Page 1

OXFORD T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M M c C U L L O U G H - H Y D E | T R I H E A LT H

FALL 2017 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

ALL-NEW SURGERY SUITES COMING: 3D MAMMOGRAMS WOMEN’S HEALTH SCREENINGS

STAY FLU-FREE Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 1

7/28/17 8:54 AM


{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

COMING SOON:

3 D Mammograms 2

FALL 2017 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 2

7/28/17 8:54 AM


3D MAMMOGRAPHY IS MORE EFFICIENT IN NOT WASTING PEOPLE’S TIME, MONEY AND ENERGY, AND ALSO MORE EFFICIENT IN FINDING MORE CANCERS AT AN EARLIER STAGE WHEN THEY HAVE A BETTER PROGNOSIS.” —HILLARY EVANS, M.D., BOARD-CERTIFIED DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGIST

BETTER ACCURACY AND LESS RADIATION MAKE 3D MAMMOGRAPHY A WIN-WIN FOR PATIENTS AND CAREGIVERS ALIKE. With fall comes Breast Cancer Awareness Month—a perfect time to remind women about the importance of receiving regular mammograms. McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth is marking this annual campaign by purchasing state-of-theart 3D-mammography equipment. Also called tomosynthesis, it is the most accurate mammography technology available. The chance that a woman will develop breast cancer in her lifetime is about 12 percent. “At this time, the best way to treat breast cancer is to detect it early, and the best method that we have for detection is annual mammography,” says Hillary Evans, M.D., a radiologist and member of the board of directors of McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital. Mammograms may not be everyone’s favorite exam, but they are often a life-saving test, according to the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force. A traditional mammogram is a twodimensional X-ray of the breast. It allows doctors who specialize in X-ray and imaging, called radiologists, to look inside the breast tissue and see whether there are any suspicious masses that could

be cancer. If an abnormality is detected, patients are called back for an exam and more diagnostic procedures. Recently, the usefulness of mammography has been questioned by some medical organizations, in part because traditional 2D mammography results in a high number of false positives. These false alarms can cause anxiety for patients, who worry that they may have cancer. In addition, patients may need to undergo invasive procedures like biopsy to get a correct diagnosis. This is where the newer threedimensional technology shines. 3D mammography works by taking a series of images, using the motion of the camera, and then stacking the images on top of each other to create a 3D picture of the breast. This is superior to traditional mammography for key reasons. “In traditional 2D mammography,” explains Dr. Evans, “something in the top of the breast might overlap something in the bottom of the breast, making it look like there’s a mass or something worrisome when there isn’t.” In addition, normal tissue from one area may overlap a suspicious finding and hide it. “The new technology enables us to divide the

breast into thinner sections,” says Dr. Evans. “That provides a clearer picture and reduces false positives.” Patients benefit because cancers can be found earlier, and fewer patients are called back for findings that turn out to be harmless. “It’s more efficient in not wasting people’s time, money and energy, and also more efficient in finding more cancers at an earlier stage when they have a better prognosis,” says Dr. Evans. Multiple studies in the U.S. and Europe have shown a 10 to 30 percent increase in cancer detection using 3D over 2D mammography. That means more patients will get the correct diagnosis, likely resulting in more lives saved. The mammography unit that McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital is acquiring uses the latest 3D technology, which exposes patients to lower levels of radiation than earlier generations of 3D-mammography equipment. “The point in the technology timeline at which we’re purchasing our 3D-mammography equipment is excellent,” says Dr. Evans. “We’re getting state-of-the-art technology with the advantage of lower radiation, so it’s a win-win.”

TO SCHEDULE YOUR MAMMOGRAM, CALL 513 524 5555. OXFORD HEALTH & LIFE | FALL 2017

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 3

3

7/28/17 8:55 AM


{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

NEW SURGERY SUITES

MAKE THEIR DEBUT

BIGGER, BRIGHTER AND TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED, THE NEW OPERATING ROOMS AT MHMH HAVE MUCH TO OFFER BOTH SURGEONS AND PATIENTS.

4

FALL 2017 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 4

7/28/17 8:55 AM


The new surgical suites at McCulloughHyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth opened with little fanfare other than a photograph to mark the occasion. But those who are working and being treated in the new facilities are giving them a standing ovation. The first physician to perform surgery in the new suites was longtime Oxford resident Paul J. Cangemi, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon with TriHealth Orthopedic & Sports Institute. “The fact that we have a state-of-the-art facility in our backyard that’s making it as easy as possible for me to work makes me more comfortable as a surgeon,” he says. “Being in a large, brightly lit room with all the latest technology makes me as confident as possible about each procedure.” The new operating rooms offer many improvements, including more space, better lighting and state-of-the-art technology. Having a larger room is important because during some complex procedures a second instrument table is needed. “Now there’s more space so it’s easier to get around both tables and have quick and convenient access to all the surgical instruments,” says Dr. Cangemi. The extra space also makes it easier to maneuver large, bulky equipment. “It’s a great advantage to be able to move a mobile X-ray machine around the table easily and have access to take images from various positions around the patient,” explains Dr. Cangemi. Janell McAbee, a patient of Dr. Cangemi’s, was the first person to have surgery in the new suites. Last year she

had a procedure in the old OR. She says that she noticed the difference as soon as they wheeled her in. “Everything is brand-new and so much brighter—there was a lot of light,” she says. “I just remember saying, ‘This is really nice!’ And next thing I knew I was waking up after the surgery.” In addition to being much brighter, the new LED lights move more easily. While surgeons are operating, they reach up and grab handles on the lights to direct the beam where they need it. The old lights could be difficult to reposition. “These lights move with so little resistance,” says Dr. Cangemi. “And the beam is brighter and covers a much bigger surface area. When surgeons are working, it’s important to get good light into all areas of the operating field.” When surgical cameras are used, new 4K monitors make images more distinct. “It’s a real benefit compared to the equipment we had previously,” says Dr. Cangemi. Photographs taken during surgery are now captured into the patient record automatically, making it easy for health-care providers at other facilities to review them if needed. “I’m very happy McCullough-Hyde and TriHealth have decided to make this investment,” says Dr. Cangemi. I feel grateful for myself and for those who follow. Without hesitation I would fully recommend this surgical facility.” Janell is pleased, too. “The care was excellent,” she says. “Everyone was very nice and made sure I had no worries. They took good care of me.”

BEING IN A LARGE, BRIGHTLY LIT ROOM WITH ALL THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY MAKES ME AS CONFIDENT AS POSSIBLE ABOUT EACH PROCEDURE.” —PAUL J. CANGEMI, M.D., ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON

MORE ENT CARE NOW IN OXFORD As part of its ongoing effort to offer more specialty care locally, McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth is bringing Raymond P. Rock, M.D., a board-certified otolaryngologist, to Oxford. “I’m excited about working in Oxford,” says Dr. Rock. “The town is so beautiful and the people I’ve treated in that area over the years have always been very friendly, as well as healthconscious.” Dr. Rock explains that his specialty is focused on the medical and surgical treatment of diseases that affect anything above the collarbone, except for the eyes, brain and spinal cord. “Problems with ears, nose, sinuses and throat, which we otolaryngologists manage, account for more than half of all visits to health-care providers,” he says.

Raymond P. Rock, M.D.

Dr. Rock will see patients in Oxford every Monday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Beginning next year, Dr. Rock also will see patients in Oxford on Thursdays. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 513 246 7000.

Board-Certified Otolaryngologist

OXFORD HEALTH & LIFE | FALL 2017

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 5

5

7/28/17 8:55 AM


BREAKFAST BOWL

LOOKING FOR FRESH WAYS TO JUMP-START YOUR DAY WITH A HEALTHY BREAKFAST? THIS RECIPE REVITALIZES OATMEAL—A PROVEN BOON TO YOUR CHOLESTEROL PROFILE. ONE GLANCE AT THE INGREDIENTS AND YOU’LL SEE: THIS ISN’T YOUR GRANDFATHER’S BOWL OF OATS.

6

FALL 2017 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 6

7/28/17 8:55 AM


{ TASTES }

Baked Oatmeal With Lemon Thyme & Ricotta DIRECTIONS

SERVES 4 The blueberries provide a great ‘pop’ of sweetness when you bite into them, but any berry will do. The whipped ricotta is lovely, but if you’re after an instant topping, a good dollop of yogurt is great, too.

n

Preheat the oven to 320°F (fan-forced). Place four small ovenproof bowls onto a baking tray.

n

Divide two-thirds of the peach slices over the bases of the bowls and sprinkle with the lemon thyme and oats. Combine the milk with 2 cups water in a jug and pour gently and evenly over the oats in each bowl. Make sure the oats are spread evenly in the bowls.

n

Bake for 15 minutes, then remove from the oven and give the mixture a light stir with a fork, pressing the oats under the liquid slightly, if necessary. Sprinkle with the blueberries, walnuts, sunflower kernels and flax seeds and return to the oven for a further 10–12 minutes or until the oats are tender and there is very little liquid left. Remove from the oven and set aside for 5 minutes.

n

Meanwhile, for the whipped ricotta, whiz the ricotta, maple syrup and vanilla bean paste in a food processor or blender until smooth. If necessary, thin with a little water or milk to reach the consistency you like. Transfer to a small bowl, cover and refrigerate until required.

n

Serve the oatmeal warm, topped with the whipped ricotta, sliced plum, remaining peach slices and extra thyme. If you like, drizzle with maple syrup.

INGREDIENTS n n

n

n n n n n n n

3 peaches, apples or pears, sliced 2 tsp. fresh lemon thyme leaves, plus extra to serve 1½ cups rolled (traditional/ porridge) oats 1 cup milk 4½ oz. frozen or fresh blueberries ¼ cup roughly chopped walnuts 2½ Tbs. sunflower kernels 4 tsp. flax seeds Sliced plum, to serve Pure maple syrup, to serve (optional)

Whipped ricotta 1 cup firm fresh ricotta n 4 tsp. pure maple syrup n 1 tsp. vanilla bean paste n

CREDIT: © Breakfast Bowls by Caroline Griffiths, Smith Street Books, 2017. Photographs © Chris Middleman.

OXFORD HEALTH & LIFE | FALL 2017

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 7

7

7/28/17 8:55 AM


HE ALTH SCREENINGS

A WOMAN’S GUIDE

STAY ON TOP OF YOUR PREVENTIVE CARE WITH THIS HANDY LIST OF RECOMMENDED HEALTH SCREENINGS FOR WOMEN. Follow this guide to help ensure that any health problems you may have are detected early, when they’re most treatable. Your health-care provider can modify or add to these recommendations based on your medical history and personal risk factors.

BREAST HEALTH • Breast self-exam: Women of all ages should be familiar with their breasts so they can discuss any changes with their health-care provider. • Breast exam by a medical professional: At least every three years for women younger than 40. Every year for women 40 and older. • Mammogram: Every one to two years, beginning at age 40, for women at average risk for breast cancer. Women 80 and older should discuss with their healthcare provider whether a mammogram is recommended for them.

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH • Pelvic exam: Annually, throughout life. This exam can help your doctor find evidence of various gynecologic conditions, including cancer, STDs, fibroids and cysts.

• Pap test: At least every three years through age 60. Women older than 60 should discuss with their healthcare provider whether a Pap test, which screens for cervical cancer, is recommended for them. • Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) tests: Throughout life, before sexual intercourse with a new partner both partners should be tested for STIs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). • Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: Women up to age 26 whose HPV vaccine series is incomplete (two to three doses are required, depending on the age at which the vaccine is given) should discuss vaccination with their health-care provider. p

HEART HEALTH • Blood pressure test: At least every two years. High blood pressure can lead to a variety of health problems, including heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney disease and dementia. • Cholesterol panel: At least every five years, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglycerides should be measured to assess heart-disease risk. Discuss the right frequency for you with your healthcare provider.

COLON HEALTH • Cancer screening: Colonoscopy every 10 years, or stool-based test (can be done at home and requires no bowel preparation) every year. Talk to your physician about which option is best for you. For those at average risk, colon-cancer screening should occur from age 50 to 75.

ONE-TIME SCREENINGS • Hepatitis C (HCV): If you’re born between 1945 and 1965, talk to your doctor about this test. • Bone density: At least once. Talk to your doctor about the right age for you to be tested. In addition to the screenings listed here, any time you have concerns about your sleep habits, mental health, risk factors for disease or symptoms you are experiencing, talk with your doctor. Early detection of disease can help people live longer, healthier lives, so keep a copy of these screening guidelines and share the information with friends and family who may benefit.

TO SCHEDULE A HEALTH SCREENING AT M c CULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL | TRIHEALTH, PLEASE CALL 513 524 5555. 8

FALL 2017 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 8

7/28/17 8:55 AM


EARLY DETECTION OF DISEASE CAN HELP PEOPLE LIVE LONGER, HEALTHIER LIVES.”

OXFORD HEALTH & LIFE | FALL 2017

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 9

9

7/28/17 8:55 AM


NO FLU FOR YOU! 4 WAYS TO REDUCE THE IMPACT OF THIS SEASONAL MENACE.

10

FALL 2017 | TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 10

7/28/17 8:55 AM


Maybe the flu, with its fever, dry cough, sore throat, body aches and chills, won’t strike you this year. But why take the chance? The influenza virus—a contagious infection of the respiratory system—affects 10 to 20 percent of the population annually. Each year the flu is different, and more or less severe. Since 2010 in the U.S., deaths from the flu or its complications have ranged from 12,000 to 56,000. Fortunately, there are preventive steps you can take to avoid the flu.

1. GET A FLU SHOT. The Centers for Disease Control recommends that everyone six months of age and older get a flu vaccine every season. Not only will it reduce your risk of coming down with the flu, but also of spreading it to others. This is especially important if you live or spend time with someone at higher risk of flu complications (see sidebar) or if you have a child who is too young to be vaccinated. Ideally, have your shot at the start of the season, which means in October or November. The vaccine is very safe, there are no serious side effects, and it’s typically covered by insurance.

Talk to your doctor before getting a flu shot if you have an allergy to eggs or any of the ingredients in the vaccine, a history of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, or an acute illness or fever.

2. AVOID GERMS. This might seem to be common sense, but it bears repeating: Try not to have close contact with anyone who’s infected. And if you’re sick yourself, stay home and get well. When someone who has the flu coughs or sneezes, the virus is expelled into the air and may be inhaled by others. That’s why health experts recommend sneezing or coughing into the crook of your arm. Other ways to protect against both spreading germs if you’re sick and catching germs if you’re not: Wash your hands frequently, and keep them away from your eyes, nose and mouth (touching these areas can spread the bacteria).

3. KEEP YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM STRONG. Boost your immune system by staying on top of fundamental healthy habits. Get plenty of sleep and exercise, drink a lot of fluids, maintain a balanced diet and manage stress.

IS IT THE FLU—OR JUST A COLD? SYMPTOM

COLD

FLU

Fever and chills

Rarely

Yes (100.4 degrees or higher)

Cough

Yes

Yes (dry)

Sore throat

Yes (scratchy)

Yes

Body aches, fatigue

Rarely

Yes

Decreased appetite

Rarely

Yes

Congestion

Yes

Yes

Sneezing

Yes

Yes

Duration

2–14 days

7 days to several weeks

Onset of symptoms

Gradual

Sudden

ARE YOU AT HIGH RISK? People in these categories are at higher risk for developing complications from the flu and should see a physician as soon as they notice symptoms: • Children under 5 • Adults older than 65 • Pregnant women • People with weakened immune systems • People with chronic illnesses, including asthma, heart disease, kidney disease and diabetes • People with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 40 or more

4. CONSIDER A MEDICATION. In most cases, flu can be treated with bed rest, plenty of fluids, and an over-thecounter pain reliever. But your doctor may recommend an antiviral medication. When taken within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms, oseltamivir (trade name Tamiflu) and zanamivir (trade name Relenza) may shorten your illness by a day or more and help to prevent complications. But these medications may cause side effects such as skin rashes, vomiting, diarrhea and headache. In addition, heavy use of antivirals could cause strains of the influenza virus to build up a resistance, making the drugs ineffective down the line. If you believe you’re getting the flu—especially if a fever has come on suddenly—see your doctor. He or she can do a nasal swab test in the office to determine promptly if you have the illness. Be sure to monitor the progress of your illness. If you start feeling worse instead of better as the days go by, consult your doctor to make sure you’re not developing a flu-related complication.

FOR A FLU SHOT, CALL YOUR PRIMARY CARE PROVIDER. DON’T HAVE A PERSONAL PHYSICIAN? FIND ONE NEAR YOU BY CALLING 513 524 5488 OR VISIT TRIHEALTH.COM/MHMH FOR OUR PHYSICIAN DIRECTORY. OXFORD OXFORD HEALTH HEALTH & LIFE & LIFE | SUMMER | FALL 2017

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 11

11

7/28/17 8:56 AM


BIGGER. NEWER. BETTER. You’re more than just a patient, and we’re more than just an ER. At McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital | TriHealth, things have changed for the better. We recently made our nationally recognized Emergency Department more accessible to patients, staff and the entire Oxford region. There’s more space, improved services and better access to specialists. But one thing hasn’t changed throughout our expansion: our commitment to providing the best care possible, thanks to our board-certified emergency medicine physicians and nurses.

• Expanded facility with 14,000 square feet of space • Individual treatment rooms with increased privacy • Central workstation with direct patient visibility at all times • Separate areas for patients exposed to hazards and infectious diseases • Separate entrances for walk-in patients and emergency squads • Two senior-focused specialty rooms and one pediatric-friendly room

Call 513 523 2111 or visit TriHealth.com/MHMH 110 North Poplar Street, Oxford, OH 45056

Oxford_Fall17_final.indd 12

001888-00 | 07 17

7/28/17 8:56 AM

Profile for Wainscot Media

Oxford Health & Life: Fall 2017  

The Good Living Magazine from McCullough-Hyde | TRIHEALTH

Oxford Health & Life: Fall 2017  

The Good Living Magazine from McCullough-Hyde | TRIHEALTH