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T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M M c C U L L O U G H - H Y D E | T R I H E A LT H

OXFORD SPRING 2018

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TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

KEEPING CANCER CARE LOCAL SLEEP BETTER NOW ORTHOPEDICS: HEALING LIVES

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

Cancer Care:

KEEPING IT LOCAL NEW STAFF AND CLINICAL FACILITIES ARE SET TO HELP THE ONCOLOGY DEPARTMENT TREAT MORE AREA PATIENTS CLOSE TO HOME.

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SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

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WE FEEL GREAT ABOUT THE CARE THEY PROVIDE. WE MAKE OURSELVES AT HOME—IT’S LIKE WE’RE PART OF THE FAMILY.” —PEGGY OTTKE

ADDITIONS TO BOTH the staff and facilities of the oncology department at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital (MHMH) will allow the hospital to continue providing an excellent level of care and support close to home for more patients fighting cancer who live in Oxford and the surrounding communities. “We’ve added four new oncology providers recently,” says Brett Kirkpatrick, executive director of operations at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital. “Two physicians and two nurse practitioners. And we’re growing our facilities to better accommodate patients and their family members, and to ensure timely care for our patients.” The new physicians who have joined the TriHealth system in Oxford are medical oncologists Faisal Adhami, M.D., Ph.D., and Edward Crane, M.D., both of whom have exceptional reputations for their expertise and close relationships with their patients. “Not only are Dr. Adhami and Dr. Crane a couple of the best in the region clinically, but as importantly they are great people who care deeply about their patients and are easy to talk to,” says Kirkpatrick. “They have attracted new patients from all over southwest Ohio into their practices and our hospital.” One of those patients is Daniel Ottke, who lives with his wife, Peggy Ottke, in the town of Ross, just south of Oxford. “In May 2016, my husband got very ill and ended up at McCullough-Hyde for surgery, where Brett Kirkpatrick Executive Director of Operations they discovered he

In McCullough-Hyde’s oncology department, patients are treated like family, with birthday cupcakes and other thoughtful gestures. Seen here: Peggy and Daniel Ottke with MHMH nurses.

had colon cancer,” says Peggy. “It was all a shock—we had no idea he had this, but once we consulted with Dr. Adhami, he was so knowledgeable that we kept coming back for his care.” The Ottkes say they look forward to the expanded facilities in the oncology center. The current plan is to add more clinical space, including new exam rooms and infusion bays, along with an expanded waiting area and redesigned physician and staff areas that will increase efficiency and communication behind the scenes. “More infusion bays will be great, since they sometimes get full,” says Peggy. “But overall we feel great about the care they provide. We make ourselves at home there—it’s like we’re part of the family.”

PERSONALIZED CARE Peggy, a breast-cancer survivor herself, says the family-like atmosphere is what really stands out when they visit McCullough-Hyde, including small, personal touches. “The nurses even brought my husband a cupcake on his birthday,” she says. “We happened to be there that whole day, which can feel disappointing, and all of sudden they came in with a cupcake. I can’t thank them enough for their care.” Through the treatment Daniel received at McCullough-Hyde, he’s been able to manage his condition and maintain a good quality of life. “He was put on an aggressive chemotherapy to keep the cancer under control, which he handles

well, and we were even able to take a cruise vacation together,” says Peggy Ottke. “Dr. Adhami is very caring. He listens and is passionate about what he does. We really appreciate that. I feel like what they’re doing is keeping my husband alive.”

NEW 3D MAMMOGRAPHY AVAILABLE FOR BREASTCANCER SCREENING In February 2018, McCulloughHyde Memorial Hospital began offering breast-cancer screenings using new 3D digital tomosynthesis mammography. This revolutionary type of mammogram creates highresolution images that allow the radiologist to view the breast in three dimensions, potentially revealing information that standard digital mammograms might not show. The benefits to patients of this new screening technology are increased detection of smaller cancers, improved confidence to rule out false positives and fewer follow-up screenings. 3D digital mammography is available upon request for screening mammograms. To make an appointment, call TriHealth scheduling at 513 524 5555 and request 3D mammography.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

A GIFT TO SAVE LIVES

A DONATION ALLOWS McCULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL TO GIVE ESSENTIAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT TO LOCAL EMERGENCY FIRST RESPONDERS.

THANKS TO A GENEROUS contribution from the McLaren family, McCulloughHyde Memorial Hospital has recently purchased automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for use by eight local fire and EMS squads in the communities served by the hospital. “As the result of a shared vision between the leadership of our emergency department and local Oxford Fire Captain Jay Fields, this equipment is being distributed throughout the region,” says Pam Collins, Chief Patient Services Officer at McCullough-Hyde. Captain Fields says the new equipment is a tremendous improvement. “Think of the differences between a computer today and one 10 years ago,” he says. “The faster processing and increased reliability alone will allow users to consistently receive and send valuable information, which will directly improve patient care

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and outcomes by enhancing communication between EMS and the hospital.” Immediate CPR and early defibrillation with an AED can more than double a patient’s chance of survival. The availability of state-of-the-art AEDs for emergency squads in the Oxford area means they can save more lives. Collins stresses the importance of the donation: “If it weren’t for the McLaren family, all of this would have been just another good idea.” Mary Bennett, Chief Development Officer at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital Trust, echoed that sentiment. “Thanks to the generosity of donors like Richard and Adele McLaren, our hospital can continue to address emerging needs in the region and provide support for critical projects like this McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital Community Heart Health Initiative. We’re grateful to the

LOCAL EMS SQUADS GIVEN NEW AEDs Through a donation from the McLaren family, McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital purchased new emergency-medical equipment for eight local fire and EMS squads. Above: Members of Oxford’s Fire Department were happy to receive new automated external defibrillators (AEDs), along with fresh-baked cookies. Pictured left to right: Chris Johns, Rob Embry, Stephanie McMahon, Jeff Matix.

whole family for joining us in this vision.” An added benefit to this collaboration between the hospital and EMS has been the development of a much closer working relationship. “Because we’ve become better acquainted as health-care partners, we’ve really been able to engage with our local EMS,” says Collins. “It has created a lot of positive energy and sharpened our shared focus on the patients we all serve.”

SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

PIANIST HEALS TO PLAY AGAIN

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT YING TAO’S CAREER-THREATENING FALL HAS A HAPPY ENDING THANKS TO HER CARE AT McCULLOUGH-HYDE. ON AN ICY DAY LAST WINTER, Miami University graduate student Ying Tao fell and fractured her right arm. While the use of an arm is important to everyone, it’s critical for Ying, a professional pianist. An international student working toward a graduate degree in piano when she fell, Ying is from China and was not familiar with how the U.S. health-care system works. Nevertheless, she was able to call 911 and was taken to McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital. “It was so painful,” recalls Ying. “I was worried I would never play piano again.” Orthopedist Bryan McCullough, D.O., of the TriHealth Bryan McCullough, D.O. Orthopedic and Orthopedist

Sports Institute, provided medical care to Ying. He had her wear a rigid Sarmiento brace, which immobilizes the arm, for four weeks. After that time, she continued to wear the brace while she was out and about. Ying’s road to recovery was filled with hours of physical therapy. She gradually got better before finally being free of any restrictions. On Dec. 1, 2017, a fully healed Ying was excited to perform a recital on the piano at McCullough-Hyde to thank the hospital staff for helping her recover. “The care here was very good,” says Ying. “Sometimes I have a hard time with my English, but everyone was very nice and explained everything to me.” Ying graduated at the end of 2017 and traveled back to China, where she is teaching piano to college students.

A FULLY HEALED YING TAO WAS EXCITED TO PERFORM A PIANO RECITAL TO THANK McCULLOUGHHYDE STAFF FOR HELPING HER RECOVER.

ORTHOPEDIC INJURIES: WHEN TO SEEK CARE Even the most coordinated among us likely will experience injury in our lives. Most often, common injuries can be treated at home with Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation (RICE), and maybe an over-the-counter pain reliever. In some situations, however, it’s important to see an orthopedic doctor—a specialist who treats injuries and diseases of the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, nerves and tendons. Why? Because some conditions can get a lot worse if not treated quickly and properly. Make an appointment with a McCullough-Hyde orthopedist if you experience: • Consistent chronic pain • Range of motion that becomes more limited • Instability while walking or standing • Difficulty performing everyday activities, such as walking the dog or using stairs • A soft-tissue injury, like a sprain or twisted ankle, that doesn’t improve despite applying RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation)

FOR AN APPOINTMENT WITH TRIHEALTH ORTHOPEDIC & SPORTS INSTITUTE CALL 513 856 5971. HEAR YING TELL HER STORY: TRIHEALTH.COM/DAILYHEALTHWIRE/ORTHOPEDICS/PATIENT-HEALS-TO-PLAY-AGAIN.ASPX

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SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

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{ TASTES }

STIR IT UP! A WOK AND A FEW FRESH INGREDIENTS ARE ALL YOU NEED TO MAKE QUICK, HEALTHY AND SUPER-TASTY MEALS.

Pineapple Chicken SERVES: 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

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Put the chicken in a bowl and season with the salt and pepper. Add the cornstarch and mix well. Whisk together all the ingredients for the sauce in a small bowl, then set aside.

9 oz. boneless chicken thighs, sliced into ½-in. cubes n  pinch of sea salt n  pinch of ground black pepper n  1 Tbs. cornstarch n  1 Tbs. canola oil n  2 dried chiles, whole n  1 Tbs. Shaoxing rice wine or dry sherry n  ½ small pineapple, sliced into ½-in. cubes n  ½ red pepper, seeded and sliced into ½-in. cubes n  small handful of roasted cashews (optional) n  1 scallion, finely sliced n  fresh cilantro leaves, to garnish FOR THE SAUCE n  ½ cup pineapple juice n  1 Tbs. low-sodium light soy sauce n  1 Tbs. cornstarch n  juice of 1 lime n  1 tsp. honey n  ¼ tsp. Sriracha chili sauce

Heat a wok over high heat and when the wok starts to smoke, add the canola oil. Add the chiles and fry for a few seconds to release their aroma, then add the chicken pieces and stirfry for 2 to 3 minutes. As the chicken starts to turn opaque, add the Shaoxing rice wine or dry sherry and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes until the chicken is cooked through. Add the pineapple and red pepper pieces and cook for less than 30 seconds. Then pour in the sauce, bring to a boil and boil until the sauce has reduced, is slightly sticky and has a thicker consistency. Add the cashew nuts (if using), followed by the scallion and cook for 20 seconds. Stir together well, then transfer to a serving plate, garnish with fresh cilantro and serve immediately.

Reprinted with permission from Stir Crazy by Ching-He Huang, Kyle Books, Great Britain. Photography by Tamin Jones. No reproduction, copy or transmission of this publication may be made without written permission from the publisher. OXFORD HEALTH & LIFE | SPRING 2018

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THE SCREENING YOU SHOULDN’T AVOID THE COLONOSCOPY’S UNPLEASANT REPUTATION IS, FOR THE MOST PART, UNDESERVED—AND IT CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE.

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SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

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THE 50TH BIRTHDAY. It’s quite a milestone—one that should be heartily celebrated with friends and family. But that festive feeling can be tinged with just a little apprehension. In the back of our minds, we know: It’s time for that first screening for colorectal cancer. While preparation for a colonoscopy is still quite a comedown from birthday cake, it doesn’t necessarily have to be the stressful experience you may have heard about from a friend or family member. “We reassure patients that they’ll have adequate sedation during the procedure and that colonoscopy is the best way for us to get a complete look at the colon and remove polyps before they develop into cancer,” says Robert B. Cucinotta, M.D., a gastroenterologist at TriHealth Digestive Institute.

A DANGEROUS DISEASE Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. When colorectal cancer is detected at an

Robert B. Cucinotta, M.D. Gastroenterologist

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Cucinotta at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital, call 513 794 5600.

early stage, the five-year survival rate is 90 percent, but that rate goes down drastically if the cancer spreads outside the colon or rectum. Screening gives doctors a chance to find and remove polyps before they become cancer—a process that can take five to 10 years— and to remove small cancers before the situation becomes critical. “Many polyps and small cancers can be removed easily during the colonoscopy,” says Dr. Cucinotta. “If we don’t catch it early, it can mean surgical resection of the colon followed up with chemotherapy.”

THE SCOOP ON PREPARATION In order to detect polyps, doctors need to get a clear view, which means the colon has to be emptied. While that used to mean drinking a large amount of unpleasant liquid in a short time frame the night before the procedure, today the process is far easier. Now, you can drink about half of the bowel-clearing liquid the night before, and the remaining dose about six hours prior to the colonoscopy. Planning to be home during this time will, of course, ensure you’re as comfortable as possible. A few days before the procedure, you’ll be asked to start eating a low-fiber diet free of grains, nuts, seeds, dried

RISK FACTORS FOR COLORECTAL CANCER There are a few factors that put you at increased risk for colorectal cancer. Some of them, like your age or family history, you can’t control. But here are a few factors you can influence.

fruits and raw fruits and vegetables. The day before your colonoscopy, you’ll be restricted to clear liquids, such as broth, black coffee or tea and clear juice. For the exam itself, you may be advised to take the day off work and must have a friend or relative give you a ride home afterward, as you’ll likely still be under the influence of a sedative. Having a colonoscopy every 10 years is the “gold standard” for colorectal cancer screening, because it offers the most comprehensive examination, and any polyps discovered can be removed right away during the procedure. However, there are other types of screening procedures available. CT colonoscopy, or virtual colonoscopy, uses X-rays and computer imagery to give doctors a picture of the colon, and is usually done every five years. Another choice is flexible sigmoidoscopy, which allows doctors to check the inner lining of the rectum and the lower colon. There are even highly sensitive home-test kits that can detect unseen blood in the stool. Those require no bowel preparation, but must be done every year. Talk to Dr. Cucinotta about the best screening option for you based on your health history, symptoms and risk level for colorectal cancer.

WEIGHT: Excess weight and larger waistlines increase risk. Work to reach or maintain a healthy weight. ACTIVITY: Regular exercise reduces risk. A half hour of moderate physical activity (brisk walking, swimming, mowing the lawn) five days a week is recommended. DIET: Eat more vegetables, lean proteins, fruits and whole grains. Eat fewer red and processed meats, such as hot dogs.

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KIDS & ASTHMA:

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW WHILE NOT CURABLE, ASTHMA CAN BE CAREFULLY MANAGED TO LET CHILDREN BREATHE EASIER.

EMERGENCY SYMPTOMS SPRING FLOWERS can take your breath away. And not just because their beauty is such a welcome break from winter landscapes. For children with asthma, the high pollen counts that come with spring can spell breathing trouble. During an asthma attack, the airways swell, produce excess mucus and narrow, limiting the amount of air that gets into the lungs. Asthma is a chronic condition, and attacks can vary from mild to severe enough that they require immediate medical attention. Pediatric asthma is a leading cause of emergency-department visits and absences from school.

COMMON TRIGGERS Allergic reactions to environmental triggers, such as pollen or pet dander, can cause asthma attacks. Exposure to smoke and cold air also can trigger attacks, as can physical expressions of emotion (laughing or yelling, for example). Many children with asthma experience symptoms when they’re physically

James Davis, M.D. Pediatrician

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active, a condition called exercise-induced bronchospasm. Your child’s doctor can help devise an action plan that makes participating in sports safe, for example by using an inhaler before physical activity. Exercise can actually strengthen airway muscles, improving their function. The exact cause of pediatric asthma is unknown, but research suggests interplay between the immune system and early exposure to environmental irritants. Genetics may also play a role. Though there’s no known cure for asthma, most serious effects are avoidable with proper treatment. Your child’s doctor can help you identify triggers and develop an action plan to share with school personnel. Medications can help prevent attacks by reducing inflammation in the airways, and inhalers can be used to relax the muscles around the airways during an attack. In some children with environmental allergies, immunotherapy (allergy shots) can help reduce asthma symptoms, making it easier for children and parents alike to relax and enjoy the many pleasures of spring.

Oxford Pediatrics is now part of the McCullough-Hyde | TriHealth family and accepting new patients. The office is located at 5141 Morning Sun Rd. in Oxford. For an appointment, call 513 523 2156.

Since asthma affects breathing, it can be deadly in a worst-case scenario. When in doubt, go to the hospital. Definitely go to the emergency room if your child is: • So out of breath he can’t finish a

sentence • Wheezing nonstop • Breathing with the help of stomach muscles • Flaring nostrils while breathing • Showing changes in facial color, like bluish lips

COMMON SYMPTOMS Consult your child’s pediatrician if you suspect asthma. Symptoms to watch for include: • Frequent cough • Wheezing while breathing • Trouble breathing, shortness of breath, rapid breathing • Chest pain, tightness • Fatigue • Poor sleep • Breathing trouble that limits play

SPRING 2018 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

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6 Better Sleep Habits for

TOO LITTLE SLEEP HAS A NEGATIVE IMPACT ON HEALTH. OUR EXPERT TIPS WILL HELP YOU GIVE YOUR BODY THE REST IT NEEDS. NOT GETTING enough sleep? You’re not alone. One-third of U.S. adults don’t sleep for the recommended seven hours, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Lack of sleep can seriously affect your mental and physical health, including depressing the immune system so you get sick more easily and causing hormonal changes,” says Shayla Pullen, M.D., a sleep medicine specialist with McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital’s Sleep Disorders Center. “It also can lead to weight gain and cognitive impairments.” Life in 2018 isn’t helping. Your cellphone, tablet and television all emit a type of blue light that restrains melatonin, which controls your sleep/wake cycle, making it harder to fall asleep. “To create good sleep habits, you need to turn off all electronics before going to bed,” says Dr. Pullen. “You should also have a set routine that you follow.” Stick with the following six habits to help ensure that you wake up refreshed and ready to go. Shayla Pullen, M.D. Sleep Medicine Specialist

1. Resist the snooze button. As good as that extra seven minutes might seem, it won’t be the quality sleep that will make you feel rested. Instead, set your alarm 10 minutes later, then get up right away.

3. Put your phone down. Turn on do-notdisturb mode to prevent notifications and give your mind a break. Better yet, buy an alarm clock so you can start leaving your phone outside the bedroom.

2. Do something physical. A daily 30-minute walk might be the change you need. A 2013 poll found that people who exercise report sleeping better and feeling more rested than those who don’t exercise. Get outside, if possible: Sunlight will help to regulate your body’s internal clock.

4. Keep your room dark. Hang room-darkening curtains or purchase an eye mask. Even light from a cable box can disrupt the quality of your sleep.

THE DANGERS OF LOSING SLEEP Not sleeping enough increases your risk of: • Diabetes • Heart disease • High blood pressure • Impaired memory

5. Avoid alcohol. Drinking before bed may give you the illusion of better sleep, but studies have shown that it interferes with quality shut-eye. Also avoid caffeine from early afternoon on, and heavy meals late at night. 6. Keep a consistent schedule. No matter how good it feels to ignore the alarm clock on weekends—don’t. It can shift your body’s natural clock. Keep your sleep/wake schedule as consistent as possible, and follow the same bedtime routine nightly.

• Lack of alertness • Obesity • Stroke

Dr. Pullen sees patients at 5151 Morning Sun Rd. in Oxford. Phone: 513 524 5475. If you have sleep issues, contact your PCP for a referral.

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A hug for every tumble, courtesy of Mom. The safest level of care, courtesy of McCullough-Hyde | TriHealth. Fourth-straight ‘A’ safety rating from The Leapfrog Group for McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth.* When patients come through our doors, we know they not only deserve top-notch, quality care, they also need peace of mind. That’s why we’re committed to meeting the highest possible standards and providing the safest, most comfortable environments—rest assured.

Discover all the award-winning care we’re bringing to the Oxford community. Visit TriHealth.com/MHMH or call 513 523 2111.

* The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade uses 27 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to assign grades.

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Oxford Health & Life: Spring 2018  

The Good Living Magazine from McCULLOUGH-HYDE | TRIHEALTH

Oxford Health & Life: Spring 2018  

The Good Living Magazine from McCULLOUGH-HYDE | TRIHEALTH