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FALL/WINTER 2019 | $3.95

THE GRATIFICATION OF WALKING PAIN-FREE BRAVO: 10 YEARS OF IMPACT

MCLAREN.ORG/MACOMBHEALTHANDLIFE

DELIGHT YOUR GUESTS

VIBRANT

GOLDEN YEARS


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WE CAN DO THIS ALL DAY. AND ALL NIGHT. To become a verified trauma center, hospitals must meet rigorous national standards—like having trauma surgeons evaluate patients within 15 minutes of arrival. At McLaren Macomb, that’s not good enough. We understand that minutes make a difference. That’s why our trauma surgeons are in-house 24/7 to evaluate each trauma patient immediately upon arrival. McLaren Macomb is Macomb County’s first verified trauma center, and we are committed to having trauma surgeons in-house every day, all day. Because when it’s someone you love, 15 minutes can be a lifetime. McLaren Macomb is Macomb County’s first verified trauma center. Learn more about McLaren Macomb’s trauma expertise at mclaren.org/macombtrauma.

1000 Harrington Blvd, Mount Clemens, MI 48043

10/26/18 2:50 PM


CONTENTS

FEATURES 15

24

Read advice from McLaren Macomb physicians to help you age well.

An innovative procedure opens up one man’s narrowed carotid artery.

VIBRANT GOLDEN YEARS

CLEARING THE CAROTID

21

26

Expert treatment from an orthopedic oncologist helps to protect patients’ bones.

After successful pregnancies, many mothers experience secondary infertility. Help is at hand.

WHEN CANCER SPREADS TO THE BONE

TRYING TO GROW YOUR FAMILY

28

THE GRATIFICATION OF WALKING PAIN-FREE

Advanced technology helps relieve one woman of her constant pain.

34

ESCAPES: SWEET ISLAND RETREAT

Visit the Sugar Beach Resort on Saint Lucia, and you won’t want to leave.

34 I N E V ERY I S S UE

6 8 4 4 2

FALL/WINTER 2019 | MCL AREN.ORG/MACOMB

W E LC O M E L E T T E R E D I TO R’S N OT E W H E R E TO E AT


2019 HALL & OATES CONCERT SPONSORS - THANK YOU. Thanks to the incredibly generous sponsors and individuals who supported McLaren Macomb’s recent Hall & Oates concert benefit at the Michigan Lottery Amphitheater at Freedom Hill. We are thrilled to take the next steps in ensuring our community a new Medical Outreach Clinic (MOC). In spring 2020, the new McLaren Macomb MOC will hit the road to continue serving the healthcare needs of Macomb County’s most vulnerable population.

PRESENTING SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS

Tracy & Dr. Timothy Logan

Special Thanks: Judy & Dr. Peter Ajluni Teri & Tom Brisse Dr. Crista Broutin – TeamHealth Jim Carnacchi Ron Chriss – DTE

Nick Contesti Mike Dadas Ray Kalosis, Venture Vision LED Michelle & Dr. Dominick Lago, Jr. Marilyn Lane Mary Free Bed

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William Peterson Diane & Dean Petitpren Jereme Poxson Nancy & Dr. Albert Przybylski David Roncelli Steve Skaglin Kevin Tompkins

10/17/19 11:05 AM


{ CONTENTS }

30 38

DEPARTMENTS 12

38

Our guide to things we love in Macomb County.

Beat the winter blues with these unique twists on comfort food classics.

LOCAL BUZZ

22

BRAVO: 10 YEARS OF IMPACT

A key fundraiser celebrates a decade of increasing access to mammograms.

30

DELIGHT YOUR GUESTS

As winter arrives, get ready for visitors by creating a welcoming guest room.

FEEL-GOOD FOOD

46

BE THERE

A roundup of noteworthy Macomb County happenings.

48

POWER FOOD

Turmeric is a flavorful, vibrant spice that’s good for you, too.

48

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SCHEDULE PHYSICIAN APPOINTMENTS ONLINE ANYTIME. Don’t wait for office hours to schedule your next physician appointment. Schedule your appointment online with a McLaren Medical Group primary care, OB/GYN or pediatric physician at mclaren.org/macombappointments and get your care in your community. McLaren Macomb Internal Medicine & Health 37399 Garfield, Suite 106 Clinton Township, MI 48036 (586) 226-3500 mclaren.org/macombIM McLaren Macomb Family Medicine - Country Meadows 16700 21 Mile Road, Suite 101 Macomb, MI 48044 (586) 263-0320 mclaren.org/macombFM McLaren Macomb - Lakeshore Medical Center 33720 Harper Avenue Clinton Township, MI 48035 (586) 294-5210 mclaren.org/lakeshoremc McLaren Macomb - Clinton Township Family Medicine 37399 Garfield, Suite 203 Clinton Township, MI 48036 (586) 228-2911 mclaren.org/clintontownshipFM McLaren Macomb Family Medicine - Lakewood 13425 19 Mile Road, Suite 100 Sterling Heights, MI 48313 (586) 843-3935 mclaren.org/macombprimarycare McLaren Macomb - Clinton Township Internal Medicine 36539 Harper Avenue Clinton Township, MI 48035 (586) 792-8877 mclaren.org/clintontownshipIM

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McLaren Macomb Family Medicine - Romeo Plank 46401 Romeo Plank, Suite 4 Macomb, MI 48044 (586) 226-8600 mclaren.org/macombfamilymedicine

McLaren Macomb Women’s Health 36561 Harper Avenue Clinton Township, MI 48035 (586) 792-5740 mclaren.org/macombwomenshealth

McLaren Macomb Family Medicine - Silvan 35103 Silvano Street Clinton Township, MI 48035 (586) 791-5250 mclaren.org/macombfamily

McLaren Macomb - New Baltimore Women’s Health 51086 Fairchild Road, Unit A New Baltimore, MI 48051 (586) 725-4604 mclaren.org/NBwomenshealth

McLaren Macomb - Hampton Medical Center 30550 Utica Road Roseville, MI 48066 (586) 771-0290 mclaren.org/hamptonmedical McLaren Macomb - Sterling Heights Pediatrics & Family Medicine 35111 Dodge Park Sterling Heights, MI 48312 (586) 978-8010 mclaren.org/sterlingheights McLaren Macomb Pediatrics 16700 21 Mile Road, Suite 104 Macomb, MI 48044 (586) 226-2032 mclaren.org/macombpediatrics McLaren Macomb - Clinton Township Pediatrics 22500 Metropolitan Parkway, Suite 201 Clinton Township, MI 48035 (586) 493-3732 mclaren.org/clintontownshippediatrics

McLaren Macomb - Clinton Township Women’s Health 37400 Garfield, Suite 200 Clinton Township, MI 48036 (586) 286-4880 mclaren.org/CTwomenshealth McLaren Macomb - North Grove Women’s Health 44200 Garfield, Suite 164 Clinton Township, MI 48038 (586) 412-5117 mclaren.org/NGwomenshealth McLaren Macomb - Shelby Creek Women’s Health 8180 26 Mile Road, Suite 101 Shelby Township, MI 48316 (586) 465-2000 mclaren.org/shelbycreekwh

10/18/19 2:09 PM


{ WELCOME LETTER }

ENHANCING HEALTHCARE

MAKE APPOINTMENTS ONLINE, ANYTIME. Visit our website to learn about our primary care physicians, access new patient forms and make your next appointment. The process is quick and easy. To make an appointment or learn more, visit mclaren.org/macombappointments

This is a beautiful time of year, and after a fun, lively summer, the crisp, cool air and colorful environment of the season are welcome changes. There is nothing quite like a Michigan fall. As we approach the end of 2019, we are given the opportunity to look back on the year, and we cannot help but feel a sense of pride. Most noticeable is the very significant progress made on the construction project that will result in the Wayne and Joan Webber Emergency and Trauma Center. Changing the face of the McLaren Macomb campus, the new facility will provide an incredible benefit to our community when it opens in the spring. It is very exciting, and the completion of this project will also allow us to break ground on other projects and continue to expand our capabilities. These efforts and all others are motivated by our commitment to enhance the health of our community. This includes providing all patients with access to the latest technology (pg. 28) and innovative procedures (pg. 24) and meeting the unique needs of our region’s growing senior citizen population (pg. 15). Lastly, I’d like to offer a sincere congratulations to the team behind our annual BRAvo breast cancer awareness event (pg 22). Reaching a 10-year milestone is no easy feat for any event, and the team behind it works tirelessly to ensure the evening’s celebration is unique and endlessly entertaining, but most importantly that your generous donations contribute to a great cause. I sincerely hope you enjoy this edition of Macomb Health & Life, and, to all of you, my wishes for a happy, healthy holiday season and prosperous new year.

Thomas Brisse President & CEO McLaren Macomb

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT M C LAREN MACOMB, VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT MCLAREN.ORG/MACOMB.


OF COURSE, SHE GETS HER OWN ROOM. At McLaren Macomb, we have assembled a team of OB/GYN physicians from a wide variety of backgrounds to meet your health care needs before, during and after pregnancy. In addition to comprehensive prenatal care at physician offices throughout Macomb County, McLaren Macomb offers birthing education and child care classes to help new mothers prepare for their special delivery. Our Family Birthing Center is staffed by a team of experienced nurses focused on meeting the unique needs of each patient. All this, with 15 private birthing suites where mom and baby can share their first moments. Whether you’re preparing to become a new mother or considering robotic gynecological surgery, McLaren Macomb’s OB/GYN team is prepared to provide the care you need. You can feel comfortable sharing your questions or concerns with our experienced and compassionate OB/GYN physicians. THOMAS ALDERSON, DO

Clinton Twp. (586) 493-3740 (586) 412-5117 KATIE BIEBER, DO

Clinton Twp. (586) 792-5740 KATHERINE BOYD, MD

Warren (586) 573-7222

MIMI CHEN, DO

Clinton Twp. (586) 412-5117 CAROL FISCHER, DO

Mount Clemens (586) 493-3880 SARAH JONES, DO

Clinton Twp. (586) 286-4880

LINDA KARADSHEH, DO

Clinton Twp. (586) 286-4880 STEPHEN OLSON, DO

Chesterfield (586) 725-4604 Clinton Twp. (586) 286-4880

CASSANDRA RAMAR, DO

Clinton Twp. (586) 412-5117 ENID ROBERTS, MD

Chesterfield (586) 716-1702 SARAH VYSKOCIL, DO

Chesterfield (586) 725-4604

To learn more about McLaren Macomb’s Family Birthing Center, visit mclaren.org/deliveringdaily.

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10/18/19 2:11 PM


Missed the last issue? Read articles and see great bonus content at mclaren.org/macombhealthandlife View videos, download recipes and more...

{ EDITOR’S NOTE }

TAKE TIME TO ENJOY THE FUN With good reason, fall is a favorite season for many. For starters, the crisp weather and warm, bright colors make fall easy to love. As a prelude to winter—with its promise of family gatherings and celebrations with friends— fall is a time of anticipation and preparation. The trick to enjoying it all even more, of course, is to start those preparations early. That way, you’ll be able to enjoy more of the fun, from lazy firelit evenings playing board games to energizing outdoor walks to impromptu lunches with friends. For us, one of the pleasures of fall is bringing you another issue of Macomb Health & Life. This one is packed with seasonal joy, including warming winter recipes and ideas you can use to make your guest room welcoming and comfortable—just in time for holiday visitors. For those who like to plan a winter vacation somewhere warm, we highlight the many pleasures of Saint Lucia, a mountainous island nation in the eastern Caribbean. One of the area’s most scenic islands, Saint Lucia offers everything from hidden rainforest waterfalls and white sand beaches framed by volcanic peaks to luxurious spa treatments and delicious, locally inspired cuisine. We hope you find this issue helpful, from its important health guidance to its cooking ideas, and that you take time to put your feet up and enjoy it.

Best regards,

MARIA K. REGAN EXECUTIVE EDITOR

mclaren.org/macombhealthandlife


YOUR CARING, ATTENTIVE, UNMATCHED ADVANTAGE. YOUR BEST CHANCE.

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KARMANOS.ORG

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1-800-KARMANOS

10/13/17 10:26 AM


MARIA K. REGAN

E XECU TIVE ED ITOR

KIJOO KIM

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CARL OLSEN PUB LI S HER

M A R K E T I N G , D I G I TA L & O P E R AT I O N S

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & DIGITAL MEDIA NIGEL EDELS HAIN

ASSISTANT EDITOR ED I T O R I A L

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ADVERTISING SERVICES DIRECTOR JACQUELYNN FISCHER

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ART

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MEDIA RELATIONS REPRESENTATIVE DAVID JONES

CONTENT CONTRIBUTORS KRYSTA IVE Y KIM FUHRMANN LIS A JAEGER K AREN TUCKER

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JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT RANDY TAS H JIAN

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CATHERINE ROS ARIO

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PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA

MCL AREN MACOMB

1000 HARRINGTON BLVD. MOUNT CLEMENS, MI 48043 586.493.8000

SUSAN WINDRUM

CHRI S FERR ANTE

CHAIRMAN CARROLL V. DOWDEN PRESIDENT & CE O MARK DOWDEN S EN I O R V ICE PRESIDENTS SHAE MARCUS CARL OLSEN VICE PRESIDENTS NIGEL EDELS HAIN THOMAS FL ANNERY RITA GUARNA

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Macomb Health & Life,, 1000 Harrington Blvd., Mount Clemens, MI 48043; fax 586.493.8775; email healthandlife@mclaren.org. Macomb Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials. MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE is published twice a year by Wainscot Media, One Maynard Drive, Park Ridge, NJ, 07656. This is Volume 5, Issue 2. ©2019 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please email healthandlife@mclaren.org, attention “Magazine Advertising.” SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Macomb Health & Life, Circulation Department, One Maynard Drive, Park Ridge, NJ 07656; telephone 201.573.5541; email susan.windrum@wainscotmedia.com.


DOING WHAT’S BEST RIGHT IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD. McLAREN MACOMB PROVIDES A RANGE OF SERVICES AT OUR BAY RIVER LOCATION McLaren Macomb Diagnostic Imaging Services include X-ray, bone density, mammography, echocardiogram and ultrasound. Walk-in appointments available for X-ray. (586) 493-8187 McLaren Macomb Physical and Occupational Therapy Services include physical, occupational and speech therapy by appointment with physician referral. (586) 591-1420

McLaren Cardiovascular Institute Staffed by board-certified cardiologists trained in the latest procedures, diagnosis and treatment of cardiac conditions and diseases. (586) 464-4010 Family Medicine and walk-in Urgent Care Services include family medicine, urgent care, and a full-service pharmacy. (586) 716-1371

McLaren Macomb Lab Services Services include routine blood tests and urinalysis with a physician order. Walk-in appointments available. (586) 591-1403 McLaren Macomb—Bay River | 36267 26 Mile Road, Lenox Twp., MI 48048

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4/2/19 11:34 AM 5/1/19 10:35 AM


{ LOCAL BUZZ }

AN ARTIST IN OUR MIDST

Speaking strictly geographically, Judy Munro is a local artist, but when it comes to the reach of her art, that’s a different story. Her sensibility touches folks all across the country. She has pieces with galleries not only in Michigan, but also in a host of other places, from Illinois to New Jersey and beyond. Despite her level of artistic achievement, Munro hasn’t led the traditional fine artist’s life, at least not all the way through. It started out typically enough— her talent was recognized by her parents and teachers at an early age, and art school followed. But after being waylaid by family needs, Munro ended up becoming a designer and, eventually, creative director in the corporate world. It was only in 2009 when her company went through a downsizing that Munro decided fate was telling her to return to her artistic roots. She did, and has never looked back. Fast-forward to the present. Munro’s landscapes, cityscapes and abstract paintings can be seen in exhibitions all over Michigan. See her 2019 Studio Collection close to home at the Anton Art Center from November 15 through December 21. While the middle of Munro’s story may have diverged somewhat from the classic artist’s journey, with paintings now in collections all over North America, it seems she’s solidly back on the artist’s track.

FRESHLY MINTED LOCAL VINTNERS

When Jess Youngblood and her husband, Dave, came back to their family farm in Ray Township after almost 20 years of living out of state, they had a mission in mind. You see, the Youngbloods had been living in places where people know a thing or two about making wine—California and Virginia. And on their return to the farm that had been in the family for five generations, they were determined to turn it into a vineyard. In 2016 they did just that, filling their 25-acre farm with as many grapes as it could handle. The journey from vine in the grass to wine in the glass is said to take about three years, so lately the Youngbloods’ efforts have fully come to fruition, literally. And now that their wines are being bottled and sold, it turns out they’ve actually earned something of a place in local history by establishing the first commercial vineyard ever to make its home in Southeast Michigan. The reds and whites that Youngblood Vineyard has produced so far include Itasca, Marquette, Petite Pearl, Prairie Star, Frontenac and Frontenac Blanc, all made using the sustainable farming practices that are crucially important to the family. And while you can get their wines from local retailers, it’s also fun to visit the vineyard, which offers tasting tours and hosts private events. Learn more at youngbloodvineyard.com

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FALL/WINTER 2019 | MCL AREN.ORG/MACOMB


PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES | MACOMB COMMUNITY COLLEGE | JUDY MUNRO

A PLACE TO THRIVE

Back in 2011, Stan Babinski made a brave decision. His son, Stanley Ian Babinski, had died of cancer, and instead of sinking into depression, he decided to turn things around by letting this tragic event become the impetus for something overwhelmingly positive. Opening his heart to the young people of his community and honoring his late son at the same time, he started the Stanley Ian Babinski Boys & Girls Club in Washington Township. Ever since then, the Babinski Club has been doing great things for kids, simultaneously enabling them to have a more fun-filled youth and preparing them to be adults healthy in both body and mind. Located in the Stoney Creek Community Church, the club hosts kids from age 6 through 18, both after school and during the summer. In addition to offering help with homework, the club keeps kids moving with sports and other physical activities, as well as stressing the qualities (leadership, honesty, creativity, communication) that will serve them well all through their lives. Besides giving Babinski a chance to do something for his community, the club allows others to give back, too—it’s staffed by volunteers who are learning the value of altruism even while they’re assisting the kids. To sign your child up for the club (now a part of Metro Detroit Youth Clubs) or just to learn more about it, check out miclubs.org/our-locations/ stanley-ian-babinski-club

HAIL THE EVERYDAY HEROES

Art Van Furniture may have its headquarters in Warren, but people all over the Midwest have patronized the widespread, longlived chain, and this year the company is celebrating its 60th anniversary. To mark that big birthday, Art Van has decided to tap into a part of its history that’s vitally important, but not that widely known. That aspect is the business’s history of generosity and social responsibility. Art Van Elslander is the man who founded Art Van Furniture back in 1959. And while his business smarts would become known far and wide, his altruism is a part of the company’s legacy, too. Over the years, Elslander’s philanthropy extended to everything from funding organizations that combat poverty to helping to foot the bill for Detroit’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Elslander is no longer with us, but Art Van’s current CEO, Gary Fazio, feels it’s important to carry on the founder’s good works, especially as the company celebrates its milestone anniversary. So Art Van has launched the Inspirational Community Hero program. This fall the organization has given the public a chance to nominate ordinary folks who do something positive to make a difference for others in their community. At every one of the company’s many locations, a winner will be chosen to receive a $1,000 gift card. And out of those, a grand-prize winner will be picked for a $5,000 home makeover. Now that’s a good example of “giving back.”

MUSIC IS THEIR MISSION

Macomb Community College has contributed plenty of welleducated people to our area, but for nearly 50 years it has also given us an important entertainment resource. Back in 1970 the first incarnation of The Macombers came together at the school. Ever since then, one iteration of the group after another has been busy bringing pro-level music and dance to the community, as well as the greater Detroit area. The stalwart song-and-dance troupe has been around long enough to gain the distinction of being the longest-lasting college show choir in the entire state. Known as the “Goodwill Ambassadors of Macomb Community College,” the choir has a wide-ranging and ever-changing stage show that incorporates a cappella performances as well as full-band accompaniment, and digs into everything from classic rock ‘n’ roll and pop to disco, show tunes and much more. While they have varying talents, every one of the Macombers is a full-time scholarship student, carrying on a college tradition that’s now a half-century old. And whether they’re delivering a Beatles tune, a song from a classic show like Oklahoma or even a calypso nugget like “Zombie Jamboree,” the members of the group come together to deliver a performance full of nonstop energy and unbridled fun. MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE | FALL/WINTER 2019

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WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU HAD A MAMMOGRAM? McLaren Macomb has revolutionized mammography, becoming the first hospital in Macomb County to offer tomosynthesis 3D imaging. This next generation technology enables our radiologists to view tissue images one millimeter at a time, offering significantly better clarity than ever before.

rates so you can avoid the anxiety of being called for follow-up mammograms.

3D mammography allows our team to detect breast cancer at an earlier, more treatable stage, and also reduces false-positive recall

To learn more, call the McLaren Macomb Breast Center at (586) 493-3790.

You deserve the next generation of technology in the fight against breast cancer. When you need a mammogram, choose the McLaren Macomb Breast Center.

1000 Harrington Blvd., Mount Clemens, MI 48043

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mclaren.org/macomb

4/30/18 11:32 AM 10/22/19 10:10 AM


{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

Vibrant Golden Years: HEALTHY AGING

READ ADVICE FROM MCLAREN MACOMB PHYSICIANS TO HELP YOU AGE WELL AND CONTINUE ENJOYING THE LIFE YOU LOVE.

MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE | FALL/WINTER 2019

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Senior citizens in the United States are now living longer and in better health than at any other time. But with aging comes increased risk for an assortment of ailments and health conditions that could dampen a senior citizen’s golden years. However, in many cases, measures can be taken to help ensure that seniors live their later years in good health, bolstering the enjoyment and gratification those years can offer. These preventive measures could be simple, everyday precautions—like a watchful diet or being attentive to symptoms that suggest certain ailments—and making sure all recommended screenings are performed. Read on as experienced McLaren Macomb clinicians across a variety of fields offer their professional advice for how to healthily age. Following these recommendations can provide substantial benefits.

DR. KAVYASHRI JAGADEESH

16

DR. CHRISTOPHER VITALE

INTERNIST

ORTHOPEDIC TRAUMA SURGEON

Many accidents, illnesses and other common geriatric health conditions, such as falls, chronic illness, depression and frailty, are preventable to a certain extent. To prevent illness, get your flu vaccine yearly and other vaccines as per the recommended schedule, and wash your hands frequently. Contact your primary care practitioner for an annual physical and wellness visit. Bring a list of all your current medications— both prescription and non-prescription medications, including herbal supplements—and keep a list of all your health concerns. Adopting healthy habits and behaviors, staying involved in your community, using preventive services, taking charge of your health and understanding all your medications help in healthy aging.

Approximately one-third of people over the age of 65 suffer a fall each year. Although treatment options are available for the injured, larger emphasis is being placed on fall prevention to help stop these injuries from occurring. The first step is taking an active role in your bone health. Speak to your provider about obtaining a bone density scan and labs to verify adequate levels of vitamin D. Monitor medications closely to avoid interactions that could lead to falls. Avoid smoking and alcohol use as they contribute to osteoporosis. A balanced diet along with an exercise program that includes weight-bearing activities helps to maintain bone strength. Also, reduce preventable falls at home by installing non-slip treads on stairs and grab bars in the bathroom, removing area rugs, installing nightlights and appropriate lighting in hallways, basements and stairwells, and avoiding the use of ladders and step stools.

FALL/WINTER 2019 | MCL AREN.ORG/MACOMB


DR. MELISSA IANITELLI

DR. ANIEL MAJJHOO

CARDIOLOGIST

INTERVENTIONAL NEUROLOGIST

First and foremost, quit smoking. Having regular routine physicals with a primary care provider, as frequently as they recommend, will help them identify new symptoms, changes in EKGs and heart murmurs. Also, be aware of family history and which conditions you might be at a higher risk of developing. These include heart attacks, strokes, valve disorders, arrhythmias, congestive heart failure and other heart diseases. To help stave off the effects of heart disease, be sure to continue to exercise. Make it a goal to exercise on a daily basis. And be sure to note any decline in functional status, such as the ability to cut the grass one year when compared to the previous year. Don’t just assume “you’re getting older.” It’s not a normal part of aging to not be able to walk up a flight of stairs without chest pain or shortness of breath. Maintain a healthy diet, limiting salt consumption (that mostly comes from restaurants, fast food, canned food, lunch meat and other processed foods) and focusing on fresh foods and vegetables.

As we age, our risk for a stroke increases. Strokes can be life-threatening, but they are also the leading cause of disability among adults. It’s incredibly important to know the risk factors that increase the chances of a stroke occurring and taking preventive measures to lower that risk. First and foremost is to stop smoking. Also, take steps to lower blood pressure if it’s high, and exercise regularly while maintaining a healthy diet and weight. Know and treat underlying conditions, such as carotid disease, atrial fibrillation and diabetes. Following these healthy living practices will go a long way in helping to maintain vascular health and protect against both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Also, senior citizens should educate themselves and those closest to them about stroke symptoms and the B.E. F.A.S.T. acronym—trouble with balance and eyesight, noticeable facial droop, arm weakness and speech difficulties. If you experience any of those symptoms, don’t hesitate to call 9-1-1.

DON’T JUST ASSUME ‘YOU’RE GETTING OLDER.’ IT’S NOT A NORMAL PART OF AGING TO NOT BE ABLE TO WALK UP A FLIGHT OF STAIRS WITHOUT CHEST PAIN OR SHORTNESS OF BREATH.” —DR. MELISSA IANITELLI, CARDIOLOGIST

ALLISON TAORMINA REGISTERED DIETITIAN

Moving through our life cycle, it’s important to ensure that good nutrition is maintained as a focus for living a healthy life. Older adults are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart failure and other conditions. Proper nutrition and physical activity can help prevent these and improve overall outcomes. As we age, our bodies tend to use fewer calories because we’re less active and have a slower metabolism. However, it’s still important to consume enough nutrients. Many patients tell me they’ve cut down to two meals per day because they’re not as hungry as they used to be. This significantly reduces nutrient intake. Focus on the food groups consumed at each meal. Half of a plate should be filled with colorful fruit and vegetables (phytonutrients). A quarter of the plate should be filled with whole grains (fiber). The last quarter of the plate should be made up of lean protein such as chicken without the skin or fish twice per week. Also, be sure to consume three servings of low-fat dairy per day. Drink plenty of fluids (11 to 15 cups per day) to avoid dehydration and complications such as kidney and mental function issues.

MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE | FALL/WINTER 2019

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DR. ALEX STEINBOCK NEUROLOGIST

For your neurological health, it’s important to be aware of the changes in your brain that come with aging. This includes studying and being aware of your family history and which chronic diseases you might be at increased risk for. Knowing this will allow you to take steps to perhaps prevent these chronic diseases or to catch them early when treatment may be more effective. Some preventive measures everyone can take as they age to sustain their neurological health are to maintain a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and low-fat dairy, and to continue to be physically active. Exercise can help prevent, delay and manage chronic diseases, and can improve brain health. If you smoke, quit. Be aware of changes with your memory and brain health. Dementia is not part of aging. Follow up with your physician if you have any questions.

DR. RANA BILBEISI ONCOLOGIST

One of the most important things that you can do for yourself is to make sure that you keep up with all your preventive screening tests. This is a means to reduce the chances of finding incurable disease later on. Talk to your physician about all recommended screenings. In regards to oncology, it is important to note that as a person ages, so does their body, and with that so does their bone marrow. So situations of lower blood counts are common in older individuals and should not be dismissed. Please talk to your physician if you see abnormalities in your blood testing. Also, many older individuals when diagnosed with a cancer assume that they are not healthy enough to receive any treatment because they are too old. With new advancements in medicine, there are many medications that are very well tolerated by individuals well into their 90s. So one should not dismiss their disease as terminal and untreatable until they have spoken with their doctor.

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TO MAINTAIN YOUR BEST HEALTH AT ANY AGE, SEE A M C L AREN MACOMB PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN IF YOU HAVE ANY HEALTH CONCERNS OR ARE DUE FOR A SCREENING OR ANNUAL PHYSICAL EXAM. VISIT MCLAREN.ORG/ MACOMBAPPOINTMENTS.

DR. NIKESH ARDESHNA EPILEPTOLOGIST

As people age, their risk for developing epilepsy and seizures increases. Seizures can occur at any moment, making it all the more important to take preventive measures against injuries should a seizure occur. Most important, minimize your risk for falls. As a result of a fall, numerous different types of injuries can occur, not just broken bones or sprains. Consequences of a fall, such as a concussion, or head trauma resulting in a brain bleed, not only can lead to permanent neurological deficits, but also place patients at risk for other future medical conditions. Do not miss meals. Ensure that you are adequately hydrated. Treat infections promptly. Check with your family doctor on a yearly basis to ensure your immunizations are up to date. Also, remember that any infection or any type of injury takes longer to recover from as you age. So it is important to, first, avoid this, and, second, if an injury or infection does occur, seek medical attention promptly.


WE WORK ON MORE HEARTS THAN A FIRST-GRADE ART CLASS IN FEBRUARY. Our cardiac specialists perform more high-risk surgeries and offer more types of cardiology procedures than any other area hospital. Find out how a McLaren cardiologist can do what’s best for you.

mclaren.org/macombheart

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DOING WHAT’S BEST RIGHT IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD. McLAREN MACOMB PROVIDES A RANGE OF SERVICES AT OUR SHELBY CREEK LOCATION McLaren Macomb Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy Physical and occupational therapists providing treatment in a variety of orthopedic, oncological and neurological conditions. (586) 992-9030

McLaren Cardiovascular Institute Staffed by board-certified cardiologists trained in the latest procedures, diagnosis and treatment of cardiac conditions and diseases. (586) 992-9040

McLaren Macomb Diagnostic Imaging Services by appointment include: CT scan, MRI, bone density, echocardiogram, ultrasound and mammography. No appointment necessary for routine lab and X-ray. (586) 493-8187

McLaren Macomb—Shelby Creek Medical Center |

8180 26 Mile Road, Shelby Twp., MI 48316

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH } DR. ALYSIA KEMP, ORTHOPEDIC ONCOLOGIST AT THE KARMANOS CANCER INSTITUTE AT MCLAREN MACOMB.

WHEN CANCER SPREADS TO THE BONE EXPERT TREATMENT FROM AN ORTHOPEDIC ONCOLOGIST HELPS TO PROTECT PATIENTS’ BONES SO THEY CAN FEEL THEIR BEST DURING TREATMENT AND THRIVE AFTERWARD. While cancer originates at one location in the body—primary cancer—metastatic cancer occurs when that growing primary cancer spreads to other parts of the body via blood vessels and, rarely, through the lymph nodes. Any cancer can spread to another organ in the body, but a few common types of cancer, including breast, prostate, lung and kidney cancers, selectively spread to the bone. “Metastatic diseases are not uncommon, and our best chances to treat them are when we find them early,” said Dr. Alysia Kemp, an orthopedic oncologist at the Karmanos Cancer Institute at McLaren Macomb. “If we find it early, before the cancer has had a chance to spread to many bones, it’s more likely our treatment options will be successful.”

CAREFUL TREATMENT The majority of bone cancers are treatable with surgery performed by an orthopedic oncologist, a specially trained oncologist and orthopedic surgeon capable of meeting the unique needs of patients with cancer of the bone or the surrounding soft tissues. “Patients with a bone cancer require a special approach, beyond that of a general oncologist or orthopedic surgeon,” Dr. Kemp said. “Their bones are compromised and in a more delicate state. Orthopedic oncologists possess an understanding and knowledge

of this unique disease to create the most effective care plan.” Primary bone cancer is rare. For metastatic bone cancer, common locations include the spine, the pelvis and bones in the arms and legs (femur and humerus). Treatment options for metastatic cancer can include targeted radiation therapy, chemotherapy, surgery or a combination of the three. When performing surgery, orthopedic oncologists aim to remove the cancer and affected areas while salvaging the bone and tissue and preserving their function. To preserve function, Dr. Kemp may replace a joint with an artificial implant, stabilize the bone to prevent fracture and repair fractures that have already occurred. “Bone cancer can weaken patients’ bones, making them more susceptible to breaks and other fractures,” she said. “Impeding their function can interfere with their overall treatment and decrease their chances for survival.” Working as part of a comprehensive cancer care team, Dr. Kemp knows the importance of keeping her patients functioning and working toward recovery. “One of our goals is to keep our patients in a condition to feel their best while undergoing treatment,” she said. “But our ultimate goal will always be to return our patients to the lives they enjoyed before their diagnosis.”

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CANCER CARE CAPABILITIES AT THE KARMANOS CANCER INSTITUTE AT M C L AREN MACOMB AT MCLAREN.ORG/MACOMBCANCER. MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE | FALL/WINTER 2019

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

BRAVO:

10 YEARS OF IMPACT

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A KEY FUNDRAISER CELEBRATES A DECADE OF ENSURING THAT AN INABILITY TO PAY DOESN’T KEEP PATIENTS FROM GETTING RECOMMENDED MAMMOGRAMS. After 10 years and more than $1 million raised, BRAvo stands apart as Macomb County’s premier breast cancer awareness event. But its beginning was simple, though with remarkable intentions. A group of McLaren Macomb clinicians and administrators aimed to put together a program that would provide mammograms to women who, for any reason, might not otherwise have access to the potentially lifesaving breast cancer screening. The BRAvo for Women program was the result. Women (and the occasional man) whose physicians recommended the breast cancer-catching screening would no longer have to make the decision to forego the order because they lacked the ability to pay. Providing mammograms free of charge to the recipients meant the program would need to be funded. “We went to great lengths to ensure none of the patients who met our guidelines ever received a bill,” said Pat Keigher, regional director of cancer services at McLaren Macomb and the founder of BRAvo. “And we knew very early on that we wanted something more than your average fundraiser.” BRAvo the event was born.

THE FIRST BRAVO “To see where we came from to where the event is now,” Keigher said, “never would I have imagined that.”

While BRAvo would eventually grow to occupy banquet halls that comfortably accommodate several hundred revelers, the first BRAvo in October 2010 was a comparatively more modest event. Hosted at a local hair salon, a dedicated group of employees volunteered their time to organize donated gift baskets, prizes and other various raffle items in a festive atmosphere. “We knew we needed something eyecatching, something to help us stand out,” Keigher said. “And that’s when we came up with the idea of the bras. “It definitely got people’s attention,” she added. “It was a huge hit.” Using a bra as a blank canvas for artistic and creative expression, supporters of the program—including many breast cancer survivors— decorated the bras, which were then displayed for voting and raffled off. All in all, BRAvo 2010 raised just under $20,000. But more importantly, the inaugural BRAvo laid a foundation for the event to build upon and grow.

A MAINSTAY EVENT Nine years and two venue changes later, BRAvo’s attendance grew to over a thousand supporters. Survivors now use the annual event as an occasion to celebrate that they are thriving after beating cancer. To put an exclamation point on that sentiment, BRAvo 2015 introduced “Dancing With Our Docs,” a spirited,

friendly dancing competition that pairs a cancer survivor with a McLaren Macomb physician. “Winners” are determined by which pair raises the most money toward the cause. “Dancing With Our Docs was a gamechanger,” Keigher said. “It’s become the evening’s main entertainment and a significate donation generator. We have physicians asking to participate and a waiting list of survivors looking to dance. “To see a thousand people fixated on the stage and erupt into applause for a few amateur dancers is quite a remarkable sight,” she said. And while the party has grown over the years, the focus of the group has never strayed. With more than $1 million raised through the event, the BRAvo for Women program has never denied anyone. Every woman who met the guidelines was provided a mammogram (and those who didn’t meet the guidelines were offered a mammogram at a reduced rate). BRAvo funds were also made available to aid in McLaren Macomb’s purchase of a 3D mammogram unit— leading-edge breast imaging technology that provides radiologists with the highest resolution images. “This program and event grew well beyond all of our expectations,” Keigher said. “It’s the result of the work of so many and a supportive community, and the good it provides to so many people makes it all worth it.”

LEARN MORE ABOUT BRAVO AT MCLAREN.ORG/BRAVO. DUE FOR A MAMMOGRAM? MAKE AN APPOINTMENT BY CALLING (586) 493-8187. MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE | FALL/WINTER 2019

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

CLEARING THE CAROTID

FOR YEARS, BOB LIVED WITH A NARROWED CAROTID ARTERY, LEADING TO MANY SYMPTOMS AND A GREATER RISK OF STROKE. AN INNOVATIVE PROCEDURE HELPED RID HIM OF HIS CONDITION. 24

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NOW IN GOOD HEALTH, BOB IS ABLE TO CONTINUE TO RIDE HIS BIKE, WHICH FOR YEARS HAS BEEN ONE OF HIS FAVORITE ACTIVITIES.

I HAD ALL THE CONFIDENCE IN THE WORLD IN THIS PROCEDURE. I TRUSTED THAT DR. CUPPARI KNOWS WHAT HE’S DOING. I WASN’T CONCERNED ABOUT IT. HE WAS A GREAT SURGEON.” —BOB

It was Bob’s pastor who first spotted his symptoms. “He noticed that I was struggling with my speech,” Bob said. “It was an odd feeling—I knew what I wanted to say, but I just couldn’t form the words and get them out. It was quite concerning.” Bob followed up by making an appointment with his cardiologist, Dr. Timothy Logan at McLaren Macomb. After some diagnostic testing, it was determined that one of Bob’s carotid arteries—the blood vessels in the neck

that carry blood to the brain, neck and face—was significantly blocked. Carotid stenosis, as his underlying condition is called, can cause symptoms of confusion and the inability to speak, among others. But Bob was not too surprised. He had multiple risk factors—family history, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Dr. Logan would continue to regularly monitor Bob’s condition. The vital carotid artery is the major blood vessel carrying oxygenated blood to the brain. Plaque buildup causing the artery to narrow—stenosis—decreases the amount of blood reaching the brain. Putting the patient at a more immediate risk, there’s a high danger that plaque will produce a clot that breaks free and travels through the blood vessel into the brain, causing a stroke. As his stenosis worsened, to relieve his symptoms while also significantly reducing his risk of stroke, Bob’s carotid artery would have to be stented—fitted with a tubular support to relieve the obstruction. He was referred to Dr. Joseph Cuppari, a vascular surgeon at McLaren Macomb. “When stenting a narrowed carotid artery, there’s still the risk of plaque breaking free and heading to the brain,” Dr. Cuppari said. “It’s vital for us to protect against this occurrence.” To relieve Bob’s specific condition, Dr. Cuppari decided he would use advanced surgical technology—a device and procedure with the capability to reverse blood flow away from the brain while a stent is placed.

PROTECTING THE BRAIN Dr. Cuppari is one of only a handful of vascular surgeons in the state with the training and certification to perform TCAR (TransCarotid Artery Revascularization), the minimally invasive procedure that allows surgeons to clear the blockage of the carotid artery while protecting the brain from rogue, stroke-causing blood clots. TCAR also allows surgeons to collect and remove plaque debris. “This is a big step for stroke

management in that the up-front treatment of carotid artery disease will significantly decrease a patient’s risk for stroke,” Dr. Cuppari said. “While DR. JOSEPH CUPPARI traditional, open approaches still have their merit, in Bob’s case this minimally invasive procedure would provide additional safeguards against a stroke by reversing blood flow and further protecting the brain, ultimately leaving the patient with an enhanced clinical outcome and improved quality of life.” In addition to high cholesterol and blood pressure, smoking is a major risk factor for carotid stenosis. Not all patients exhibit symptoms, but those who do can experience those that mirror a stroke, such as numbness in the face, temporary loss of vision, sudden, severe headaches and speech loss, as Bob experienced.

QUALITY OF LIFE “I had all the confidence in the world in this procedure,” Bob said. “I trusted that Dr. Cuppari knows what he’s doing. I wasn’t concerned about it. He was a great surgeon.” After the procedure, the artery that was critically blocked was now back to flowing at a healthy capacity. Gone were the alarming symptoms. After a single night’s stay for observation, Bob was back home. “I haven’t noticed any speech symptoms, or other symptoms, since,” he said. Said Dr. Cuppari, “This procedure, in its very unique and innovative way, gives our patients a very lasting impact. Not only can it alleviate their current symptoms, it also significantly reduces the risk of them having a life-threatening stroke. This gives them greater peace of mind and a revamped quality of life.”

LEARN MORE ABOUT M C L AREN MACOMB SURGICAL CAPABILITIES AT MCLAREN.ORG/MACOMB. MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE | FALL/WINTER 2019

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TRYING TO GROW

YOUR FAMILY

AFTER SUCCESSFUL PREGNANCIES, MANY MOTHERS EXPERIENCE SECONDARY INFERTILITY, THE MOST COMMON FORM OF FEMALE INFERTILITY, WHEN TRYING TO GROW THEIR FAMILIES. And baby makes three… Successfully forming a family by welcoming a baby into a loving partnership can be one of life’s great joys. So much so that many couples soon decide to expand their families by trying for another baby. But if time passes and pregnancy continues to elude a couple, many feelings can begin to set in, specifically frustration with a measure of confusion. Secondary infertility, as this circumstance is known, occurs when a couple is unable to get pregnant (or to successfully carry a child to full term) after a previous birth. “Every woman reacts to pregnancy differently,” said Dr. Katie Bieber, an OB/GYN with McLaren Macomb. “And pregnancy can have a personally unique effect on a woman’s body, and in many cases, this may affect their ability to get pregnant again.”

YOU’RE NOT ALONE Further explained by Dr. Bieber, secondary infertility is the most common form of female infertility in the United States, affecting more than 3 million women. But it still can cause the couple to feel lost and alone. The inability to get pregnant again can make a couple feel frustrated, angry, confused and maybe scared, depressed or guilty. “The most important thing to remember in this situation is knowing that you’re not alone,” she said. “Not being able to get pregnant again after already delivering a child can cause a lot of emotions, but this is a very common situation DR. KATIE BIEBER that many couples find

themselves in, and it is something a physician can help with.” There is no one cause of secondary infertility. The causes can vary, and both partners can be contributors.

A VARIETY OF CAUSES Causes from the female side can include a history of pelvic inflammatory disease, miscarriages, painful periods, irregular cycles or impaired fallopian tubes. For the male, it could be a low or abnormal sperm count, or problems with sperm shape or motility. Dr. Bieber recommends couples see their physicians before trying to get pregnant again, and also to track how long and frequently they have been trying. “There’s no need to get discouraged right from the start—stress won’t help the situation,” Dr. Bieber said. “If couples have been trying for over a year with no success, or six months if they are over the age of 35, that’s when they should consider following up with their physician. “It’s at that point that an OB/GYN like myself may assist with a treatment option, or depending on their specific situation, we may refer them to a fertility specialist.”

TREATMENT OPTIONS Treatments may include fertility medications or injections, or perhaps a minor surgical procedure to repair a fallopian tube. “Being unable to get pregnant again does not mean the couple is doing anything wrong,” Dr. Bieber said. “It’s something many, many couples experience. “Having a family and adding to it is a joy for countless couples, and we’ll do everything we can to help patients so they can continue to grow their families.”

VISIT MCLAREN.ORG/MACOMBAPPOINTMENTS TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH A M C L AREN MACOMB OB/GYN. FOLLOW M C L AREN MACOMB ON INSTAGRAM AND HEAR MORE FROM DR. KATIE BIEBER BY SEARCHING #BOOKWITHBIEBER. MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE | FALL/WINTER 2019

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

JUST MONTHS AGO, THE PAIN IN LIZ’S KNEE WOULD NOT HAVE ALLOWED HER TO ENJOY A SLOW, SIMPLE WALK THROUGH THE NEIGHBORHOOD PARK.

THE GRATIFICATION OF WALKING PAIN-FREE NOT SATISFIED WITH A KNEE PROCEDURE SHE’D HAD, LIZ FOUND ANOTHER SURGEON WHO USED ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO RELIEVE HER CONSTANT PAIN. 28

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This was not the life Liz dreamed she would be living. The mother and grandmother loved nothing more than spending time and playing around with her family, but the pain in her knee kept her out of the fun and forced her to watch from the sideline. Her debilitating pain forced her to rely on friends and family for virtually everything—simple, everyday tasks like grocery shopping and doing the laundry. And what really perplexed her was that her pain was supposed to have already been relieved by surgery. “My former doctor told me that he would only do a partial knee replacement, that that was all I needed,” Liz said. “My pain never went away. It even got worse.”

WE NEED PRECISION TO ACHIEVE PROPER FORM AND, AS A RESULT, FUNCTION. MAKO PROVIDES US WITH THAT LEVEL OF PRECISION. LIZ IS A PERFECT EXAMPLE OF THE BENEFITS OF THIS TECHNOLOGY.” —DR. MICHAEL WAGNER

LIFE-CHANGING PAIN Three years after her partial knee replacement, the debilitating pain in her right knee left her with such decreased mobility that she could not walk any distance without assistance—a cane for short distances and a walker for more significant distances. She loved to can fruits and vegetables. Couldn’t can. She was in a bowling league. Couldn’t bowl anymore. “I was just tired of being in pain,” she said. “I was in pain all the time. I talked to my primary care doctor, and he recommended Dr. Wagner.” Dr. Michael Wagner was familiar with this type of situation. The McLaren Macomb orthopedic surgeon has experience with revision procedures, in which he replaces joint implants with other, properly functioning materials. “Revisions can be common because implants do wear out over time,” Dr. Wagner said, “but Liz’s case was more unique in that her pain persisted after her partial knee procedure, and she needed to be converted to a full knee replacement.” This revision would require Dr. Wagner to remove the worn implant as well as diseased portions DR. MICHAEL WAGNER

of bone to provide Liz with a better joint surface. Even with revisions, Dr. Wagner’s goal is still to maintain as much of his patient’s bone, ligaments and muscles as possible. “With total knee replacements, we like to keep as much natural, healthy bone in the joint as possible,” he said. “To keep as much bone as possible in Liz’s knee, we would need to perform at a high level of precision.”

ROBOTIC ASSISTED

To achieve this level of precision, Dr. Wagner would utilize Mako robotic arm technology. This leading-edge piece of surgical equipment allows orthopedic surgeons to achieve that level of precision by tailoring cases to each patient’s unique anatomy. “To give Liz the best possible revision,” Dr. Wagner said, “using Mako would make this procedure go a lot smoother.” Said Liz, still frustrated with her first surgery, “I had confidence after first meeting Dr. Wagner—I had high hopes. He said it was in my best interest for him to use the robot. And he was right.” In late April, Liz received her full knee replacement. She was up and walking that day. She returned home the next day and after just three weeks of physical therapy (as opposed to four months after her previous procedure), the pain in her knee was finally gone. “I had no doubts that this would work,” she said. Liz was so impressed with the outcome of her knee that she allowed herself to dream bigger. “During her first follow-up appointment, she asked when she could get her hip done,” Dr. Wagner said. “I told her, ‘Let’s let the knee fully heal first, then we’ll talk about your hip.’” He kept his promise. Just three months after her knee procedure, Dr. Wagner, again using the Mako robotic arm, replaced Liz’s hip. “I always like to tell my patients that form equals function,” Dr. Wagner said. “We need precision to achieve proper form and, as a result, function. Mako provides us with that level of precision. Liz is a perfect example of the benefits of this technology.” Liz, now back—pain-free—on two legs, can do for herself what she once had to rely on friends and family for. “I can do it all myself again,” she said.

LEARN MORE ABOUT JOINT REPL ACEMENT PROCEDURES AT M C L AREN MACOMB AT MCLAREN.ORG/MACOMBORTHO. MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE | FALL/WINTER 2019

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{ HOME }

Add accessories that keep guests comfortable and reflect your style. Left: Embroidered velvet cushions, floral sheets, an antique phonograph, and blue and white ginger jars set the scene for a serene night’s rest. Above: Soft, plush fabrics in warm pinks and a thoughtful amenities basket create a fun, relaxing tone for the visit.

DELIGHT YOUR GUESTS AS WINTER ARRIVES, GET READY FOR VISITING FAMILY AND FRIENDS BY CREATING A COZY, WELCOMING GUEST ROOM FILLED WITH THOUGHTFUL, PERSONAL TOUCHES.

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Welcome! WIFI PASS:

JOLLYGOOD

Amenities make the room. Provide layers of bedding and extra pillows so guests can turn the bed into their own personal comfort zone. On the nightstand, leave thoughtful items like books of local interest and your guests’ favorite snacks. A framed “Welcome” sign with your Wi-Fi password will no doubt be appreciated. Consider including a mirror in the room, especially if it doesn’t have an en suite bathroom—guests will likely be grateful they can tidy up a bit in the morning before heading out in the hall. Add a chair and a small table or dresser to create a reading nook. Even if it ends up being more of a place to pile clothes or sit and put shoes on, guests will use it.

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Put yourself in your guests’ shoes. What makes you feel at home when you’re not? A sure hit: wonderfully thick curtains that ensure privacy and make it possible to sleep off travel fatigue. Having an inroom coffee or tea maker is sure to gain you new fans, as is a handy dish of fresh fruit. Other ideas: a dog bed and dishes for those who travel with their best friend; a charging station with cables for both Apple and Android; fresh or dried fl owers; some dedicated hanging space in the closet; and a cozy rug underfoot.

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{ ESCAPES }

SWEET ISLAND RETREAT VISIT THE SUGAR BEACH RESORT ON SAINT LUCIA, AND YOU WON’T WANT TO LEAVE. MAYBE YOU WON’T HAVE TO! By Rita Guarna

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Accommodations at Sugar Beach Resort and Residences feature stunning views and luxury amenities, such as timber decks with expansive lounging areas for sunbathing or communing with nature.

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{ ESCAPES }

Think twin mountain peaks can be intimidating? Meet the Pitons. You’ll find these abrupt but comparatively diminutive volcanic spires (each about 2,500 feet) on the seacoast of the small island nation of Saint Lucia in the eastern Caribbean. They preside over the Sugar Beach Resort and Residences, a fivestar Viceroy luxe property set within more than 100 acres of pristine rainforest—part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site—on the site of an 18th-century sugar plantation. (Hence the name.) And they’re just two of the many joys you’ll discover at Sugar Beach. While the resort’s exterior pays homage to its colonial past, the interior—specifically its 96 guest rooms—boasts a crisp, modern aesthetic: white-on-white décor from the walls and furnishings to the Egyptian bedding and sheer fabrics surrounding four-poster beds. Terraces, many with magnificent views, allow guests to commune with nature, while private plunge pools encourage all to soak their cares away. But first you have to find the resort’s entrance amid the winding road with little signage. Once you locate the driveway heading into thick foliage, you’ll come upon an elegant plantation-style building, where you’ll be offered a welcome drink and a tiny mobile phone that connects to your personal butler, who’s on call 24 hours a day. Need help opening a coconut? No problem. What about a spa appointment? Ditto. With relaxation in mind, one of the first items on my to-do list included exploring the resort’s Rainforest Spa, designed by leading Caribbean architect Lane Pettigrew. A palm-leaf-lined corridor 36

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leads to a tropical forest where you’ll find seven wooden treatment rooms on stilts. Yes, you’re in a tree house, where you’re not just looking up at the trees, you’re practically part of them. Here you’ll enjoy all-natural Saint Lucian treatments: Think coconut as an exfoliator for a body scrub and mashed banana as part of a facial’s wrinkle busting. There are plenty of services to choose from: facials and citrus peels to bamboo massage and seaweed wraps. My choice? A deep-tissue massage. Between all that kneading and the soothing sounds of trickling water, I felt the tension wash away. I decided to celebrate my blissful state with some serious beach relaxation—one can blithely soak up the sun at Anse des Pitons, just down the hill. OK, it’s a steep hill, but you can hitch a ride on one of the motorized tuk-tuks, the three-wheelers that were imported from Southeast Asia. And lest you worry about feeling too peckish to climb up the hill in search of a cool drink, chances are a beach attendant will appear with complimentary treats and iced tea. Once reinvigorated, you can paddleboard and pedal boat, all free. Snorkeling is free, too, but the country tacks on a fee for a worthy cause: marine conservation. While it’s easy to vow to never leave the resort, Saint Lucia itself is a delight. It has two airports with daily flights to and from the U.S. It’s northwest of Barbados and south of Martinique, and dropping those neighbors’ names should give you an idea of the kind of sunny, beachy ’hood we’re talking about. Spend some time on this island and you won’t wonder why in its colonial past the French and British greedily snatched it from each other so many times.

WWW.SUGARBEACHRESIDENCES.COM

Spend your Saint Lucia days finding hidden waterfalls, scuba diving and soaking up sun on picture-perfect beaches. Then come “home” to the amenities of Sugar Beach resort, including luxurious spa treatments, elegant, plantationstyle rooms and dining experiences that feature locally inspired dishes.


In addition to the rainforest and the iconic Pitons, this volcanic-formed paradise offers sparkling white beaches that coexist blissfully with quaint fishing villages. It’s the perfect backdrop for adventure, whether to you that means a lofty zip-line ride above the trees, a refreshing dip under a cascading waterfall, horseback saunters along the coast or snorkeling in turquoise waters. (You can climb nature trails on the Pitons, too.) Sugar Beach isn’t far from “the Caribbean’s only drive-in volcano” at Sulphur Springs Park. It’s way more hissing fumaroles and spitting geysers than erupting magma, and the mineral-rich, exfoliating mud does a body good (as long as you don’t mind the smell of rotten eggs). Saint Lucia is thought to have been settled first by Arawak Indians around 200 A.D., then the French arrived in the mid-1500s. The island became a nation when it won independence from Britain in 1979. In the centuries in between, influxes from Africa, Asia and the Americas contributed to its multicultural mix. You can taste this tangy diversity in Saint Lucia’s eclectic cuisine. It makes full use of the fertile island’s produce and seafood to serve up the best of farm- (and sea-) to-table delights. From mouthwatering accra (salted fish cake) enjoyed at roadside stands to a magnificent mahi-mahi dinner at one of Sugar Beach’s fine restaurants, it’ll be love at first bite. It turns out food plays a big part in the Sugar Beach experience, and if the mood strikes, you can nosh all day long. There’s breakfast at The Terrace and a leisurely lunch at The Bayside, a stone’s throw from the pool and beach. The Palm Court offers afternoon tea and sunset cocktails, while The Cane Bar doubles as a specialty rum and sushi bar. Libations such as the Lava Flow—a mix of aged rum, strawberry nectar, orange juice and mint leaves—and the Rosemary Mojito (white rum, mint, lime, rosemary syrup, brown sugar and seltzer) left us feeling refreshed and eager to try the bar bites. The Great Room is the resort’s formal eatery, with fresh seafood and both Caribbean- and Mediterraneaninspired dishes. The garlic-roasted sea bass with baby leeks and mussel-saffron hollandaise was a favorite. We ate there twice, and both times were divine. Never want to leave? No problem! Invest in a piece of paradise and you can come back any time. Now you can own one of the hotel’s Beachfront Collection residences. Built by the award-winning Michaelis Boyd Associates, a British firm, these include four-bedroom homes with butler service, game rooms, Italian kitchens with Gaggenau and Miele appliances, and floor-to-ceiling windows. Private reflection pools surround master bedrooms, rain showers grace bathrooms, and you can find virtually anything your hedonistic mind can conjure up. Residence owners have full access to the five-star service and facilities provided by the resort, including two floodlit tennis courts with certified pros, sailing and other water sports. Plus they’re offered a discount on food and beverage purchases and spa treatments. Imagine having a home base overlooking the pearly white sands of Sugar Beach and the Caribbean’s shimmery blue waves—with those up-close-andpersonal Pitons cozily watching over you.

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{ TASTES }

FEEL-GOOD FOOD LESS DAYLIGHT AND COLDER TEMPS CAN LEAD TO THE WINTER BLUES. BEAT THEM (AND GET A LITTLE TASTE OF HOME) WITH THESE UNIQUE TWISTS ON COMFORT FOOD CLASSICS.

GUINNESS & BLACKBERRY BEEF STEW YIELDS: 4 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

2¼ lb. beef chuck steak, diced n  2 tbsp. all-purpose flour n  sunflower or olive oil, for cooking n  1 14.9 oz. can Guinness stout n  1 cup plus 1 Tbs. beef stock n  1 red onion, coarsely chopped n  3 parsnips, diced n  3 carrots, diced n  1 1 ⁄3 cups blackberries n  3 dried bay leaves n  sea salt flakes and coarsely ground black pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 325°F.

n

FOR THE RELISH: 1 red onion, finely sliced 11⁄3 cups blackberries, halved n  ¼ cup plus 1 Tbs. red wine vinegar n  1 Tbs. superfine sugar n n

Put the steak into a bowl and add the flour and a generous pinch of salt and pepper. Toss together with your hands until the beef is evenly coated. In a Dutch oven, heat a generous glug of oil. Once the oil is hot (it will shimmer gently), add the beef and cook, turning once, until colored. You’ll need to do this in at least two batches; if you overcrowd the pan, the meat will braise rather than brown and you won’t achieve the desired color or depth of flavor. Once all of the meat has been browned, return it to the pan with the remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil, then cover with the lid and cook in the oven for 2-3 hours, until the meat is tender and flaking. Meanwhile, make the relish. In a bowl, combine all the ingredients, then let sit at room temperature until needed. Serve the stew with some of the relish spooned over it.

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{ TASTES }

CRAB & SRIRACHA MAC ‘N’ CHEESE YIELDS: 6 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

3½ cups dry macaroni n  7 Tbs. butter n  ¾ cup plus 1 Tbs. all-purpose flour n  2 cups plus 2 Tbs. milk n  2 cups plus 2 Tbs. chicken stock n 1 1 ⁄3 cups finely shredded Gruyère cheese n 1 1 ⁄3 cups finely shredded sharp cheddar n 1 Tbs. whole grain mustard n  6 Tbs. sriracha sauce, plus more to serve n 1 tsp. cayenne pepper n 10½ oz. lump crabmeat n  2 Tbs. chopped flat-leaf parsley n  scant ½ cup panko bread crumbs n  fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

n

Cook the macaroni according to the package directions, then drain and set aside. In a large saucepan, heat the butter over medium-high heat until it melts, then stir in the flour using a wooden spoon to make a very thick paste. Let the paste cook until browned slightly, 1 minute. Beat in a ladleful of milk—it will get quickly absorbed, so repeat. When you’ve added all the milk, switch to a wire whisk and add the stock, a bit at a time, whisking to avoid any lumps. As soon as the liquids are incorporated, add the cheeses, reserving some to sprinkle on top, along with the mustard, sriracha and cayenne pepper. Reduce the heat to a simmer for 10 minutes, then season to taste, remembering that when you add the pasta the seasoning will be diluted, so overseason. Add the crabmeat, parsley and macaroni to the sauce and combine well, then transfer to a medium-size roasting dish or pan. Sprinkle over the reserved cheese and the bread crumbs and bake for 25-30 minutes, or until hot and bubbling.

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{ TASTES }

ONION SOUP WITH AN ÉPOISSES & CARAWAY CRUST YIELDS: 2-4 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

FOR THE CROUTONS:

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

1 French baguette, torn into chunks n 1 Tbs. garlic oil (or olive oil, if you prefer) n 1 Tbs. caraway seeds n  5 ½ oz. Époisses cheese, chilled n  3 ½ oz. Comté cheese, shredded n

FOR THE SOUP:  Tbs. olive oil 1 7 Tbs. unsalted butter n 18 oz. pink onions, finely sliced n  2 Tbs. all-purpose flour n  ¾ cup dry white wine n  4 ¼ cups beef stock n  1 Tbs. onion chutney or relish (optional, but recommended) n  fine sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper to taste

MAKE THE CROUTONS: Place the torn baguette onto a baking sheet and toss with the garlic oil and caraway seeds. Bake for 5-10 minutes, or until dry and crispy. MAKE THE SOUP: In a large pot, heat the olive oil and butter over high heat. When the butter has melted, add the onions and cook until they are starting to color around the edges, 10 minutes or so. Once they are gently browned, reduce the heat to low and cook slowly for up to 40 minutes. The onions should caramelize deeply, and smell strong and sweet.

n n

When the onions are caramelized, add the flour and stir to coat the onions. Increase the heat to high, wait a minute for the pan to get hot, then pour in the wine and let bubble and evaporate almost entirely. Add the stock and bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes, partially covered. Stir in the chutney or relish, if using, and salt and pepper to taste. Preheat the broiler. Divide the soup among serving bowls—make sure they’re heatproof— then scatter the croutons over the top. Slice the Époisses into fairly thin slices (do so quickly before it starts to melt) and lay them on top of the croutons. Scatter over the Comté and broil until the cheese has melted and burned a little at the edges.

All recipes and photos are reprinted with permission from Comfort: Food to Soothe the Soul by John Whaite. Photos by Helen Cathcart © Kyle Books.

MACOMB HEALTH & LIFE | FALL/WINTER 2019

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{ WHERE TO EAT }

AMERICAN

BAD BRADS BBQ “The best possible BBQ every day,” along with a full bar and catering. 36845 Groesbeck Hwy., Clinton Township, 586.789.7320; 35611 Green St., New Baltimore, 586.716.9977; 6525 23 Mile Rd., Shelby Township, 586.254.7010 DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT Authentic Texas-style barbecue with home-style flavor and a family-friendly atmosphere. 20755 Hall Rd., Macomb Township, 586.741.5270 FILIPPA’S WINE BARREL Upscale traditional American cuisine with an Italian influence and impressive wine list. 45125 Mound Rd., Shelby Township, 586.254.1311 FIN’S All-American food and spirits with a racing theme, starting with breakfast. 51006 Washington St., New Baltimore, 586.725.9000

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GUMBO’S Contemporary American fare with a Cajun/Creole influence. 53 N. Walnut St., Mount Clemens, 586.307.3100 J. BALDWIN’S Restaurant, lounge and caterer serving gourmet food and signature stone-fired crispy pizza. 16981 18 Mile Road, Clinton Township, 586.416.3500 JOHN’S FAMILY GRILL A favorite for classic comfort food. 304 Cass Ave., Mount Clemens, 586.463.0033 LITTLE CAMILLE’S BY THE BAY Casual eatery serving salads, pasta, pizza and more. 51083 Washington St., New Baltimore, 586.725.4866 NORTH 42 AT MACRAY HARBOR Fresh American cuisine served in a waterfront setting. 30675 N. River Rd., Harrison Township, 586.329.7880

FALL/WINTER 2019 | MCL AREN.ORG/MACOMB

THEE OFFICE PUB & COOKERY Family-friendly gathering place serving burgers, sandwiches, steaks and pastas. 128 S. Main St., Romeo, 586.752.6680

STERLING’S BISTRO Creative American dishes with seasonal ingredients and an international wine menu. 13905 Lakeside Circle, Sterling Heights, 586.566.0627

THE PANTRY RESTAURANT Contemporary American restaurant serving breakfast and brunch. 44945 Morley Dr., Clinton Township, 586.465.5514; 34220 Van Dyke Ave., Sterling Heights, 586.939.1370; 58884 Van Dyke Rd., Washington Township, 586.677.4135

STRAWBERRY FIELDS Friendly family restaurant serving American fare, pizza and pasta with a Beatlesthemed menu. 51070 S. Foster Rd., Chesterfield, 586.949.7740

RIVER RAT Casual restaurant and bar, located in “Boat Town,” serving large portions in a nautical atmosphere. 29370 S. River Rd., Harrison Township, 586.465.6565 SEEBURGER’S CHEESEBURGERS Burgers and more, including paninis and salads. 26756 Gratiot Ave., Roseville, 586.362.8585

TWISTED ROOSTER A twist on classic American fare, featuring bold flavors and fresh local ingredients. 45225 Marketplace Blvd., Chesterfield, 586.949.1470 VICTORY SMOKEHOUSE Upscale BBQ joint serving smoked meat by the half-pound as well as sandwiches and classic sides. 28950 Mound Rd., Warren, 248.671.6328


BATH CITY BISTRO Steaks, fish and pasta, plus Belgian trough bowling, a cross between bocce and shuffleboard. 75 Macomb Pl., Mount Clemens, 586.469.0917

NONNA’S ITALIAN KITCHEN Family-friendly food inspired by family traditions, including specialty pizzas. 50528 Schoenherr Rd., Shelby Township, 586.884.6949

IRISH PUB

PENNA’S Fine dining since 1968. Penna’s of Sterling, 38400 Van Dyke Ave., Sterling Heights, 586.978.3880

THREE BLIND MICE IRISH PUB Irish-inspired pub fare, including Guinness stew and corned beef. 101 N. Main St., Mount Clemens, 586.961.6371

ITALIAN/PIZZA

ANDIAMO Refined classic Italian menu with an international wine list. 14425 Lakeside Circle, Sterling Heights, 586.532.8800; 7096 E. 14 Mile Rd., Warren, 586.268.3200 ANTONIO’S ITALIAN CUISINE Authentic family-style Italian dishes made from family recipes. 2505 E. 14 Mile Rd., Sterling Heights, 586.264.5252 DA FRANCESCO’S Quality Italian cuisine with a homemade touch, and sporting an extensive wine list. 49521 Van Dyke Ave., Shelby Township, 586.731.7544

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN

CEDAR KABOB & CAFE Classic Lebanese fare served in a cozy, comfortable setting. 34796 Van Dyke Ave., Sterling Heights, 586.795.1722 IKE’S RESTAURANT Lebanese fusion restaurant also serving burgers and other American and Italian classics. 38550 Van Dyke Ave., Sterling Heights, 586.979.4460 SAJO’S Quality, reasonably priced Mediterranean cuisine served in a contemporary atmosphere. 36470 Moravian Dr., Clinton Township, 586.792.7256

MEXICAN

LUCIANO’S Family-owned establishment serving northern and southern Italian cuisine. 39091 Garfield Rd., Clinton Township, 586.263.6540

EL CHARRO Family-owned, with authentic Mexican cuisine, including unique soft-shell tacos. 6720 14 Mile Rd., Fraser, 586.294.3520; 21519 21 Mile Rd., Macomb, 586.598.7556; 24401 Harper Ave., St. Clair Shores, 586.779.5060

LUIGI’S ORIGINAL RESTAURANT “Small in size but big in originality,” featuring pizza, steaks, pasta and seafood. 36691 Jefferson Ave., Harrison Township, 586.468.7711

JUAN MIGUEL’S Authentic Mexican dishes, including fajitas, tacos and enchiladas, plus a full bar. 21342 Hall Rd., Clinton Township, 586.783.9751

TACO LOCO Authentic Mexican favorites, including their own stuffed poblano peppers, “puffy” tacos and more. 52899 Van Dyke Ave., Shelby Township, 586.323.9494

SPORTS BAR

ART & JAKES Sports bar and grill with an international menu focusing on Macedonian and Serbian cuisine. 14741 23 Mile Rd., Shelby Township, 586.532.9600; 44899 Mound Rd., Sterling Heights, 586.739.7000; 65859 Van Dyke Rd., Washington Township, 586.752.7500 EAGLES BAR & GRILL Neighborhood sports bar and grill serving comfort food and craft beers. 50640 Waterside Dr., Chesterfield, 586.949.9600 ENGINE HOUSE Firefighter-themed sports bar and restaurant serving pizzas, sandwiches and steaks. 309 Cass Ave., Mount Clemens, 586.468.2442

STEAK/SEAFOOD

THE BREWERY Longtime familyowned restaurant known for its steak, seafood, extensive wine list and topshelf spirits. 39950 Hayes Rd., Clinton Township, 586.286.3020 CREWS INN Lunch and dinner served in a harborside setting, with a focus on fish and beef, including prime rib specials on Friday and Saturday night. 31988 N. River Rd., Harrison Township, 586.463.8144 FISHBONE’S Seafood, steaks, sushi and New Orleans favorites served up

in a setting reminiscent of the French Quarter. 23722 Jefferson Ave., St. Clair Shores, 586.498.3000 MR. PAUL’S CHOP HOUSE Familyrun restaurant specializing in fresh beef and seafood and Caesar salad prepared tableside. 29850 Groesbeck Hwy., Roseville, 586.777.7770 WAVES Fun eatery and nightclub featuring “under the wave” and “over the wave” dishes. 24223 Jefferson Ave., St. Clair Shores, 586.773.3840

SUSHI/JAPANESE

ASAHI SUSHI Award-winning sushi bar and Korean restaurant. 41860 Garfield Rd., Clinton Township, 586.412.2700 NARUTO SUSHI Fresh, light Asian menu that includes sushi as well as bibimbap, udon noodles and more. 34788 Van Dyke Ave., Sterling Heights, 586.977.0123 OSAKA Japanese steakhouse featuring hibachi tables and a sushi bar. 45323 Market St., Utica, 586.566.9572

THAI

AMARIN THAI CUISINE Classic dishes using traditional Thai spices with meat, seafood and vegetarian options. 11528 E. 12 Mile Rd., Warren, 586.582.8787 THAI ORCHID Casual, authentic Thai eatery known for its fresh, wellseasoned dishes. 60 Cherry St., Mount Clemens, 586.783.1727

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BETHERE FA L L / W I N T E R

2 0 1 9

THE NUTCRACKER December 20–22

WEDDINGS TO BE BRIDAL SHOW January 26

AN EMERALD ISLE CHRISTMAS December 1

THE ANTON ART CENTER HOLIDAY MARKET manages two tasks at the same time. It celebrates the legacy of the Center, which is turning 50 this year, and offers a broad range of possibilities for holiday shoppers in search of interesting decorations and gifts. Every year, we face the challenge of finding the right presents for the special people in our lives. The Center’s holiday artists’ market will help you rise to the occasion. To find out more, visit theartcenter.org/holiday-market

NOVEMBER 15–22 In case the offerings at the Anton Art Center market aren’t enough to help you scratch all the names off your holiday shopping list, you also can hit the ST. NICK’S WAREHOUSE ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW at Henry Ford II High School in Sterling Heights. You’ll come across all kinds of gift ideas of the hand-crafted kind, from ornaments and toys to jewelry and baby clothing. And here’s a little secret you might find helpful—if you discover something you really like, you’re not legally bound to give it to somebody else! Whether you’re hunting for gifts or treating yourself, you can get more info at 10times.com/artscraftsshow DECEMBER 1 They take their Christmas celebrations pretty seriously in Ireland, and if you want to import a little bit of the Irish holiday spirit when the season starts to roll around, you can’t do much better than AN EMERALD ISLE CHRISTMAS featuring the top-tier Irish

band Danú. Playing traditional Irish tunes on old-school instruments like bodhran, uilleann pipes and button accordion, the group has been around for nearly a quartercentury now. The show they’ve got cooked up will deliver the best of holiday music from Ireland, with some step-dancing thrown in to enhance the festivities. Find out more at macombcenter.com

DECEMBER 20–22 When it comes to traditions that are irrevocably associated with the holiday season, THE NUTCRACKER ranks right up there with mistletoe, egg nog and pretending to be excited about the pair of socks your aunt gave you. When it’s in the right hands, Tchaikovsky’s timeless ballet can conjure up the spirit of Christmas like nothing else. And the combination of choreographers Amber Megna Michalik, Sarah Boik and Mary Sherman with the dedicated dancers of the Macomb Ballet Company would definitely qualify as the right hands. Hang around for the meet and greet after the show. Get more info at macombcenter.com JANUARY 18 Founded by the uproariously satirical singer/songwriter Christine Lavin in 1990, FOUR BITCHIN’BABES has spent the last three decades proving that folk music can be funny. The group’s songs detail the fun and foibles of everyday life for women of a certain age, but the main takeaway at shows is that a batch of female singer/ songwriters banding together in sardonic sisterhood can be a powerful force. At one time, Lavin became so busy that she took

herself out of the group’s touring rotation, but she’s back on board for this tour to celebrate 30 years of Bitchin’ Babes. Get the scoop at macombcenter.com

JANUARY 26 Attention all brides-to-

be! Pack up your bridesmaids, your family and your fiancé, and haul them over to the Fern Hill Golf Club. Leave the golf clubs at home, though, as this will be the site of the WEDDINGS TO BE BRIDAL SHOW. Sponsored by McLaren Macomb, the show is the answer to an anxious future bride’s prayers. Instead of spending endless hours fretting over where to find the right photographer, the right flowers, the right food and all the other right things that you need for your special day, you can just come to the show and have it all laid out right in front of you. For more information, go to weddingstobe.com

FEBRUARY 15–16 Whether you’re

a homeowner with plans for renovations big or small, or you’ve got a business that caters to people with those kinds of projects on their plates, the MACOMB SPRING HOME IMPROVEMENT SHOW is the place for you to be. At the Macomb Sports & Expo Center, contractors, suppliers and others can meet up with potential customers in a mutually beneficial environment. The latter can get their questions answered by the pros, and the pros get a chance to network with their peers as well as meet homeowners with renovations on their minds. Get the lowdown at yourhomeshows.com/ macomb-registration.html

TO SEE OTHER MACOMB COUNTY EVENTS, PLEASE VISIT MCLAREN.ORG/MACOMBCOMMUNITYEVENTS.

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FALL/WINTER 2019 | MCL AREN.ORG/MACOMB

PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES | MACOMBCENTER.COM

NOVEMBER 15–DECEMBER 22


PARTNERING FOR A HEALTHIER COMMUNITY McLaren Macomb is excited and proud to partner with the Chaldean Community Foundation to address a growing and worrisome health crisis. The rise in e-cigarette usage has led to an epidemic of vaping illnesses, which has resulted in several deaths around the country while also grabbing headlines across the nation. A recipient of a Tobacco Control Grant from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the Chaldean Community Foundation will focus part of its efforts on the most at-risk population for vaping: the youth. In its partnership with McLaren Macomb, the Chaldean Community Foundation’s aim is to continue to build awareness around the unique dangers that result from teen vaping habits, accomplishing this through community presentations and discussions with school officials, among other informative activities.

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The perception of vaping is that it is a safer alternative to smoking. However, vaping carries many of the same cancer-causing chemicals as cigarette smoke, including nicotine. When compared to non-users, e-cigarettes are associated with a 71 percent higher risk for stroke, 59 percent for heart attack and 40 percent for coronary heart disease. While cigarette smoking among the youth in grades 8 to 12 has steadily declined over the past 20 years (down to under 5 percent in 2017), the group’s e-cigarette usage has soared, with 26.7 percent of high school seniors reporting having vaped in the past 30 days. Michigan was the first state in the country to ban the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, followed by recommendations for everyone to stop vaping from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and American Lung Association.

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{ POWER FOOD }

TASTY TURMERIC A SPICE THAT’S FLAVORFUL, VIBRANT AND GOOD FOR YOU, TOO? THIS VERSATILE SEASONING’S BENEFITS WILL HAVE YOU ADDING IT TO ALL YOUR FAVORITE DISHES. Let’s be honest—cleaning up after prepping with turmeric isn’t easy. It’s known to stain everything from dishes and countertops to linens and fingertips, and scrubbing the golden tint from your kitchenware can be a headache. Well, pour yourself a cup of turmeric tea and you’ll quickly feel better. The many benefits of this powdery spice make using it worthwhile. Ground from the flowering turmeric plant, it has been a go-to in Asia for centuries and is celebrated not only for its peppery and warm flavor, but also for its health advantages. For years, the spice has been embraced by the Ayurvedic system of medicine, which originated in India and treats conditions such as pain, fatigue and breathing problems. Today, turmeric is used all over the world as a dietary supplement for inflammation, stomach pain, liver ailments and more.

POWER UP Turmeric’s main component, curcumin, is the ingredient that gives curry its burnt-orange hue. But curcumin offers much more than color. It’s responsible for turmeric’s many health benefits, which include treating headaches, diabetes and arthritis. Several studies from the Arthritis Foundation credit turmeric with reducing inflammation, and it may even alleviate joint pain. Turmeric also can be helpful in improving memory

and attention in older adults. A study published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry in 2018 found that curcumin protects the brain. In the study, those who took curcumin for 18 months showed significantly improved performance on memory tests. One tablespoon of turmeric contains roughly 24 calories and is a source of iron as well as vitamins C and B6. Though turmeric is a healthy dietary addition for most people, for those taking certain medications, it’s best avoided. Before taking any curcumin supplements, talk to your doctor.

BUY/STORE/SERVE Want the most nourishing turmeric? When shopping, look for organic. If you prefer the dried root, it’s best to shop at specialty spice shops, which have a faster turnover and fresher stock than regular supermarkets. You’ll have to look past turmeric’s color, which varies too much to be a sign of quality. In recipes, turmeric adds a slightly bitter, peppery, earthy taste along with its signature color. There are plenty of recipes out there, but some easy ways to incorporate turmeric into your diet include adding it to dressings, soups, marinades, curries, rice and chicken dishes. Sprinkle turmeric and cinnamon to taste on hot oatmeal or add turmeric to scrambled eggs, along with some pepper. The spice also works well mixed into hummus or sprinkled over roasted veggies.

DID YOU KNOW? Turmeric and coconut milk are the main ingredients in “golden milk,” a drink that boosts healthy cholesterol levels and enhances wound healing. The beverage can be easily made at home or ordered at many restaurants.

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FALL/WINTER 2019 | MCL AREN.ORG/MACOMB


AT McLAREN MACOMB’S EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT, THE WAITING ROOM IS YOUR LIVING ROOM.

Check-in to the ER from home. At McLaren Macomb, we understand that when you need emergency care, the waiting room is the last place you want to be. That’s why we offer an online registration so you can check-in to our ER right from home and minimize the wait when you arrive. Visit mclaren.org/macombER to select an ER treatment time that fits your schedule. The next time you need expert ER care, register online so the waiting room can be your living room. It’s one more way McLaren Macomb is doing what’s best.

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8/2/2019 12:09:33 PM


OPEN OUR APP AND SAY “AHHH.” OUR NEW TELEHEALTH SERVICE PROVIDES ACCESS TO CARE ANYTIME, ANYWHERE.

With McLarenNow, you can be seen by a boardcertified physician using your smart phone, tablet or computer with web cam. This service is available for urgent care needs including minor illnesses, injuries, or skin conditions. No waiting room, no traffic, no hassles and no appointment is required. It’s one more way McLaren is doing what’s best.

AVAILABLE 24/7

PRESCRIPTIONS IF RECOMMENDED

NO APPOINTMENT REQUIRED

$49 Per Visit

Get started at mclarennow.org. Available for patients 2 years and older. This service should not be used for emergencies.

®

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4/5/19 3:40 PM 5/1/19 2:49 PM

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Macomb Health & Life: Fall/Winter 2019  

Macomb Health & Life: Fall/Winter 2019