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OXFORD T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M M c C U L L O U G H - H Y D E | T R I H E A LT H

SUMMER 2017

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EXPANDING PRIMARY CARE OUTDOOR EXERCISE GROWING TO MEET YOUR NEEDS

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

STATE-OF-THE-ART CARE CLOSE TO HOME RECENT UPGRADES ARE BRINGING MORE SPECIALTY HEALTH CARE TO OXFORD.

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LATEST TECHNOLOGY AND MORE SPACE Three new OR suites, just opened in May, have brought state-of-the-art surgical facilities to Oxford. “The new suites benefit not only the surgeons,” says Bryan McCullough, D.O., an orthopedic surgeon with TriHealth Orthopedic and Sports Institute, “but all health-care workers at the hospital and, most importantly, the patients and community.” The new suites are about 40 percent larger. The additional space facilitates equipment setup during surgical procedures. “We can move equipment around more easily with less risk of contaminating the operating field,” says Dr. McCullough. “That will help us continue to improve our already excellent quality of care at McCullough-Hyde.”

The new surgical suites feature boom arms that house surgical instruments within easy reach, and top-of-the-line video equipment. Each suite has two video screens on moveable arms and a larger screen on the wall. “The surgeon can toggle back and forth,” explains Kirkpatrick. “This makes it easier, for example, to compare old and new MRI images while continuing to monitor patient vitals.” Additional upgrades improve the patient experience. “No more glaring lights,” says Kirkpatrick. “Nurses can control the lighting via computer, and can also play music for patients. It creates a much more calming environment, both before and after surgery.” Overall, the new surgical suites are a valuable community asset. “These are

COVER PHOTO © HOLLY WERDEN PHOTOGRAPHY

It’s stressful enough to need surgery or emergency medical care. Having to leave your community to receive those services only makes matters more challenging. That’s why McCulloughHyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth has worked hard to offer a wider range of clinically-advanced care close to home. “We want to be able to provide additional specialty services and surgeries within our region,” says Brett Kirkpatrick, Executive Director at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital. “It’s in the best interest of our patients and our community.” Kirkpatrick explains that there are two parts to achieving that goal: improvements to the hospital’s physical infrastructure and the expansion of available specialty physicians.

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OPPOSITE PAGE, AND ABOVE LEFT AND CENTER: McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth’s new leading-edge Emergency Department. ABOVE RIGHT: Matthew Patel, M.D., and Kelsey Paz, R.N., consult on patient care.

state-of-the-art OR suites that compare to any you might find in an urban setting,” says Kirkpatrick.

ALL-NEW ED McCullough-Hyde’s Emergency Department, an all-new space that opened in 2016, brought many improvements to what was already a nationally recognized ED. The new space is much larger, with a more open reception area and individual treatment rooms that are both bigger and more private. There are separate entrances for walk-in patients and emergency squads, and separate areas for patients exposed to hazards and infectious diseases. The new ED also offers two senior-focused rooms and one child-friendly room for pediatric patients. “The Emergency Department has doubled in size, and new technology has been integrated at patient bedsides,” says Matthew Patel, M.D., a boardcertified emergency medicine physician with Talawanda Emergency Physicians. “These changes have improved overall workflow and enhanced patient experience. The expansion ensures greater access to care and essentially no wait times, which supports our collective goal of promoting wellness in the community.” Dr. Patel reports that patients have

Matthew Patel, M.D.

Brett Kirkpatrick, Executive Director

reacted positively to the new space. “They appreciate the abundant natural light in the waiting area that carries into the actual department,” he says. “They also enjoy the added privacy of the new compartment-style rooms.” A traveling kiosk makes bedside patient-registration possible. Having computer stations in all rooms enables physicians to complete most tasks right at the bedside, from reading patient histories and making new notes to reviewing test results, including X-rays and CAT scans, directly with patients. The new ED also features technology for telemedicine, enabling specialists in different locations to consult on patient care. “That’s a positive trend in healthcare delivery we can now take full advantage of,” says Dr. Patel.

EXPANDING SPECIALTY CARE The second part of the hospital’s goal to provide a wider range of health-care services to the community is bringing in more specialists. “New collaborations with specialists through our TriHealth partners are helping us achieve that,” says Kirkpatrick. The addition of a new shared specialty suite provides offices and exam rooms that can be used by specialists who come to Oxford from their tertiary hospital in Cincinnati. Specialists who now offer either new or expanded office hours in Oxford include cardiologists, pulmonologists, ENTs and gastroenterologists. “Creating new leading-edge treatment facilities has made it possible for us to bring more specialty care to the community,” says Kirkpatrick. “Patients can be treated by specialized physicians in a state-of-the-art environment without having to travel to Cincinnati.”

DIRECTORY OF PHYSICIANS AND SPECIALISTS TriHealth Heart Institute 513.745.9800 Stephen Lewis, M.D. Christopher Thoresen, M.D. TriHealth Digestive Institute 513.867.2834 Robert Cucinotta, M.D. TriHealth Surgical Institute 513.523.1844 Rolf Brunckhorst, M.D. Douglas Hingsbergen, M.D. Karen Summe, M.D. TriHealth Cancer Institute 513.853.1300 Faisal Adhami, M.D. TriHealth Orthopedic and Sports Institute 513.856.5971 Paul Cangemi, M.D. Matthew Daggy, M.D. Bryan McCullough, D.O. Douglas Ross, D.O. Otolarynology (ENT) TriHealth Physician Partners 513.246.7000 Jeffrey Willbrand, M.D. Raymond Rock, M.D. TriHealth Pulmonary Medicine 513.524.5490 Craig Eisentrout, M.D. Dorionne Whitaker, CNP Group Health Sleep Medicine 513.524.5475 Shayla Pullen, M.D.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

OXFORD INTERNAL MEDICINE JOINS TRIHEALTH FAMILY FOR 44 YEARS, OXFORD INTERNAL MEDICINE HAS PROVIDED THE VERY BEST IN PRIMARY CARE IN OXFORD AND THE SURROUNDING REGION. NOW PART OF McCULLOUGHHYDE | TRIHEALTH, THE PRACTICE IS SET TO EXPAND ON THAT TRADITION.

Founded in 1973, Oxford Internal Medicine (OIM) has stayed true to its small-town values of community, caring and quality. It also has kept its focus on the future. Recently, the practice made changes that will allow it to accept new patients, extend appointment hours and add new services. Many of these enhancements result from the practice’s new partnership with McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth. In addition, OIM patients now have seamless access to TriHealth’s specialists and its state-of-the-art hospital care.

STAYING ROOTED IN THE COMMUNITY “Oxford is a great town, both for practicing medicine and for raising a family,”

says Brent Bader, M.D., who joined OIM 28 years ago. “All of our physicians are part of the community.” He, like several other OIM clinicians, graduated from Miami University and has strong ties to Oxford. Dr. Bader says he has seen the medical profession change over the past 30 years. Today, it’s hard for smalltown independent medical practices to attract highly qualified physicians because those doctors look for specialty resources, which are seldom available in small communities. “Fortunately, when we were looking to add a physician to our practice we were already part of TriHealth so we didn’t have that problem,” says Dr. Bader. TriHealth provides access to the specialty resources doctors want, and they

MEET THE CLINICIANS: OXFORD INTERNAL MEDICINE

Terry G. Hunt, M.D. Internal Medicine

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Brent A. Bader, M.D. Internal Medicine

Molly Emmert, M.D. Internal Medicine

Perry Funk, D.O. Family Practice

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made the recruitment process easy. Perry Funk, D.O., will join OIM in June, after practicing at the Cleveland Clinic in both Ohio and Florida. “His training in family practice and extensive experience in the outpatient setting make him a great fit for us,” says Dr. Bader. “It is helpful to have the up-to-date resources that TriHealth provides,” says Dr. Funk. “Today, no single person can deliver on every medical need. It really does ‘take a village’ to accomplish the best results. I’m excited to learn from doctors who grew up here and have much to share about treating a diverse college town and a rural population.”

EMBRACING TECHNOLOGY Another important June event: OIM will integrate its electronic medical record system with those of McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital and TriHealth. Once the systems are joined, when an OIM patient receives care at a TriHealth facility, OIM clinicians will be able to check on the patient’s status and care in realtime. “I love the fact that I’ll be able look at my computer and see everything that’s happening to my patients in the hospital,” says Dr. Bader. “It’ll be as if I’m right there with them.” The alliance also will give OIM access to TriHealth’s team of hospitalists— experts in the care of hospitalized

patients. This brings many benefits for patients, including shorter hospital stays and a seamless transition back to primary care. It also means fewer trips to the hospital for OIM physicians, freeing up time for them to see more patients in the office.

ADDING SERVICES To better serve the community, OIM also is taking advantage of a national trend in medical care—relying on nurse practitioners to address many patient conditions. The practice hired Debra Perkins, CNP, who has been a nurse practitioner in the region for 11 years and is certified in both family medicine and pediatrics. Previously, Perkins worked at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital in a variety of positions caring for both adult and pediatric patients. “Nurse practitioners are fully qualified to evaluate new patients and treat many conditions,” explains Dr. Bader, adding that “Debra has been part of this community for a long time. We’re very happy to have her join our team.” The clinicians at OIM look forward to providing patients with the quality care that has defined their practice since its earliest days—and to adding new features to ensure that small-town values continue to be accompanied by stateof-the-art care.

PRACTICE LOCATIONS AND HOURS In addition to the three offices below, Oxford Internal Medicine will soon open a new location at 5151 Morning Sun Road in Oxford. Hours for all offices are Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 12:00* p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00* p.m.

OXFORD, OHIO 12 West Church Street P: 513.523.4195 F: 513.523.4353

BROOKVILLE, INDIANA 10130 Oxford Pike P: 765.647.3557 F: 765.647.2977

WEST COLLEGE CORNER, INDIANA 121 West Liberty Street P: 765.732.3114 F: 765.752.3903

Kami Park, M.D.

Amy Spivey, M.D.

Debra Perkins, CNP

Family Practice

Internal Medicine

Certified Nurse Practitioner

* For planning purposes, please note that the last morning appointment is generally scheduled at 11:15 a.m. and the last afternoon appointment at 4:15 p.m.

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PRIMARY CARE PREP Unfortunately, we often let hurry, worry or embarrassment keep us from getting what we need from a physician visit. So how can you maximize one-on-one time with your doctor? Try these tips:

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MAKE A LIST. Before your appointment, jot down the two or three things you most want to ask the doctor.

BE SPECIFIC. Be prepared to describe your symptoms in as much detail as possible. If you’re having knee pain, for example, explain what it feels like and when it occurs. Is it sharp or dull? Is it constant or does it come and go?

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5 BENEFITS OF

PRIMARY CARE IN AN INCREASINGLY COMPLEX MEDICAL WORLD, HAVING ONE DOCTOR WHO KNOWS YOUR HEALTH HISTORY HAS BECOME HIGHLY IMPORTANT.

RESEARCHERS AT the journal Health Affairs found that patients who have a primary care provider benefit from better management of chronic diseases, lower overall health-care costs and a higher level of satisfaction with their care. Here are the five most important ways building a relationship with a primary care provider—generally considered to include the specialties of internal medicine, family practice and pediatrics—can improve health care for you and your family.

1. CONTINUITY. Having a single physician who has seen you for everything from bellyaches to immunizations to blood-pressure control means having a health resource who knows your history. When you have an appointment, you don’t have to explain that there’s heart disease in your family or list the medications you’re taking and in what doses—it’s all in your record already.

GET MEDICINES CHECKED. If you take several medications that have been prescribed by different doctors, bring a list of them—or bring the pill bottles with you.

SPEAK UP PROMPTLY. Don’t leave your biggest worry for the end of the visit. Mention major concerns early to be sure there’s time to answer your questions.

2. CONVENIENCE. Within a primary care practice you can access a wide variety of health services: preventive care and screenings; care for chronic conditions such as asthma, hypertension and diabetes; and acute care for problems like coughs, digestive issues and high fever.

3. HEALTH MAINTENANCE. Your primary care doctor is uniquely positioned to help you avoid health problems. Based on the doctor’s examination and your medical history, he or she can determine whether you’re at increased risk for conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and cancer, and then help you take steps to prevent them from developing.

4. EARLY DETECTION. Regular checkups and contact with a single physician make it more likely that any health issues will be detected early, when they’re most treatable.

5. BETTER COMMUNICATION. When patients know their physician and the practice staff, visits are less stressful and more productive. It’s easier to talk about sensitive issues with someone you know in a familiar setting than with a stranger in a strange place.

DON’T TRY TO BE YOUR OWN DOCTOR. It’s good to do research, but resist jumping to conclusions about your condition.

SUMMARIZE. Before the doctor leaves the room, ask for a moment to repeat back the main things you learned during your visit to help ensure you understood fully.

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A LITTLE PREPARATION WILL MAKE THIS YOUR SAFEST SUMMER YET. MOST OF US CAN’T WAIT for summer’s carefree days— but carefree shouldn’t mean careless. Without taking some precautions while you’re outside, summer can end up being a real pain. Follow these tips to ensure that avoidable health problems don’t take the fun out of your summer.

SUN SAFETY Almost all sunburns can be prevented. Adults and teens should apply sunblock with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30. For toddlers and younger children, a sunblock with an SPF of 45 is best. Children have thinner skin than adults and can get a serious burn more quickly. Regardless of age, it’s important to lotion up at least every two hours and right after swimming. Keep infants under 6 months out of direct sunlight and dress them in light-colored, lightweight pants and shirts with long sleeves, using a brimmed hat to protect baby’s head.

HEAT DEFENSE Some of the most common summer illnesses are heatrelated. They include heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heatstroke, which can cause multi-organ damage if left untreated. Use caution exercising on hot, humid days. Dress in light, loose clothing and drink lots of water (don’t wait until you’re thirsty). Avoid alcohol and caffeine, which dehydrate the body. If children seem lethargic after prolonged heat exposure, give them plenty to drink, take them into an air-conditioned area and have them rest or lie down.

SWIM SMARTS Who doesn’t love to indulge in a refreshing dip on a hot summer day? But having fun doesn’t mean letting down your guard. Watch children around any water environment, whether it’s the ocean, a lake, a pool or even a wading pool or tub. An adult should be within arm’s length at all times. If you have a pool keep rescue equipment, such as a shepherd’s hook (a long pole with a

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hook on the end), a life preserver and a portable phone, nearby. And when you’re planning a pool party that will keep you busy, consider calling your local YMCA or pool club to hire a certified lifeguard.

BEAT THE BUGS Usually, mosquito bites are a minor inconvenience, leaving behind an itchy bump that’s bothersome for a day or two then disappears. But it’s important to limit bites because mosquitoes can carry diseases. In Florida, those include West Nile virus, Eastern equine encephalitis and St. Louis encephalitis. Play it safe by covering your skin with clothing and using mosquito repellent. Around your home, use door and window screens to keep bugs out and drain any standing water to stop mosquitoes from reproducing. Ticks can also carry disease, including Lyme disease. If you’re going to be in a wooded or grassy area, wear protective clothing, such as long-sleeved shirts, long pants, hats and closedtoe shoes. When you get back inside, check your skin thoroughly for ticks.

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RECOGNIZE HEAT EXHAUSTION

WHEN KIDS ARE AROUND WATER, AN ADULT SHOULD BE WITHIN ARM’S LENGTH AT ALL TIMES.”

When the body can’t cool itself, heat exhaustion can set in. Unless steps are taken to lower the body’s temperature, heat stroke—a medical emergency—can develop. When temperatures soar, watch for these warning signs in yourself and others. • Skin that is moist and cool, despite the heat • Feeling faint or dizzy • Feeling tired • Heartbeat that is rapid, but weak • Muscle cramps • Nausea • Headache If these symptoms occur, find shade or an air-conditioned place, rest or lie down, mist yourself with cool water, and drink water or sports drinks. If symptoms get worse or don’t improve within an hour, seek immediate medical attention.

Young children

AT HIGHER RISK

People who have a mental illness

Though the heat of summer can affect anyone of any age, these groups are at increased risk for developing serious complications, including heatstroke, more quickly.

Anyone with heart disease or high blood pressure

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People age 65+

Anyone who is physically ill

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EXERCISING OUTDOORS BEATS THE GYM BY A MILE SURE, A CLIMATE-CONTROLLED gym with all the bells and whistles can be a pleasant place to work out, especially in winter, but science suggests there are powerful benefits to leading an active lifestyle in the great outdoors. When the weather permits, take your activity out in nature for a variety of benefits to body, mind and soul. Writer Laura Ingalls Wilder was on to something when she said, “Some oldfashioned things, like fresh air and sunshine, are hard to beat.” And now, there’s research to support her claim.

BOOST ENERGY AND REDUCE TENSION For example, a team from England’s Peninsula College of Medicine and

DON’T LET ALLERGIES KEEP YOU INDOORS Do you love exercising outdoors but fear an allergy attack? Three key strategies will help you stay comfortable:

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Dentistry analyzed 11 trials that included more than 800 adults. They found that, when compared with indoor exercise, outdoor exercise was associated with increased energy and revitalization, as well as decreased confusion, anger, depression and tension. Outdoor exercisers also reported enjoying their workouts more and were more likely to say they planned to repeat them than exercisers who were holed up inside a gym. Many also had lower levels of cortisol (a hormone produced in response to stress) than their indoor counterparts and said exposure to sunlight improved their mood. In addition, people who walked outdoors completed an average of 30 minutes more exercise per week than those who exercised indoors.

1. PREP YOUR SYSTEM. “For most people with minor seasonal allergies, taking an oral antihistamine (Claritin, Allegra or Zyrtec) shortly before going outside is adequate,” says Jeffrey Willbrand, M.D., an Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) specialist with TriHealth Physician Partners in West Chester. Those medications are available without a prescription. “However, physicians have prescription medications that may be helpful in difficult cases,” says Dr. Willbrand.

So, which outdoor activities provide the greatest benefit? Walking is at the top of the list. It boosts cardio, is gentle on the joints, strengthens bones, can be done almost anywhere and is free. From a mental-health standpoint, it can reduce stress, improve mood and spark creativity. Gardening is another favorite outdoor activity for many. It promotes tranquility and relaxation and has many physical benefits as well. According to the Centers for Disease Control, moderate activity, such as active gardening, for as little as twoand-a-half hours each week can reduce risk of obesity, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and depression.

KEEP IT SIMPLE AND START KIDS EARLY Outdoor activities can be as simple as teaching a grandchild to ride a bike, shooting hoops with friends, hiking or going for a brisk swim. If you have children, introduce them to outdoor fun at an early age. They’ll be more likely to carry your example into their teen and adult years, when stressbusting and health-enhancing activities become even more vital. Being active outdoors lets you improve your fitness while enjoying nature and relieving daily stress in the process. Now that’s what we call effective multitasking.

2. KEEP POLLEN OUT.

3. KEEP AN EYE ON THE TIME.

For people with severe seasonal allergies, Dr. Willbrand recommends keeping windows closed in the car and in the house. In addition, he says: “Rinse nasal passages with a saline kit (Netipot) once or twice daily to remove accumulated pollen and mucus.”

“Pollen counts are highest in the morning,” says Dr. Willbrand, “so people with seasonal allergies should do their outdoor runs or yard work in the evenings.” He also recommends that anyone taking a 24-hour medication do so at bedtime. “This will ensure a high level of medicine in your body at the worst time of the day,” he explains.

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FOR MOST PEOPLE WITH MINOR SEASONAL ALLERGIES, TAKING AN ORAL ANTIHISTAMINE SHORTLY BEFORE GOING OUTSIDE IS ADEQUATE.” —JEFFREY WILLBRAND, M.D., EAR, NOSE & THROAT SPECIALIST

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Oxford Internal Medicine is joining our family McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital and TriHealth are bringing more Primary Care resources to our region You can count on us for more than high-quality hospital care. We are connecting you with a collaborative team of primary care physicians and

New patients welcome! Need a primary care appointment right away? Oxford Primary Care and Debra Perkins, CNP, will continue to see patients at our Morning Sun Road location.

specialists who can help you navigate any health issue that comes your way. And beginning June 1, we welcome Oxford Internal Medicine to our health care family. Dr. Perry Funk, board-certified in Family

Office location Oxford 5151 Morning Sun Road Oxford, OH 45056

Practice, will be joining Oxford Internal Medicine and accepting new patients as of June 28.

For appointments, call:

All major insurance plans accepted.

513 664 3950

001308 | 03 17

TriHealth.com/MHMH

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Oxford Health & Life: Summer 2017  

The Good Living Magazine from McCullough- Hyde | TRIHEALTH

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