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OXFORD SUMMER 2019

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BREASTFEEDING SUCCESS RELIEF FROM SUMMER ALLERGIES A NEW SPACE FOR HEALING

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BEST NURSING STRATEGIES • Let your baby set the feeding schedule. Most babies feed every two to three hours for a total of eight to 12 times in 24 hours. • Pay attention to hunger signs. Babies indicate they’re hungry when they look alert and bring their fingers to their mouths. This is the time to offer a feeding. • Don’t neglect your own needs. Moms need an extra 450 to 500 calories while breastfeeding. Be sure to consume fruits, vegetables and grains and drink plenty of water. • Watch for signs of trouble. Issues like engorgement and pain are not normal. If you experience any problems, contact a lactation consultant.

SUCCEED AT

BREASTFEEDING WITH THE RIGHT SUPPORT, A NEW MOM CAN BE A PRO IN NO TIME.

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HAVING A BABY is one of life’s most joyous experiences. But it can also be overwhelming— especially when it comes to learning the art of breastfeeding. While about 83 percent of infants are breastfed at some point, only 58 percent are nursed at six months and just 36 percent are breastfed at one year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life and that breastfeeding continues, along with the introduction of complementary foods, for one year or longer. “This is the natural way to feed a tiny human,” says Janet Feazell, a lactation consultant and perinatal educator at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital (MHMH).

PROVIDING CRITICAL SUPPORT To help new moms succeed at nursing, MHMH has four International Board Certified Lactation Consultants, lactation counselors, registered nurses and physicians on staff. The hospital also offers “Baby Bound,” a childbirth education program that provides, among other things, breastfeeding education. A nurse meets with expectant parents to provide information and instruction. “At McCullough-Hyde, we want a woman to be successful in all of her goals, from her birth plan to her feeding plan,” says Feazell. “So we teach moms about breastfeeding.

Far left: Nicole White, MD, an Emergency Department physician at McCullough-Hyde, with her twins and husband. Left: Nurses and lactation consultants, such as Rachelle Downing, RN, and Mary Wagner, RN (left to right), are available to assist new parents.

This gives expectant moms a good idea of what to expect and how to tackle any issues that may come up.” In addition, two days after a mom and baby are discharged from the hospital, they return for a well visit. “We provide a checklist to see how things are going and help new moms with breastfeeding-related issues like engorgement and trouble latching,” says Feazell. Nicole White, MD, an Emergency Department physician at MHMH and the mother of a 4-year-old and 3-month-old twins, took advantage of the hospital’s support. “In the beginning, it was challenging to trust that my body would know to make enough milk for not just one baby this time around, but two,” she says. “But the lactation consultants were helpful whenever I had questions and supported me in my desire to breastfeed twins.” Dr. White recommends that new moms ask for support when they need it. “Whether it’s through the hospital lactation consultants, breastfeeding support groups, La Leche League or friends and family, it really helps,” she says. “Breastfeeding may not be for everyone, but if a woman has the desire, it’s doable. You can be successful.”

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT BABY BOUND, CALL 513.524.5689. TO CONTACT THE OXFORD LA LECHE LEAGUE, CALL 513.461.0331.

KEY HEALTH BENEFITS August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month, which encourages nursing. There are many important health benefits for both babies and moms:

FOR BABY • Provides optimal nutrition (just the right amount of fat, sugar, water, protein and minerals). As the baby’s nutritional needs change, so does the composition of the milk. • Offers protection against illness, such as ear infections. • Lowers the risk of developing type 1 and type 2 diabetes. • Reduces the chance of developing certain cancers, such as lymphoma and leukemia. • Promotes a healthy weight later in life. Childhood obesity rates are 15 to 30 percent lower in babies who are breastfed than those who are formula fed.

FOR MOM • Leads to less postpartum bleeding. • Promotes weight loss after childbirth. Breastfeeding helps new moms return to their pre-pregnancy weight sooner. • Lowers the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers. • Saves money. Breastfeeding costs less than formula feeding.

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A NEW SPACE FOR HEALING ONE PATIENT IS GRATEFUL FOR THE SUPPORTIVE, COMFORTABLE CARE SHE RECEIVED IN THE NEW INFUSION CENTER.

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WHAT’S AN INFUSION? An infusion is a procedure for delivering medications or other fluids, including chemotherapy, to a patient intravenously. After a patient receives an intravenous line, an infusion pump steadily releases the fluid from an infusion bag. A patient may receive a single medication or a combination of therapies depending on his or her treatment plan. Some infusions may only take minutes, while others last a few hours or longer. So most infusion centers have private, comfortable places for patients to sit while they’re being treated. Sabrina England with healthcare professionals who work in the infusion center. Left to right: Jeanna Kinney, RN, Kristina Marcum, Sabrina and Rebecka Sayne-Meyer, RN.

SABRINA ENGLAND WAS SHOCKED when she received a colon cancer diagnosis after a checkup last year. “I never get sick, and I’m the kind of person who’s always taking care of everyone else,” says Sabrina, 64, a retired nurse, mother, grandmother and primary caregiver for her paralyzed brother, a veteran who served the country in Vietnam. Sabrina chose to have surgery at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital (MHMH) immediately. The surgical team removed the tumor from her bowel. Afterward, under the guidance of her physician, Seerin Viviane Shatavi, MD, a hematologist and oncologist at MHMH, Sabrina started a course of chemotherapy to destroy any remaining cancer cells. “Her chemotherapy has been a curative attempt,” says Dr. Shatavi.

A CHEERFUL ENVIRONMENT Initially, Sabrina received her chemotherapy treatments, known as infusions, on the second floor of the hospital while the infusion center at MHMH was being updated. (In addition

to chemotherapy, the infusion center provides IV antibiotics, blood products and bone density and iron deficiency treatments.) The renovations involved expanding the infusion center and oncology clinic. “We’ve grown our oncology services, so we needed more room for everyone—doctors, nurses and patients,” says Sharon Klein, Director of Employee and Community Wellness at MHMH. “Patients seem to appreciate the updated infusion chairs. They’re heated and recline into a full bed. Also, each private infusion bay has extra seating for friends and family.” In addition, the bays include TVs and Wi-Fi for patients’ enjoyment. After the renovations were complete, Sabrina continued chemotherapy in the new space. “It’s bigger and more beautiful, and it’s such a cheerful environment,” she recalls. “To me, the best part is that family members can sit with you during treatments.” Last December, in the midst of chemotherapy, Sabrina suffered the tragic loss of her husband to a motorcycle accident. There was an outpouring of support from the staff at

the infusion center. “I’m so thankful to them,” she says. “They’ve all been so wonderful.”

COMPREHENSIVE, CONVENIENT CARE To provide high-quality care close to patients’ homes, MHMH is steadily expanding its oncology services. The hospital offers advanced imaging for breast, colon and other cancers. It also provides the latest surgery and chemotherapy options. In addition, genetic counseling is available to patients via telemedicine. “At the Cancer Center, we provide everything from screening and diagnosis in the clinic to treatments in the new, large-capacity infusion center,” says Dr. Shatavi. “I’m proud of the facility, but I’m even more proud of my team members—especially the nurses, who provide great care by putting our patients first.” Sabrina is grateful for the care she’s received at MHMH and is eager to return to spending time with her brother and grandchildren. Says Sabrina: “I’m hopeful that Dr. Shatavi will say I’m cancer-free after my last infusion.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE INFUSION CENTER, CALL 513.524.5540.

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PEDIATRICIAN EXTRAORDINAIRE AN OXFORD PHYSICIAN IS HONORED FOR HIS EXPERTISE, AS WELL AS HIS SERVICE AND COMMITMENT TO THE COMMUNITY.

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DAVID FEAZELL, MD, still recalls the first time he needed major medical care. He was a teenager, and he was diagnosed with a collapsed lung. He spent several days at McCulloughHyde Memorial Hospital, where his pediatrician, James Davis, MD, diagnosed and treated him. “Dr. Davis stayed calm and confident throughout the experience, and he reassured me

that I was going to get better,” says Dr. Feazell. The way Dr. Davis treated Dr. Feazell inspired him to become a physician himself. Today, Dr. Feazell is a pediatrician at UCLA Health’s Santa Monica Pediatrics in Los Angeles. In May, he returned to Ohio to present the Cincinnati Pediatric Society’s Community Pediatrician Recognition Award to Dr. Davis,

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KEEP KIDS SAFE Everyone looks forward to enjoying quality family time in the summer. To make the most of it, heed these tips from James Davis, MD, a pediatrician at Oxford Pediatrics:

Left to right: David Feazell, MD, with his mentor, James Davis, MD, who received the Cincinnati Pediatric Society’s Community Pediatrician Recognition Award, and Phil Lichtenstein, MD, a member of the Society’s Executive Committee who co-presented the award with Dr. Feazell.

who was recognized for his service, commitment and expertise. “It’s a wonderful honor to be recognized by my peers in this way,” says Dr. Davis. “Words can’t describe how honored and humbled I feel. Having David present the award is also an honor. He is the only person who has known me from all sides of my career. As a child, he was my patient. He worked with me in my office when he was in medical school, and now he is a respected colleague.”

A DISTINGUISHED CAREER The award recognizes Dr. Davis for the 40 years of experience he brings to the community as a pediatrician. He has cared for children from Oxford and nearby towns and has watched many of them grow up alongside his own four children through his practice, Oxford Pediatrics, and as a member of the community he serves. Not only does he see patients at his office and treat them in the hospital, but he also participates in academic research to improve patient care. After graduating from Harvard University in 1975, Dr. Davis attended the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He completed his pediatrics residency at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. In addition to his clinical work,

he serves as chapter coordinator for Pediatric Research in Office Settings, a practice-based research network for the American Academy of Pediatrics. He’s also the associate director of the Cincinnati Pediatric Research group.

A SPECIAL BOND Dr. Feazell says he was honored to present the award to Dr. Davis. “It was exciting to see him recognized with this award,” he says. “Over the years, Dr. Davis has been a powerful mentor and role model for me.” When Dr. Feazell began to plan his journey to medical school, Dr. Davis offered guidance and provided professional support. “I had the opportunity to be there when David was presented with his white coat as he started medical school at the University of Cincinnati,” says Dr. Davis. “Later, he came to work in my office, helping to coordinate a research project. It’s been great to see him grow and succeed as a doctor.” Dr. Feazell still makes regular trips home to Oxford, and Dr. Davis continues to mentor him. “We get together to talk about life and our careers,” says Dr. Feazell. “Dr. Davis is everything you’d expect a good pediatrician to be. This award is a testament to what a great doctor he is.”

TO FIND A PHYSICIAN AT M c CULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL I TRIHEALTH, VISIT DIRECTORY.TRIHEALTHPHO.COM.

• Avoid water accidents. About one in five people who die from drowning are children ages 14 and younger. “Water accidents are one of the biggest risks during the summer,” says Dr. Davis. “To reduce the risk of drowning, give your kids swimming lessons and always be sure to watch them closely when they’re near water.” • Watch for ticks. “This summer promises to be a big season for Lyme disease and other tickborne diseases,” says Dr. Davis. “Check kids for ticks after they come inside and be on the lookout for fevers or unusual rashes.” A tick bite can lead to Lyme disease, which can cause fever, chills, headache, fatigue, muscle and joint pain and swollen lymph nodes. A rash may appear at the site of the bite; it expands gradually over days and may have a “bull’s-eye” appearance. • Steer clear of measles. At press time, 22 states had reported cases of the measles, a virus that causes high fever, cough, runny nose, red, watery eyes and a rash. This is the largest number of cases in the U.S. since 1994, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Make sure your kids are vaccinated,” says Dr. Davis. “They could contract the virus by being in the same room with someone who is infected—even if he or she doesn’t have symptoms.”

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HOW TO PICK THE RIGHT FITNESS TRACKER

WHY A SPORTSBAND MIGHT BE JUST WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED TO HELP YOU GET AND STAY FIT.

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A FITNESS TRACKER is a great tool to help you get serious about keeping active. Designed to be comfortable, easy to use and fashionable—most companies offer a range of bracelet styles in varying colors—fitness trackers (also called sportsbands) can help you track daily and weekly activity levels and ensure your heart rate stays within a safe zone while working out. More than that, fitness trackers can help motivate you to keep up your new regimen. They provide encouragement that ranges from a virtual coach who delivers voiced approval to game-like scoring systems that reward you for progress and prompt you to share your accomplishments with friends. But picking the right tracker can be a bit tricky. Sportsbands offer varying features and can differ in price by hundreds of dollars. Begin by identifying the key features you want. If all you need is a device that counts your steps and tracks calories burned, you can get away with spending a lot less. If you want something more advanced—like the ability to track your jogging

MOOV NOW $60

One of the most affordable—yet surprisingly robust— fitness trackers currently available, this is a screen-free device that captures your movement and sends it to a smartphone app for analysis. It automatically detects the type of activity you’re performing— swimming, jogging, sit-ups—and provides encouragement and voiced guidance on how to improve your technique. No recharging required, but the battery needs to be replaced every six months.

route via GPS without bringing your phone with you—you’ll pay a lot more. You also should consider details such as battery life—some sportsbands need to be recharged every few days; others come with a replaceable battery that can last up to a year—and the companion app that’s available for your phone. These apps can make a big difference. Some simply organize and present information collected by your tracker. Others provide detailed insights on each of your daily activities, help you set longterm goals and connect you with a network of peers for extra motivation. Typically free, these apps can be downloaded before you buy to get a sense of which tracker and app are right for you. We’ve rounded up a handful of popular fitness trackers to give you a sense of what’s available. They differ widely in form and function—and we didn’t even get into luxury options, like the Apple Watch—but you can be confident that all of them are designed with one primary purpose: to help you become the healthier, fitter version of yourself that you want to be.

GARMIN VIVOFIT 4

FITBIT ALTA

$80

From one of the companies credited with starting the fitnesstracker trend, the Fitbit Alta is a blissfully simple sportsband designed to gently nudge you toward maintaining a healthier lifestyle. It tracks your steps, distance traveled and calories burned; reminds you to get up and move when you’ve been stationary too long; and even tracks your sleeping habits. It connects to your phone, but you also can see key stats on the Alta’s clear touch display. Expect about five days of use per charge.

Garmin’s entry-level fitness tracker covers the sportsband basics. It counts steps, tracks distance traveled and calories burned, and monitors your sleep. Its small, non-interactive color screen provides essential information, but to see more details you’ll need to open a companion app on your smartphone. Its biggest selling point is its battery life—up to a year with standard use, at which point you’ll need to replace a pair of little lithium discs.

$100

WITHINGS PULSE HR

SAMSUNG GEAR FIT2

$130

$180

Withings’ fitness bracelet is focused on your heart. It performs the same functions as other trackers—counting steps, estimating calories burned and keeping tabs on your sleep cycles—but its signature feature is that it monitors your pulse all day, measures beats during specific activities and analyzes changes over the long term. You’ll need to plug it in now and then, but it can run for up to 20 days on a single charge.

This more advanced sportsband has a complete set of features. It automatically identifies and tracks your performance in activities ranging from street walking to elliptical training and keeps tabs on your heart for good measure. But it stands out because of its bright and colorful screen with easy-to-read text and a built-in GPS that lets you track your activities and routes without lugging a phone along. The downside: Its rechargeable battery typically drains in just a few days.

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SNEEZIN’ SEASON IF YOU SUFFER FROM SUMMER ALLERGIES, TAKE HEART: THERE ARE MANY WAYS TO FIND RELIEF.

AS BEAUTIFUL as springtime is, many people with allergies breathe a sigh of relief when summer arrives. But some don’t get a respite from the sneezing and itchy eyes. Trees typically release pollen from March to June. Once they die down, grasses kick into high gear, causing difficulty come summer. “From late August to October, allergies are sparked by ragweed,” says Jeffrey R. Leipzig, MD, a board-certified allergist at Family Allergy & Asthma, with locations in Fairfield Township, Mason and Oxford. Another common allergen: outdoor molds, which grow when it’s warm and damp, such as on humid summer afternoons. Seasonal allergic rhinitis, Jeffrey R. Leipzig, MD also known as

hay fever, affects more than 35 million Americans, making it one of the most common chronic diseases, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI). “A seasonal allergy is a reaction to a specific trigger that is present only at a certain time of the year,” says Dr. Leipzig. Symptoms include sneezing, nasal congestion or a runny nose, a scratchy throat, red or runny eyes and itchiness of the ears, eyes and nose.

AVOIDING ALLERGENS To feel your best, limit your exposure to pollen. Monitor pollen and mold counts by tuning into your local weather channel or checking out the National Allergy Bureau website. On high-pollen days, stay inside with the windows shut and the air conditioning on. Trees, grasses and weeds generally emit pollen from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m., so

consider postponing outdoor activities until the afternoon. If lifestyle changes aren’t enough, consider medication: • Antihistamines: Available by prescription or over the counter, these pills and nasal sprays are effective for relieving itching and sneezing but not a runny nose. • Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists: These drugs relieve sneezing and itching and can clear nasal congestion. They also help prevent asthma. • Intranasal steroids: These medications are highly effective and don’t cause the side effects associated with other steroid medications, such as weight gain. • Immunotherapy (allergy shots): These shots, which contain enough of a specific allergen to stimulate the immune system, are very effective but must be given for three to five years.

TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WITH JEFFREY R. LEIPZIG, MD, AT McCULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, CALL 513.894.0500.

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{ POWER FOOD }

THE ALMIGHTY

BLUEBERRY THESE BERRIES MAY BE SMALL, BUT THEY’RE LOADED WITH NUTRIENTS. POWER UP Blueberries are packed with antioxidants, which protect against cell damage and may reduce the risk of cancer and heart disease. They’re also rich in soluble fiber—a type of fiber that absorbs water—helping to reduce cholesterol levels and keeping blood sugar stable, making them an excellent choice for people with diabetes. These berries also help you feel full longer, promoting a healthy weight. Blueberries are a great source of vitamin C, which helps to ward off and fight infection; manganese, a mineral that may help control blood sugar and maintain bone; and potassium, a mineral that may reduce blood pressure and the risk of stroke. Studies have even linked blueberries with better memory. A onecup serving packs just 80 calories and 0.2 grams of fat.

be kept in the refrigerator for up to 14 days, either in a plastic container or covered bowl. Wait to rinse until just before use; the bloom keeps them fresher longer. Delicious on their own, blueberries can be added to sweet or savory dishes and pair especially well with lemon, banana, almond, mint and coconut. Add some to your breakfast smoothie or oatmeal; pack them with yogurt and granola for a snack; toss with cucumber and feta or spinach and pecans for a refreshing lunch; or make a blueberry relish or barbecue sauce to pour over pork for dinner. Blueberries are a tasty addition to salads, sandwiches and flatbreads, as well as sweet treats like muffins, crumbles and pies.

DID YOU KNOW? BUY/STORE/SERVE Choose berries that are firm, plump and dark blue or purple with a “bloom,” a dusty or silvery coating. (This helps keep insects away and is a sign of freshness.) Reddish berries haven’t ripened and tend to taste sour. Look for berries that are uniform in size and free of stems and leaves. Blueberries can

You can purchase fresh blueberries year-round. North American blueberries are harvested between April and October, while South American berries are available from November through March. Blueberries are also available frozen. As long as you choose unsweetened berries, they can be just as nutritious as fresh ones.

1916

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1.5 billion

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The first cultivated crop of blueberries was sold in the U.S.

Minutes it takes blueberries to freeze

Pounds of North American blueberries produced annually

Percent Daily Value (DV) of vitamin C in one cup

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McCullough-Hyde first

best care

McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth is expanding cancer care services. McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital has transformed our cancer care center with the creation of a new environment for infusion patients. Here you’ll receive the most advanced treatment in surroundings specifically designed to care for your mind, body and spirit. This healing atmosphere includes private infusion bays with recliners for you and your companion, private TV’s, iPads and Wi-Fi. We made these changes because we believe our patients should have the best health care services, close to home.

Infusion center services include:

We also feature:

• IV antibiotics

• On-site physician offices

• Blood products

• Care navigators and genetic counselors

• Chemotherapy • Bone density treatments

Hours:

• Iron deficiency treatments

Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

TriHealth.com/mhmh To speak with an infusion center team member call

513 524 5540

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Profile for Wainscot Media

Oxford Health & Life: Summer 2019  

THE GOOD LIVING MAGA ZINE FROM McCULLOUGH-HYDE|TRIHEALTH

Oxford Health & Life: Summer 2019  

THE GOOD LIVING MAGA ZINE FROM McCULLOUGH-HYDE|TRIHEALTH