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C E N T R A L J E R S E Y H E A LT H & L I F E

CENTRAL JERSEY

T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M S A I N T P E T E R ’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

SUMMER 2017 | $3.95 CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

S U M M E R 2 0 17 T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M S A I N T P E T E R ’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

THE OUTDOORS ISSUE

THE OUTDOORS ISSUE

FRESH-AIR FUN IN YOUR TOWN ALFRESCO PARTY IDEAS GET YOUR GARDEN ON

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THE BEST IN PEDIATRIC CARE 6/23/17 8:30 AM


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6/30/17 8:44 AM


New Jersey Realtors® We’ve shown our true colors for 100 years. New Jersey Realtors® is comprised of 48,000 members who’ve pledged to serve their clients with knowledge, experience, and responsibility. It’s this higher standard that separates a Realtor® from any other real estate agent.

njrealtor.com/truecolors

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Contents SUMMER 2017

FEATURES 14

19

26

30

The Pediatric Surgery Program at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital expands to meet the needs of the region’s children.

The New Jersey American Academy of Pediatrics honors Elliot Rubin, M.D., for his commitment to caring for children.

Boost your well-being by taking these nutrition dynamos from garden to table.

You’ve seen the selfproclaimed mama’s boy Eric Bolling on Fox News. Here, the New Jersey resident waxes poetic on God, family, country—and his next move.

SMOOTH OPERATORS

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A BIG K.O. TO GERMS

A germ-zapping robot enhances safety at Saint Peter’s University Hospital by killing infection-causing microbes.

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SPECIAL TESTING FOR SPECIAL NEEDS Developmental pediatricians test special needs kids to help families plan for school.

CELEBRATING A TOP PEDIATRICIAN

SUPERFOODS YOU CAN GROW E ASILY AT HOME

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20

FACES OF SAINT PE TER’S

Meet a deep-seadiving doctor and a gastroenterologist who designs clothes.

E XERCISING OUTDOORS

Take your activities to nature for a variety of benefits to the mind, body and soul.

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DON’T CALL HIM MR. RIGHT

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FRESH AIR DINING

There’s nothing quite like dining alfresco in the summer. Vibrant colors and cozy touches elevate even a casual luncheon to a memorable fête.

GE T OUTSIDE

Central Jersey has no shortage of scenic destinations for hiking, fishing, boating and more.

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I N E V ERY I S S UE

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W E LC O M E L E T T E R E D I TO R’S N OT E W H E R E TO E AT BE THERE

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SPH-1801 CJH&L Ped ED Ad 8.375x10.875_SPH-1801 CJH&L Ped ED Ad 8.375x10.875 6/27/17 10:41 AM Page 1

We built an emergency department just for kids. State-of-the-art care in a state-of-the-art facility.

The minute you walk into The Dorothy B. Hersh Pediatric Emergency Department (ED), you’ll know we’re dedicated to kids. From our specially trained doctors, nurses and staff to our dedicated pharmacist and full-time child life specialist who helps children and parents deal with the stress of an emergency, we’ve worked hard to make your child’s visit to the ED a lot less scary. With 11 private rooms, a Fast Track treatment area, orthopedic surgeons on call 24/7, a rapid asthma treatment area and more, it’s one of the largest pediatric ED facilities in the region.

For more details on our Pediatric Emergency Department, call 732.565.KIDS (5437) or visit saintpetershcs.com/PedsED

254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

732.745.8600

saintpetershcs.com

Sponsored by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen

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Contents SUMMER

46 DEPARTMENTS 12

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Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in central New Jersey.

It’s time to spill the beans. There is a wide variety of these little legumes out there, and each type has its own benefits.

LOCAL BUZZ

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POWER FOOD

48 28

GATHERINGS

Photos from recent charity and social events.

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HOME FRONT

Forget stainless steel. Add pops of color to your kitchen via functional necessities.

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ESCAPES

Turn off that phone and enjoy the rustic sights and tempting tastes of Pennsylvania Dutch Country, surprisingly close to home.

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SUMMER 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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THE BERKELEY OCEANFRONT HOTEL The Berkeley Oceanfront Hotel boasts 238 guest rooms and five unique and luxurious ballrooms that can be perfectly tailored to accommodate any special event or wedding. Whether you are planning an ornate plated dinner for 300 or an intimate outdoor cocktail celebration for close friends, we can do it all.

732-776-6700 | 1401 Ocean Avenue, Asbury Park, NJ 07712 | BerkeleyHotelNJ.com

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Our ER has been recognized as one of the best for stroke care.

WELCOME LETTER

PROUD TO BE THE LEADER FOR PEDIATRIC CARE NO MENTION OF SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM IS EVER complete without talking at length about our services for children. They are extensive. And they are among the best in the region. In fact, The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital is the goto source for much of New Jersey—including many of our neighboring hospitals—when it comes to finding the highest quality care for pediatric patients of all ages. This edition of Central Jersey Health & Life explores that topic of better health for our kids. Consider surgery, for example, when it involves a youngster. The techniques for treating a child—from anesthesia to the actual procedure—can be markedly different than those required for an adult. Fortunately, Saint Peter’s boasts having three of the most experienced and accomplished pediatric surgeons in the area. (See “Inside Look,” page 14.) The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital also offers 24-hour, seven-day-a-week coverage by a sevenmember team of pediatric anesthesiologists—the largest group of its kind in Central Jersey—who are specially trained to treat kids all ages, from infants to teenagers. The Children’s Hospital offers more—much more, in fact—for the families of New Jersey. Saint Peter’s is a state-designated acute care children’s hospital. We offer a full-range of pediatric specialized healthcare services. Our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is the largest and one of the most advanced between Boston and Washington, D.C., and our Pediatric Intensive Care Unit is among the highest rated in New Jersey. Saint Peter’s is also a leader in the testing and treatment of developmental disabilities, including autism, of particular importance as these children approach another new school year (see “Seasonal Health,” page 18), because those children with special needs often require special services from their schools. Saint Peter’s is also home to a remarkable pediatrician. His name is Eliot Rubin, M.D., who was honored in April as Pediatrician of the Year by the New Jersey American Academy of Pediatrics. Those who know Dr. Rubin—including the many families he has served—are no doubt aware this award was overdue. Dr. Rubin has practiced since 1985, with offices in Highland Park and East Brunswick. (See “Up Close,” page 19) Please also take the time to learn a bit more about two of our pediatric specialists (see “Faces of Saint Peter’s,” page 20): Rupinder Gill, M.D., a pediatric gastroenterologist whose spare time is devoted to designing beautiful Asian-Indian-style clothing for children and adults, and Arnaldo Abreu, M.D., a pediatric emergency medicine physician who relaxes as an accomplished chef and loves to scuba dive. Of course, this edition of Central Jersey Health & Life wouldn’t be complete without its usual mix of lifestyle articles, from outdoor fun, to great summer food, to fashion, to day trips, to home decor. We hope you will enjoy the magazine and the summer…and look to Saint Peter’s for your healthcare needs. Sincerely,

254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901 saintpetershcs.com 732.745.8600 ■

Sponsored by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen

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LESLIE D. HIRSCH, FACHE IN T E R I M C E O A ND P R E S IDE N T S A IN T P E T E R’S HE A LT H CA R E SYST E M

6/29/17 6/29/17 10:20 10:20 AMAM


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in a medical emergency, the fastER you’re treated, the bettER.

SAINT PETER’S EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT. AWARD-WINNING CARE MAKES A DIFFERENCE. The Robert and Joan Campbell Adult Emergency Department at Saint Peter’s University Hospital is one of the largest ER facilities in central New Jersey, staffed by a highly trained team of emergency medicine physicians, Magnet-designated nurses, and other emergency professionals. From an award-winning, designated primary stroke center to minor injuries, asthma attacks, fractures and more, we’re treating patients with faster turnaround times.

To learn more about Saint Peter’s Emergency Department, call 732.745.8525 or visit saintpetershcs.com/ER

254 EASToN AvENUE, NEw bRUNSwiCk, NJ 08901

732.745.8600

saintpetershcs.com

Sponsored by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen

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EDITOR’S NOTE

TAKE IT OUTSIDE

FRESH… Like You’ve Never Tasted.

Our menu has been designed specifically to give you the maximum amount of nutrition along with an unbelievable amount of flavor and aroma. We source our ingredients from the very best vendors we can find, and in some instances we’ve parternered, or invested in the facilities that are supplying our products. Take it from us, we care about these details.

ORDER BY PHONE

732.769.8133 11AM–9PM EVERYDAY

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DON’T TAKE OFFENSE when we tell you to “Get Out!” No, we haven’t lost our cool; you know exactly what we mean. After the long, wet, gray months we’ve all suffered, our reward has finally arrived. Summer is here, and the warm, sunny days it brings are best savored outside. Plus there are legitimate health benefits to being out in nature. I recently read research from Columbia University that discussed the particles—really negative ions—found in ocean waves, river rapids and waterfalls and how they act as natural antidepressants. Then there’s a study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise that reported people who walked on an outdoor track moved faster and felt better than those walking on an indoor treadmill. That’s why, starting on page 24, you’ll find two full pages devoted to wonderful ways to enjoy the great outdoors in Central Jersey. There are plenty of ideas for hikers, cyclists, birdwatchers and more! And there’s even more outdoor fun in this issue. Is gardening your fancy? There are dozens of fruits, vegetables, herbs and other plants that are easy to grow and can thrive in your backyard—even in the smallest of spaces. Find out what you can grow on page 26. There’s no such thing as having too much fun, but being outside does come with certain responsibilites. Turn to page 28 and read tips on how to stay cool and safe when exercising outdoors. Of course, we have plenty of other stories for you. If you’re thinking of taking a quick getaway trip, turn to page 46 to learn what you need to know about beautiful Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Then flip to page 48 and learn about five beans that you should have in your kitchen now. Enjoy these and all the other articles in this issue. Bring it to the park or the beach, then have some outdoor fun when you’re done reading!

RITA GUARNA EDITOR IN CHIEF EDITOR@WAINSCOTMEDIA.COM

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TREATING PATIENTS COMPREHENSIVELY, MONMOUTH COUNTY’S

TOP

DENTISTS 2017

with respect and compassion, is what Dr. Scott Lurie is known for. For almost 25 years, he has maintained his reputation as a meticulous family dentist, skilled at providing the highest quality dental care. Dr. Lurie’s practice includes both adults and children. Many of his patients have been coming to him for more than twenty years, before they had children of their own. They continue to see Dr. Lurie, as do their adult children. Dr. Lurie hopes to be their family dentist for a lifetime. Whether you are looking for a routine dental cleaning or you desire complex cosmetic treatment such as implants, crowns, invisalign or veneers, Dr. Lurie has the skill and years of expertise to meet your every need. His goal is to provide patients with a smile that will look beautiful and last a lifetime. At Dr. Lurie’s office you will experience the most modern equipment and techniques dentistry has to offer, such as digital x-rays, magnification glasses, and metal-free fillings and crowns. Dr. Lurie offers convenient early morning, late evening, and Saturday appointments.

SCOTT D. LURIE, D.M.D.

172 Summerhill Rd., Ste. 6, East Brunswick, NJ 08816 • 732.613.4522 • drscottdlurie.com 1553 State Highway 27, Ste. 3400, Somerset, NJ 08857 • 732.545.7650

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CENTRAL JERSEY RITA GUARNA

SHAE MARCUS

SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

ART DIRECTOR

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

INTERIM CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND PRESIDENT

ED I T O R I A L

ADVERTISING

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

EDITORIAL INTERN

DIRECTOR, SPECIAL PROGRAMS

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

M A R K E T I N G , D I G I TA L & O P E R AT I O N S

ED ITOR I N C H I EF STEPHEN M. VITARBO

DARIUS AMOS

DANIELLE GALLO

LI Z DONOVAN, KELLY DOUGHER, DAVID LE VINE, MARI S A S ANDOR A ART

ART ASSISTANT

Y VONNE MARKI PRODUCTION

PUB LI S HER JODI BRUKER

K AREN A Z Z ARELLO

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND DIGITAL MEDIA NIGEL EDELS HAIN

MARKETING ASSOCIATE RICHARD IURILLI

MICHELLE L A Z Z AROT TI

DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS PHIL HARTMAN

SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

PRESIDENT, MEDICAL AND DENTAL STAFF GOPAL R. DES AI, M. D.

ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER JACQUELYNN FI SCHER

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR, AGENCY SERVICES

PRODUCTION/ART ASSISTANT

CONTROLLER

AL ANNA GIANNANTONIO

SENIOR DIRECTOR, MARKETING

L AUR A A . DOWDEN

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION CHRI STINE HAMEL

LES LIE D. HIRSCH, FACHE

KI JOO KIM

AGNES ALVES

SAINT PETER’S HEALTH AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES CORPORATION

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

STE VEN S. RADIN, ESQ.

ACCOUNTANT

MEGAN FRANK

MANAGER, OFFICE SERVICES AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CATHERINE ROS ARIO

PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA CHAIRMAN CARROLL V. DOWDEN PRESIDENT & CE O

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MARK DOWDEN S EN I O R V I CE P RESIDENTS S HAE MARCUS CARL OLSEN VICE PRESIDENTS NIGEL EDELSHAIN RITA GUARNA CHRI STINE HAMEL

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Central Jersey Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; email editor@wainscotmedia.com. Central Jersey Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials. CENTRAL JERSEY HEALTH & LIFE is published 3 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 11, Issue 2. © 2017 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Central Jersey: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Shae Marcus at 856.797.2227 or shae.marcus@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Central Jersey Health & Life, Circulation Department, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

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LOCALBUZZ CENTRAL JERSEY NEWS

REVIEWS

Better Business Idea The Somerset County Library System recently held a “Teen Tycoons” contest in celebration of Small Business Week and awarded prizes to four entrepreneurial teens at the Manville Library. The contest was similar to the TV show “Shark Tank,” and 14 Somerset County students pitched their ideas to a panel of judges who were looking for original business concepts or unique variations on an existing business concept. The first-place winning idea was “Breathin’ Easy” by Brianna Broderick and Madison Hill-Glover, both 11th graders at Academy for Health and Medical Sciences (SCVTHS). The concept included modifications and enhancements to an oxygen concentrator machine, inspired by and in memory of Brianna’s mother, who passed away several years ago. Enhancements to the device included ambulance connection technology, a remote control, additional tubing and more. “This year’s contestants were all very impressive,” says Cathy DeBerry, adult services librarian at the Somerset County Library System. “I wouldn’t be surprised to see some of the ideas on the market someday. What impressed me the most, however, was the amazing support each of the contestants provided each other even though most of them had just met for the first time.”

TIPS

TRENDS

A SHOW OF SUPPORT

The recent Care Couture Hair Art Show at the Mercer County Boat House raised $11,000 to support the Princeton-based Breast Cancer Resource Center. Several salons, including 12 from Central Jersey, showcased unique hair designs in the themes of Earth, Seasons and Ocean. Participating area salons were: Godfrey Fitzgerald, Princeton; Sydney Albert Salon, Lawrenceville; Copper River Salon, Princeton; Salon Teknique, East Brunswick; Salon Dolcetto, Lawrenceville; Oasis Salon & Spa, Hopewell; Salon Artigiano, Hamilton; VC Salon, Robbinsville; Salon Meori, Hamilton; Great Looks Salon, Lawrenceville; Anthony Vincent Salon & Spa, West Windsor; Blo Out Lounge and Colour Bar, Hamilton Square.

HUNGRY FOR HALAL

Jonesing for a gyro? You’re in luck. The Halal Guys recently opened on Route 22 in Union where you can get chicken, beef, both or falafel in a gyro or as a platter that comes with lettuce, tomato and basmati rice. Both are topped with hot sauce or the chain’s signature white sauce. This is New Jersey’s third The Halal Guys location (the others are New Brunswick and Newark, and a Teterboro location opened June), and it all started back in 1990 on the corner of West 53rd Street and Sixth Avenue in Manhattan when the first Halal Guys began as a food truck serving hungry taxi drivers and late-night party goers. Sides include hummus, falafel, baba ganouj or fries, and they also offer delivery and catering. The Halal Guys, 2317 US-22, Union, 908.623.3521, thehalalguys.com

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SUMMER 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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A NEW WOODBRIDGE WATERING HOLE

New Jersey’s second Bar Louis location recently opened in The Plaza at Woodbridge (the first was East Brunswick). The popular chain has more than 100 locations nationwide, but no two are alike, according to the company. Woodbridge’s location features an extensive selection of beers on tap and wine by the glass, in addition to its signature handcrafted martinis and cocktails. Food options include flatbreads, burgers, salads, sandwiches and entrees like Drunken Fish & Chips, Tuscan Chicken Pasta and Sesame Encrusted Ahi Tuna. Bar Louie, The Plaza at Woodbridge, 675 Rt. 1S, Iselin, 848.214.0010, barlouie.com

ROCK THESE SOCKS

The next time a flight is in your future, consider wearing a pair of compression socks. Studies show that they help circulate oxygenated blood and prevent conditions like blood clots and deep vein thrombosis. And don’t wear the ugly brown medical-grade socks that your grandmother wore because companies like VIM & VIGR make socks, such as those pictured, in cool and stylish designs. “I’ve never had any real problems flying, but after long flights sometimes my legs feel a bit tired and heavy so I tried them,” says Rita Guarna, editor in chief of Central Jersey Health and Life. “I definitely felt the difference: after landing, my legs felt rested enough to sprint through the airport.”

Oh, What A Night

The State Theatre New Jersey Benefit Gala raised $624,604 for the not-for-profit performing arts center in New Brunswick. Guests enjoyed dinner, a Viennese dessert buffet, a silent auction that included more than 70 items, a wine pull, a posed photo station, dance music by Gerard Carelli Orchestra and a performance by Tony-award winner Audra McDonald (pictured). Three honorees were recognized at the gala: American Benefits Consulting, Brent and Susan Podlogar, and Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios and the Middlesex County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Proceeds from the event support year-round arts education and outreach initiatives with the community, as well as mainstage programming.

TJ’S ON THE WAY

Trader Joe’s fans, rejoice! Officials in North Brunswick have announced plans for a Trader Joe’s to open on Route 1 later this year in part of the space formerly occupied by Barnes & Noble in the North Village Shopping Center. It will be the chain’s 13th location in New Jersey and the first in Middlesex County. The grocery store is known for its unusual assortment of items and affordable prices. Some favorites? It’s hard to pick just a few, but we love the Soyaki, a unique blend of soy sauce and teriyaki, the Garlic & Herb Stuffed Brie, Joe-Joe’s (Oreo-like sandwich cookies), the PB&J Bar, the Spanakopita, the Cookie Butter and the frozen Mac ’N’ Cheese. For many shoppers, half the fun of going to Trader Joe’s is discovering new, interesting items. Learn more about the grocery store at traderjoes.com.

Fire company receives donation The River Road Fire Department recently received a $1,620 donation from Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar. The funds were raised during an Applebee’s Breakfast with the Easter Bunny event at its Piscataway location, where 100 percent of the proceeds supported the fire company and its efforts to fight childhood cancer. The fire department is dedicated to providing firefighting and rescue services to the residents and visitors of Fire District #2 in Piscataway, the surrounding communities and Rutgers University. CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

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INGOODHEALTH PAT I E N T C A R E AT S A I N T P E T E R’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

SMOOTH

OPERATORS THE SMALLEST PATIENTS SOMETIMES POSE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES, AND NO one knows that better than the pediatric surgeons who work at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. There are very few medical facilities in the area that offer as many neonatal and pediatric surgical services as the hospital’s Pediatric Surgery Program. Its three specially trained surgeons provide comprehensive general and specialized surgical care to treat congenital and acquired conditions affecting children from birth through young adulthood. Those three pediatric surgeons are John Gallucci, M.D., and Steven Palder, M.D., who assembled the program, and Anthony Georges, M.D., who joined the practice earlier this year. Together, they perform everything from lifesaving microsurgery on premature infants weighing no more than a pound to treating common pediatric conditions as appendicitis and hernias—and everything in between. The Children’s Hospital is a state-designated acute care children’s hospital, which means it offers a full range of pediatric specialized healthcare services for newborns and children. It boasts one of the largest, most advanced neonatal intensive care units (ICU) in the country, and its Regional Perinatal Center and pediatric ICU are among the best in New Jersey. Board certified experts in pediatric anesthesiology, pediatric radiology, neonatology, nursing and other pediatric specialties work with the surgeons to provide round-the-clock care. “Surgery is the sexy part, but the real work happens before and after surgery,” Dr. Palder says. “Working as a team allows all of us to do things we couldn’t have imagined doing in the past.” Surgically speaking, Dr. Palder and Dr. Gallucci began working together around 2003 to grow the program. “The best thing has been my association with Dr. Gallucci,” he says. “It was just us working hard to make the program a success. When we started, the hospital was doing about 100 surgical cases a year. We took it to a high of 900 cases.” They are now back down to about 700 between the two of them, and the addition of Dr. Georges will push that number back up. The most amazing work the surgeons perform is on premature babies weighing as little as 500 grams—or 1.1 pounds. “That’s about as small as you will get,” Dr. Galluci says. He has done surgery on these babies’ tiny, underdeveloped airways and bowels to literally save their lives. “Taking babies that are likely going to die, and three to four months later they’re discharged home with their parents, that’s memorable,” he says. “Pediatric surgery by description is memorable and special. That’s why we didn’t go into other areas of surgery. This was not a career I picked. It was my destiny. It picked me.” “It’s hard to fathom what they do with these preemies unless you see it,” says Scott

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From left, Drs. Anthony Georges, John Gallucci and Steven Palder, pediatric surgeons at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital.

JOHN JOHN O’BOYLE O’BOYLE

THE PEDIATRIC SURGERY PROGRAM EXPANDS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE REGION’S CHILDREN.

SUMMER 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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JOHN O’BOYLE O’BOYLE JOHN

INSIDE LOOK

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

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INSIDE LOOK Matin, administrative director of the Department of Surgery. Pediatric surgery is a highly specialized field, he adds. “At last count there were only 12 or 13 pediatric surgeons in the entire state of New Jersey and very few others throughout the country,” Matin says. “For Saint Peter’s to have three of them demonstrates the commitment the hospital has to its mission as a women and children’s hospital.” David Jaipersaud, administrative director of the Department of Pediatrics, says it is well-documented that there is a growing number of children with health problems, and thus a growing need for pediatric specialists. “We are very lucky to have three pediatric surgeons,” he says. “It represents an opportunity to be the regional center for pediatric surgery and one of the busiest programs in the state.” Dr. Palder, who at 65 will begin to work fewer hours with the addition of Dr. Georges, has been with Saint Peter’s since 1993. “The hospital itself has a family feel you don’t find at other hospitals,” he says. “It’s a very humanistic place that treats people more like friends than patients.” Among the memorable patients he has treated are the children he operated on in South and Central America while on humanitarian missions, and those flown to Saint Peter’s and cared for here on the hospital’s dime. About 10 years ago, he operated on a 13-year-old boy from the Dominican Republic who had Hirschsprung’s disease, which makes defecating difficult to impossible. “He wore a sheet around his abdomen and stooled into the sheet,” Dr. Palder says. After surgery, the child

could defecate naturally for the first time in his life. And in June, the boy, now 23, returned to Saint Peter’s to thank him. “He said he could finish school, get a job and is doing well,” Dr. Palder says. “He gave me a hug, and I got goosebumps and a little teary. It’s pretty heavy stuff.” Dr. Georges trained at SUNY Downstate, with a fellowship at Columbus Children’s Hospital. He also worked as a pediatric oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and then at Miami Children’s Hospital before joining the Saint Peter’s staff in February 2017. He specializes in thoracic and cancer surgery, but like the other surgeons, performs a host of procedures. “Last night, we did a radiology study on a 4-month-old. An adult radiologist wouldn’t know how to do that safely and effectively,” he says. He joined Saint Peter’s in part because of the wealth of pediatric subspecialists on hand as well as a dedicated pediatric emergency department that is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “That is a really big deal,” he says. For Dr. Gallucci, working at a Catholic hospital is also a big deal. “Saint Peter’s is all for saving the smallest, most fragile infants, and that is what I love most,” he says. “I do lots of older kids and appendixes, but the preterm babies I find most gratifying. I approach every kid combining an academic, surgical view mixed in with a spiritual view, and I believe to my core that there is much more to life than what is in front of your nose. [Preemies] are the most incapable human beings on the planet, and helping them is so emotionally gratifying.”

SPECIAL CARE

FOR SPECIAL PATIENTS

The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital is one of the largest specialized facilities of its kind on the East Coast. A Level III NICU, it treats more than 1,300 fragile newborns each year. Babies are taken directly from Saint Peter’s labor and delivery rooms in specially designed transporters and then transferred to one of 54 intensive and special care bassinets expressly used for premature or special needs babies from 22 to 44 weeks. Newborns in need of specialized care are also transferred to the NICU from other hospitals. Minimally invasive neonatal and pediatric surgeons use advanced surgical equipment and tiny video cameras to perform major procedures on the youngest patients. The result is less trauma to the body, which translates to less pain and pain medication, fewer complications, less anesthesia and decreased overall healing time. Pediatric surgeons also provide surgery and rehabilitation for children born with facial abnormalities, including cleft lip and cleft palate, at the regional CraniofacialNeurosurgical Center at The Children’s Hospital.

JOHN O’BOYLE

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8600.

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TECH SAVVY

A BIG K.O. to germs

A GERM-ZAPPING ROBOT ENHANCES HOSPITAL SAFETY BY KILLING INFECTION-CAUSING MICROBES.

JOHN O’BOYLE

HOSPITALS AROUND THE WORLD ARE LOOKING FOR NEW and innovative ways to battle deadly pathogens and kill multidrug resistant organisms that can cause hospital-acquired infections, or HAI. Saint Peter’s University Hospital has taken a leap into the future with the implementation of a LightStrike Germ-Zapping Robot that emits waves of ultraviolet (UV) light to destroy hard-to-kill bugs in hard-to-clean places. “In infection prevention, our goal is to provide a clean, safe environment for our patients, their families and our employees. This latest technology provides an added level of protection in combating HAI’s caused by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Staphylococcus aureus,” says Amy Gram, director of Infection Prevention at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. “By improving our disinfection practices with the implementation of the Xenex LightStrike Germ-Zapping Robot, we have added another strategy to further reduce our infection rates.” UV has been used for disinfection for decades. The Xenex robot is a new technology that uses pulsed xenon, a high-intensity UV light that penetrates the cell walls of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, mold, fungus and spores. Their DNA is fused, rendering them unable to reproduce or mutate, effectively killing them on surfaces without contact or chemicals. “This is a revolutionary system that provides a second layer

of protection after a room is cleaned and sanitized,” says Perry Zycband, manager of Environmental Services for Saint Peter’s University Hospital. After the Environmental Services staff cleans a room, a portable robot is wheeled in. “It’s a cool device—it looks like R2-D2 from Star Wars or the robot from Lost in Space,” Zycband says. The staff must leave the space and let the machine run for 10 minutes in the room and five minutes in the bathroom. The system is effective against even the most dangerous pathogens, including Clostridium difficile (C. diff), norovirus, influenza, Ebola and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA. “Studies have proved it is very effective,” Zycband says. Indeed, other hospitals have published their C. diff, MRSA and surgical site infection rate reduction studies in peer-reviewed journals, showing infection rate reductions in excess of 70 percent. More than 400 hospitals, Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense facilities in the United States, Canada, Africa, Japan and Europe are using Xenex robots, which are also in use in skilled nursing facilities, ambulatory surgery centers and long term acute care facilities. “Anything that helps clean the room benefits patients,” Zycband says. “They can know the room has this second layer of protection to eliminate germs.”

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8600 OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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SEASONAL HEALTH

Special testing for

SPECIAL NEEDS DEVELOPMENTAL PEDIATRICIANS HELP FAMILIES PLAN FOR SCHOOL. for what the child needs such as physical, occupational or speech therapy, classroom accommodations or other support services. Her report is sent to the parents, who then can pass it on to the child’s school, where child study team professionals use it to create an Individual Education Plan, or IEP, for each child with special needs. “I collaborate with the guidance counselors and case workers and answer follow-up questions if they have any,” Dr. Ridley says. “They take the information and meet with parents to discuss the findings and how to incorporate them into the IEP.” The department also coordinates with other medical specialists at the children’s hospital when children have concurrent physical health issues. “Autism spectrum children can have significant medical problems as well as behavioral problems, and other medical conditions can affect

their behavioral symptoms,” Dr. Merola says. These include gastrointestinal, vision, allergy and ear, nose and throat problems. “We have all the pediatric subspecialties you could need here under one roof, on the same floor,” she says. “It’s a unique opportunity here at Saint Peter’s that parents may not get at other centers.” With the initial screening process, Dr. Merola and her team will also assess current medical issues that may require attention from other specialists. Such medical conditions can be easily overlooked in a pediatrician’s office, partly due to the child’s behaviors. Harumi Jyonouchi, M.D., a pediatric allergist/immunologist, is experienced in seeing ASD children with immune/allergic conditions—she has published in medical journals and is conducting ongoing research. She has been closely collaborating with Dr. Merola’s team.

Maria Ridley, M.D., child psychologist, tests a young patient.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8600 OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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JOHN O’BOYLE

CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS OFTEN require special services from their schools. Determining what those needs and services should be often falls into the hands of outside evaluators, who may include developmental pediatricians, child psychologists and other pediatric specialists. The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital has gathered those specialists together to offer a full, individual evaluation when the child’s school or parents believe that the young one may need special education services and other medical precautions at the school. Rose Mary Merola, M.D., a developmental pediatrician, is the chief of developmental pediatrics at Saint Peter’s Children’s Hospital. Her team includes Meenal Mehta, advanced nurse practitioner, and Maria Ridley, M.D., a child psychologist. “We can test any child with developmental delays or behavioral problems at any age,” Dr. Merola says. The goal is to diagnose such health issues as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), mood disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), cognitive abilities and memory, among other things. Testing may involve interviews with parents to determine the history of the concern, conducting physical and cognitive tests, and checking for social skills such as movement, eye contact, speech and interactions with others. The tests are designed to be fun, says Dr. Ridley. “Many kids like them,” she says. “It is about problem solving and puzzles or blocks for the younger kids, and standardized tests at school for older kids. It’s not three hours of math questions.” Breaks, snacks and games are incorporated into the sessions to keep the children engaged during the one- to three-hour evaluations. Once the results are reviewed, Dr. Merola makes her diagnosis and recommendations

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UP CLOSE

CELEBRATING A TOP PEDIATRICIAN

ELLIOT RUBIN, M.D., IS HONORED FOR HIS DEDICATION AND COMMITMENT TO CARING FOR CHILDREN.

JOHN O’BOYLE

JOHN O’BOYLE

ELLIOT RUBIN, M.D., WAS HONORED THIS PAST APRIL AS Pediatrician of the Year by the New Jersey American Academy of Pediatrics—an award that is “long overdue,” according to David Jaipersaud, administrative director of The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, where Dr. Rubin has worked since 1985. In fact, his path to the award started far earlier than that. “I enjoyed going to my pediatrician growing up,” says Dr. Rubin, who was raised on Long Island. “I was interested in what he did, and I naturally gravitated to that department during my medical training,” he says. His fondness for dealing with kids is demonstrated in his bedside manner. “I try to engage children to tell me what they are interested in, what their passions are,” he says. “I get them to talk about what is exciting in their lives, and sometimes I tell them what I was doing at their age. It is great to get them to think of their doctor as a human being.” Along with that personal engagement, he cherishes the longstanding bonds he develops with his patients. “It is exciting to watch kids grow and develop, and take a proactive approach to guide what they need growing up,” he says. Dr. Rubin has a wealth of knowledge, Jaipersaud says. “Other pediatricians look to him for information, and he is always willing to the go extra mile for his patients and never says no.” Leslie D. Hirsch, interim CEO and president of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, adds, “He is well-liked and well-respected by virtually everyone who is fortunate to have come to know him. Saint Peter’s is graced by his presence, as are his medical colleagues and the families he has served.” Rubin is owner and executive manager of University Pediatric Associates, which has offices in Highland Park and East Brunswick. In addition to his practice, Dr. Rubin is active on several committees at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, including the Medical Executive Board and Newborn Nursery Committee. He lives in Highland Park with his wife, Joan—a pediatric nurse at Saint Peter’s—and their poodle, Maggie. They have two grown sons, one of whom also works at Saint Peter’s. Dr. Rubin enjoys cycling, kayaking, winter sports, woodworking and farming at their second home in Vermont. The New Jersey American Academy of Pediatrics (NJAAP) represents more than 1,700 New Jersey physicians. “Recognition by the NJAAP is among the highest honors a children’s doctor who

works in the Garden State can receive,” says Niranjan Rao, M.D., chief medical officer at Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. “It is a great honor,” says Dr. Rubin, who has been active in the NJAAP chapter for about 12 years and now serves as its immediate past president. “The AAP is not like other professional organizations—it is not just to represent doctors. It is a valuable advocate for children, a voice for children. I am very proud to be a part of it. And that makes being honored by them very special.”

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT SERVICES AVAIL ABLE FOR YOU OR YOUR FAMILY AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8542 OR VISIT SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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FACES OF SAINT PETER’S

Rupinder Gill, M.D. PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGIST

A NATIVE OF INDIA, RUPINDER GILL, M.D., brought her love of Indian clothing with her to the U.S. and now designs traditional garments—with a modern twist—for adults and children. Dr. Gill, a pediatric gastroenterologist (GE) with The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, moved to West Virginia at age 12. She attended West Virginia University and Marshall University Medical School, where she did her pediatrics residency. That was followed by a fellowship in pediatric gastroenterology at SUNY Downstate, where she also earned a Master’s in Public Health. She and her husband, Karan Gill, an investment banker, have two children, Aneira, 10, and Ayra, 4. She has been with Saint Peter’s since 2015. HOW DID YOU CHOOSE PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY AS YOUR SPECIALTY?

I like interacting with kids more than adults. I also like the challenge—the patient can’t always tell us what’s going on, so there is a little bit of detective work. My mentor was in pediatric GE, and I really enjoyed working with him. I love it because it takes you from the minute kids are born all the way to their adulthood. We see a wide variety of things, and that keeps it interesting. WHERE DID YOUR INTEREST IN INDIAN CLOTHING COME FROM?

My mom was a fashionista, and my sister, Rimi, and I gravitated to her clothes when we were little. As we grew older we really got into it. We would sit in at workshops, learning about embroidery and how the design process works. It got to the point that we design our own clothes now. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGNS?

“I LOVE [PEDIATRIC CARE] BECAUSE IT TAKES YOU FROM THE MINUTE KIDS ARE BORN ALL THE WAY TO THEIR ADULTHOOD. WE SEE A WIDE VARIETY OF THINGS, AND THAT KEEPS IT INTERESTING.” — RUPINDER GILL, M.D.

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BOHM-MARRAZZO STUDIOS

We incorporate non-Indian elements, and it’s really fun to make it more “fusion.” We have lived in the U.S. most of our lives, and it is fun to make the clothing more contemporary. They are not just traditional, so I wear them frequently, to American weddings and things. They blend in nicely.

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Arnaldo Abreu, M.D. PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE

WHEN HE IS NOT TENDING TO SERIOUSLY ILL or injured children as a pediatric emergency medicine specialist, Arnaldo Abreu, M.D., is likely to be found in one of two places: at a grill or oven cooking, or underwater scuba diving. The New York City native now lives in Randolph with his wife, Angela, a commercial property manager. They have three children, ages 17 to 27. Dr. Abreu graduated from Saint Peter’s University in Jersey City and the Ross University School of Medicine in the Dominican Republic. He did his pediatrics residency at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center and has been with Saint Peter’s University Hospital for the past four years. WHY DID YOU PURSUE PEDIATRICS?

Ever since seventh grade, I liked science and how it relates to the human body. I chose pediatrics because I enjoy being with children, and I really enjoyed being in the emergency department during my residency. It keeps you on your toes, and each day has different challenges. HOW DID YOU GET INTO SCUBA DIVING?

My first dive was during our honeymoon in Aruba. I enjoyed it so much that I became certified afterward. I like that you can float and see natural beauty other than what is on land—from different sea life to coral formations, each area is different. I prefer warm water, so I mainly dive in the Caribbean and Florida. The Florida Keys are my favorite; they combine shallow dives with beautiful reefs and a lot of sea life, and deeper dives that involve shipwrecks. WHAT ABOUT GRILLING AND COOKING?

I bought my first grill before we had kids, and the hobby blossomed. I am always trying new things. My specialty is paella. I won an award at Jersey City’s first Paella Festival, which took place in 2014. WHAT MAKES YOUR PAELLA SPECIAL?

BOHM-MARRAZZO STUDIOS

BOHM-MARRAZZO STUDIOS

I spent time in Spain on vacation, and I would sneak back to the kitchens and ask questions and see how the chefs made it. The secret is to put a lot of effort into the broth that the rice is cooked in. That will make or break the paella.

“[PEDIATRICS] KEEPS YOU ON YOUR TOES, AND EACH DAY HAS DIFFERENT CHALLENGES.” —ARNALDO ABREU, M.D. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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GATHERINGS AT SAINT PETER’S SUPPORTING BREAST HEALTH The Saint Peter’s University Hospital Auxiliary presented a $45,000 check on May 17 to the Saint Peter’s Breast Center in support of breast care services. Susan McManus, M.D., center, director of the breast center, accepted the donation from Kathleen Killion, president of the Saint Peter’s Auxiliary, and Les Hirsch, FACHE, interim CEO and president of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. The proceeds were raised at the auxiliary’s spring fashion show held in March at The Pines Manor in Edison. The auxiliary has raised more than $480,000 for Saint Peter’s Breast Center programs over the last nine years. The public may contact Killion at 732.745.8588 for more information about the auxiliary or Mary Ann Snediker at 732.846.9434 to become a member.

BEST NURSES IN THE WORLD Saint Peter’s University Hospital nurses celebrated National Nurses Week (May 1–5) in grand style by hosting a lunch for all employees and an awards ceremony at the hospital. National Nurses Week recognizes the contributions and commitments nurses make and all they do to educate the public about the significant work they perform. Last spring, Saint Peter’s became only the fifth hospital in the world to earn the prestigious Magnet recognition for nursing excellence five straight times. Shown at the celebration are standing, from left: Allan Villapaz, RNFA (registered nurse first assistant in surgery); Joseph Abraham, RNFA; May Marie Armenio, ORRN (operating room registered nurse); and Felix Rivera, RNFA. Seated, from left: Jude Lespinasse, ORRN; Omar Rodgers, OR technician; Jameel Mapp, OR technician; Linda Carroll, MSN, RN-BC, chief nursing officer; Lora Ann Oblenda, ORRN; Eileen Tomas, ORRN; Muriel Saludez-Chan, ORRN; and Romel Torres, ORRN.

SAFEGUARDING THE PUBLIC Saint Peter’s University Hospital took part in Operation Gotham Shield, a statewide exercise conducted on April 26 to test New Jersey’s disaster response readiness among its many public agencies and private safety entities. This year’s exercise focused on decontamination operations and statewide emergency communications. Shown during the action outside of the Saint Peter’s Emergency Department in New Brunswick are, from left: Sharon Haskins, director of the Medical Surgical and Critical Care Division at Saint Peter’s; Diana Goldstein, nurse educator; Jennifer O’Leary, assistant nurse manager, Emergency Department; Gilbert Vicencio, assistant nurse manager, Emergency Department; and Gary Schuman, director, Safety and Security.

FOR INFORMATION ON UPCOMING EVENTS SPONSORED BY SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM, GO TO SAINTPETERSHCS.COM/COMMUNITY-CALENDAR.

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GET OUTSIDE CENTRAL JERSEY HAS NO SHORTAGE OF SCENIC DESTINATIONS FOR HIKING, FISHING, BOATING AND MORE—SO WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? THE GREAT OUTDOORS BECKON.

BIRDWATCHING

If you go early in the morning, the Central Jersey area offers great spots to see a variety of winged species during breeding season. See the sites below; learn more at njaudubon.org.

NATURE WALKS is home to more than 150 species.

Herrontown Woods (Princeton): The spring and fall migrations bring the greatest number of species to the woods, including warblers and thrushes. There are permanent residents too, such as the great-horned owl and Eastern screech owl.

Thompson Park Conservation Area (Monroe Township): About five miles of trails enable you to take a short stroll or string several together for a longer hike.

Institute Woods (Princeton): The 589-acre nature reserve comes alive each spring with wave after wave of migrating warblers. In fact, it’s one of the best spots in the state to observe the migration of warblers and other songbirds.

Washington Crossing State Park (Titusville): The 3,575-acre park is known for its trails and wildlife, including whitetail deer, great-horned owl and redtailed hawk.

Scherman-Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary (Bernardsville): More than 60 species of birds nest in the 276acre sanctuary, including Louisiana waterthrush, ruby-throated hummingbird, pileated woodpecker and the great-horned owl.

Enjoy hiking, educational opportunities and more at one of the many tranquil nature spots in our area. Cheesequake State Park (Matawan): This unique park is located between two different ecosystems and is home to open fields, saltwater and freshwater marshes, a white cedar swamp and a northeastern hardwood forest. Five designated trails, ranging from 1.5 miles to 3.5 miles, vary in difficulty level from easy to moderate. Jamesburg Park Conservation Area (East Brunswick, Helmetta, Spotswood and Monroe Township): Inside the

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1,400-acre park you’ll find a network of four marked trails ranging from 0.6 mile to 2.8 miles long. John A. Phillips Open Space Preserve (Old Bridge): This 1,700-acre preserve has four major hiking trails, ranging from a half-mile to 2.1 miles. Plainsboro Preserve (Plainsboro): Hike more than 5 miles of trails at this 1,000-acre preserve. Those with a keen eye can spot different birds—the park

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GOLF

BOATING

Whether you own or rent a boat, the area has several places to launch canoes, rowboats, kayaks and more.

The 25-mile Lower Raritan corridor has many public access points from which to launch a canoe or kayak. Head to the Edison Boat Basin, Sayreville Boat Dock, Duke Island Park in Bridgewater, Johnson Park in Piscataway or Donaldson Park in Highland Park and enjoy scenery ranging from urban settings and small river towns to farm country and woodlands. You can also bring your boat to Mercer Lake in West Windsor—or rent one at the Mercer County Marina. Pedal boats are available for rental at Warinanco

Park in Roselle, Echo Lake Park in Mountainside and Colonial Park in Somerset. You can also rent canoes and kayaks (go to canoenj .com) and spend the day paddling on the Delaware & Raritan Canal or Lake Carnegie. The Somerset County Park Commission offers a variety of introductory experiences on Branta Pond at the Environmental Education Center, including “CAN-UCANNU??” and “KANU-KAYAK??” Once you pass the class, you’re able to participate in the kayak and canoe trips offered.

Eager to get back in the swing? Pack your bag and head to the course— there are more than a dozen open-to-the-public ones from which to choose.

Ashbrook Golf Course 1210 Raritan Rd. Scotch Plains 908.756.0414 ashbrookgolf course.com Bunker Hill Golf Course 220 Bunker Hill Rd. Princeton 908.359.6335 bunker.distinctgolf .com Cranbury Golf Club 49 Southfield Rd. West Windsor 609.799.0341 cranburygolf.com Galloping Hill Golf Course 3 Golf Dr. Kenilworth 908.241.8700 gallopinghillgolf course.com

Green Knoll Golf Course 587 Garretson Rd. Bridgewater 908.722.1301 greenknollgolf.com Hyatt Hills Golf Complex 1300 Raritan Rd. Clark 732.669.9100 hyatthills.com The Meadows at Middlesex 70 Hunters Glen Dr. Plainsboro 609.799.4000 mciauth.com Mercer Oaks Golf Course 725 Village Rd. West Windsor 609.936.9603 golfmercercounty .com Mountain View Golf Course 850 Bear Tavern Rd.

Ewing 609.882.4093 golfmercercounty .com Neshanic Valley Golf Course 2301 Branch Rd. Neshanic Station 908.369.8200 neshanicvalleygolf .com Princeton Country Club 1 Wheeler Way Princeton 609.452.9382 golfmercercounty .com Quail Brook Golf Course 625 New Brunswick Rd. Somerset 732.560.9199 quailbrookgolf.com Raritan Landing Golf Course 491 Sidney Rd. Piscataway 732.885.9600 mciauth.com

Royce Brook Golf Club 201 Hamilton Rd. Hillsborough 908.904.0499 roycebrook.com Rutgers University Golf Course 777 Hoes Ln. Piscataway 848.445.2637 golfcourse.rutgers .edu Spooky Brook Golf Course 582 Elizabeth Ave. Somerset 732.873.2242 spookybrookgolf .com Tamarack Golf Course 97 Hardenburg Ln. East Brunswick 732.821.8881 mciauth.com Tara Greens Golf Center 955 Route 27 Somerset 732.247.8284

BIKING Both serious mountain bikers and families can find their ideal biking trail here. Cyclists, rejoice! There are a pair of mountain biking hot spots in our area—the 715acre Washington Valley Park in Bridgewater Township and Sourland Mountain Preserve, whose 3,000 acres stretch across Hillsborough and Montgomery townships through southern Hunterdon and northern Mercer counties to the Delaware River. Both feature miles of trails for different skill levels in an undisturbed natural setting. Also check out Mercer County Park, which has four dedicated mountain biking trails for all levels of skill and ability. If you prefer pavement, bring your bike to Duke Island Park in Bridgewater Township, which has 3.5 miles of trails along both the canal and the Raritan River. At Natirar Park, a 404-acre site in Peapack-Gladstone, Far Hills and Bedminster, two trails (1.3 miles and 1 mile) traverse scenic meadows and wooded areas. In Mercer County, the Lawrence Hopewell Trail extends for approximately 20 miles through Lawrence and Hopewell Townships.

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SUPERFOODS

You Can Grow Easily at Home 26

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Bump up your health benefits by taking these nutrition dynamos from garden to table.

WANT TO RAMP UP YOUR ANTIOXIDANT INTAKE, boost your health and feel more energized? You can start by integrating a few select superfoods into your diet. We’ve chosen four nutrient-dense dynamos that are easily grown in a home garden and fare well in our region. Most of these superfoods don’t take up a lot of square footage in the garden and also will thrive in outdoor containers, or inside on a windowsill. Taking vitamin-rich produce from garden to table gives you the freshest food available, with the greatest possible health benefits.

THE BOUNTY OF BLUEBERRIES They grow well locally and are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber. A hardy blueberry patch will yield bounty for years to come, and kids love to pick the berries every summer. Spring is the ideal time to plant blueberry bushes. For best results, choose a sunny spot with acidic soil that has been amended with organic material, like peat moss. Add two to four inches of mulch to protect the shallow roots, and water regularly. Fertilize about one month after planting. Finally, blueberries are catnip for birds, so be sure to cover your bushes with netting.

HERBS THAT PACK NUTRITIONAL PUNCH Mint is a nutritional superstar that will amp up your smoothies. Other uses? Stir fresh mint into hot or iced tea, or snip into Mediterranean salads, dips and entrees. Mint is loaded with antioxidants, and is a natural antimicrobial agent and breath freshener. High in chlorophyll, fresh peppermint helps reduce inflammation in the gut and soothe an upset stomach. So much so that it’s sometimes used to bring relief to patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Mint spreads rapidly in the garden. To control the creep, plant in a confined outdoor space or a container. Parsley, best known as a garnish, is delicious when

blended into pesto and chimichurri sauce, or chopped into an array of soups and salads. Loaded with iron and vitamins C, A, K and B-12, parsley may help relieve joint pain, and some studies show it can inhibit tumor formation. Parsley seeds are slow to sprout. To give them a boost before planting, cover in warm water and let stand overnight. Parsley can be planted in pots indoors or out in the garden two to three weeks before the last frost. It likes moist, nutrient-rich soil and does best in partial shade or full sun.

SUPER SEEDS AND SPROUTS More than ever, nutritionists are touting the benefits of seeds and sprouts. Chia can be eaten in both forms. Chia seeds, which have a mild, nutty flavor, can be eaten whole—sprinkled on cereal or yogurt, mixed into vegetable or rice dishes, added to sauces, or baked into muffins. Sprouted chia has even more vitamins and minerals, and is a tasty addition to salads, soups and sandwiches. Chia sprouts are tiny workhorses, high in omega-3 fatty acids, protein, fiber, antioxidants, calcium and magnesium. Chia sprouts grow happily in a sunny indoor spot. (Remember the Chia Pet®?) Use the sprinkle-sprouting method: Add equal amounts of chia seeds and bottled spring or filtered water to a shallow glass baking dish. After an hour, tilt the dish to pour out the water, leaving behind the moistened chia seeds. Cover the tray with foil or a plastic lid to trap in the moisture, but leave one corner slightly open. Keep the seeds in a warm place. After about four days, they’ll sprout into seedlings, and when they’re about onehalf inch long, it’s time to taste! Leftovers? No problem— you can store them in a sealed container in the refrigerator for two weeks. One caveat: If you’re taking blood-pressure medications or blood thinners, ask your doctor before eating chia, which can interact negatively with some of those medicines.

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EXERCISING OUTDOORS

Good for the Body and Soul SURE, A CLIMATE-CONTROLLED GYM WITH ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES can be a pleasant place to work out, especially in winter, but science suggests there are powerful benefits to leading an active lifestyle in the great outdoors. When the weather permits, take your activity out in nature for a variety of benefits to body, mind and soul. Writer Laura Ingalls Wilder was on to something when she said, “Some old-fashioned things, like fresh air and sunshine, are hard to beat.” And now, there’s research to support her claim.

BOOST ENERGY AND REDUCE TENSION For example, a team from England’s Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry analyzed 11 trials that included more than 800 adults. They found that, when compared with indoor exercise, outdoor exercise was associated with increased energy and revitalization, as well as decreased confusion, anger, depression and tension. Outdoor exercisers also reported enjoying their workouts more, and were more likely to say they planned to repeat them than exercisers who were holed up inside a gym. Many also had lower levels of cortisol (a hormone produced in response to stress) than their indoor counterparts, and said exposure to sunlight improved their mood. In addition, people who walked outdoors completed an average of 30 minutes more exercise per week than those who exercised indoors. So, which outdoor activities provide the greatest benefit? Walking is at the top of the list. It boosts cardio, is gentle on the joints, strengthens bones, can be done almost anywhere and is free. From a mental-health standpoint, it can reduce stress, improve mood and spark creativity. Gardening is another favorite outdoor activity for many. It promotes tranquility and relaxation, and has many physical benefits as well. According to the Centers for Disease Control, moderate activity, such as active gardening, for as little as two-and-a-half hours each week can reduce risk of obesity, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and depression.

KEEP IT SIMPLE; START KIDS EARLY Outdoor activities can be as simple as teaching a grandchild to ride a bike, shooting hoops with friends, hiking or going for a brisk swim. If you have children, introduce them to outdoor fun at an early age. They’ll be more likely to carry your example into their teen and adult years, when stressbusting and health-enhancing activities become even more vital. Being active outdoors lets you improve your fitness while enjoying nature and relieving daily stress in the process. Now that’s what we call effective multitasking.

DON’T LET ALLERGIES KEEP YOU INDOORS Do you love exercising outdoors but fear an allergy attack? Here are three key strategies to help you stay comfortable: 1. Prep your system. During days or seasons when your allergies are at their worst, use an over-thecounter antihistamine, like Allegra, Claritin or Zyrtec, before you exercise. This will help stave off allergens’ effects and may prevent an attack before it starts. 2. Pick your time. If you have a pollen allergy, exercise early morning or late evening when pollen counts are lowest. If you’re allergic to mold, avoid exercising right after a rain shower, when molds are at their peak. Check the weather and use smart-phone apps to review allergen counts in your area. 3. Keep allergens outside. Shower, wash your hair and change your clothes after exercising outdoors. Also consider rinsing out nasal cavities using a Neti Pot filled with a saline solution, as allergens can accumulate and sit in nasal passages and lungs.

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DON’T CALL HIM

MR. RIGHT YES, THIS CO-HOST OF FOX NEWS’ THE FIVE CALLED THE TRUMP WIN. BUT HE RESISTS BEING PIGEONHOLED—EXCEPT AS A DEVOTED FAMILY MAN. HERE, SELF-PROCLAIMED MAMA’S BOY AND NEW JERSEY RESIDENT ERIC BOLLING WAXES POETIC ON GOD, COUNTRY—AND HIS NEXT MOVE. BY RITA GUARNA

This is your third career. What inspired you to go into broadcasting? I was literally confronted by a reporter with a mic and a camera crew asking me what was “going on with the oil prices?” Apparently the CNBC bosses were watching, and they called me in for an interview. They were thinking about launching a new show, and I was thrown into this world by accident. Do you think the recent political climate has divided us? How do you navigate discussions with your more liberal friends? I lost more than a few friends being so out in front pro-Trump. Liberals and anti-Trump Republicans can be harsh and fickle friends. CONTINUED...

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Author and Fox News personality Eric Bolling says commuting to New York City from the New Jersey suburbs is perfect.

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A neutral palette with pops of color and lots of texture produce a sophisticated yet inviting home. Bolling, along with his wife Adrienne, enjoys entertaining friends at their home. They usually invite small groups of six to eight for an evening of cocktails and conversation.

If you weren’t a journalist, what would you be? I love what I am doing. And I will continue to host television until it’s time to move on. Then I will run for Congress on the Senate side. Politics? You have a great life. What’s the motivation? I’m a political junkie. I love the very idea of politics, and I have a message. What’s the biggest thing people get wrong when they make assumptions about you? That I am a “right-winger.” I am a conservative but not buried in right-wing ideology. I hate the idea of sending our young people into war, and I am in favor of increasing legal immigration: two policies that don’t fit into the right-wing platform. The recent action in Syria sent a strong message to the world, but it might have been a bit too aggressive. What’s the best advice you’ve ever been given? “Never quit.” They were my mom’s last two

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words on Earth, whispered into my ear at her bedside. Tell us about your family. I have a loving wife and a smart and motivated son… I lost my mom, dad and sister a few years ago, all within a short time span. I am still dealing with that. I have a niece who I’m very close to. She’s my hero.

Tell us about an on-air glitch and how you dealt with it. I was typing my show notes in bigger and bigger fonts until I realized I was playing poker with my hand showing! The fix: Lasik eye surgery—amazing!

What made you fall in love with your wife? Adrienne is beautiful inside and out. That’s cliché, I know, but with her, it’s true. And we laugh—a lot!

What’s your recipe for combining a happy family with a demanding, highprofile job? You’ve got to be a very good juggler and salesman. Believe me, it helps. The juggling involves being able to do several projects; the salesmanship comes into play when I can’t be home during certain periods. When you’re a voice in mainstream media, there are sacrifices to be made: weekend shows, midnight shows. On the plus side, I did a book tour last year for Wake Up America and had a lot of father/son time.

When was the last time you cried? After losing my mom, then my dad and my sister in such a short time period, I lost that fear of shedding tears. There was no way to hide them.

What do you hope for your son, Eric Chase? I go to St. Patrick’s Cathedral almost daily and light candles. My first candle is always for Eric Chase: that he is healthy and happy

What can’t you live without? God, family, country, TV. (Bolling claims to have a TV in every room, and when Central Jersey Health & Life visited, three largescreens were on in the main living area.)

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“I LOVE WHAT I’M DOING. AND I WILL CONTINUE TO HOST TELEVISION UNTIL IT’S TIME TO MOVE ON. THEN I WILL RUN FOR CONGRESS ON THE SENATE SIDE.”

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This page, the main living space in Bolling’s townhouse features three large-screen TVs, including one mounted above the fireplace. Opposite, clockwise from top left, a tableau between two staircases; Bolling converted an office into a den, where he can relax or catch up on emails; tile atop the marble vanity is the perfect complement to the powder room; there’s enough room on the couch for everyone, including the family dog, Freedom.

in whatever he chooses to do. Praying gives me comfort and confidence. It makes me feel good. Have you ever wanted to go back and alter something in your life? No. Live life moving forward, and don’t look back. Eyes forward; the rearview mirror should be removed. How do you want to be remembered? Hard charging, intellectually honest, and a great father, husband, uncle, co-host. Who inspires you and why? My niece Tina, who is a single mom in Illinois with seven kids: two biological and five adopted from her fostering. She is an American heroine. Yankees or Mets?

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Neither. The World Series champion Cubbies. (I’m from Chicago, after all.) What’s your favorite room in the house and why? I turned an office into a den by blowing out a wall and adding awesome lighting. It’s my happy space. Finish this sentence: It’s never okay to ________. Quit. You’ve said that you were close to your mom. Tell us about her and your fondest memory. My mom and dad worked so hard. We were very poor growing up in inner city Chicago. It breaks my heart thinking about how many hours they worked to make life better for me. And the way they found time to watch my baseball

career develop. They were such amazing parents. I hope I can be 1/100th the parent they were. When you entertain, what kind of events do you host? Cocktails usually—in smaller groups of six to eight. But for our 10-year anniversary, Adrienne and I flew a big group of close friends to the Bahamas to renew our vows. We are coming up on 20 years now, and there’s precedent but the plans are not final as of yet. Tell us about what went into the design of your home. What were you looking to achieve? Bright and happy. Clean lines with natural materials. What’s next for you, career-wise? Senator (R-TBD).

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FRESH AIR DINING THERE’S NOTHING QUITE LIKE ENJOYING A MEAL OUTDOORS IN THE SUMMER. VIBRANT COLORS AND COZY TOUCHES ELEVATE EVEN A CASUAL LUNCHEON TO A MEMORABLE FÊTE. EVENT DESIGNER DEJUAN STROUD PLANS CELEBRITY PARTIES FOR THE stars, including Anderson Cooper, Jon Bon Jovi and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. In his book Designing Life’s Celebrations, recently published by Rizzoli, he demystifies the art of entertaining. Be inspired by the way he uses simple elements to create a sublime experience.

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Candles clustered in large lanterns invite the possibility of extending the conversation past twilight.

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This page: Mismatched place settings and a cacophony of rainbow-hued flowers in blue vases keep the tablescape lively. Opposite: A side table boasts cheery sunflowers and a hearty offering of fresh bread, cheese and cherries.

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To achieve a festive vibe that is eye-catching without being too chaotic, allow one or two colors or elements to be repeated throughout. Here, the graphic lines of the chairs are echoed by the napkins, and the orange and blue color theme helps tie everything together. Dried artichokes as napkin placeholders are a whimsical final touch.

© Designing Life’s Celebrations by Dejuan Stroud, Rizzoli New York. Photographs © Monica Buck. No images may be used, in print or electronically, without written consent from the publisher.

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WHERETOEAT F I N E

C A S UA L

FA M I LY

Gusto Grill in East Brunswick

AVENEL

EAST BRUNSWICK

CARTERET

WASABI HOUSE Fresh sushi and authentic Japanese dishes in a friendly, relaxed environment, 77 Tices Ln., 732.254.9988

JULIAN’S American steak house with seafood options, 1000 Roosevelt Ave., 732.541.9500

EDISON

D’ITALIA RESTAURANT Italian fare, specializing in pizza, 1500 St. Georges Ave., 732.574.1120 CHATEAU MADRID Spanish and Portuguese fare, 8 Holly St., 732.969.0692

GUSTO GRILL Traditional American food, 1050 Route 18 North, 732.651.2737

modern twists, 432 New Brunswick Ave., 732.738.0666

HIGHL AND PARK

APOSTO PIZZERIA Mediterranean grill and pizzeria, 76 Raritan Ave., 732.745.9011 MIDORI SUSHI Japanese fusion with a sushi bar, 237 Raritan Ave., 732.246.4511

CAFÉ GALLO Family-style Italian dining, 1153 Inman Ave., 908.756.4745

PAD THAI Vegetarian-friendly Thai eater y, 217 Raritan Ave., 732.247.9636

THE CRANBURY INN Traditional American dining, 21 S. Main St., 609.655.5595

LOUCÁS Upscale American and Italian fare, 9 Lincoln Hwy., 732.549.8580

PITHARI TAVERNA Greek cuisine with seafood fare, 28 Woodbridge Ave., 732.572.0616

CRANBURY PIZZA Casual Italian pizzeria, 63 N. Main St., 609.409.9930

MEEMAH Casual Chinese and Malaysian cuisine, Hwy. 27 at Parsonage Rd., 732.906.2223

HILLSBOROUGH

ZINNA’S BISTRO Casual Italian fare, BYO, 1275 S. River Rd., 609.860.9600

MING Asian fusion cuisine with vegetarian options, 1655-195 Oak Tree Rd., 732.549.5051

CRANFORD

PENANG Malaysian and Thai eater y, 505 Old Post Rd., 732.287.3038

CRANBURY

PAIRINGS Globally inspired menu combined with local and sustainable practices, 10 Walnut Ave., 908.276.4026

SKYLARK FINE DINER & LOUNGE Upscale diner with creative cocktails, 17 Wooding Ave., 732.777.7878

DAY TON

FORDS

LA TAVERNA Cozy traditional Italian dining, 375 Georges Rd., 732.274.2200

VILLA BORGHESE Traditional Italian fare with

FUJI Japanese hibachi and sushi, 485 Georges Rd., 732.274.8830

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MCLOONE’S WOODBRIDGE GRILLE Upscale interpretations of American classics, 3 Lafayette Rd., 732.512.5025

BIG HEADS GRILL & BAR Grill favorites mixed with pub fare, 315 Route 206 #502, 908.281.0268 LEE’S SUSHI Premiere Japanese cuisine in a casual atmosphere, 438 Route 206 #5, 908.829.3140

ISELIN

CASA GIUSEPPE Italian fine dining, 487 Route 27, 732.283.9111 URBAN SPICE Authentic Indian fine dining, 42 Marconi Ave., 732.283.1043

JAMESBURG

FIDDLEHEADS American fine dining, Sunday brunch ser ved, 27 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.0878

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PER TUTTI Italian cuisine, private dining, BYO, 49 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.4900

KENDALL PARK

GLO ULTRA LOUNGE AND TEQUILA BAR Upscale pub food and a bar with more than 200 tequilas, 367 George St., 732.261.4044

DUSAL’S Casual Italian seafood and pizza eater y, 3300 Route 27, 732.821.9711

HARVEST MOON BREWERY & CAFÉ American pub fare, 392 George St., 732.249.6666

SHOGUN 27 Hibachi steakhouse with a sushi bar, 3376 Route 27, 732.422.1117

MIKE’S COURTSIDE SPORTS BAR & GRILL Traditional pub fare, 1 Elm Row, 732.455.8511

KENILWORTH

THE OLD BAY New Orleans–style restaurant with Cajun and French Creole dishes, 7 Church St., 732.246.3111

TAORMINA Authentic Italian fare featuring an extensive wine list, 482 Kenilworth Blvd., 908.497.1717

KINGSTON

OLD MAN RAFFERT Y’S Casual American eater y, 106 Albany St., 732.846.6153

ENO TERRA Italian cuisine featuring seafood, homemade pasta and an extensive wine list, 4484 Route 27, 609.497.1777

PANICO’S Classic Italian entrees and sandwiches, with specialty pizzas at its sister location across the street (94 Church St.), 103 Church St., 732.545.6100

OSTERIA PROCACCINI Quaint Italian restaurant serving pizza, sandwiches and salads with organic and local produce, 4428 Route 27 North, 609.688.0007

RESTAURANT 2FIFT Y4 Saint Peter’s University Hospital restaurant, offering healthy dishes and vegetarian options for breakfast, lunch and dinner, 254 Easton Ave., 732.745.8600, ext. 7773

METUCHEN

ANTONIO’S BRICK OVEN PIZZA Traditional Italian pizzeria, 453 Main St., 732.603.0008

STAGE LEFT Upscale American fare with an extensive wine list, 5 Livingston Ave., 732.828.4444

THE METUCHEN INN American fare in an upscale setting, 424 Middlesex Ave., 732.494.6444

STEAKHOUSE 85 Premium steaks ser ved in various portion sizes to fit a wide range of budgets, 85 Church St., 732.247.8585

THE ORCHID Glatt kosher dining, 455 Main St., 732.321.9829

MIDDLESEX

CARPACCIO RISTORANTE Southern Italian fare, 651 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.3242 VINCENZO’S RISTORANTE Italian cuisine, 665 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.7777

MILLTOWN

FRANCESCO PIZZERIA & RESTAURANT Casual Italian eater y and pizzeria, 23 N. Main St., 732.214.9222 FRESCO Seafood and steak grill, prix fixe menu, 210 Ryders Ln., 732.246.7616

MONMOUTH JUNCTION

PIERRE’S Fine international dining with an awardwinning wine list, 582 Georges Rd., 732.329.3219 SENS ASIAN CUISINE Far East fusion cuisine, 4095 Route 1 South, 732.355.1919

MONROE

GARVEY’S Family-friendly American eater y, 405 Spotswood Gravel Hill Rd., 732.521.3311 LA VILLA Casual Italian dining, 335 Applegarth Rd., 609.655.3338

MONTGOMERY

GENTEEL’S TRATTORIA & PIZZERIA Italian cuisine featuring a variety of pastas, pizza, sandwiches, soups and salads, 1378 Route 206, 609.252.0880 TIGER’S TALE Bar and grill menu with sliders

and extensive dinner specials, 1290 Route 206, 609.924.0262

TUMULT Y’S Upscale pub food, featuring steaks and seafood, 361 George St., 732.545.6205

NORTH BRUNSWICK

ARTHUR’S STEAK HOUSE & PUB Traditional American steakhouse, 644 Georges Rd., 732.828.1117 ISTANBUL RESTAURANT & PATISSERIE Turkish and Mediterranean fare boasting freshly baked pides and lahmajouns, 1000 Aaron Rd., 732.940.1122

OLD BRIDGE

BIG ED’S BARBECUE American barbecue, 305 Route 34, 732.583.2626

DUE MARI Modern Italian food featuring fresh local and seasonal ingredients, 78 Albany St., 732.296.1600 EVELYN’S Lebanese food with vegetarian options, 45 Easton Ave., 732.246.8792 THE FROG AND THE PEACH American fare with a focus on fresh ingredients, 29 Dennis St., 732.846.3216

PONTE VECCHIO Classic Italian and American Continental fare with seafood options, 3863 Route 516 East, 732.607.1650

ROSELLE PARK

VINHUS Portuguese fare with formal dining or casual bar and lounge, 157 E. Westfield Ave., 908.259.5907

SOUTH AMBOY

BLUE MOON Contemporar y American and pub fare, 114 S. Broadway, 732.525.0014 COSTA VERDE Portuguese and Spanish cuisine featuring fresh seafood, 6039 Route 35 South, 732.727.7070

SOUTH PL AINFIELD

FLANAGAN’S American and Irish pub fare, 2501 Plainfield Ave., 908.757.1818 KIMCHI HANA Traditional, authentic Korean BBQ restaurant where dishes are grilled at the table, 6101 Hadley Rd., 908.755.0777

SOUTH RIVER

KRAKOWIAK Casual Polish restaurant, BYO, 42 Main St., 732.238.0441 RIA-MAR Traditional Portuguese, Spanish and American fare, 25 Whitehead Ave., 732.257.1100

WOODBRIDGE

MULBERRY STREET RESTAURANT Italian seafood eater y with exceptional steak and chop specials, 739 Rahway Ave., 732.634.4699

PERTH AMBOY

THE BARGE Water front restaurant and cocktail lounge featuring steak and seafood dishes in generous portions, 201 Front St., 732.442.3000 PORTUGUESE MANOR Traditional Portuguese featuring sangria, 310 Elm St., 732.826.2233

PISCATAWAY

MIDORI Authentic Japanese and hibachi dining, 1392 Centennial Ave., 732.981.9300

PL AINSBORO

CASA ROSARIA’S ITALIAN RISTORANTE Classic Italian food, 607 Plainsboro Rd., 609.799.9009 CROWN OF INDIA Authentic Indian cuisine, 660 Plainsboro Rd., 609.275.5707 EAST Asian fusion fare with a bubble tea bar, 5 Market St., 609.750.3278

Krakowiak in South River

FOR OUR COMPLETE LIST OF DINING OPTIONS, VISIT THE “WHERE TO EAT” SECTION OF CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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WITHERSPOON GRILL Steakhouse dining featuring all-natural Angus beef and locally sourced poultr y, 57 Witherspoon St., 609.924.6011

J.J. BITTING BREWING CO. Traditional American fare, 33 Main St., 732.634.2929

CATHERINE LOMBARDI Italian with locally sourced ingredients, 3 Livingston Ave., 732.296.9463

DELTA’S RESTAURANT Southern cuisine with live music and specialty drinks, 19 Dennis St., 732.249.1551

TERESA CAFFE Simple Italian-inspired fare incorporating many fresh ingredients grown at nearby Canal Farm, 23 Palmer Sq. East, 609.921.1974

THE PINE TAVERN Imaginative A merican cui s ine with Continental flavors, 151 Route 34, 732.727.5060

CHAND PALACE Family-friendly Indian restaurant featuring an allvegetarian menu, 1296 Centennial Ave., 732.465.1474

CLYDZ Contemporar y American cuisine with extensive martini selection, 55 Paterson St., 732.846.6521

MAIN STREET BISTRO & BAR Euro-American bistro fare, 301 N. Harrison St., 609.921.2779

CHRIS MICHAEL’S STEAKHOUSE Steak and seafood restaurant, featuring a sushi bar, 40 Oakwood Ave., 732.634.5355

NEW BRUNSWICK

CHRISTOPHER’S American seafood and steak fare, 10 Livingston Ave., 732.214.2200

ELEMENTS American restaurant ser ving local steak and seafood, and a new bar bites menu, 66 Witherspoon St., 609.924.0078

JUST Contemporar y American and French fare, 2280 Route 9 South, 732.707.4800

AL DENTE RISTORANTE Traditional Italian eater y, 1665 Stelton Rd., 732.985.8220

CARIBBEAN CAFÉ Cuban cuisine, 85 Bayard St., 732.846.2620

PRINCETON

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BE THERE J U LY

The QuickChek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning, July 28-30

JULY 8–AUG 19 Enjoy a diverse

range of music at the SOMERVILLE SUMMER STAGE concert series at Division Street Plaza, Saturdays at 7 p.m. Chairs are provided. Admission: FREE. For more information visit downtownsomerville.com.

JULY 12–AUG 12 This summer you can choose from two PLAYS IN THE PARK at Roosevelt Park Theater in Edison (or see both!). See West Side Story from July 12–22 and Mary Poppins from Aug. 2–12. Both shows start at 8 p.m. and do not perform on Sunday nights. Admission: $7 for adults, $5 for seniors and FREE for children 12 and under. Check out playsinthepark .com for details. JULY 15–16 Bring your cat or adopt one at the GARDEN STATE CAT CLUB’S ANNUAL EXPO & SHOW in Edison. The expo runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days and will have cats up for adoption, competitions for your furry friend, face painting, vendors and more. Admission: $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $7 for kids under 12. Visit gardenstatecatexpo .com for more information, to enter your cat in the show, or to get a ticket coupon. JULY 28–30 Take to the skies at THE QUICKCHEK NEW JERSEY FESTIVAL OF BALLOONING at the Solberg Airport in Readington. In addition to about 100 hot air balloons, there will be concerts, hundreds of crafters and vendors, food, fireworks and more. The festival runs from 1–10 p.m. Friday, 6 a.m.–10 p.m. Saturday and 6 a.m.–8 p.m. Sunday. Admission: Adult tickets start at $20 and tickets for kids over the age of 3 start at $8. Buy

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AU G U S T

Garden State Cat Club’s Annual Expo & Show, July 15-16

tickets now and get more information at balloonfestival.com.

AUG 2, 9, 16 & 23 Bring a blanket or lawn chair to the UNION COUNTY SUMMER ARTS FESTIVAL and enjoy free live music. Concerts start at 7:30 p.m. at Oak Ridge Park in Clark and will include tributes to the Grateful Dead, Led Zeppelin and Billy Joel. Admission: FREE. Visit ucnj .org for details. AUG 5 & 6 Calling all gamers! Prepare to nerd out at the first-ever COLECO EXPO in Edison from 10 a.m.–10 p.m. Browse retro and modern video games, toys and collectibles. There will also be cosplay and contests, plus surprise special guests. Kids and kids at heart will love it. Admission: $21. Visit colecoexpo.com for more. AUG 7–13 You won’t want to miss the MIDDLESEX COUNTY FAIR returning for its 79th year at the Middlesex County Fairgrounds in East Brunswick, starting at 5 p.m. on weekdays and 11 a.m. on weekends. Admission: $7 for adults, $4 for seniors, $1 for children ages 3-12, and FREE for children age 2 and under. Visit middlesexcountyfair.com for more details. AUG 9–11 This year’s theme of the SOMERSET COUNTY 4-H FAIR is “Grow with Green.” Located at North Branch Park in Bridgewater, the fair will have exhibits, activities and performances by 4-H members. Admission: FREE. Visit somer setcounty4h.org/fair for more information. AUG 11–12 Pack up your tent for the COME OUT AND PLAY CAMPOUT at

Come Out and Play Campout, August 11-12

Baldpate Mountain in Mercer County. This overnight event involves a hike, a campfire with hot dogs and s’mores, a Perseid Meteor Shower viewing, a catered breakfast, a children’s scavenger hunt and sunrise yoga. To get more details about the event visit mercercountyparks.org.

AUG 12 The 17th annual BUTTERFLY FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m.–4 p.m. at the Watershed Reserve in Hopewell Township. Expect entertainment and workshops as well as local exhibitors and more. For details and tickets, visit the “Events” page at thewatershed.org. AUG 12 There will be something for

everyone at the fun-filled SALT WATER DAY from 3–10 p.m. on the beach front of Laurence Harbor. Enjoy vendors, crafts, games, food, rides, live music, a beer garden and fireworks. Admission: FREE. For more info or to fill out a vendor application visit oldbridge.com.

AUG 19 Bring your appetite to the EDI-

SON FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL at Papaianni Park, which will have dozens of gourmet food trucks, beer, wine, vendors, face painting, a bouncy house and music. The festival runs from 11 a.m.–7 p.m. The rain date is Aug. 20. Admission: $5 for adults, FREE for kids under 10. Go to the “Events” page at visitnj.org for more information. Send event listings to: Central Jersey Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; or email us at editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number or website that will be published. Share events online by clicking the “Submit an Event” link below the Calendar at centraljerseyhealthandlife.com.

SUMMER 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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ESCAPES

LET’S GO DUTCH TURN OFF THAT PHONE AND ENJOY THE RUSTIC SIGHTS AND TEMPTING TASTES OF PENNSYLVANIA DUTCH COUNTRY, SURPRISINGLY CLOSE TO HOME. BY RITA GUARNA Amish Country is famous for its smorgasbords, or all-you-can-eat buffets, where little ones who are always hungry will get their fill. At the Plain and Fancy Restaurant (part of the eponymous farm), food is served “family style.” That means you’ll be seated at a random table with strangers. You’ll pass platters around the table and make small talk with people with whom you might have little, if anything, in common. And yet, it’s surprisingly pleasant to have an amicable chat with those whose views are not our own. Could this be the lost art of conversation? With that conversation you’ll get great fried chicken, carved roast beef, ham, corn bread, bread pudding, sausages, veggies and baked goods. Here too you can catch “Jacob’s Choice,” a short flick that explains what it means to be Amish. Or check out the Sight and Sound Theater where Bible stories—think Samson, Moses, Jonah—are brought to life on stage. And speaking of food, don’t miss a visit to the city’s Central Market. The Romanesque-style building was constructed in 1889 and is home to ethnic foods, sweets (shoofly pie, anyone?), cured meats, plus plenty of fruits and veggies. It’s the oldest continuously operating farmers’ market in the U.S. If you prefer an attraction with your shoofly pie, check out Dutch Haven. Yes, it looks like a tourist trap with its big windmill on the roof, but it sells more pies than any other bakery in Lancaster

County. (Some folks swear that it’s the perfect souvenir.) Check out the Hans Herr House and Eastern Woodland Longhouse. Built in 1719, the house is the oldest building in the county. Guides point out a still-intact wood and iron steamer trunk, belonging to one of the original immigrant occupants. Leave enough time to visit the Native American Longhouse on the property. The 62-foot-long, 20-footwide structure was recreated to depict life during the early years of European settlement. Train buffs will love the Strasburg Rail Road in nearby Strasburg. Hop aboard for a steam-powered 45-minute meander through the charming countryside. Once the kids are good and tired (isn’t that why you brought Grandma?), Mom and Dad might want to drop by one of the area’s two outlet shopping malls. Better yet, check out downtown Lancaster, its streets teeming with chic art galleries, boutiques—antiques, jewelry, even midcentury furniture—and restaurants. There’s a BYO French bistro, Citronnelle, or Luca, where you’ll find Italian favorites and wood-fire-ovencooked pizzas. The Federal Tap House features more than 100 beers on tap and great pub grub, presented by superattentive servers. And the Horse Inn, a horse-stable-turned gastropub, is a hotspot with good food and sips. When it’s time to return home, you’ll leave the buggies behind—but keep that new perspective.

Courtesy of discoverlancaster.com

IF YOU’RE SHORT ON TIME (AND frequent flyer miles) and want to a show your family a different world without traveling too far, consider Lancaster, Pennsylvania. About 125 miles from New Brunswick, this city at the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch Country may be your quickest ticket out of the 21st century. At first glance, the kids might not think cows nibbling on grass, bearded men in straw hats and apron-andbonnet-clad girls are all that cool. But the Amish, who’ve been “Witnessed” by Harrison Ford (in the 1985 movie of that name) and spoofed on David Letterman’s TV show aren’t the only “attraction.” (And truth be told, they are cool.) “Pennsylvania Dutch” is a misnomer, as the Amish came here in the early 18th century from Switzerland, not Holland. Along with the Quakers, Mennonites and others, they came to William Penn’s land seeking religious freedom. They’re a simple people who preach pacifism, eschew electricity (the better to avoid the influences of computers and TV) and encourage members to marry within the flock. One of the best ways to learn about them and see the countryside is to take a buggy ride. We took one with Aaron and Jessica’s Buggy Rides, conveniently located at the Plain and Fancy Farm. Guides—ours was a lovely young woman named Esther—are very open about their lifestyle and happy to answer questions.

Clockwise from top: Lucky visitors will catch a glimpse of an Amish buggy traversing the Pennsylvania countryside. Colonial life is replicated at the 1719 Hans Herr House, the oldest surviving house in Lancaster County. Board the Strasburg Rail Road for a 45-minute ride on an authentic coal-burning steam train. The Longhouse is a replica of a Native American home built on the grounds of the Hans Herr House to honor Pennsylvania’s native people. There are more than 25 different Amish, Mennonite and Brethren church groups in Lancaster County. At the Intercourse Pretzel Factory, hard pretzels are still twisted by hand.

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Courtesy of discoverlancaster.com

CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

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SUMMER 2017

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POWER FOOD

CRANBERRY BEAN Also called Roman, borlotti and shell beans, the cranberry bean’s name is derived from its reddish pod, but it turns brown once cooked. Used often in soups, salads or even as a snack, one cup of the boiled variety contains 241 calories, 16 grams of protein, 17 grams of fiber and less than one gram of fat—plus they’re cholesterol-free. PINTO BEAN This popular bean goes well with just about any dish, from burritos to chili. They are an excellent source of nutrients, as one cup is packed with 15 grams of protein and 15 grams of fiber. At 250 calories and just 1 gram of fat, pintos are a low-fat addition to your diet. They also contain phytonutrients, which may help prevent cancer. BLACK BEAN Black beans (also known as turtle beans) are beneficial for digestive health, and consumption is believed to reduce risks of colon cancer. One cup of cooked black beans has 227 calories and offers 15 grams of protein and 15 grams of fiber. They’re also a good source of your daily value of folate, manganese, iron, magnesium and thiamin.

beans

MAKE THIS AFFORDABLE AND VERSATILE SUPERFOOD A STAPLE IN YOUR PANTRY. The humble bean may not seem very exciting at first glance, but there’s good reason to make it a recurring star in your kitchen. They come in a variety of textures and flavors that go well with almost any dish, and they’re also a nutritional workhorse. You can buy dry beans and cook them yourself or buy them canned for similar nutritional value. Here we feature five varieties.

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LIMA BEAN One cup of lima beans (also known as butter beans) contains 13 grams of fiber, 14 grams of protein and 216 calories, plus a large percentage of your recommended daily value of manganese, folate, potassium and iron. Uncooked lima beans contain a compound that releases cyanide, so don’t eat them raw! —Kelly Dougher

Photo by Yvonne Marki

Spill the

GARBANZO BEAN More commonly known as chickpeas, garbanzos are mildtasting, versatile (hummus, anyone?) and nutritious. They contain 12 grams of fiber, 14 grams of protein and 269 calories per cup. Most are familiar with the cream-colored kabuli variety, but the darkercolored desi is even richer in some nutrients.

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Central Jersey Health & Life: Summer 2017  

The Good Living Magazine from Saint Peter's Healthcare System

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