. Specifically, says Gilmore, get checked out if you notice any of these “ABCDE” signs in a wart or mole:

Asymmetry: One half is unlike the other half.

Border: There’s a scalloped, poorly defined or otherwise irregular boundary.

CHECK IT OUT. Your skin, that

is. “Inspect your skin regularly, and if anything changes or gives you concern, show your doctor or a dermatologist,” says Gilmore. Examine your skin during showers and in the mirror for moles that change or look abnormal, and ask a loved one to inspect hard-to-see areas such as your back and neck. And don’t forget to check your scalp, especially if you’re a man with thinning hair. (See the sidebar, “Could the Alphabet Save Your Skin?”)

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More than 3.5 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed yearly in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society. But only a small percentage of these are melanoma, the most serious kind of skin cancer.

Color: The hue varies from one area to another, has shades of tan, brown or black, or is sometimes red, white or blue. Diameter: The diameter is greater than 6 millimeters, roughly the size of a pencil eraser.

BE A ROLE MODEL. “Some

parents zealously protect their children’s skin but neglect their own,” says Gilmore. “Set a good example for your kids by taking care of your skin, too.”

Evolving: The skin lesion is changing in size, shape or color.

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This moment of tranquility made possible by 3D mammography. TriHealth was the 1st to bring 3D mammography to the greater Cincinnati region. McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth continues our strong commitment to the Oxford region with the addition of 3D mammography technology. Now residents don’t have to travel far to take advantage of technology that gives a more accurate image, reduces false positives, requires fewer biopsies and detects abnormalities with greater accuracy.

Early detection saves lives— schedule your 3D mammography screening by calling 513 524 5555 or by visiting TriHealth.com/MHMH.

Actor portrayal

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Oxford Health & Life: Summer 2018  

THE GOOD LIVING MAGAZINE FROM McCULLOUGH-HYDE | TRIHEALTH

Oxford Health & Life: Summer 2018  

THE GOOD LIVING MAGAZINE FROM McCULLOUGH-HYDE | TRIHEALTH