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C E N T R A L J E R S E Y H E A LT H & L I F E

CENTRAL JERSEY

T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M S A I N T P E T E R ’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

FALL 2017 | $3.95 CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

F A L L 2 0 17 T H E G O O D L I V I N G M A G A Z I N E F R O M S A I N T P E T E R ’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

THE FALL ISSUE

WORLDCLASS SCOLIOSIS CARE FOR KIDS

THE SEASON’S COOLEST LOOKS KNOW YOUR APPLES BACK TO SCHOOL: A COLLEGE-TOWN CRAWL

T H E FA L L I S S U E

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Contents FALL 2017

34

FEATURES 14

IN MEDICINE: AMERICA’S GOT THE TALENT

A teen dancer and performer on a British competition show had severe scoliosis, and the only treatment that could keep her on stage was in Central Jersey.

17

FOOTPRINTS 2.0

Saint Peter’s University Hospital is the first in the region to give fingerprinting for newborns a high-tech makeover.

18

KIDS AND DIRT: SURPRISING FACTS The solution to some childhood conditions like asthma and allergies could be found in an unexpected place.

19

CONNECTING THE HE AD WITH THE HE ART

A long history at Saint Peter’s University Hospital inspires a local businessman to give time, gifts and talent.

20

FACES OF SAINT PE TER’S

Meet a doctor who loves fishing and a podiatric surgeon who has a passion for horses.

2

28

IN THE MOOD FOR...

A quick getaway? A night on the town? Or just looking great? These fall looks have everything covered.

34

THE WOW FACTOR

Admit it: A great pair of shoes can transform your outfit— and your mood.

36

SWOON WORTHY You’ll surely fall for the season’s new bags.

I N E V ERY I S S UE

6 8 4 6 4 8

W E LC O M E L E T T E R E D I TO R’S N OT E W H E R E TO E AT BE THERE

FALL 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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Delivering life’s little miracles... our midwives call it a labor of love.

SAINT PETER’S NEW MIDWIFERY PROGRAM OFFERS MORE NATURAL BIRTHING OPTIONS. Women experiencing a low risk pregnancy who are looking for more natural options for their birthing experience can be cared for by our certified nurse midwives. From pregnancy through delivery, our midwives will support you in the way you want to experience the birth of your child. You may choose to move around freely, use birthing tools for comfort or remain medication-free during labor. All this, and the delivery of your baby, will take place in one of our family-centered Labor and Delivery suites, providing a safe alternative to a home birth. To learn more or to make an appointment, call 732-339-7879 or visit saintpetershcs.com/midwives

254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901

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Contents FALL

38

DEPARTMENTS 12

38

Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in central New Jersey.

Embarking on campus tours with your teen? Seeing the school is just a small part of the fun in these cities full of sights.

LOCAL BUZZ

22

GATHERINGS

Photos from recent charity and social events.

24

HOME FRONT

Our favorite lamps reflect the essence of “functional style.”

26

ESCAPES

40

40

TASTES

Move over, acai and poké. These delicious vegeterian recipes offer a fresh take on the food bowl trend.

27

RED-HOT LOOKS

Though not for the faint of heart, the color of passion is one of the hottest hues for fall.

27

JE WELRY BOX

Natural or cultured, white or black, round or baroque, these pearls are gorgeous.

4

24

FALL 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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WELCOME LETTER

PROUD TO BE A GLOBAL HEALTHCARE LEADER LET’S TALK ABOUT WORLD-CLASS MEDICAL CARE IN NEW Jersey. One place you will find it is at Saint Peter’s Healthcare System. Saint Peter’s is a global leader in treating scoliosis among the young, for instance. I share the example of Julia Carlile, 15 years old. Residents of the Garden State may never have heard of her, but she is all the rage in her native country of England, where Julia was a popular contestant on that country’s hit TV show Britain’s Got Talent. If that name sounds familiar, that’s because Britain’s Got Talent is the United Kingdom’s variant of America’s Got Talent, both hosted by producer Simon Cowell. Julia is a dancer and, along with her dance troupe “The MerseyGirls,” she made it all the way to the British finals. There was one problem, however. Julia suffered from severe spinal scoliosis, a condition so dire it threatened her dream of winning the competition and ever dancing again. Traditional spinal fusion would have sidelined her for life as a dancer. So she—with Cowell’s assistance—turned to Saint Peter’s and orthopedic surgeon Darryl Antonacci, M.D., who is one of only a handful of surgeons in the world, along with his team, to perform a new, exciting procedure known as anterior scoliosis correction, or ASC. Dozens of children from across the United States and the far corners of the globe have come to Saint Peter’s this year to seek out this breakthrough technique and assume normal lives after a brief recovery. Julia was no different, though her case was extra complex. And she is eternally grateful, as is her nation. Please turn to “Inside Look” (page 14) to learn more about Julia’s remarkable story and this important cutting-edge technique that is now available at Saint Peter’s. Saint Peter’s is breaking barriers in other ways as well. This summer, Saint Peter’s became the first hospital in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania to store computer-generated digital footprints of every newborn, replacing the old ink and paper method. Because every footprint is as unique as a fingerprint but unlike a fingerprint is fully developed at birth, digital footprints can serve as a lifelong protection to clearly connect a mother and baby should the pair ever be separated. This extra measure of security was developed with help from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (“Tech Savvy,” page 17). Elsewhere in the magazine, an infectious disease physician tells parents that it is healthy for their children to go outside and get a bit dirty (“Seasonal Health,” page 18), a longtime benefactor of Saint Peter’s explains why he is such a devoted fan of the hospital and its staff (“Up Close,” page 19), and two Saint Peter’s physicians share a personal glimpse into their private lives—one fishes with his young son, while the other is part of horse-racing family—when they are not busy tending to their patients (“Faces Of,” page 20). Please enjoy this edition of Central Jersey Health & Life. And thank you for choosing Saint Peter’s. Sincerely,

254 EASTON AVENUE, NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ 08901 732.745.8600 saintpetershcs.com ■

LESLIE D. HIRSCH, FACHE IN T E R I M C E O A ND P R E S IDE N T S A IN T P E T E R’S HE A LT H CA R E SYST E M

Sponsored by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen

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EAST BRUNSWICK EDISON HOBOKEN JAMESBURG MANHATTAN MONROE NORTH PLAINFIELD OLD BRIDGE PLAINSBORO SOMERSET WARREN NEW BRUNSWICK ■

Saint Peter’s Physician Associates: we’ve got you covered. Adult Primary Care

Gynecology / Gynecologic Oncology / Gynecologic Surgery

E-6B Briar Hill Court, East Brunswick, NJ 08816, 732.238.2010 200 Perrine Road, Suite 220, Old Bridge, NJ 08857, 609.642.7043 59 Veronica Avenue, Suite 201, Somerset, NJ 08873, 732.828.0200

59 Veronica Avenue, Suite 202, Somerset, NJ 08873, 732.828.3300

Adult Primary Care / Specialty Care 333 Forsgate Drive, Suite 201, Jamesburg, NJ 08831, 732.521.3131 Internal Medicine Pulmonology / Critical Care

294 Applegarth Road, Suite A, Monroe Township, NJ 08831, 609.409.1363 Breast Surgery Diabetes Self-Management Education Endocrinology Family Medicine Gastroenterology

Geriatrics Infectious Diseases / Travel Medicine Internal Medicine Nutrition Counseling Pulmonology / Critical Care / Sleep Medicine

59 Veronica Avenue, Suite 203, Somerset, NJ 08873, 732.937.6008 Diabetes Self-Management Education Internal Medicine Pulmonology / Critical Care

Breast Health / Breast Surgery 240 Easton Avenue, 3rd Floor, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, 732.846.3300 Cardiology / Cardiovascular Disease 620 Cranbury Road, Suite 207, East Brunswick, NJ 08816, 732.846.7000 98 James Street, Suite 314, Edison, NJ 08820, 732.549.7000 333 Forsgate Drive, Suite 202, Jamesburg, NJ 08831, 732.994.3278 294 Applegarth Road, Suite F, Monroe Township, NJ 08831, 732.846.7000 317 George Street, Suite 440, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, 732.994.3278 51 Veronica Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873, 732.846.7000 Family Medicine / Fertility 15 E. 40th Street, Suite 101, New York, NY 10016, 212.481.1219 General / Laparoscopic Surgery 59 Veronica Avenue, Suite 204, Somerset, NJ 08873, 732.249.0977

Gynecology and Menopausal Health 2477 Route 516, Suite 103, Old Bridge, NJ 08857, 732.679.6900 Maternal Fetal Medicine Outreach 4 Ethel Road, Suite 402B, Edison, NJ 08817, 732.339.7641 190 Greenbrook Road, North Plainfield, NJ 07060, 732.339.7641 666 Plainsboro Road, Suite 432, Plainsboro, NJ 08536, 732.339.7610 Obstetrics / Gynecology / Fertility 222 Easton Avenue, 1st Floor, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, 732.565.5490 Orthopaedic Surgery 1527 Highway 27, Suite 1300, Somerset, NJ 08873, 732.249.4444 Pediatric Multispecialties 1802 Oak Tree Road, Edison, NJ 08820 Adolescent Medicine 732.565.5487 Hematology / Oncology 732.745.6674 Nephrology 732.565.5489 Pulmonology 732.565.5467 5 Marine View Plaza, Hoboken, NJ 07030, 201.620.3120 Endocrinology Gastroenterology Hematology / Oncology Infectious Diseases

Neurology Nephrology Orthopedics Pulmonology

65 Mountain Boulevard, Suite 205, Warren, NJ 07059, 732.339.7052 Gastroenterology

Surgical Oncology 59 Veronica Avenue, Suite 204, Somerset, NJ 08873, 732.339.7779 Advanced Foregut, Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery

Our network of physician practices is always growing. Visit our website to learn more about new physicians and locations. Schedule an online appointment with select Saint Peter’s physicians at SPPhysicianAssociates.com or via Zocdoc at BookMySPDoc.com

General / Vascular Surgery 2 Research Way, Suite 307, Monroe Township, NJ 08831, 609.409.4500 General Surgery / Vascular Access 59 Veronica Avenue, Suite 204, Somerset, NJ 08873, 732.399.7761

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EDITOR’S NOTE

THE DELIGHTS OF FALL MAYBE IT’S THE WAY THE trees become a riot of color. Or the knowledge that Halloween will soon give us an excuse to be silly and dress up in wild costumes. Or simply the fact that, while surely cold weather is on its way, there are still wonderfully comfortable days outdoors that rival anything in May. Whatever the cause, I’ve always responded joyfully to autumn—and I gather I’m not alone. The pages of this Central Jersey Health & Life reflect that joy. On page 28, we celebrate the best looks of the season, which focus on texture and fabric, and it turns out the choices are as varied as your many moods. Meanwhile, what makes you feel your best? Is it a great pair of shoes? Or perhaps it’s a new purse or clutch? See page 34 for the fall’s best footwear and page 36 for stunning handbags. But there’s more to a fun fall than fashion. How about a trip to see a bustling college town? Flip to page 38 to see five cities that are known for major universities but also boast sights worth seeing. For a hearty meal that won’t knock you into a food coma, check out page 40 and try one of the recipes that offer a fresh take on the bowl trend. And speaking about things to eat, don’t miss Local Buzz on page 12, which includes a guide to apple varieties, bite-size desserts and a farm-to-table restaurant in Hopewell. From great clothing to amazing eats, there’s plenty to enjoy this fall. Here’s hoping this is your best autumn yet. Enjoy!

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10/2/17 3:06 PM


CENTRAL JERSEY RITA GUARNA

SHAE MARCUS

SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

ART DIRECTOR

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

INTERIM CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND PRESIDENT

ED I T O R I A L

ADVERTISING

MANAGING EDITOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

DIRECTOR, SPECIAL PROGRAMS

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

M A R K E T I N G , D I G I TA L & O P E R AT I O N S

ED ITOR I N C H I EF STEPHEN M. VITARBO

L ANCE DEBLER DARIUS AMOS

ALENA WOODS

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR MARI S A SANDOR A

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER DANIEL S PRIN STON ART

PUB LI S HER JODI BRUKER

K AREN A Z Z ARELLO

SENIOR DIRECTOR, MARKETING MICHELLE L A Z Z AROT TI

DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS PHIL HARTMAN

L AUR A A . DOWDEN

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND DIGITAL MEDIA NIGEL EDELS HAIN

MARKETING ASSOCIATE RICHARD IURILLI

SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

PRESIDENT, MEDICAL AND DENTAL STAFF GOPAL R. DES AI, M. D.

ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER JACQUELYNN FI SCHER

ART ASSISTANT

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR, AGENCY SERVICES

PRODUCTION

CONTROLLER

Y VONNE MARKI

LES LIE D. HIRSCH, FACHE

KI JOO KIM

AGNES ALVES

SAINT PETER’S HEALTH AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES CORPORATION

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

STE VEN S. RADIN, ESQ.

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION CHRI STINE HAMEL

ACCOUNTANT

MEGAN FRANK

PRODUCTION/ART ASSISTANT AL ANNA GIANNANTONIO

MANAGER, OFFICE SERVICES AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CATHERINE ROS ARIO

PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA CHAIRMAN CARROLL V. DOWDEN PRESIDENT & CE O

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WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Central Jersey Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; email editor@wainscotmedia.com. Central Jersey Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials. CENTRAL JERSEY HEALTH & LIFE is published 3 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 11, Issue 3. © 2017 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S. outside of Central Jersey: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Shae Marcus at 856.797.2227 or shae.marcus@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Central Jersey Health & Life, Circulation Department, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

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LOCALBUZZ CENTRAL JERSEY NEWS

REVIEWS

TIPS

TRENDS

STANDING IN THE

HALL OF FAME

AN APPLE A DAY

The Hunterdon County Chamber of Commerce Foundation recently inducted the first class of honorees into its Business Hall of Fame. The induction ceremony was held at the Ryland Inn on Sept. 14 and celebrated past and present Hunterdon locals who have made a difference in their community. Here is the list of winners and their designated honors: Pioneer Award: Custom Alloy, global provider of time-critical manufacturing services Distinguished Leaders: Peter G. Verniero, former associate justice of the state Supreme Court and attorney general, and the Creter family, owners and operators of the Flemington Granite and Architectural Supply Contemporary Award: ShopRite of Hunterdon County Essence of Hunterdon: The Large family, influential lawyers, senators and judges in the county, and the Red Mill, a historic Clinton landmark

More than 30 varieties of apples grow in New Jersey, so which is best to banish the doc and placate the teacher? Here’s a cheat sheet (all of the tasty apples listed below are available for picking through October): Cortland: There’s a lot you can do with this apple, which freezes well: Snack on it straight away or store it in the freezer for Thanksgiving pie-making. Golden Delicious: This fruit’s mild, sweet taste will help you create the tastiest pies ever. Golden Delicious are firm to the touch and soften after being baked. Honeycrisp: They’re perfect for tarts and turnovers, as the Honeycrisp’s sweet flesh packs a slightly tart punch. Jonathan: This mid-season apple has a longer storage life than other varieties. Save it to pack in school lunches or cut it up for your next fruit salad. (Decisions, decisions!) Winesap: With its aromatic, wine-like flavors, the Winesap is perfect for applesauce, and its juiciness promises the best cider you’ve ever had.

THINK PINK…AND THEN SOME Wearing a pink ribbon is one way to mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month (and support those battling the disease), but there are plenty more ways to help others…and yourself:

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Do a walk: Walk and raise money for the Central Jersey Making Strides event, which takes place on Sunday, Oct 22. The American Cancer Society is hosting the walk, and registration begins at 8:30 a.m. More info can be found on acs.org. n Start exercising: Experts say physical activity regulates hormones like estrogen n

and insulin, keeping these horomones that can fuel breast cancer growth in check. n Get a screening: For lowincome women, mammograms are covered at The Women’s Imaging Center at Saint Peter’s University Hospital by funds from The Amy Foundation. For more information, call 732.745.6686.

FALL 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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SWEETEST DAY IN OCTOBER

You’ll soon have plenty of reason to satisfy your sweet tooth: Oct. 14 is National Dessert Day. But if you’re watching your waistline, don’t worry—you can have your cake and eat it too with bite-size treats from the bakeries listed below: CHEZ ALICE GOURMET CAFÉ AND BAKERY Chez Alice, right in downtown Princeton on Nassau Street, is the perfect place to grab a warm drink and treat. Pick up an almond or chocolate croissant to enjoy during breakfast or as a dessert. The bakery also specializes in signature cakes like Black Forest Cherry, Praline and Java, meant for celebrations of all types. Chez Alice, 5 Palmer Square W., Princeton, 609.921.6760, chezalicecafe.com THE MIXING BOWL You’ll be seeing double at The Mixing Bowl in Flemington: All of its cupcakes are accompanied by tiny versions of themselves, meant to satisfy cravings of all sizes. Before committing to a full-size cupcake, try a mini piña colada, topped with candied pineapple and toasted coconut, or a red velvet treat with creamcheese frosting. The Mixing Bowl, 10 Turntable Jct., Flemington, 908.237.0666, themixingbowlnj.com

IT’S JUST

COMMON SENSE

The family-owned brewery Common Sense recently opened in Bordentown near Crosswick Creek, on the border of Mercer and Burlington counties. Named after American patriot Thomas Paine’s famous pamphlet, the bar is located on Farnsworth Avenue ­­­— where Paine lived for nine years. Beers on tap during the brewery’s opening celebration were the Blackberry Blonde, Smart Blonde and Paine’s Porter. Owner Eric Eaves brews all the beers himself; he and his stepfather learned to do so at home as a hobby. The bar is currently open on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays—more information about the new hot spot can be found on the establishment’s website. Common Sense Brewing, 102 Farnsworth Ave., Bordentown, 609.526.8651, commonsensebrewing.com

LA BONBONNIERE BAKE SHOPPES Wanna sit around eating bonbons all day? At La Bonbonniere Bake Shoppe, it’s encouraged. The bakery offers assorted French macarons, its titular “La Bon Bons” dipped in chocolate and other bite-size treats like Rugaloch and butter cookies. La Bonbonniere Bake Shoppes, locations in Edison, Somerset, South Plainfield and Woodbridge, labon.com

CULINARY CORNER

FRESH FROM THE FARM

Brick Farm Tavern, a restaurant located on the 800-acre Double Brook Farms in Hopewell, serves farm-to-table food and spirits brewed on the premises nearby at Brewing and Sourland Mountain Spirits. The tavern sources its meat from the farm, where it is harvested and prepared for use in the kitchen. Double Brook Farms was founded in 2004 by Jon and Robin McConaughy, who had just one cow in their pastures at the time. The restaurant’s executive chef, Greg Vassos, puts together a weekly tasting menu for guests, which includes either five or eight courses. Entrees include Pekin Duck Confit with collard greens and smoked Cheddar grits, and Whole Wheat & Argula Gnocci Bolognese. If a sit-down dinner isn’t your style, the tavern also offers traditional bar food to be enjoyed alongside a beer or cocktail. Brick Farm Tavern, 130 Hopewell Rocky Hill Rd., Hopewell, 609.333.9200, brickfarmtavern.com CENTRAL JERSEY HE ALTH & LIFE

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|

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INGOODHEALTH PAT I E N T C A R E AT S A I N T P E T E R’ S H E A LT H C A R E S Y S T E M

IN MEDICINE:

AMERICA’S GOT THE TALENT TWO YEARS AGO, JULIA CARLILE, now 15, discovered a dream treatment for her painful back. Thousands of miles away from her home in Merseyside, England, a surgeon in the United States offered a cure for her scoliosis, the severe and growing curve in her spine she’d been diagnosed as having at age 6. Scoliosis was increasingly making even normal activities, especially her passion for dance, difficult. “I always had pain when I danced or did anything active,” she says. “It was getting worse, and I knew that the only treatment available meant I had to give up dancing.” That treatment was spinal fusion surgery, with metal rods. It’s a common remedy for scoliosis as severe as hers. However, fusion stiffens the spine significantly, making twists and turns of the back—basic dance movements—impossible. “I’d tried all types of treatments, but they didn’t work. They wouldn’t hold my spine straight,” she says. “Here in

14

the U.K. (United Kingdom), fusion was the only option for me to get free of the pain.” And she needed treatment soon. That was extremely disappointing, especially because an innovative new treatment was available at Saint Peter’s University Hospital in the United States. Pioneered by Darryl Antonacci, M.D., a surgeon who practices exclusively in New Jersey at Saint Peter’s, this treatment would both cure her scoliosis and keep her spine flexible enough for dance. But considering the costs of travel, testing, surgery and recovery, it was expensive—far too expensive for her family to afford. So Julia set her sights on another dream, one she could only reach before her spine was fused. In an exciting step this past spring, she and her dance team vied for a spot on one of her country’s biggest talent competitions, Britain’s Got Talent. “We tried out and we got in!” she says of “Mersey Girls,” her group consisting of five teens. But it was

JOHN O’BOYLE

A TEEN DANCER AND PERFORMER ON A BRITISH COMPETITION SHOW HAD SEVERE SCOLIOSIS, AND THE ONLY TREATMENT THAT COULD KEEP HER ON STAGE WAS IN CENTRAL JERSEY.

FALL 2017 | CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM

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INSIDE LOOK

CHALLENGES

OF SCOLIOSIS AND A GROWING CHILD

JOHN O’BOYLE

An innovative new treatment at Saint Peter’s allows surgeons to achieve dramatic corrections to the curve of the spine, says Darryl Antonacci, M.D., seated. Standing from left: Randal Betz, M.D., and Laury Cuddihy, M.D.

At age 6, Julia Carlile, of Merseyside, England, received her first treatment for curvature of the spine, or scoliosis. “I had to wear this hard plastic brace 24 hours a day,” she recalls. “It was uncomfortable, and it was embarrassing when I was around my friends.” Also, because Julia’s condition was so severe, the brace just didn’t work. “Braces are very effective for most children to prevent the need for surgery later on,” says Darryl Antonacci, M.D., a spine surgeon who heads up Saint Peter’s scoliosis program at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. “But children have to wear it for long periods each day and until they stop growing. Many ultimately need surgery anyway.” The most common surgery to correct scoliosis is fusion. During the procedure, surgeons attach materials such as metal rods, screws and wires to the curved part of the spine. This straightens and stops the curve from worsening. However, it also stiffens the spine significantly and limits many activities the child is able to do—for life. It can also stunt the child’s growth and interfere with the lungs. With years of experience in treating children with scoliosis, Dr. Antonacci sought a better option. He pioneered a procedure that corrects the curvature of the spine without many of the downsides of other treatments. It’s called Anterior Scoliosis Correction (ASC). And unlike some surgeries, it can be used for people who have extreme curves, in children who are still growing and in adults. So, in a rather dramatic series of events, Julia, now 15, traveled to the United States this past spring for Dr. Antonacci to perform this successful new treatment at Saint Peter’s. Today, Dr. Antonacci and his colleagues continue to provide life-changing care at Saint Peter’s for children with serious spine conditions. There, just about every week, a child or teen heads back home—to a town in New Jersey or in countries across the world—to enjoy a life full of pain-free movements and the option to enjoy many more activities than they could have dreamed of before.

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INSIDE LOOK

hard for Julia because the rigors of competitive dance made her health challenges especially clear. “Rehearsals were long and tiring,” she says. “I was in pain most of the time.” But she and her close-knit team pushed through all their challenges. They made it to the semi-finals and then to the finals! This talented troupe had become one of the top nine in the entire competition. Before one performance in April 2017, Julia’s pain and perseverance became part of the on-air story. “I told the judges that this competition was my last, and this could be my final performance ever,” she says. By then, Dr. Antonacci was working behind the scenes with his colleagues, Randal R. Betz, M.D., and Laury A. Cuddihy, M.D., to present Julia with a life-changing gift. Reality TV producer and judge Simon Cowell—who also judges America’s Got Talent—had arranged to pay all hospital expenses for her surgery here at Saint Peter’s. And Dr. Antonacci stepped forward to donate his services, too. Doctors Antonacci, Betz and Cuddihy are among only a handful of spine surgeons in the world to perform this new corrective surgery, called Anterior Scoliosis Correction, or ASC. Dozens of children from around the world have come to The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s to be cared for by Dr. Antonacci and his fellow surgeons. “This pioneering technique allows us to achieve dramatic corrections to the curve even when the spine is very stiff and the curves are extreme,” Dr. Antonacci says. “So even for people like Julia who have a severe curve to the spine, they will have much more flexibility and range of motion compared to other treatments.” It is very different from current surgeries for scoliosis and offers dramatic benefits. “Unlike other spine surgeries, we reach the spine from the side of the body, instead of from the back,” he says. “So the back muscles are unaffected.” That helps reduce recovery time—to several weeks versus several months— and avoids long-term scarring of the spine. The ASC procedure also offers many other important benefits over traditional metal

“It was very hard, but every day the pain got better and better,” Julia says. She’s still on the mend, her mother, Kate, says. “But our expectation is that when she’s fully recovered, she’ll be painfree and back to dancing.” Now at home and beginning a new school year, Julia is grateful for the gift of a healthy back and will soon resume dancing. “We didn’t win in the finals in Britain’s Got Talent,” Julia says. “But with everyone who made this happen for me—including Simon and the great doctors and everyone at Saint Peter’s—I feel like I did!”

FOR KIDS FROM AROUND THE WORLD, SAINT PETER’S IS NOW A “DESTINATION” In the past year, world-renowned experts have joined a growing team of orthopedic specialists at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. They are now providing some of the most innovative care to children locally as well as those from around the world. “We’ve created this service to meet the significant need in our area for children with conditions of the bones and spine,” says David Jaipersaud, administrative director of The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s. “And because our physicians offer such innovative treatments, more and more children from around the world come to us.” For one such treatment (severe scoliosis, or curvature of the spine), Saint Peter’s Darryl Antonacci, M.D., has

been sought out by more than a dozen patients from the United Kingdom, Malaysia and other foreign countries, plus many more from across the United States. Physicians with the pediatric hematology/oncology division have also treated children throughout the tri-state area of the United States, plus as far away as the Netherlands and Belarus. The staff at Saint Peter’s is in an excellent position to care for such a broad international group of patients, Jaipersaud says. “From our nurses to our doctors and everyone in between, we know how to adjust to different cultures. So we’re ready to help when they walk through the door for the first time. “It’s part of our focus on all aspects of care, so we can help kids get back to being kids.”

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE PEDIATRIC SCOLIOSIS SURGERY PROGRAM AT THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.565.5437 OR GO TO SAINTPETERSHCS.COM

JOHN O’BOYLE

rod fusion. Instead of an inflexible rod, for example, Dr. Antonacci uses a flexible cord to straighten the spine. This results in patients’ having greater movement of the back. ASC repair also reduces the risk of infection and reduces blood loss (which can occur with any type of surgery). “Perhaps most important, patients can return to full activity levels,” he says. For Julia, the curves in her back were so significant that she needed two procedures at Saint Peter’s. Both were major surgeries, performed 10 days apart, lasting six hours each. Julia spent another six weeks of recovery in New Jersey.

TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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TECH SAVVY

FOOTPRINTS

2.0

SAINT PETER’S IS THE FIRST IN THE REGION TO GIVE INK AND PAPER A HIGH-TECH MAKEOVER.

MOST HOSPITALS RECORD NEWBORN FOOTPRINTS USING black ink and paper. It’s a rite of passage of sorts and a great keepsake for parents and the family. But a special type of baby’s footprint serves as an additional layer of security at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. A new, computer-generated digital footprint can now clearly and quickly match mother and baby should they ever become separated. The service, called CertaScan, is a first for the region and is not offered at any other hospital in New Jersey, New York or Pennsylvania. In fact, fewer than 40 hospitals in the country offer it. Staff in the mother/baby unit at Saint Peter’s introduced the new measure this past summer.

HIGH TECH

JOHN O’BOYLE

“We use the same technology to scan each newborn’s foot that the FBI uses for fingerprints,” says Pamela Harmon, R.N., director of women’s and children’s services The new, computer-generatated digital footprint can at Saint Peter’s. quickly match mother and baby should they become separated. “In addition to the baby’s footprint, we include the mother’s fingerprint as part of the record, along with a photograph of the baby.” Like fingerprints, footprints are unique

to each person and provide a clear record linking information about baby and mother. The software was developed with help from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. Staff members record these images in the mother’s room, within the first hours of the baby’s birth. The information is stored in the hospital’s electronic medical record—as well as on a passwordprotected server—so it’s always accessible if it’s ever needed. Security is a priority at Saint Peter’s for the approximately 5,700 children born there each year, says Debbie Ford-Thompson, R.N., manager of the hospital’s mother/baby units. One long-used security measure is identification bands on mothers’ wrists and babies’ ankles. A second measure is a sensor on babies’ ankles. “If a baby with this sensor is brought near any door on our unit, an alarm sounds and all doors lock until the person and baby are checked,” she says. “We’ve kept those measures in place, plus added CertaScan. Both families and staff appreciate this new, extra layer of protection.” In preparing to launch this service, several hundred registered nurses and patient care technicians took part in a five-day training effort.

MORE BONUSES THAT FAMILIES LOVE

Families have been excited by this program, and they appreciate one more bonus: Because the images are digital, parents can use them in any way a photograph can be used: to customize their baby’s birth certificate and birth announcements, for example, whether printed or emailed. Initial funding for the program was made possible by the support of Saint Peter’s benefactors.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SUPPORTING THIS PROGRAM OR OTHERS, CONTACT SAINT PETER’S FOUNDATION, 732.745.8542. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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SEASONAL HEALTH

KIDS AND DIRT:

SURPRISING FACTS

Doctors say it’s okay for children to get dirty on the ballfield.

THE SOLUTION TO SOME CHILDHOOD CONDITIONS LIKE ASTHMA AND ALLERGIES COULD BE FOUND IN AN UNEXPECTED PLACE.

DIRT AND BABIES

The timing of exposure is also important. Though it seems counterintuitive, research shows that the younger the child, the better. “Children exposed before their first birthday get the most protective effects,” Dr. Zivin-Tutela says. Research of people around the globe supports these ideas. In one study, more than 40 percent of children who had no allergies or wheezing grew up in homes rich with allergens and bacteria. On the other hand, among children who did have these symptoms, more than 90 percent had “cleaner” homes—with much less exposure to these things in the first year of life. Research of children who grow up on farms—and are exposed to microorganisms in the soil—also shows they are less likely to have asthma and allergies. Likewise, city-dwelling infants exposed to high levels of pollution and allergens actually seem to benefit from it. “We think we’re protecting children from illness by keeping them so clean, but we might be depriving them of the opportunity to develop stronger immunity,” Dr. Zivin-Tutela says.

When to clean, and how?

Not only is a little dirt on a kid’s hands not a big deal, it can actually be helpful, says Tracy Zivin-Tutela, M.D., who specializes in infectious disease at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. She’s also part of The Wellness Project, a locally based group of physicians and others in the community who promote ways to make small changes that improve health and wellness. To help parents find the balance between the benefits and risks of dirt, she offers these guidelines: In the bathroom, the dirtiest spot isn’t the commode. “It’s the floor and door handles,” she says. In the backyard sandbox, let them play, she says. But keep the box covered so it doesn’t become a cat’s litter box. On the ballfield or gym floor, it’s okay to get dirty. “That’s the kind of dirt that’s probably best for them,” she says. When someone is sick or you’re getting ready to eat, do wash your hands. If your child has an illness, talk to your doctor about the best precautions against exposure. And when you clean off dirt and germs, antibacterial wipes aren’t usually necessary. “Hot, soapy water for 20 seconds will usually take care of anything dangerous,” Dr. Zivin-Tutela says.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE PROGRAM AT THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT PETER’S UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL 732.565.5437 OR GO TO SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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IN AN ERA OF HAND SANITIZERS ON DEMAND AND ANTIBACTERIAL soap at every turn, many physicians are promoting a shift in personal hygiene that might surprise you—especially when it comes to kids. “A little dirt isn’t going to hurt you,” says Tracy Zivin-Tutela, M.D., who specializes in infectious disease at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. “In fact, we know that over-sterilizing and over-cleaning everything might actually be harmful in the long run, especially for children during their first year of life.” The medical community thinks that early exposure to germs decreases the number of inflammatory cells in the lungs and colon, she says. “So lack of exposure could affect someone into adulthood, since inflammation plays a role in Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, asthma and allergies.” Instead of avoiding all germs all the time, she says, exposure to everyday germs is essential for normal development of the immune system. “Just like babies need stimulation to develop their brains and muscles, contact with everyday germs actually strengthens their young immune systems.” An otherwise healthy child exposed to certain germs might come down with a cough, upset stomach or even a cold, for example. “But that exposure allows their immune system to learn to adapt and regulate itself,” she says. “So the next time he’s exposed, he can take care of it on his own.”

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UP CLOSE

Connecting the head with the heart

A LONG HISTORY WITH SAINT PETER’S INSPIRES A LOCAL BUSINESSMAN TO GIVE HIS TIME, GIFTS AND TALENTS. IN A HOSPITAL MEETING room filled with business people, caregivers and esteemed visitors, everyone listened intently. And each dabbed tears from their eyes. They were reacting to heartfelt examples of how important Saint Peter’s University Hospital has been to one man—literally from birth. The speaker was Jeff Hentz, 56, a local businessman, family man and strong advocate of Saint Peter’s. “I’ve seen first-hand how compassionate everyone who works here is,” he told them. “I saw how they cared for my wife and my family through tragic losses and also during great joys, like the birth of my daughter; how hospital staff not only provided tremendous end-of-life care for a close friend of mine, who was dying of a brain tumor, but how they also offered enormous comfort to his wife and family; their kindness and skill in caring for my premature twin nephews—who are now 30; how competently and quickly they cared for me during a recent emergency room visit and hospital stay for blood clots in my leg and lungs.” Hentz stopped, choking back tears. “There’s a very special warmth to this place that I’ve witnessed my entire life.”

TRANSFORMATIVE GIFTS

JOHN O’BOYLE

JOHN O’BOYLE

What Jeff didn’t choose to share that day was how all these connections have inspired him to support Saint Peter’s. “He epitomizes the idea of ‘giving back,’” says Michael Loch, director of annual giving for Saint Peter’s Foundation. “Jeff has

Jeff Hentz has many special connections with Saint Peter’s—he and his wife were even born there in the very same week.

been a part our golf fundraisers for 24 years, constantly promotes Saint Peter’s when he’s out in the community, and personally supports us with his philanthropy. When it comes to sharing of his time, gifts and talents, he lives it.” Most recently, Hentz helped coordinate a fundraiser that brought together genetics experts from Saint Peter’s and area middle schoolers. “In this day of bullying, our goal was to show seventh- and eighth-graders that people are different for a variety of reasons,” he says. That effort raised more than $2,500 for Saint Peter’s Department of Medical Genetics and Genomic Medicine and, more importantly, conveyed a memorable message.

LONG HISTORY

Jeff’s first experience with Saint Peter’s was in the nursery. “I met my wife there,” he says with a smile. “We were both born there in the same week!” Another interesting connection relates to Jeff’s work. “For many years, Saint Peter’s was my customer,” he says, speaking of his sales work with Staples Business Advantage. Jeff chooses to invest so heavily in Saint Peter’s in part because of this history. But in addition, the hospital’s mission aligns closely with his own values. “Their mantra is to never turn people away, to give them the care they need,” he says. “I’ve been incredibly blessed in my life, and I do what I can to support this family-centered, customerfocused hospital and everyone who works in it.”

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE SAINT PETER’S FOUNDATION, PLEASE CALL 732.745.8542 OR GO TO SAINTPETERSHCS.COM. TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR TO RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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FACES OF SAINT PETER’S

Arkady Broder, M.D. GASTROENTEROLOGIST

“AS SOON AS I SAW THE TWO FISHING RODS, I GRABBED THEM IN ONE HAND AND MY 6-YEAR-OLD SON, KOBY, IN THE OTHER.” —ARK ADY BRODER, M.D.

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ON VACATION LAST YEAR IN FLORIDA, ARKADY BRODER, M.D., found a pleasant surprise in the family’s rental home, a surprise that led him to rediscover a childhood love and find yet one more way to connect with his children. “As soon as I saw the two fishing rods, I grabbed them in one hand and my 6-year-old son, Koby, in the other,” he says. Growing up in the Bronx, he had spent summers in upstate New York and many hours fishing with friends. “I was excited to see if Koby would enjoy it, too.” Did he? No question. “The fact that he caught five fish that day and his dad caught nothing got him hooked,” Dr. Broder says. Now, fishing is a favorite pastime for the pair. That kind of one-on-one family time is important to Dr. Broder, who lives in Edison with his wife, Marni, and their four children: Ahuva, 8; twins Emma and Koby, 6; and Aidan, 3. Both parents are busy physicians, and their children are busy with school and activities. Dr. Broder attended Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and completed his residency at Beth Israel Medical Center. He specializes in therapeutic endoscopy, which he describes as a hybrid of gastroenterology and oncology, at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. The family spends a lot of time together on the weekends. In summers, they often head to the shore or a waterpark. In winter, a favorite is sledding down a big hill near their home or at Roosevelt Park in Edison, the site where Dr. Broder taught his kids to ice skate. Friday nights are a little more routine when all six gather for a big family meal. A tradition that everyone enjoys is taking turns sharing the “best” and “worst” of their week. Sometimes, a single issue looms large, Dr. Broder says. “‘I dropped a cookie,’ or ‘someone gave me a cookie,’” might be the most significant thing the kids think of,” he laughs. “No matter how hard a day I’ve had, they really help me keep my perspective.” As an orthodox Jewish family, they celebrate religious holidays together. And on national U.S. holidays, it would be hard to find any family celebrating more. Dr. Broder came to the United States from the Ukraine at age 10. “I’m very proud of our country and what it’s given me and my family,” he says, just before adding with a broad smile, “The Fourth of July, Thanksgiving, Flag Day—we host them all at our house. I take national holidays very seriously.”

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John Mostafa, DPM, FACFAS PODIATRIC SURGEON

BOHM-MARRAZZO STUDIOS

BOHM-MARRAZZO STUDIOS

A SERIOUS ANKLE INJURY IN HIGH SCHOOL SCUTTLED a real chance for John Mostafa, DPM, FACFAS, to play college basketball. But he used that experience to adapt his dreams for his future, and ultimately merged a lifelong love of sports with a longtime interest in surgery. Today, the Bordentown resident—who graduated from Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine and completed his residency at Mount Auburn Hospital in Massachusetts—is a reconstructive foot and ankle surgeon at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. “I love working with my hands,” says Dr. Mostafa. “As with my doctors who treated my high school injury, my work today helps my patients achieve maximum mobility.” He treats patients for foot and ankle sports injuries and trauma as well as those who need total ankle joint replacement due to arthritic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Though rewarding, it’s intense work. But he’s found a hobby that gives him a unique opportunity to immerse himself in another setting and to be part of another sport. “My wife’s family owns a farm for standardbred horse racing,” he says. Those are the races where horses pull a light, two-wheeled cart with a driver. “Every weekend, we visit the animals and just enjoy the beauty. It’s our little escape from reality.” But “little” doesn’t describe the operation. Run by his wife’s family, the Joie de Vie Farm, French for “joy of life,” is a training and breeding facility that covers more than 200 acres in Jobstown in Burlington County. There, more than 100 horses train, breed and board. Notables coming out of the program include national and international champion racers with names like Moni Maker, Credit Winner and Dog Gone Lucky. “It’s an oasis that allows us to nurture the horses, plus care for dozens of cats and dogs,” he says. “It really takes your breath away.” Besides the beautiful setting, another huge draw is the chance to spend time at the farm with family, he says. Dr. Mostafa and his wife, Gina, love bringing their toddler, Cozette, who’s just over one year old, to visit her grandmother, uncles and aunts. They enjoy regular family dinners on the property almost every weekend. “I’m a family guy,” Dr. Mostafa says, “so during my free time, this farm is where we come to relax, to be with our family. It’s our place to slow down and focus on the present, to enjoy each other.”

“EVERY WEEKEND, WE WE VISIT THE ANIMALS AND JUST ENJOY THE BEAUTY. IT’S OUR LITTLE ESCAPE FROM REALITY.” — JOHN MOSTAFA, DPM, FACFAS TO SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH A FRIEND OR RECOMMEND IT ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGE, VISIT CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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GATHERINGS AT SAINT PETER’S AN AFFINITY FOR IMPROVING PATIENT CARE The Affinity Federal Credit Union Foundation has pledged $50,000 over three years in support of the new state-of-theart Simulation Center for Inter-Professional Learning at Saint Peter’s University Hospital. The Sim center encompasses an Institute for Bedside Medicine, an Institute for Technical Simulation and a medical library for healthcare providers and patients. Its goal is to promote the development of a multidisciplinary approach to patient care; it is structured to meet the educational needs of all healthcare staff (medical students, residents, attending physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, physical therapists, pharmacists, social workers and others). Pictured at the donation presentation, from left: Dr. Lauretta A. Farrell, executive director, The Affinity Federal Credit Union Foundation; Stephanie L. Medianka, grants manager, Saint Peter’s Foundation; James S. Choma, chief development officer and executive director, Saint Peter’s Foundation; Leslie D. Hirsch, interim CEO and president, Saint Peter’s Healthcare System; and John T. Fenton, president and CEO, Affinity Federal Credit Union.

RAISING GREEN ON THE GREENS More than 116 golfers turned out at The Ridge at Back Brook for Saint Peter’s 31st Annual Golf Classic in early September. The event raised more than $100,000 for the Saint Peter’s Foundation in support of various patient programs and projects at Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, which includes Saint Peter’s University Hospital and The Children’s Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital, both in New Brunswick. Pictured, from left: Michael McCormick, of Pavese-McCormick Insurance Agency and a member of the Saint Peter’s Foundation board of trustees; William Skala, TD Bank; Gerard Gauthier, TD Bank; and Dr. Charles Wallace, Puerto Rican Action Board.

HOW SWEET IT IS Les Hirsch, interim CEO and president of Saint Peter’s Healthcare System, far right, and Linda Carroll, vice president, patient care services, and chief nursing officer, second from left, join nurse manager Eliza Sanchez to celebrate with the members of the cardiac progressive care team, which has received numerous Sweet Success Awards for achieving outstanding patient satisfaction scores. The team consistently ranks among the top units in the nation in patient satisfaction rankings. Saint Peter’s issues its Sweet Success Awards on a regular basis in recognition of its highperforming clinical units.

FOR INFORMATION ON UPCOMING EVENTS SPONSORED BY SAINT PETER’S HEALTHCARE SYSTEM, GO TO SAINTPETERSHCS.COM/COMMUNITY-CALENDAR.

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Blue and black dress by Knitts, black leather necklace by Carol Lipworth Designs.

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IN THE

MOOD FOR... A NIGHT ON THE TOWN? WEEKEND ERRANDS? SUNDAY BRUNCH? THESE FALLS LOOKS HAVE EVERYTHING COVERED.

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This page, furry white vest by dylan/true grit, Nordstrom, Edison, 732.603.5000; red and blue plaid shirt by Punch, TK; jeans by AG Jeans, Lord & Taylor, Westfield, 908.233.6600. Opposite, black blazer with crown patch and red/grey striped shirt by eleventy, Nordstrom, Edison, 732.603.5000; black pants by MINXX, minxx.us.

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This page, camel-colored fur poncho by DiBello, dibello.com; sequin jacket by Daniela Dallavalle, danieladallavalle.com; ivory tank top by Nikibiki, Nordstrom Rack, Lawrenceville, 609.524.2625; tan pants by eleventy, Nordstrom, Edison, 732.603.5000. Opposite, blue velvet blazer by Donna Degnan, Rhona's, Manalapan; white tank top by Majestic Filatures, Nordstrom, Edison, 732.603.5000; blue and black pants by MAC Jeans, mac-jeans. com; black leather necklace by Carol Lipworth, carollipworth.com.

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THE WOW FACTOR ADMIT IT: A GREAT PAIR OF SHOES CAN TRANSFORM YOUR OUTFIT—AND YOUR MOOD.

Clockwise from top: silver cage stilettos, suede sock booties with embellished heel and black suede butter fly grommet booties, all by Sophia Webster.

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Clockwise from top: stiletto heel sandle with disco tinsel (and Minnie Mouse-inspired ears!), Giorgia sock booties, red velvet sandal with a block heel, all by Oscar Tiye.

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SWOON WORTHY YOU’LL SURELY FALL FOR THE SEASON’S NEW BAGS.

This page: signature Gancio hardware on suede by Salvatore Ferragamo. Opposite: leather bags by Furla.

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5

ESCAPES

COLLEGE- T

EMBARKING ON CAMPUS TOURS WITH YOUR TEEN? SEEING THE SCHOOL IS JUST A SMALL PART OF THE FUN IN THESE CITIES FULL OF SIGHTS. BY MARISA SANDORA

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CHAPEL HILL, N.C.

Schools to see: University of North Carolina, Duke University (Durham) Around town: The city was actually created to serve the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which was established in 1793 as the first state university in the country. The historic charm can still be felt in the winding streets, stone walls and small shops that surround the school. On bustling Franklin Street, more than 200 restaurants, bars and shops serve the multicultural population. Called “America’s Foodiest Small Town” by Bon Appetit, Chapel Hill is a culinary delight. For a memorable BLT, try Merrit’s Store & Grill. For classic Southern dishes, you can’t go wrong at Crook’s Corner, and for upscale Asian food, try Lantern. Work off your meal by taking a stroll around the North Carolina Botanical Garden, a free popular spot to enjoy the outdoors. The life-size chessboard is a hit with kids. Then take a tour of the Top of the Hill Distillery, which uses local ingredients to make organic spirits. Tar Heels (and college hoops fans in general) won’t want to miss the Carolina Basketball Museum, full of video clips, game balls, uniforms and more. Dare we mention Duke in this paragraph? UNC’s archrival is a mere 20 minutes away, so head to Durham if you’d like to visit the home of the Blue Devils.

BERKELEY, CALIF.

Schools to see: UC Berkeley, San Francisco State University (San Francisco) Around town: Enjoy the sunshine when visiting the University of California, Berkeley. Stroll down Telegraph Avenue to take in the hippie vibe while checking out the eclectic mix of stores, cafés and street vendors. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love, after all. Tilden Regional Park is the perfect place to go for a hike. Nature fans will also enjoy the UC Botanical Garden at Berkeley, a tranquil 34-acre gem located above the main campus in Strawberry Canyon. Also in the hills is the Lawrence Hall of Science, a great place to take curious children. Worn out from all that walking? Take a load off in one of Berkeley’s many coffee shops. Try the Guerilla Café, a cozy spot on Shattuck Ave. in the Gourmet Ghetto. Yes, you read that right. The North Berkeley neighborhood was given that nickname in the late 1970s and is anchored by Alice Waters’ Chez Panisse, the farm-to-table restaurant at the epicenter of the local food movement. Before you leave town, take in the sweeping views from the 307-foot Sather Tower (commonly known as the Campanile) on campus, which is the third-tallest bell and clock tower in the world.

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- TOWN TRIPS BURLINGTON, VT.

Schools to see: Champlain College, University of Vermont Around town: This bustling college town is nestled on the shores of beautiful Lake Champlain. But let’s get real: The best reason to head this far north in Vermont is to see how ice cream is made and sample fun flavors at the Ben & Jerry’s factory, a quick 30-minute drive east in Waterbury. (The first Ben & Jerry’s shop was in a renovated gas station on the corner of St. Paul and College Street in Burlington. Sadly, it’s no longer there.) But there’s more beyond ice cream. The Church Street Marketplace is a pedestrian mall with historic buildings, interesting shops, cafés and craft vendors. It’s a great place to people-watch and soak up the city’s artsy vibe. Another popular spot is the Burlington Farmers’ Market, held in City Hall Park during warm weather and indoors on St. Paul Street in the colder months. Stock up on locally made treats from Vermont farmers, cheese makers, bread bakers and more. Walk off all that food at the Fleming Museum of Art at the University of Vermont, which, incidentally, is one of the nation’s oldest universities, having been chartered in 1791. The museum features more than 20,000 objects that span the history of civilization. Another interesting stop is the ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, an aquarium and science center located right on the water. Hungry? Grab dinner at Farmhouse Tap & Grill, a farmto-table gastropub famous for its craft beers, burgers and entrees like the bourbon-braised Adams Farm chicken and polenta.

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

Schools to see: University of Michigan, Eastern Michigan University (Ypsilanti) Around town: Taking in a game at Michigan Stadium (the largest stadium in the U.S. and aptly nicknamed The Big House) should be your first priority if it’s football season, but there are plenty of other things do while in Ann Arbor. Grab a local treat for breakfast at the Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market, open Saturdays year round, then wander the brick streets of historic Kerrytown (named after County Kerry in Ireland) and peruse the locally owned shops selling everything from clothing to handmade art. Once you’ve worked up an appetite for lunch, pop into Zingerman’s Deli for one of its famous gigantic sandwiches. Don’t miss Main Street in downtown Ann Arbor for more unique boutiques, bookstores, cafes and great people watching. Feeling adventurous? Rent a kayak or canoe and paddle down the Huron River. Or enjoy the outdoors in a more relaxed fashion by strolling through the Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum on the U of M campus. By now, you’re probably exhausted, so head to the Michigan Theater and enjoy an independent or classic film while marveling at the historic building, which opened in 1928.

AUSTIN, TEXAS

Schools to see: University of Texas, St. Edward’s University Around town: Have you heard the saying “Keep Austin Weird”? Well, get ready to experience what the weird is all about. This quirky, liberal town is unlike the rest of Texas, even though it’s the capital of the Lone Star State. Music reigns here (and not just during the South by Southwest music festival), so make seeing some live music your No. 1 to-do. Walk along Red River Street or 6th Street for lots of options, but never fear, live music can be found in dive bars and other venues all over town. The other must-do while in Austin is to eat barbeque. There are countless meat meccas in town, but standouts include Franklin Barbecue, La Barbecue, Rudy’s Country Store & Bar-B-Q and Freedmen’s. When you’ve had your fill, wipe that sauce off your hands and get shopping. Some spots to check out include Uncommon Objects, an antiques store in South Austin that sells everything from vintage jewelry to oddities like skulls, and I Luv Video, the “oldest and largest video store in the world.” If the Texas heat is getting to you, take a dip in the Barton Springs Pool, a 1,000-foot long limestone pool fed by several underground springs. Fun fact: A young Robert Redford learned to swim there when he was visiting family in Austin. The pool is within Zilker Park, which is a great place for a picnic or to take a bike ride (you can rent wheels).

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BOWLS OF GOODNESS

MOVE OVER ACAI AND POKÉ. THESE DELICIOUS VEGETARIAN RECIPES OFFER A FRESH TAKE ON THE FOOD BOWL TREND.

GOLDEN SHAKSHUKA ONIONS, PEPPERS AND EGGS IN CUMIN AND TURMERIC SAUCE Serves: 2 INGREDIENTS n 2 onions, thinly sliced n 2 yellow bell peppers, thinly sliced n ½ tsp. ground cumin n ½ tsp. freshly grated or ground turmeric n ½ tsp. thyme (dried or fresh) n ½ tsp. ground coriander n pinch of cayenne pepper or ½ tsp. spicy harissa n 2 cups yellow cherry tomatoes, chopped n 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped to a paste with ½ tsp. salt n 2 free-range eggs YOGURT SAUCE n ½ cup Greek yogurt n 1 tsp. honey n juice of ½ lemon TO SERVE n handful of fresh herbs (cilantro, mint, parsley), chopped n dusting of za’atar n fresh bread

DIRECTIONS Prepare the yogurt sauce by mixing the ingredients in a bowl, then set aside. Add a drizzle of olive oil to a skillet and place over medium-low heat. Stir-fry the onion until translucent, about five to 10 minutes. Add the peppers, cumin, turmeric, thyme, ground coriander, and cayenne to the skillet. Stir to coat the onions and peppers with the spices. Add the cherry tomatoes and garlic-salt mixture and cook over low heat for 15 minutes, stirring frequently. If the sauce begins to dry out, add a little oil and water, but add sparingly as the shakshuka should not be watery. Use the back of a spoon to make two shallow indentations in the surface of the shakshuka and crack an egg into each. Leave the shakshuka to slowly bake the eggs for 10 minutes, keeping the heat low. The result should be a dry sauce with the eggs just set. Remove from the heat. Serve in bowls with the yogurt sauce drizzled over, and top with fresh herbs and za’atar. Enjoy with bread to scoop up the shakshuka sauce.

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TASTES

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SMOKED TOFU AND GREEN PEA SALAD A FAUX FISH SALAD WITH HORSERADISH CREAM Serves: 2 to 3 INGREDIENTS n ¾ lb. spinach n ¾ lb. white cabbage leaves, finely shredded n 1 head romaine lettuce, leaves separated n 2 handfuls of arugula n 1 apple, quartered, cored, and sliced n 2 avocados, pitted, peeled, and sliced n 1 zucchini, spiralized n ¼ lb. green peas, fresh or frozen (defrost at room temperature for 15 minutes) n 1–2 Tbs. vegetable oil n 2 handfuls of pumpkin seeds n 1 sheet nori (seaweed), torn or cut into smaller flakes n7 oz. smoked firm tofu, cut into small cubes n sesame seeds n pinch of ground black pepper n 1 Tbs. toasted sesame oil n soy sauce n handful of hemp seeds n juice of 1 lemon n pinch of salt

DIRECTIONS Toss the spinach, cabbage, lettuce, and arugula in a large bowl. Add the apple, avocado, zucchini and peas. Heat a small skillet over medium-low heat. Add a little of the oil and toast the pumpkin seeds and nori flakes for two minutes, stirring to make sure they don’t stick. Sprinkle with salt, remove from the pan, and set aside. Mix the horseradish cream ingredients in a small bowl. Combine in a blender or work it to a smooth consistency with a fork, then set aside. Return the skillet to medium heat and add a little oil. Cook the tofu cubes with the sesame seeds and ground pepper, stirring constantly, for two to three minutes. Remove from heat and drizzle with sesame oil and soy sauce. Add the tofu, pumpkin seeds, and nori flakes to the salad bowl. Top with the hemp seeds. Drizzle with lemon juice and sprinkle with salt. Serve with the horseradish cream.

HORSERADISH CREAM n ¾ cup vegan crème fraîche or dairy crème fraîche n ¾ Tbs. horseradish (or 1 Tbs. wasabi or 1 Tbs. Dijon mustard) n good pinch of salt

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THE LOYAL LENTIL CHILI

LENTIL CHILI WITH BUTTERNUT SQUASH, COCONUT MILK, PEPPER AND LIME Serves: 4 INGREDIENTS n 1 cup Le Puy or black lentils n 1 Tbs. coconut or olive oil n 5–7 shallots, finely chopped n 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped to a paste with 1 Tbs. salt n ½ Tbs. ground cumin n 1 tsp. ground turmeric n 1 tsp. ground cinnamon n 1 tsp. paprika n 1 tsp. ground coriander n 1 red bell pepper, halved, seeded and finely chopped n 1–2 red chile peppers, seeded and finely chopped n 2 tomatoes, finely chopped n1 lbs. butternut squash, cooked and diced n 1 Tbs. tahini n 1 Tbs. honey or agave syrup n14 oz. can coconut milk n juice of 1 lime n 3 Tbs. soy sauce n salt and pepper

SIMPLE YOGURT SAUCE n1 cup yogurt or vegan yogurt

(soygurt or coconut yogurt) n1 tsp. honey or agave syrup n drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil

QUICKEST CUCUMBER SALAD n½ cucumber, shaved into ribbons n ¼ cup rice vinegar TO SERVE n extra-virgin olive oil nfresh cilantro ncooked brown rice or other whole grain nlime wedges n Sriracha or similar hot sauce

DIRECTIONS Cook the lentils according to the package instructions. Rinse, drain and set aside. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil and gently cook the shallots until translucent. Add the garlic, spices, bell pepper, chile peppers and tomatoes. Cook for a few minutes over mediumlow heat. Stir in the lentils, squash, tahini and honey. Pour in the coconut milk and stir, then simmer over medium-low heat for five minutes, adding a little water if needed and stirring regularly. Add the lime juice and soy sauce, then continue simmering for a few minutes while stirring. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper. Remove from the heat. Mix the ingredients for the yogurt sauce. Make the cucumber salad by combining the shaved cucumber and rice vinegar. Drizzle the chili with extra virgin olive oil, top with freshly chopped cilantro. Serve with the cool yogurt sauce, cucumber salad, brown rice, lime wedges and hot sauce.

Reprinted with permission from Bowls of Goodness by Nina Olsson, published by Kyle Books. Photography by Nina Olsson. No images may be used, in print or electronically, without written consent from the publisher.

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WHERETOEAT F I N E

C A S UA L

FA M I LY

WASABI HOUSE Fresh sushi and authentic Japanese dishes in a friendly, relaxed environment, 77 Tices Ln., 732.254.9988

EDISON

CAFÉ GALLO Family-style Italian dining, 1153 Inman Ave., 908.756.4745 LOUCÁS Upscale American and Italian fare, 9 Lincoln Hwy., 732.549.8580 MEEMAH Casual Chinese and Malaysian cuisine, Hwy. 27 at Parsonage Rd., 732.906.2223 MING Asian fusion cuisine with vegetarian options, 1655-195 Oak Tree Rd., 732.549.5051 PENANG Malaysian and Thai eater y, 505 Old Post Rd., 732.287.3038 SKYLARK FINE DINER & LOUNGE Upscale diner with creative cocktails, 17 Wooding Ave., 732.777.7878

FORDS

MCLOONE’S WOODBRIDGE GRILLE Upscale interpretations of American classics, 3 Lafayette Rd., 732.512.5025 VILLA BORGHESE Traditional Italian fare with modern twists, 432 New Brunswick Ave., 732.738.0666

HIGHL AND PARK

APOSTO PIZZERIA Mediterranean grill and pizzeria, 76 Raritan Ave., 732.745.9011 MIDORI SUSHI Japanese fusion with a sushi bar, 237 Raritan Ave., 732.246.4511 PAD THAI Vegetarian-friendly Thai eater y, 217 Raritan Ave., 732.247.9636

Zinna’s Bistro in Cranbury

AVENEL

D’ITALIA RESTAURANT Italian fare, specializing in pizza, 1500 St. Georges Ave., 732.574.1120

CARTERET

CHATEAU MADRID Spanish and Portuguese fare, 8 Holly St., 732.969.0692 JULIAN’S American steak house with seafood options, 1000 Roosevelt Ave., 732.541.9500

PITHARI TAVERNA Greek cuisine with seafood fare, 28 Woodbridge Ave., 732.572.0616

HILLSBOROUGH

ZINNA’S BISTRO Casual Italian fare, BYO, 1275 S. River Rd., 609.860.9600

BIG HEADS GRILL & BAR Grill favorites mixed with pub fare, 315 Route 206 #502, 908.281.0268

CRANFORD

LEE’S SUSHI Premiere Japanese cuisine in a casual atmosphere, 438 Route 206 #5, 908.829.3140

PAIRINGS Globally inspired menu combined with local and sustainable practices, 10 Walnut Ave., 908.276.4026

DAY TON

ISELIN

CASA GIUSEPPE Italian fine dining, 487 Route 27, 732.283.9111

FUJI Japanese hibachi and sushi, 485 Georges Rd., 732.274.8830

URBAN SPICE Authentic Indian fine dining, 42 Marconi Ave., 732.283.1043

THE CRANBURY INN Traditional American dining, 21 S. Main St., 609.655.5595

LA TAVERNA Cozy traditional Italian dining, 375 Georges Rd., 732.274.2200

JAMESBURG

CRANBURY PIZZA Casual Italian pizzeria, 63 N. Main St., 609.409.9930

EAST BRUNSWICK

CRANBURY

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GUSTO GRILL Traditional American food, 1050 Route 18 North, 732.651.2737

FIDDLEHEADS American fine dining, Sunday brunch ser ved, 27 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.0878 PER TUTTI Italian cuisine, private dining, BYO, 49 E. Railroad Ave., 732.521.4900

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KENDALL PARK

DUSAL’S Casual Italian seafood and pizza eater y, 3300 Route 27, 732.821.9711 SHOGUN 27 Hibachi steakhouse with a sushi bar, 3376 Route 27, 732.422.1117

KENILWORTH

TAORMINA Authentic Italian fare featuring an extensive wine list, 482 Kenilworth Blvd., 908.497.1717

KINGSTON

ENO TERRA Italian cuisine featuring seafood, homemade pasta and an extensive wine list, 4484 Route 27, 609.497.1777 OSTERIA PROCACCINI Quaint Italian restaurant serving pizza, sandwiches and salads with organic and local produce, 4428 Route 27 North, 609.688.0007

METUCHEN

ANTONIO’S BRICK OVEN PIZZA Traditional Italian pizzeria, 453 Main St., 732.603.0008 THE METUCHEN INN American fare in an upscale setting, 424 Middlesex Ave., 732.494.6444 THE ORCHID Glatt kosher dining, 455 Main St., 732.321.9829

MIDDLESEX

CARPACCIO RISTORANTE Southern Italian fare, 651 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.3242 VINCENZO’S RISTORANTE Italian cuisine, 665 Bound Brook Rd., 732.968.7777

MILLTOWN

FRANCESCO PIZZERIA & RESTAURANT Casual Italian eater y and pizzeria, 23 N. Main St., 732.214.9222 FRESCO Seafood and steak grill, prix fixe menu, 210 Ryders Ln., 732.246.7616

McLoone’s Woodbridge Grille in Fords HARVEST MOON BREWERY & CAFÉ American pub fare, 392 George St., 732.249.6666

MIDORI Authentic Japanese and hibachi dining, 1392 Centennial Ave., 732.981.9300

MIKE’S COURTSIDE SPORTS BAR & GRILL Traditional pub fare, 1 Elm Row, 732.455.8511

PL AINSBORO

THE OLD BAY New Orleans–style restaurant with Cajun and French Creole dishes, 7 Church St., 732.246.3111 OLD MAN RAFFERT Y’S Casual American eater y, 106 Albany St., 732.846.6153 PANICO’S Classic Italian entrees and sandwiches, with specialty pizzas at its sister location across the street (94 Church St.), 103 Church St., 732.545.6100

PIERRE’S Fine international dining with an awardwinning wine list, 582 Georges Rd., 732.329.3219

RESTAURANT 2FIFT Y4 Saint Peter’s University Hospital restaurant, offering healthy dishes and vegetarian options for breakfast, lunch and dinner, 254 Easton Ave., 732.745.8600, ext. 7773

SENS ASIAN CUISINE Far East fusion cuisine, 4095 Route 1 South, 732.355.1919

STAGE LEFT Upscale American fare with an extensive wine list, 5 Livingston Ave., 732.828.4444

MONROE

STEAKHOUSE 85 Premium steaks ser ved in various portion sizes to fit a wide range of budgets, 85 Church St., 732.247.8585

MONMOUTH JUNCTION

GARVEY’S Family-friendly American eater y, 405 Spotswood Gravel Hill Rd., 732.521.3311 LA VILLA Casual Italian dining, 335 Applegarth Rd., 609.655.3338

MONTGOMERY

GENTEEL’S TRATTORIA & PIZZERIA Italian cuisine featuring a variety of pastas, pizza, sandwiches, soups and salads, 1378 Route 206, 609.252.0880 TIGER’S TALE Bar and grill menu with sliders

and extensive dinner specials, 1290 Route 206, 609.924.0262

NEW BRUNSWICK

CARIBBEAN CAFÉ Cuban cuisine, 85 Bayard St., 732.846.2620 CATHERINE LOMBARDI Italian with locally sourced ingredients, 3 Livingston Ave., 732.296.9463 CHRISTOPHER’S American seafood and steak fare, 10 Livingston Ave., 732.214.2200

TUMULT Y’S Upscale pub food, featuring steaks and seafood, 361 George St., 732.545.6205

NORTH BRUNSWICK

ARTHUR’S STEAK HOUSE & PUB Traditional American steakhouse, 644 Georges Rd., 732.828.1117 ISTANBUL RESTAURANT & PATISSERIE Turkish and Mediterranean fare boasting freshly baked pides and lahmajouns, 1000 Aaron Rd., 732.940.1122

OLD BRIDGE

EAST Asian fusion fare with a bubble tea bar, 5 Market St., 609.750.3278

PRINCETON

ELEMENTS American restaurant ser ving local steak and seafood, and a new bar bites menu, 66 Witherspoon St., 609.924.0078 MAIN STREET BISTRO & BAR Euro-American bistro fare, 301 N. Harrison St., 609.921.2779 TERESA CAFFE Simple Italian-inspired fare incorporating many fresh ingredients grown at nearby Canal Farm, 23 Palmer Sq. East, 609.921.1974 WITHERSPOON GRILL Steakhouse dining featuring all-natural Angus beef and locally sourced poultr y, 57 Witherspoon St., 609.924.6011

ROSELLE PARK

VINHUS Portuguese fare with formal dining or casual bar and lounge, 157 E. Westfield Ave., 908.259.5907

SOUTH AMBOY

BLUE MOON Contemporar y American and pub fare, 114 S. Broadway, 732.525.0014 COSTA VERDE Portuguese and Spanish cuisine featuring fresh seafood, 6039 Route 35 South, 732.727.7070

JUST Contemporar y American and French fare, 2280 Route 9 South, 732.707.4800

SOUTH PL AINFIELD

THE PINE TAVERN Imaginative A merican cui s ine with Continental flavors, 151 Route 34, 732.727.5060 PONTE VECCHIO Classic Italian and American Continental fare with seafood options, 3863 Route 516 East, 732.607.1650

DELTA’S RESTAURANT Southern cuisine with live music and specialty drinks, 19 Dennis St., 732.249.1551

PERTH AMBOY

DUE MARI Modern Italian food featuring fresh local and seasonal ingredients, 78 Albany St., 732.296.1600

THE BARGE Water front restaurant and cocktail lounge featuring steak and seafood dishes in generous portions, 201 Front St., 732.442.3000

EVELYN’S Lebanese food with vegetarian options, 45 Easton Ave., 732.246.8792

PORTUGUESE MANOR Traditional Portuguese featuring sangria, 310 Elm St., 732.826.2233

THE FROG AND THE PEACH American fare with a focus on fresh ingredients, 29 Dennis St., 732.846.3216

PISCATAWAY

AL DENTE RISTORANTE Traditional Italian eater y, 1665 Stelton Rd., 732.985.8220 CHAND PALACE Family-friendly Indian restaurant featuring an all-vegetarian menu, 1296 Centennial Ave., 732.465.1474

FOR OUR COMPLETE LIST OF DINING OPTIONS, VISIT THE “WHERE TO EAT” SECTION OF CENTRALJERSEYHEALTHANDLIFE.COM.

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CROWN OF INDIA Authentic Indian cuisine, 660 Plainsboro Rd., 609.275.5707

BIG ED’S BARBECUE American barbecue, 305 Route 34, 732.583.2626

CLYDZ Contemporar y American cuisine with extensive mar tini selection, 55 Paterson St., 732.846.6521

GLO ULTRA LOUNGE AND TEQUILA BAR Upscale pub food and a bar with more than 200 tequilas, 367 George St., 732.261.4044

CASA ROSARIA’S ITALIAN RISTORANTE Classic Italian food, 607 Plainsboro Rd., 609.799.9009

FLANAGAN’S American and Irish pub fare, 2501 Plainfield Ave., 908.757.1818 KIMCHI HANA Traditional, authentic Korean BBQ restaurant where dishes are grilled at the table, 6101 Hadley Rd., 908.755.0777

SOUTH RIVER

KRAKOWIAK Casual Polish restaurant, BYO, 42 Main St., 732.238.0441 RIA-MAR Traditional Portuguese, Spanish and American fare, 25 Whitehead Ave., 732.257.1100

WOODBRIDGE

CHRIS MICHAEL’S STEAKHOUSE Steak and seafood restaurant, featuring a sushi bar, 40 Oakwood Ave., 732.634.5355 J.J. BITTING BREWING CO. Traditional American fare, 33 Main St., 732.634.2929 MULBERRY STREET RESTAURANT Italian seafood eater y with exceptional steak and chop specials, 739 Rahway Ave., 732.634.4699

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BE THERE O C TO B E R

Princeton Oktoberfest, October 14

OCT 7, 2017-SEPT. 9, 2018

Spend the day perusing NJ State Museum’s new exhibit “HEARTH & HOME,” which opens in Trenton. Visitors will learn about the homes and lives of Native Americans in the Eastern Woodlands and other environments across North America. Admission: FREE, but a donation is appreciated. Learn more at state.nj.us.

OCT 14 The Black Forest Craftsman Club is hosting its annual PRINCETON OKTOBERFEST at the Central Jersey Masonic Center from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. There will be traditional German dishes available like bratwurst, spaetzel, sauerkraut and apple streudel. Of course, many types of authentic German beers will be available, including Paulaner, Hacker, Pschorr and Franziskaner. Admission: $10, which includes 20 tickets to use for food and drink purchases. For more details, call 609.412.7235. OCT 21 Run (and drink) your way through Alba Vineyard in Milford at the GRAPE GALLOP RUN AND WINE TASTING. Registration for the event is at 8:30 a.m., and the race begins at 10 a.m. Participants can start their wine tasting as early as 10:45 a.m., when they’ll receive a race T-shirt, tote bag and wine glass. Tickets: $50 for runners/tasters, $35 for

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Pumpkinfest, October 27

N OV E M B E R

Art All day, November 4

designated drivers. For information, visit grapegallop.com.

OCT 27 Bring your painted, illuminated

gas’ “Comedian of the Year” for nine years running. Tickets: $35-$75. Learn more and purchase tickets at stnj.org.

or carved pumpkins to enter Clinton’s annual contest at PUMPKINFEST. The celebration will occur throughout downtown and at Clinton’s community space at the Terrace of the Hunterdon Art Museum. There will be face painting, balloon artists and horse-drawn hay rides, with decorated pumpkin judging at 9 p.m. Admission: FREE. More information can be found at visitnj.org.

NOV 4 Experience Trenton’s rich art

OCT 27, 28, 29 Visit an entire village

County, unite! The first-ever RIVER TOWN FILM FESTIVAL in Clinton at the historic Red Mill is set to span two days, opening Saturday with a screening of On Golden Pond followed by a Q&A with the film’s award-winning writer Ernest Thompson. There will be screenings and a judging of films submitted by local filmmakers throughout the day on Sunday, Nov 12. Admission: TBA. For admission prices and more info, head to rivertownfilmfestival.org.

full of haunted houses and meet the ghosts of people who lived and died there on the HAUNTED HAYRIDES, conducted in the Deserted Village at the Watchung Reservation in Berkeley Heights. Rides run on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, with a rain date of Monday, Oct 30. Tickets: $8 per family of six (in-county); $16 per family of six (out-ofcounty). To learn more, visit ucnj.org.

OCT 29 Spend your Sunday with BRAD GARRETT & RITA RUDNER at their comedy show at the State Theatre of New Jersey in New Brunswick. Garrett is an Everybody Loves Raymond alum and accomplished voice actor; Rudner is an award-winning writer, actress and Las Ve-

culture at ART ALL DAY from 12 to 10 p.m., sponsored by Artworks, the state capital’s Visual Arts Center. The event will include studio tours, demos, pop-up galleries, public art and more at 19 Everett Alley, the center’s location. Admission: FREE. Head over to artworkstrenton.org for more information.

NOV 10-12 Film buffs of Hunterdon

Send event listings to: Central Jersey Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; or email us at editor@ wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number or website that will be published. Share events online by clicking the “Submit an Event” link below the Calendar at centraljerseyhealthandlife.com.

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Central Jersey Health & Life: Fall 2017  
Central Jersey Health & Life: Fall 2017