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C I N C I N N AT I H E A LT H & L I F E W I N T E R 2 0 19

CINCINNATI T H E

G O O D

L I V I N G

M A G A Z I N E

F R O M

T R I H E A LT H

DIABETES: STEMMING THE TIDE R E C I P E S : S W E E T S E N S AT I O N S

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WINTER 2019 | $3.95 | TRIHEALTH.COM

THE GOOD LIVING MAGA ZINE

HERNIA HELP PERFECT PORTUGAL LUNG CANCER: NEW TREATMENTS

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FEATURES

{ WINTER 2019 }

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Preventive care, screenings and lifestyle changes all have important roles to play in helping more people avoid this dangerous disease.

Use these ideas to create all the coziness needed to keep spirits up till spring.

AVOIDING DIABETES

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HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT

The Zero in on Zero program helps total hip and knee replacement patients get back to normal daily activities quickly and safely.

BRING WARMTH TO YOUR WINTER

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LUNG CANCER: TARGETED TREATMENT

How precision medicine helped one patient return to an active life with his family.

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HELP FOR HERNIAS

20 I N E V ERY I S S UE

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W E LC O M E L E T T E R E D I TO R’S N OT E W H E R E TO E AT BE THERE

CONTENTS

A former firefighter enjoys an active retirement after losing 75 pounds and having hernia surgery.

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{ WINTER 2019 }

CONTENTS

36 28 DEPARTMENTS

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Our guide to new ideas, trends, tips and things we love in or near Hamilton County.

Photos from recent events in Hamilton County.

LOCAL BUZZ

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HEALTH NEWS

Tips and insights you can use now.

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GATHERINGS

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POWER FOOD

Rich in antioxidants and taste, squash makes a healthy go-to side dish.

TASTES

Cap your meal with one of these delicious Middle Eastern desserts.

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ESCAPES

Explore Portugal and savor its delicious food, vibrant cities, exquisite beaches and Medieval history.

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{ WELCOME LETTER }

ONE LIFE, MAKE IT YOUR BEST... Top 15 in the nation. #1 with our patients. • Bethesda North and Good Samaritan hospitals ranked among the Top 100 Hospitals in the nation • Bethesda Butler, Bethesda North and Good Samaritan hospitals awarded Leapfrog “A” safety ratings • 140 locations • 650+ employed physicians • 4th-largest employer in Cincinnati, with 12,000+ team members We are bringing all of this together to deliver the health care that is right for you. TriHealth has been recognized as a top health system in Cincinnati and one of the top 15 in the nation by Watson Health. This and other awards acknowledge our commitment to setting a higher standard of care as we continue to deliver the right care at the right time. We are proud of these achievements, and we look forward to continuing to provide the best health care in the region.

WINTER BRINGS A SEASON of reflection and new beginnings as we say goodbye to another year and look ahead, with promise, at the opportunity to improve and enhance our lives, our relationships and our health. At TriHealth, we are proud to partner with hundreds of thousands of individuals throughout the Greater Cincinnati community to help them live their best life—no matter what their circumstance. TriHealth understands that being your personal best is, well...personal—and begins with setting clear goals that are right for you, creating a plan you can stick with, and then committing to doing what it takes to reach the finish line. It’s about discipline, small victories and having a trusted, supportive team in your corner to help you excel every step of the way. Featured in this issue are four very different, yet equally inspiring stories about the power of partnership and what’s possible when you commit to live your best life, despite overwhelming health obstacles—including stage 4 lung cancer, chronic diabetes, crippling arthritis and a debilitating hernia. Each story shares a common theme—when determined patients partner with compassionate, world-class, multidisciplinary care teams that have access to the latest medical advances and technology, the potential for good health and a great life is limitless. Wishing you a holiday season filled with peace, love and special memories—and a New Year that inspires you to be your best! Yours in Good Health,

MARK C. CLEMENT TRIHEALTH PRESIDENT AND CEO

TriHealth.com/best FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT TRIHEALTH, VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT TRIHEALTH.COM.

100 Top Hospitals® is a registered trademark of IBM Watson Health™

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When you need care, you need a multidisciplinary approach that recognizes the complex brain and body relationship. A team that knows your brain works with all the systems of your body, making you – you. We created the TriHealth Neuroscience Institute with our partner Mayfield Brain & Spine to advance the knowledge and treatment of everything from strokes and brain tumors, to neurological and spine diseases, delivering care for the whole you. TriHealth and Mayfield have learned a lot in the past 80 years of working together, but what we’ve known from the beginning is most important – this has always been all about you.

Whole you care. Let’s connect. Call us today at 513 853 5500. *Independent physician group contributed to the costs of this advertisement.

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{ EDITOR’S NOTE }

Natural Childbirth plans are

KEEPING UP WITH SCIENCE TriHealth Midwife Care: Your partners for a personalized birth experience. A happy and healthy delivery—it’s what all expectant families want. But you also want reassurances and a personal connection along the way. TriHealth Women’s Services Midwife Care, now open in West Chester, provides a new option for highly personal maternity care. TriHealth Women’s Services Midwife Care offers dedicated midwifery services focused on your birth plan and your family, but fully backed by the TriHealth system of maternity care, with deliveries at Bethesda North Hospital. Our midwives will be with you every step of your pregnancy journey.

Make an appointment with one of our nurse midwives today.

Call 513 853 7400 or visit TriHealth.com/Midwifery

As I turned my attention to writing this memo, email alerts flashed in one corner of my screen, one after the other. My curiosity piqued, I took a look. They were alerts from Medscape, a company that covers medical news. Three arrived in the space of 10 minutes, and they weren’t the first I’d seen that day. After reviewing all of this issue’s wonderful health articles— several of which are about advanced treatments available at TriHealth—it struck me what a challenge it is to stay medically current in today’s world, with science advancing so quickly. Each day, diligent researchers around the world discover new information that helps patients heal faster, experience less pain and live longer. TriHealth works hard to capitalize on all those advances. One example: The Zero in on Zero (ZIOZ) program pioneered by Mark Snyder, MD, medical director of Good Samaritan Hospital’s Orthopedic Center of Excellence. This integrated program is designed to improve the recovery process for total hip and total knee replacements by reducing 10 of the most debilitating and costliest adverse events that can follow those procedures. Two patients share their ZIOZ stories, beginning on page 16. On page 26, the article Targeted Lung Cancer Treatment tells how one patient’s multidisciplinary team at TriHealth utilized precision medicine, genetic testing and other advanced clinical tools to help save his life. Today, three years later, his symptoms have disappeared and his cancer is under control. He’s back to working full time and enjoying time with his wife and children. We hope you enjoy those stories, as well as the travel, home and recipe articles we’ve included to help you fill this winter with warm, welcoming rooms, exciting vacation plans and unique sweet treats. Thanks for spending some of your day with us! Warm regards,

MARIA K. REGAN EXECUTIVE EDITOR

5900 West Chester Road, Suite G | West Chester, OH 45069

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CINCINNATI MARIA K. REGAN

E XECU TIVE ED ITOR

KIJOO KIM

CRE ATIVE D IR ECTOR ED I T O R I A L

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

CARL OLSEN PUB LI S HER

M A R K E T I N G , D I G I TA L & O P E R AT I O N S

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & DIGITAL MEDIA NIGEL EDELS HAIN

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT GIANA BRUCELL A

JIM ALLEN PATRICIA DIBONA

ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER

ART

GRAPHIC DESIGNER, AD SERVICES

ART ASSOCIATE

AL ANNA GIANNANTONIO

PHYSICIANS, HOSPITALS AND COMMUNITIES WORKING TOGETHER TO HELP YOU LIVE BE T TER.

JACQUELYNN FISCHER VIOLETA MUL AJ

CONTROLLER AGNES ALVES

T R I H E A LT H

PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER MARK C. CLEMENT

VP MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS ROB WHITEHOUSE

MANAGER, EXTERNAL AND DIGITAL MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS JOYCE BAT TOCLE T TE

SENIOR MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONSULTANT DENYSE REINHART

EILEEN CR ABILL

SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONSULTANT

PRODUCTION

MANAGER, OFFICE SERVICES AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONSULTANT

DESIGN CONTRIBUTOR

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND CIRCULATION CHRISTINE HAMEL

MEGAN FRANK

CATHERINE ROS ARIO

PUBLISHED BY WAINSCOT MEDIA CHAIRMAN CARROLL V. DOWDEN

CHRISTINE SWALLOW

EMILY KITZ MILLER

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONSULTANT LINDS AY LOMA X

H O S P I TA L S BE THESDA BUTLER HOSPITAL

3125 HAMILTON MASON RD., HAMILTON PRESIDENT & CE O MARK DOWDEN

BETHES DA NORTH HOS PITAL

10500 MONTGOMERY RD., CINCINNATI GOOD S AMARITAN HOS PITAL

S EN I O R V ICE PRESIDENTS

375 DIXMYTH AVE., CINCINNATI

SHAE MARCUS CARL OLSEN

M c CULLOUGH -HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

110 N. POPLAR ST., OXFORD TRIHE ALTH E VENDALE HOSPITAL

VICE PRESIDENTS

3155 GLENDALE MILFORD RD., EVENDALE

NIGEL EDELS HAIN THOMAS FL ANNERY RITA GUARNA CHRISTINE HAMEL

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Cincinnati Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; email editor@wainscotmedia.com. Cincinnati Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE is published 4 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 4, Issue 3. © 2018 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Carl Olsen at 847.274.8970 or carl.olsen@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address, or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Cincinnati Health & Life, Circulation Department, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

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Over 80,000 children in the tristate are at risk of hunger today. $1 could help provide 3 meals.

Our Mission: We provide food and services, create stability, and further self-reliance for people in crisis.

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freestorefoodbank.org

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{ LOCAL BUZZ }

A GIFT

FOR DINING W H E T H E R I T ’S T I M E for a date night with your honey, a business dinner, a birthday celebration…or just about any occasion, really, Tony’s Steaks and Seafood can be counted on to provide the festive mood and delicious, thoughtfully prepared food you’re after. Though steak is a specialty, Tony’s offers a tasty dish to suit every taste, from burgers to mussels to pasta. And don’t even get us started on the handcrafted cocktails and delectable desserts—Opera Cream Cake, anyone? With its rich, sophisticated atmosphere and attentive staff, Tony’s is a welcome treat for all the senses. In search of gift ideas? Take your holiday list and cross any number of deserving friends and family off of it with an easy, sure-tobe-appreciated gift card to Tony’s. And now, for every $100 gift card you purchase, Tony’s will give you a $25 gift certificate in return. Think of it as the icing on that delectable Opera Cream Cake.

A WORK SPACE THAT WORKS FOR FAMILIES

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F O R I N D E P E N D E N T W O R K E R S with young children, it can be quite challenging to find the right kind of childcare with the flexibility their work demands. Two women with a good perspective on both business and parenting have hit upon a novel solution that brings both together. Meg Cooper has spent years working remotely as a consultant. When she was expecting her first child, the need for a combined set of solutions for parents with freelance careers really hit home. Cooper’s mother, Peggy Bustamante, has extensive experience in sales and business management. Mom and daughter banded together to create Gather Cincy, a revolutionary combination of co-working space and childcare center. Gather Cincy allows parents not only to drop off their children every day at the same place where they work, but also to make schedule changes as needed. Children from 3 months to 6 years are eligible for care. In addition to providing childcare and meeting all the basic business needs, for additional fees Gather Cincy offers enticing extras like fitness/ wellness services (for example, massage and yoga) and catered meals. The old cliché about working parents being able to “have it all” suddenly sounds possible. WINTER 2019 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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OPENING UP THE TECH BIZ I F YO U W E R E to just take a random guess as to how much venture capital is given to women and people of color, what would you say? Odds are your estimation would be a lot higher than the actual number, which is a sobering 2 percent. That portion of the entrepreneurial community has been drastically underserved in terms of funding and support for a very long time. Fortunately, some folks in Cincinnati have taken it upon themselves to do something about it by starting Hillman Accelerator. The idea was taken up in 2016 by three people with a vision: erstwhile Hello Parent CEO Candice Matthews, Qey Capital’s Ebow Vroom and Dhani Jones, a former Cincinnati Bengal. With help from a number of partners, including Ohio Third Frontier, Cincy Tech, Cintrifuse and Jumpstart Capital to name just a few, they created Hillman Accelerator to change the face of the tech space, operating from a local base but ultimately affecting the business world on a national level. Entrepreneurs whose ideas are picked up by the program are offered seed money to get their project off the ground. In addition, Hillman helps entrepreneurs make contacts with national corporations, sets up a path for subsequent, sustainable funding, provides a carefully created educational curriculum and offers targeted advice. So, if you happen to notice the tech landscape starting to change for the better in the next few years, don’t be surprised if Hillman Accelerator had something to do with it.

TIME STANDS STILL IN TOYTOWN T H E R E ’S A N U N A S S U M I N G little storefront on Beechmont Ave. in Mt. Washington where some very strange things have been spotted. Representatives of different eras, different worlds and sometimes even different galaxies have been seen sharing the same space. Iron Man, Princess Leia, 1970s Barbie, RoboCop, Halloween’s Michael Myers and the Six Million Dollar Man all coexist within the rarefied environment known to lovers of vintage toys as O’Smiley’s Dolls and Collectibles. The cavalcade of items available at O’Smiley’s is a cross section of new and vintage toys from a number of generations. You’ll find everything from the mightiest superhero action figures to the most delicate dolls and everything in between. When you visit, if it seems like several different childhoods are happening at once and happily colliding into each other, don’t worry, it’s all part of the plan.

FUN DONE RIGHT J U S T O F F O F I - 2 75 in Forest Park lies the kind of place that probably plays a central role in the daydreams of countless kids: the OMNI Funplex, where 35,000 square feet of family-oriented attractions can be found under a single roof. The Funplex caters to the whole family, not just the kids. For instance, whenever you’re ready to take a break from all the action, there’s a full bar and grill where you can get everything from wings and burgers to vegetarian dishes. But the main focus is fun, and as far as that goes, there’s no shortage of options. You’ll find a trampoline park (including dodgeball, basketball and free jump), a two-level laser tag play area, 10 lighted bowling lanes and all kinds of arcade and virtual reality games to try. In other words, whether you enter the OMNI Funplex for a quick visit or a full-on party, you’ll find you’re in the right spot.

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{ HEALTH NEWS }

MEDITATE FOR BETTER SLEEP You know meditation reduces stress and improves concentration, but did you know that it helps you sleep better? A study found that mindfulness meditation improved sleep quality among its participants.

60 SECONDS

JOB MAKING YOU FAT?

Research shows that people who work more than 40 hours per week are 8 percent more likely to be obese. Getting 8 hours of sleep each night can increase productivity and help you get out of the office earlier.

—JAMA Internal Medicine

—Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

VEGGIE SWAP TO BANISH BLOAT

HEAR YE, HEAR YE Here’s another reason to break open that bottle of red wine. One study found that rodents given large amounts of resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, showed delays in age-related hearing loss. —Neurobiology of Aging

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Popeye must have been on to something! One easy way to get rid of belly bulge is to eat more spinach and less broccoli. While the latter is good for you, you’ll consume less raffinose, a complex sugar in broccoli, which breaks down in the large intestine, causing gas. —Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

The time it takes to kill the bacteria—salmonella and E. Coli—found on typical kitchen sponges. In one study of 325 sponges, 15.4 percent were found to contain bacteria. The fix? Regularly nuke sponges on high for one minute. —University of Arizona

A NATURAL HIGH Folks who gaze at a beautiful sunset, birds outside a window or a gorgeous field of flowers, then snapped a picture and posted it to Instagram, recording their feelings about the shots, were happier and more likely to be connected to other people than those folks who did the same with man-made objects. —University of British Columbia

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The percent increase in stroke risk for folks who don’t eat breakfast versus those who do. Experts think it may be because eating helps prevent spikes in blood pressure. So how do you like your eggs? —Stroke

WINTER 2019 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

DIABETES:

Stemming the Rising Tide PREVENTIVE CARE, SCREENINGS AND LIFESTYLE CHANGES ALL HAVE IMPORTANT ROLES TO PLAY IN HELPING MORE PEOPLE AVOID DIABETES.

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DIABETES HAS BECOME one of the leading chronic diseases affecting Americans today, and the numbers are continuing to skyrocket. Currently, about one in 10 Americans has some form of diabetes, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) projects that number could rise to one in three by 2050 if the current trend continues. Diabetes is a challenging and potentially deadly disease for those who live with it. In addition, it puts a massive economic burden on patients and on the healthcare system itself—those affected need a lifetime of expensive care. “I can’t see how our health-care system won’t go bankrupt if the CDC’s projections are correct,” says Michael Heile, MD, a primary care doctor with TriHealth Physician Partners, who is himself living with type 1 diabetes. What’s the solution to this growing public health crisis? Giving more people the information and support needed to take preventive steps that will help them avoid getting diabetes in the first place. In addition, technology paired with a greater understanding of the causes of diabetes will enable doctors to help those at risk recognize the warning signs and help those affected control it better.

DIABETES 101 There are two main forms of diabetes: Type 1 accounts for less than 5 percent of cases and is usually not avoidable. It occurs when the body becomes unable to produce insulin, the hormone that helps process glucose in the body. For many patients, type 1 diabetes can be wellcontrolled with regular insulin treatments. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the vast majority of diabetes cases. It develops over time, often as a result of lifestyle factors—including poor diet, lack of exercise and obesity—that cause the body to become insulin-resistant. With insulin resistance, the body can’t effectively control the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Over time, that can damage the arteries and lead to a wide range of serious, and potentially deadly, health effects. Type 2 diabetes is the type responsible for today’s diabetes epidemic because it’s connected with the epidemic of obesity, which stems from sedentary lifestyles and diets high in sugar, carbohydrates and processed foods. “So many conditions

SO MANY CONDITIONS OCCUR, OR GET WORSE, BECAUSE OF OBESITY AND EATING POORLY. DIABETES IS ONE OF THE BIGGEST EXAMPLES.” —MICHAEL HEILE, MD

occur, or get worse, because of obesity and eating poorly,” Dr. Heile says. “Diabetes is one of the biggest examples.” The good news is that a future in which one in three Americans has type 2 diabetes isn’t inevitable. Because this widespread condition is the result of lifestyle factors, efforts to change people’s lifestyles can also change the trajectory of the disease. “We’re creatures of habit and it’s a real challenge to change those habits, but living a low-carb lifestyle and having a regimented exercise program has had a great impact on my sugar levels,” says Don DiGiacomo, who has type 2 diabetes and has being seeing Dr. Heile for the past two years. “The tool I’ve used that has made the biggest difference is an implanted device that provides instant feedback about my blood sugar numbers.” The availability of—and ongoing innovation around—continuous glucose monitoring devices will play an important part in wider population health efforts as well. By monitoring patients’ glucose levels in real time, doctors will be able to analyze not only individual patient data, but also the data from entire populations of people with diabetes, providing deep insight into what works and what doesn’t on a large scale. Widespread collection of health data, and tools to analyze that data, also can help primary care physicians identify people who are prediabetic, defined as having higher-than-normal blood sugar. Identifying at-risk patients allows them to make the necessary lifestyle changes early to avoid getting diabetes and the financial and physical burdens that come with it.

Today, it’s more important than ever for everyone to have regular preventive checkups from their primary care physicians, including regular screenings and blood work for those who may be at risk for diabetes or prediabetes. “The American Diabetes Association says anyone over 40 to 45 should be screened if they’re overweight or have risk factors for diabetes,” Dr. Heile says. “But there are a lot of reasons we may do it even earlier.”

DIABETES RISK FACTORS About 90 percent of all people with prediabetes don’t even know they have it. You’re at increased risk of developing diabetes if you: • are overweight • are 45 years or older • have a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes • do not participate in a physical activity at least three times a week • had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or have given birth to a baby who weighed more than nine pounds • are African American, Hispanic/ Latino American, American Indian or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk)

TO LISTEN TO TRIHEALTH’S PODCAST OF DR. HEILE AND HIS PATIENT, DON, DISCUSS DON’S JOURNEY, GO TO TRIHEALTH.COM/DIABETES. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | WINTER 2019

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

TOTAL APPROACH TO TOTAL HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT

Knee-replacement patient David Kiihnl, right, enjoying time out on the water with family.

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THE ZERO IN ON ZERO PROGRAM HELPS TOTAL HIP AND KNEE JOINT REPLACEMENT PATIENTS GET BACK TO LIFE QUICKLY AND SAFELY. ONE HUNDRED leg lifts a day. Jim Griffith and David Kiihnl say performing these exercises prior to total knee replacement surgery sped up their recoveries. The ambitious regimen, championed by Mark Snyder, MD, medical director of TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital Orthopedic Center of Excellence, was just one of many strategies that got Jim, 72, and David, 70, back on their feet. Jim knew that the methods of Dr. Snyder, a volume leader in joint replacements in the Tri-State area, worked. In 2007, Dr. Snyder performed Jim’s first total knee replacement surgery, replacing his damaged right knee joint with a prosthesis. A Vietnam war veteran and air conditioner salesman, Jim often crawled into tight spaces on the job. His knee, originally injured in Vietnam, became debilitated as arthritis progressed— making his occupation difficult and painful. “I worked in hundreds of homes a year, including those of nurses and doctors,” says Jim. “TriHealth Orthopedics and Dr. Snyder’s name kept coming up.” Two months after Dr. Snyder performed Jim’s first knee replacement procedure, which involved a three-day stay at Good Samaritan Hospital and intensive physical therapy, Jim’s mobility was nearly 100 percent. “I was able to do a full squat. It hurt, but I could do it,” says Jim, fit and trim due to regular home workouts.

ZEROING IN ON COMPLICATIONS Jim’s active lifestyle continued into retirement until his left knee began acting up in 2017. This time, he didn’t hesitate and scheduled an appointment with Dr. Snyder. “Jim had severe arthritis and a meniscus tear,” says Dr. Snyder. “A total knee replacement was the best approach for long-lasting results.

The only time we do a less invasive arthroscopic procedure to correct a meniscus tear in people with knee arthritis is if they have knife-like catching or locking episodes,” clarifies Dr. Snyder. Though Jim felt prepared for replacement surgery the second time around, he was heartened to learn that Dr. Snyder had pioneered an integrated TriHealth program designed to make the recovery process even better. Known as Zero in on Zero (ZIOZ), the program focuses on reducing 10 of the costliest and most debilitating adverse effects that can follow lower joint replacement surgery. This includes eliminating unnecessary blood transfusions by screening and treating preoperative anemia; lessening blood clots through the use of mobile compression devices and low-dose aspirin; and reducing opiate dependence with multiple pain control methods before, during and after surgery. When a patient has a medical risk that might impact the outcome of joint replacement surgery, Good Samaritan Hospital has systems of care in place. “By working collaboratively with our centers of care, obesity is improved, smoking stops, diabetes is better managed and sleep apnea is diagnosed and treated,” Dr. Snyder affirms. “This synergy is what makes Good Samaritan Hospital unique.”

EMPOWERING PATIENTS Dr. Snyder says patients of the Orthopedic Center of Excellence, which earned the Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for Advanced Certification for Total Hip and Total Knee Replacement in 2017, are educated about potential problems pre-surgery and provided tools to solve them. Jim attended a joint-replacement class prior to his second surgery in 2018, something he hadn’t done the first

“A TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT WAS THE BEST APPROACH FOR LONG-LASTING RESULTS. THE ONLY TIME WE DO A LESS INVASIVE ARTHROSCOPIC PROCEDURE TO CORRECT A MENISCUS TEAR IN PEOPLE WITH KNEE ARTHRITIS IS IF THEY HAVE KNIFELIKE CATCHING OR LOCKING EPISODES.” —MARK SNYDER, MD

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time. “I was given protein shakes and energy bars to promote good nutrition. I followed exercise and medication recommendations. When I came out of the OR and woke up, I was amazed. The pain level wasn’t there,” says Jim, who was discharged the next day. Dr. Snyder says all ten of the ZIOZ pathways were applied to Jim. This included using a multi-layer, water tight closure without surface staples, a new surgical technique that greatly reduces wound infection. “Our pathways are like bridges over a raging river,” says Dr. Snyder. “Patients must literally step on stones laid before them.” Pain, a constant problem for orthopedic patients, must be managed carefully. “Patients have less pain if they prepare themselves before surgery with the right non-narcotic medications. That way, drugs are in a patient’s system controlling pain pathways when they have surgery. During the procedure, we treat patients with a spinal anesthetic and long-lasting tissue and nerve blocks. Most of our patients are narcotic-free within the first week.”

RETURN TO FAMILY AND FITNESS

TODAY, DAVID KIIHNL IS WALKING DISTANCES WITH EASE AND FINDING JOY AGAIN PLAYING WITH HIS GRANDKIDS.

For Jim, adherence to the ZIOZ pathways made a world of difference. He not only restored his fitness level quickly and safely, but says he is now better able to care for his wife during her cancer treatment. Family involvement was also the driving force behind the April 2018 knee replacement surgery of David Kiihnl, a

ZIOZ: IMPROVING OUTCOMES The Zero in on Zero (ZIOZ) program targets reducing adverse effects in these 10 areas for hip and knee replacement patients.

Reducing blood transfusions

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Reducing surgical site and deep prosthetic infections

Improving patient satisfaction

Minimizing inpatient falls

Reducing prolonged length of stay

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Cincinnati-based business consultant. After struggling to walk to the beach with his grandchildren during a Florida vacation, David turned to Dr. Snyder. He was diagnosed with advanced arthritis and a knee replacement was scheduled after injections proved short-lived. Like Jim, David was well-schooled in ZIOZ pathways. “Dr. Snyder is an expert in what he does, but that’s only one part of the process. I knew I had a responsibility to do my part and follow instructions. Dr. Snyder told me early on, ‘If you do what you need to do and I do what I need to do, all you’ll require after surgery is a bottle of Tylenol and ice packs.’ He was right.” David was impressed with clinicians at Good Samaritan Hospital and their commitment to the ZIOZ pathways. “I wanted to continue the process in outpatient rehabilitation with a physical therapist who understood Dr. Snyder’s recovery expectations,” he says. While David could have gone to a physical therapy practice minutes from his home, he opted to drive 30 minutes to TriHealth’s outpatient physical therapy department at Good Samaritan. Because he had “prehabbed” his knee with exercises before surgery, David found outpatient PT less taxing than his peers who did not follow Good

Samaritan’s protocols. “I used a walker for a short time and bypassed the cane all together,” he says. Today, David is walking distances with ease and finding playful joy again with his six grandkids.

TOTAL JOINT REPLACEMENT: WHEN IS IT TIME? Total joint replacement is reserved for patients who have disabling joint pain that no longer responds to conservative treatments, such as:

LOCAL, NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL IMPACT Like his two patients, Dr. Snyder is confident that the ZIOZ program for total hip and knee replacement works. It includes a Level 3 American Joint Replacement Registry through the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, which provides valuable data about outcomes, complications and patient feedback. Data collected in a Good Samaritan Hospital legacy registry about patients revealed that when integrated pathways for 10 adverse events were simultaneously enacted, rates of complications, readmissions and revisions in 2,000+ primary hip and knee arthroplasties in 2011–2017 plummeted below national averages. It’s a model that Dr. Snyder believes has far-reaching potential. “The integrated clinical pathway method is a way for every doctor, every hospital, every patient in the United States and the world to more rapidly achieve safer and more optimal outcomes at the lowest possible cost.”

• Anti-inflammatory medications • Nutraceuticals •J  oint injection therapy • Assistive devices such as canes and walkers •L  ifestyle changes including diet and exercise •P  hysical therapy Before joint replacement surgery, your orthopedic surgeon will consider: • Your arthritis history • Your past medical history • A review of your general health systems • A physical exam • Inspection of X-rays and other anatomic imaging studies •C  onfirmation that you have failed conservative treatments and have end-stage joint disease

TRIHEALTH OFFERS JOINT REPLACEMENT SURGERIES AT GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL, BETHESDA NORTH HOSPITAL, BETHESDA BUTLER HOSPITAL, McCULLOUGH-HYDE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL AND TRIHEALTH EVENDALE HOSPITAL.  FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT JOINT REPLACEMENT SURGERY AT TRIHEALTH, CALL 513 24 ORTHO OR VISIT TRIHEALTH.COM/ORTHO.

Preventing poor pain management

Eliminating readmissions/ deaths from deep vein blood clots

Lowering 30-day hospital readmission

• Additional testing

Improving discharge handoff

Lowering rate of early total hip prosthetic dislocations

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BRING WARMTH TO YOUR WINTER

WHEN THE TEMPERATURE OUTSIDE PLUMMETS, USE THESE IDEAS TO CREATE ALL THE COZINESS NEEDED TO KEEP SPIRITS UP TILL SPRING.

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{ HOME }

When it comes to turning winter darkness into an asset, Scandinavians are way ahead of the game, having plenty of opportunity each year to practice. Candles are considered indispensable, casting a warm glow over breakfast as often as dinner. When you see candles on sale, stock up on various shapes and sizes. Sticking to a single color will keep an array of candles from looking too busy.

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Adding texture is an excellent way to bump up the cozy in just about any room. Left: Knit blankets add visual and physical warmth, whether layered on a bed or kept close to the sofa where everyone loves to curl up with a good book. Above: Crocheted ornaments brighten the season, are a fun indoor project for cold days, and make thoughtful gifts. Adding hand-made texture doesn’t have to be complicated. Simple mini ski hats created with just a few knots and some imagination can turn a plain mantel into a festival of cheerful color, or serve as place-card holders for a winter feast. Knitters can, of course, busy themselves adding warmth and texture to just about anything, from feet to vases.

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Winter decor doesn’t have to mean an expensive makeover for every room in the house. Simple touches that easily can be swapped out come spring will keep your project both fun and feasible. Left: Splashes of rich color mixed with bright neutrals can do wonders to lighten mood. Below and right: Bringing the warmth of nature indoors is always uplifting, especially in the gray days of winter. Evergreen boughs, a favorite this time of year, are easily found, but a cluster of succulents carries equal appeal. Consider repotting plants you already have in containers of similar color to create a new arrangement—one that’s sure to brighten your table and your mood all the way until spring.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

After his lung cancer treatment and recovery, Finest Johnson threw the first pitch at a Cincinnati Reds game—to his oncologist, Andrew Parchman, MD. Family members, pictured at right, joined in the fun at Great American Ballpark.

TARGETED LUNG CANCER TREATMENT PRECISION MEDICINE TAILORS LUNG CANCER TREATMENT TO A PATIENT’S DNA, RETURNING HIM TO ACTIVE LIFE.

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WHEN FINEST JOHNSON visits the TriHealth Cancer Institute at Good Samaritan Hospital, he doesn’t take the elevator. He prefers climbing the stairs— from basement parking up to the 4th floor without stopping to catch his breath. It’s a challenge the lung cancer survivor does to keep his lungs healthy. It’s also a reminder of how far he’s come since his diagnosis three years ago. In 2015, Finest, 46, had a chronic cough he attributed to dust exposure at his job as an automotive assembly

technician. Visits to his doctor yielded diagnoses of bronchitis and asthma with prescriptions for medications and an inhaler. After fatigue and headaches set in, Finest’s mother, Barbara Johnson, RN, an infusion nurse at TriHealth Cancer Institute, insisted he get an X-ray. An initial X-ray showed a suspicious mass in the lungs and a follow-up scan and biopsy at Good Samaritan Hospital confirmed stage 4 lung cancer. According to Finest, father to Finest Jr., 23, and Christiana, 16, “A full body scan

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showed the cancer had spread. There was a tumor in my brain as well.”

MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAM TAKES ACTION David J. Draper, MD, a medical oncologist, took charge. “He was the first person to see Finest and got the ball rolling, organizing tests and referring him to specialists,” says Barbara. An expert multidisciplinary team was swiftly assembled. It included Andrew Parchman, MD, a medical oncologist with expertise in innovative lung cancer treatment, as well as neurosurgeon Christopher McPherson, MD, and radiation oncologist Daniel White, MD. “As we’ve come to better understand what causes cancer, treatment has become much more complex,” says Dr. Parchman. “We take a multidisciplinary approach to care. At our clinic, patients meet with specialists—a medical oncologist, thoracic surgeon, pulmonologist, radiation oncologist, pharmacist, oncology nurse navigator and genetic counselor—who review their case as a team. We examine images and biopsy and genetic results and create a personalized treatment plan that is put into action quickly.” To combat Finest’s debilitating symptoms, Dr. McPherson performed palliative brain surgery to remove the metastasized tumor and Dr. White

coordinated radiation treatments. Finest received radiation to his lungs and stereotactic radiosurgery (a form of radiation therapy that focuses high-dose energy on a precise area with fewer side effects) to his brain. “At TriHealth Cancer Institute, I had the best team,” says Finest, calling out radiation therapists who supported him during difficult radiation sessions and his nurse who helped him prepare Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) paperwork. “I was determined to return to work,” he says. Precision medicine was in its infancy 10 years ago. Today, TriHealth augments chemotherapy with targeted therapies that focus on specific genes or proteins to combat cancer, and with immunotherapy, which stimulates the body’s immune system to join the fight. Genetic testing discovered that Finest’s tumor had a mutation of the ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) gene, an occurrence in 2 percent of lung cancer patients. This ALK abnormality acts as an “on switch” to cancer. The genetic results meant Finest was eligible for targeted drug therapy that could turn the ALK mutation switch off. Finest was prescribed an ALK inhibitor called crizotinib. “It’s a pill that rapidly shrinks the cancer and is effective at holding it at bay,” says Dr. Parchman. When Finest experienced side effects, a

new plan was put into action. “Science is moving so fast that a second medication, alectinib, was approved by the FDA while Finest was on the first drug.” Alectinib has proven effective at subduing Finest’s cancer, without any negative consequences. “There’s a lot of hope,” says Dr. Parchman about the future of cancer treatment. “Here’s a young guy, a non-smoker, who works hard, is raising his kids and cancer hits him out of the blue. His response to treatment has been remarkable. His symptoms have disappeared and his cancer is under control.”

BACK ON THE PLAYING FIELD For TriHealth oncology staff who know and respect their longtime colleague Barbara Johnson, her son’s cancer experience hit close to home. “But it also energized us as a team because we saw how far we’ve come with lung cancer treatment and how effective we’ve been at getting Finest back to his life,” says Dr. Parchman. These days, Finest is feeling great, working full-time and enjoying time with family and friends. They rallied around him this summer when Finest took to the pitcher’s mound at a Cincinnati Reds baseball game. It’s a moment he’ll long remember. “I threw the first pitch and Dr. Parchman caught it!”

TO LEARN MORE OR TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH THE TRIHEALTH CANCER INSTITUTE, CALL 513 853 1300 OR GO TO TRIHEALTH.COM/CANCER. WINTER 2019

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SWEET SENSATIONS CAP YOUR MEAL WITH ONE OF THESE DELICIOUS MIDDLE EASTERN DESSERTS— BECAUSE THE ENTRÉE SHOULDN’T BE THE ONLY COURSE WITH FLAVORS TO SAVOR.

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{ TASTES }

LAYERED CUSTARD AND NUT CRUMBLE (KSHTALEIA) YIELDS: 12 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

FOR THE PUDDING n  2 quarts milk n  2 Tbs. rose water n  2 Tbs. orange blossom water n  1 cup confectioners’ sugar or honey n  1 tsp. vanilla extract n  1 tsp. mastic (optional) n  1 cup rice flour

Preheat the oven to 300°F. Grease a 9-by-13-inch baking pan with butter. TO MAKE THE PUDDING: In a large saucepan, bring the milk to a simmer over medium heat. Add the rose water, orange blossom, confectioners’ sugar, vanilla and mastic, if using. Slowly add the rice flour, stirring all the while. Cook until the pudding begins to thicken and a whisk leaves tracks in the mixture. Spread evenly on a baking sheet to cool.

FOR THE CRUST  cup panko breadcrumbs 1 1 cup unseasoned standard breadcrumbs n  1 cup walnuts, chopped n  1 cup almonds, chopped n  1 ½ cups (3 sticks) unsalted butter, melted n  1 Tbs. vanilla extract n  ½ tsp. ground cinnamon

TO MAKE THE CRUST: In a large bowl, combine the panko breadcrumbs, walnuts and almonds. Add the melted butter, vanilla and cinnamon, working the mixture with your hands. Spread half of the bread-crumb mixture over the bottom of the prepared pan. Using a spatula, pack it down evenly and firmly. Spread the pudding mixture over the top, then spread the jam over the pudding. Sprinkle the remaining bread mixture on top of the jam and press it down.

FINISHING TOUCHES

Bake until the crust is golden brown. Pour the simple syrup over the top and let it cool for a few minutes. To serve, cut into squares. The kshtaleia can be served cold too. To store, cover the pan with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator, where it will keep for up to 1 week.

n n

 cup jam of your choice 1 n  1 cup blossom-scented simple syrup n

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{ TASTES }

BUTTER COOKIE SANDWICHES (GRAYBEH) YIELDS: 36 COOKIES

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

 lbs. (4 sticks) unsalted butter, 1 at room temperature n  1 ½ cups confectioners’ sugar n  seeds from 1 vanilla bean n  4 cups all-purpose flour n  1 cup jam or preserves (fig, quince or apricot) n  ½ cup ground pistachios

Put the butter in the bowl of a stand mixer and gradually beat from low to high speed for 3 minutes until light and fluffy. and continue to beat until the mixture is foamy. Beat in the vanilla seeds. Add the flour a little at a time and beat until the dough holds together when pressed between your fingers. Divide the dough in half and pat each half into a disc. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate until firm, about 1 hour.

n

Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease two large baking sheets or line with parchment paper. On a slightly floured surface, roll one disc of dough to a thickness of ¼ inch. Cut out circles using a 2-inch round cookie cutter. Gather the scraps, roll out, cut and repeat until you’ve used all of the dough. Transfer to one of the prepared baking sheets and place in the refrigerator to chill for 30 minutes. Repeat the rolling and cutting process with the remaining disc of dough. Then use a smaller (no bigger than 1 inch) cookie cutter or the wide end of a piping tip to make a cutout in the center of each circle. (Discard the small cutout pieces.) Transfer the circles to the second prepared baking sheet and place in the refrigerator to chill for 30 minutes. Place both baking sheets in the oven and bake for 8 to 10 minutes, until the edges of the cookies are just beginning to brown. Let the cookies cool for 5 minutes on the sheets, then roll in ground pistachios if desired and transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. To make the sandwiches, turn the cookies without the holes flat side up, and gently spread each with 1 teaspoon of jam. Top with the cutout cookies, flat side down. Store in airtight containers for up to 1 week.

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{ TASTES }

TRIPLE ALMOND CAKE YIELDS: 12 SERVINGS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

 utter and all-purpose flour, for b the pan n  20 oz. almond paste, homemade (see below) or store-bought n   2½ sticks unsalted butter, at room temperature n  6 large eggs n  3 Tbs. rosewater n  2 cups almond flour n  2½ Tbs. baking powder n  1 cup granulated sugar n  pinch of sea salt n  zest of 1 lemon n  sliced almonds and confectioners’ sugar, for serving

TO MAKE THE ALMOND PASTE: In a food processor, process the almonds until ground and clumpy. Add the honey and vanilla as well as the Amaretto and Frangelico, if using. Process until the mixture is the consistency of dough. You can make the almond paste in advance; it will keep, covered in the refrigerator, for up to one week.

n

FOR THE ALMOND PASTE  0 oz. blanched slivered or 2 whole raw almonds n  6 Tbs. honey n  2 Tbs. vanilla extract n   1 Tbs. Amaretto liqueur (optional) n  1 Tbs. Frangelico liqueur (optional) n

TO MAKE THE ALMOND CAKE: Preheat the oven to 300°F. Grease a Bundt pan and dust lightly with flour, shaking out any excess. Place half of the almond paste in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Add the butter and mix for 3 minutes or until it becomes foamy. Carefully add the eggs one at a time as you mix. Add the rosewater and beat until fluffy, about 3 to 5 minutes. In another bowl, whisk together the almond flour, baking powder, granulated sugar, salt and lemon zest. Gradually add these dry ingredients to the butter mixture and mix for 5 minutes. Pour half of the batter into the prepared pan. Evenly top with the remaining half of the almond paste by breaking off bits and scattering them over the batter (they will sink into the batter). Top with the rest of the batter. Bake for about 1 hour, until the cake springs back when pressed. Remove the cake from the oven and let it cool in the pan for a few minutes. Run a thin knife around the edge of the cake to make sure it has released from the pan, then flip it onto a plate. Let the cake cool completely. Serve at room temperature, sprinkled with sliced almonds and dusted with confectioners’ sugar.

Recipe and photo are reprinted with permission from Levant by Rawia Bishara. Photos by Con Poulos. © Kyle Books.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

HELP FOR

HERNIAS

A FORMER FIREFIGHTER ENJOYS AN ACTIVE RETIREMENT AFTER LOSING 70 POUNDS AND HAVING HERNIA SURGERY.

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RECURRENT HERNIAS prevented Dan Allen, 62, from doing the things he loved— working on his farm, tinkering with cars and hitting the ski slopes with friends. With each hernia, the retired firefighter says he gained weight, adding to his already large frame. “I couldn’t bend at the waist without discomfort,” says Dan, whose highest weight was 260. “I had to get down on one knee to tie my shoe.” Dan’s first hernia appeared in 2009 as a bulge on his stomach. His primary care physician referred him to general surgeon Bryan Ellis, DO, who found that Dan had an umbilical hernia—a weakness in the abdominal muscles in and around the belly button. Umbilical hernias are most common in women during and after pregnancy, but also affect people who are overweight. If left untreated, they can cause serious illness. “The hernia had become big and was incarcerated—trapped by fat in the belly button,” says Dr. Ellis, who repaired the hernia surgically and added mesh reinforcement. A second hernia appeared in 2013, requiring another surgery. In 2016, the hernia was back, and Dan returned to Dr. Ellis, now with the TriHealth Comprehensive Hernia Center. Dan’s obesity and lack of conditioning, coupled with his prediabetes, contributed to the hernia recurrences. “Excess weight increases the pressure on the abdominal muscles and makes them weaker and more prone to developing hernias,” explains Dr. Ellis. In addition, Dan, a former smoker, had been diagnosed in the past with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, another risk factor for hernia repair failure.

BENEFITS OF WEIGHT LOSS Dan was forced to retire early after 30 years as an industrial firefighter for General Electric. “I was in a lot of pain,” he explains. “Putting the hazmat suit and

Bryan Ellis, DO

Nina C Gray, MD

fire gear on and off and climbing up and down ladders was taking its toll.” During his consult with Dr. Ellis about a third surgery, the conversation took a life-changing turn. “Dr. Ellis sat me down and said, ‘If you lose weight, your health will improve. The next surgery will be more successful and your recovery easier,’” Dan recalls. “I told him I wanted to ski Snow Shoe Mountain in West Virginia and he promised I’d get there.” Dan was referred to TriHealth’s Weight Management Center’s Nina Gray, a bariatrician specializing in non-surgical weight loss. The two discussed the reasons behind Dan’s weight gain and reviewed his diet and lifestyle. They decided a lowcarbohydrate/high-protein diet was the best approach. “Though the goal was to lose weight for surgery, we wanted to create a program that Dan liked for life—so the weight would stay off. His diet is now leaner, filled with fruits and vegetables and low on unhealthy processed foods,” explains Dr. Gray. Dan says he learned to make better food choices. He still can have red meat, though it’s a leaner cut now. And he has switched his occasional beer to one lower in carbohydrates and calories.

FINDING BALANCE Dr. Gray approaches weight loss as she would a chronic medical condition, individualizing prevention and management strategies and meeting regularly with patients. The key is to balance exercise and nutrition. At the TriHealth Fitness & Health Pavilion, where Dan received his weightloss consultations, patients have access to medically based exercise, rehabilitation and education programs. For Dan, manual chores on his farm in Fayetteville were his workouts of choice. He also followed a series of abdominal strengthening exercises. When he returned to TriHealth’s Comprehensive Hernia Center one year later, Dr. Ellis did a double take. “He showed up in my office 70 pounds lighter,” says Dr. Ellis. In December 2017, Dan underwent hernia surgery at TriHealth’s Bethesda North Hospital. Dr. Ellis performed a standard open surgical procedure called RivesStoppa repair with retrorectus mesh. “There were challenges due to scar tissue and weakened tissue from previous hernias,” he says. Two months after surgery, Dan was on the ski slopes. “The weight loss and hernia repair made a phenomenal difference in my

maneuverability,” recalls Dan, now also free of blood-pressure medication. He calls his energy level “tremendous” and says his wife has benefited from his lifestyle changes as well. “She’s lost 45 pounds.” Dan is grateful for the care he received at TriHealth and approaches each day with renewed zeal. “My doctors opened doors for me—I can do everything I want now,” says Dan, excited to ride his horse again. “Nothing holds me back.”

TRIHEALTH COMPREHENSIVE HERNIA CENTER Board-certified surgeons perform 1,000 repairs annually for all types of hernias, using traditional open and minimally invasive surgical methods. They are volume leaders in robotic surgery. Located within the TriHealth Fitness & Health Pavilion, the Comprehensive Hernia Center is the only hernia center in the Midwest to offer preoperative and postoperative conditioning and surgical consultation under one roof: • Medical and surgical weight management • Nutrition counseling • Personal training • Physical therapy • Fitness classes • Smoking cessation and diabetes programs TriHealth is part of the American Hernia Society Quality Collaborative data registry to improve patient care. TriHealth ranks below the national average in hernia recurrence, infection and readmission rates.

TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH A SURGEON IN THE COMPREHENSIVE HERNIA CENTER, CALL 513 246 9025. TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT AT THE WEIGHT MANAGEMENT CENTER, CALL 513 862 4957. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE TRIHEALTH FITNESS & HEALTH PAVILION, CALL 513 985 0900. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | WINTER 2019

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{ ESCAPES }

ESCAPE TO PORTUGAL

WITH ITS VIBRANT CITIES, MEDIEVAL HISTORY, BEAUTIFUL ARCHITECTURE, FABULOUS FOOD AND SOME OF THE MOST EXQUISITE BEACHES IN ALL OF EUROPE, PORTUGAL IS THE PLACE TO GO. PORTUGAL, ONE OF EUROPE’S FINEST GEMS, has become a hot destination—and not just because of its year-round mild climate. The country’s welcoming people, nine centuries of history, fabulous food and wine, gorgeous architecture and natural sights all add up to a vacation that offers something for everyone. It’s no wonder that Portugal tops many bucket lists. Since this vibrant country is relatively small—about the size of Indiana—you can explore a lot in one trip. It’s also a mecca for foodies. Boasting the largest exclusive fishing zone in Europe, seafood is fresh, plentiful and affordable. Local cuisine is vegetarianfriendly as well, offering hearty soups, stews and locally grown fruits and vegetables. Here are some of our favorite spots in Portugal….

Rabelo boats on the Douro River in the coastal city of Porto, famous for its port wine and lively Ribeira district, made up of medieval streets, colorful ancient houses and dozens of cafés and restaurants. The iconic Dom Luís I Bridge is in the background.

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{ ESCAPES }

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At left, Belém Tower, also known as the Tower of St. Vincent, stands guard on the bank of the Tagus River in Lisbon. The photo above shows Azenhas do Mar, a picturesque coastal town. Below, a fairy-tale corridor beckons in Monserrate Palace, one of the wonders of Sintra.

LISBON The elegant coastal city of Lisbon, Portugal’s capital, is home to white domed cathedrals, brightly tiled buildings and some of the country’s most famous sights. Those include a Gothic monument from the 1500s that guards the entrance to the very harbor from which Vasco da Gama, Magellan and Columbus all set sail. Other can’t-miss destinations include the historic neighborhood of Alfama, which dates back to the Moors, with its narrow cobblestone streets and indescribable charm; Águas Livres Aqueduct, a majestic 18th-century example of Portuguese engineering; St. George’s Castle, with phenomenal views of the city; and the Monastery of St. Jerome, with its highly ornate architecture. Lisbon also proudly boasts a wealth of excellent museums, including the world-renowned Calouste Gulbenkian Museum and the National Tile Museum. Sightsee via the iconic yellow trams that traverse the hilly streets of the city, and indulge in pastel de nata, the infamous Portuguese custard tart. Lisbon is a remarkable city that will entrance you with its sights, sounds and flavors.

SINTRA Located about 20 miles northwest of Lisbon is the picturesque, hilly resort town of Sintra, dotted with pastel-colored villas, historical palaces and ancient mansions. This fairy tale-like city is a UNESCO World Heritage site and is a must-see, full of lush vegetation and cobblestone streets. continued... CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | WINTER 2019

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Praia da Marinha (above) is a stunning beach in the Algarve region. Portugal is known for top-quality canned seafood; at left, mussels bask in escabeche, a spicy oil and vinegar marinade. Barrels of Porto wine (below) age in a traditional stone cellar. Opposite, Porto’s Douro River is glimpsed through an arch in the 14th-century Fernandina wall.

PORTO Even farther up the coast in northwest Portugal is the magical city of Porto. The region is famed for the production of port wine, which is still stored and matured in cellars that stretch along the banks of the Douro River. Here, it’s all about having fun in the charming Ribeira district, another UNESCO World Heritage site, where cafés, bars and restaurants line the colorful cobblestone streets. Stroll across the iconic Dom Luís I Bridge, go for a wine tour or tasting at Vila Nova de Gaia, and discover incredible gilt carvings at the Church of St. Francis, which dates back to 1245. Harry Potter fans won’t want to miss the Livraria Lello, a bookshop with stunning architecture that served as the inspiration for Hogwarts—J.K. Rowling was actually a customer here when she was teaching English in Porto in the 1990s.

ALGARVE REGION For Portugal’s most celebrated beaches—adorned with golden sand, crystal-clear water, rock cliffs, and mystical caves—travel to the southernmost region called the Algarve. While still relatively unspoiled, here’s where you’ll find luxury oceanfront hotels, Michelin-starred restaurants, chic spas, thermal baths and internationally acclaimed golf resorts. With more than 150 beaches to choose from, it’s the perfect place to unwind after days of touring up north.

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{ ESCAPES }

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{ WHERE TO EAT }

AMERICAN

ARNOLD’S BAR AND GRILL The city’s oldest bar, featuring traditional American comfort food and a wide beer selection, 210 E. 8th St., 513.421.6234 BJ’S RESTAURANT AND BREWHOUSE Handcrafted burgers and deep-dish pizzas with beers brewed on-site, 11700 Princeton Pike, Unit J1A, 513.671.1805 CHARLEY’S STEAKERY Serving quality Philly steaks for more than 25 years, Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty Township, 513.755.1626 THE CHEESECAKE FACTORY Inventive American cuisine with an extensive dessert menu focusing on cheesecake, Liberty Center, 7612 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.755.2761 THE EAGLE FOOD AND BEER HALL Southern comfort food and beer hall, 1342 Vine St., 513.802.5007 FLIP SIDE BURGER & BAR Burger, shake and craft beer concept featuring Ohio grass-fed beef and free-range chicken, Liberty Center, 7622 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.777.6328 THE GOLDEN LAMB Comfort food that may just be worth the half-hour trek to Lebanon, 27 S. Broadway, 513.932.5065 HOLY GRAIL TAVERN & GRILLE Lively sports bar with casual fare and drink menu, 161 Joe Nuxhall Way, 513.621.2222 INCLINE PUBLIC HOUSE Upscale pub food including NYC-style pizzas served against a stunning view of the city, 2601 W. 8th St., 513.251.3000

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J. AUSTIN’S RIVERBANK CAFE Southern-style specialties like grilled catfish and shrimp po-boys, 102 Main St., Hamilton, 513.795.7640

THE PRESIDENTS ROOM Eclectic menu that blends contemporary American, Italian and German flavors, 812 Race St., 513.721.2260

KRUEGER’S TAVERN Contemporary American bar food with a European influence, 1211 Vine St., 513.834.8670

RED ROOST TAVERN Contemporary American fare with organic, farmto-table ingredients, 151 W. 5th St., 513.579.1234

MELT ECLECTIC CAFE Vegetarian restaurant specializing in sandwiches and meat substitutes, 4165 Hamilton Ave., 513.681.6358 METROPOLE Contemporary dishes cooked in a wood-burning fireplace, 609 Walnut St., 513.578.6660 MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET Specializing in off-the-boat-fresh fish, 9456 Water Front Dr., West Chester, 513.779.5292 NORTHSTAR CAFE Hearty, healthy American fare with a renowned brunch service, Liberty Center, 7610 Sloan Way, Liberty Township, 513.759.0033 ORCHIDS AT PALM COURT Contemporary American food at Hilton’s well-established fine-dining restaurant, 35 W. Fifth St., 513.421.9100 THE ORIGINAL MONTGOMERY INN Cincy staple well-known for its BBQ ribs, 9440 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, 513.791.3482 PALACE RESTAURANT Inventive finedining establishment located inside the historic Cincinnatian Hotel, 601 Vine St., 513.381.3000 PAXTON’S GRILL Relaxed, friendly spot housed in one of Loveland’s oldest buildings, 126 W. Loveland Ave., Loveland, 513.583.1717 PIES & PINTS Authentic craft pizza and beer establishment featuring bar food, Liberty Center, 7621 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.755.7437

RICK’S TAVERN & GRILLE Friendly neighborhood drinkery serving up pub grub amid 50 flat-screen TVs, 5955 Boymel Dr., Fairfield, 513.874.1992 THE RUSTY BUCKET Relaxed, family-friendly neighborhood tavern, Liberty Center, 7524 Bales St., Liberty Township, 513.463.2600 SALAZAR Casual contemporary American fare with farm-inspired lunch and dinner menus, 1401 Republic St., 513.621.7000 SENATE RESTAURANT Casual contemporary American eatery specializing in upscale hot dogs, 1212 Vine St., 513.421.2020 SKYLINE CHILI It’s a Cincy staple, famous for its chili served as Cheese Coneys and 3-Ways, multiple locations including 10792 Montgomery Rd., 513.489.4404 SLATTS Relaxed neighborhood pub with plenty of plasma TVs for watching the game, 4858 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, 513.791.2223 STONE CREEK DINING COMPANY A varied menu of sandwiches, salads, seafood and steaks, multiple locations including 9386 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, 513.489.1444 and 6200 Muhlhauser Rd., West Chester, 513.942.2100

TANO BISTRO & CATERING Contemporary bistro in historic Loveland, featuring fresh ingredients and a menu that changes with the seasons, 204 W. Loveland Ave., 513.683.8266 TERRY’S TURF CLUB Laid-back burger joint with large portions and vegetarian options, 4618 Eastern Ave., 513.533.4222 TOM + CHEE Specializes in tomato soup and grilled cheese, multiple locations including 9328 Union Centre Blvd., West Chester, 513.860.0638 THE WILDFLOWER CAFE Farmto-table fare served in a converted century-old farmhouse, 207 E. Main St., Mason, 513.492.7514

BBQ

MIDWEST BEST BBQ & CREAMERY BBQ joint and ice cream parlor launched by the popular local BBQ sauce and rub company, 7832 Glendale-Milford Rd., Camp Dennison, 513.965.9000 MONTGOMERY INN BOATHOUSE Ribs, burgers and other BBQ specialties, 925 Riverside Dr., 513.721.7427 SMOQ Southern BBQ soul food cooked low and slow, including ribs, brisket and pulled pork, 275 Pictoria Dr., Springdale, 513.671.7667

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FRENCH

MEXICAN

LAROSA’S PIZZERIA Casual pizza joint serving the area for more than 60 years, multiple locations

TASTE OF BELGIUM Waffles and crepes (both sweet and savory) at this local favorite, multiple locations including 1133 Vine St., 513.381.4607

CHUY’S Eclectic Tex-Mex eatery featuring handmade tortillas, 7980 Hosbrook Rd., 513.793.2489

RICHARDS PIZZA Local chain serving up pies since 1955, multiple locations including the original at 417 Main St., Hamilton, 513.894.3296

JEAN-ROBERT’S TABLE Exquisite French cuisine with a weekly changing lunch menu, 713 Vine St., 513.621.4777

GREEK/ MEDITERRANEAN

ABIGAIL STREET Inventive cuisine with cheese menu and wine on tap in a trendy but casual setting, 1214 Vine St., 513.421.4040 DURUM GRILL Small, casual gyro eatery loved by the locals, 4764 Cornell Rd., 513.489.4777 PALOMINO Offering a mix of Mediterranean and contemporary American cuisine with a view of Fountain Square, 505 Vine St., 513.381.1300 PHOENICIAN TAVERNA Mediterranean cuisine in a trendy but casual setting, 7944 S. Mason Montgomery Rd., Mason, 513.770.0027 RAYA’S LEBANESE Mediterranean food, specializing in kabobs and gyros, 801 Elm St., 513.421.0049 ZULA Eclectic menu of Greek tapas dishes and extensive wine and craft beer lists, 1400 Race St., 513.744.9852

ITALIAN

BOCA French and Italian dishes, NYCstyle pizzas and a gluten-free menu, 114 E. 6th St., 513.542.2022 BRIO TUSCAN GRILLE Serving high-quality steaks, housemade pasta and flatbreads prepared in an authentic Italian oven, Liberty Center, 7600 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.759.4500 BRAVO CUCINA ITALIANA Upscalecasual chain serving Italian classics with a twist amid Roman-ruin decor, multiple locations including 5045 Deerfield Blvd., Mason, 513.234.7900, and 9436 Waterfront Dr., West Chester, 513.759.9398 NICOLA’S RISTORANTE Italian cuisine featuring fresh pastas and an extensive wine list, 1420 Sycamore St., 513.721.6200 PITRELLI’S A true mom-and-pop dining experience with cuisine from several regions of Italy, 404 2nd Ave., Mason, 513.770.0122 PRIMAVISTA Traditional Italian entrees with wine menu and a view of the city, 810 Matson Pl., 513.251.6467 SOTTO Trendy Italian restaurant serving small plates and handmade pastas, 118 E. 6th St., 513.977.6886 VIA VITE Casual dining of stone-fired pizza and fresh pastas with alfresco courtyard seating, 520 Vine St., 513.721.8483

BAKERSFIELD Authentic Mexican street food with extensive tequila and whiskey menus, 1213 Vine St., 513.579.0446

EL PUEBLO Authentic Mexican fare made from secret family recipes, 4270 Hunt Rd., Blue Ash, 513.791.4405 JEFFERSON SOCIAL Upscale Mexican fare with extensive cocktail weekend, 101 E. Freedom Way, 513.381.2623 MAZUNTE TAQUERIA MEXICANA Casual Mexican eatery with trendy, festive decor, 5207 Madison Rd., 513.785.0000 NADA Trendy Mexican cantina serving creative cocktails and modern twists on traditional south-of-the-border favorites, 600 Walnut St., 513.721.6232 QDOBA Casual Mexican grill featuring fresh, handcrafted meals, 2721 Edmonson Rd., 513.351.2269; Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty Township, 513.755.0486; Mason, 5030 Deerfield Blvd., 513.770.0301; Blue Ash, 9749 Kenwood Rd., 513.984.2629; Florence, 7683 Mall Rd., Florence, KY, 859.647.0296

PIZZA

DELICIO COAL-FIRED PIZZA An artisan pizzeria that fuses rustic Italian traditions with the smoky flavors of the U.S. Southwest, 9321 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, 513.834.5460; Xavier, 3701 Montgomery Rd., 513.834.5460 DEWEY’S PIZZA Specialty pizza pies with seasonal menu, multiple locations including 7663 Cox Ln., West Chester, 513.759.6777 GOODFELLAS PIZZERIA Pizzeria with large slices and late-night hours, 1211 Main St., 513.381.3625

SBARRO Casual eatery serving up New York-style pizza and pastas, Liberty Center, 7100 Foundry Row, Liberty Township, 512.443.8300

STEAK HOUSE

BISTRO ON ELM Located within the Millennium Hotel Cincinnati, this bright spot offers steaks, seafood and pasta, 150 W. 5th St., 513.352.2189 CARLO & JOHNNY Another winner from Jeff Ruby serving prime steaks, seafood options and bountiful sides in an elegant space that was once a stagecoach stop, 9769 Montgomery Rd., 513.936.8600

MOERLEIN LAGER HOUSE Fine-dining establishment and artifact-adorned beer bar with a wonderful view of the river, 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, 513.421.2337 MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE Popular steak house and seafood restaurant overlooking Fountain Square, 441 Vine St., 513.621.3111 PARKERS BLUE ASH TAVERN Elegantly rustic restaurant known for its prime rib and award-winning wine list, 4200 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, 513.891.8300

CELESTIAL STEAKHOUSE Upscale steak house and seafood restaurant with an impressive view, 1071 Celestial St., 513.241.4455

THE PRECINCT The original Jeff Ruby’s location features fine steaks and seafood in a turn-of-the-century setting, 311 Delta Ave., 513.321.5454

JAG’S STEAK & SEAFOOD Surf and turf is served in the dining room or the high-energy piano bar, 5980 West Chester Rd., West Chester Township, 513.860.5353

PRIME 47 Upscale menu featuring prime cuts and a wine vault, 580 Walnut St., 513.579.0720

JEFF RUBY’S STEAKHOUSE Reservations highly recommended at this high-end steak house, 700 Walnut St., Ste. 206, 513.784.1200 MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S Steak house and seafood with extensive bar menu and tapas options, 21 E. 5th St., 513.721.9339

RODIZIO GRILL Brazilian steakhouse serving succulent meats and authentic sides, Liberty Center, 7630 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.777.4777 TONY’S OF CINCINNATI Huge portions of prime beef and the freshest seafood (salad and potato included) are the hallmarks of this steak house from Tony Ricci, 12110 Montgomery Rd., 513.677.1993

SUSHI/ASIAN FARE

ASIAN PARADISE Asian fusion restaurant and lounge offering popular happy-hour specials, 9521 Fields Ertel Rd., Loveland, 513.239.8881 BIBIBOP Healthy Korean meals that include quality proteins, vegetables, gluten-free grains and Asian sauces, Liberty Center, 7616 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.310.6615 FUSIAN Sushi bar with create-your-own rolls, fresh juices and healthy side dishes, 600 Vine St., 513.421.7646 KAZE Trendy sushi and Japanese gastropub featuring a beer garden, 1400 Vine St., 513.898.7991 KONA GRILL Innovative exotic entrees, award-winning sushi and fresh fish, 7524 Gibson St., Liberty Center Mall, Liberty Township, 513.322.5860 MANGO TREE THAI & SUSHI Casual eatery serving fresh, authentic Thai cuisine and sushi, 7229 Wooster Pike, 513.271.0809 QUÁN HAPA Asian fusion and gastropub with trendy setting, 1331 Vine St., 513.421.7826

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angels { GATHERINGS }

CELEBRATION OF

‚ Spencer Cropper, son of Mary Jo Cropper and Bethesda Foundation Board Chair; Anna Frank, Mary Jo’s Angel Award Recipient; Kelli Kolkmeyer, Mary Jo’s Angel Award Recipient; Amy Winkler, daughter of Mary Jo Cropper and Celebration of Angels Committee Member

MORE THAN $480,000 in net revenue was raised at the Celebration of Angels event hosted by the Bethesda Foundation! Proceeds will help support the purchase of a new mobile mammography van and updated technology to make breast exams accessible to everyone in our community.  Nearly 400 guests joined the Bethesda Foundation for a dinner at the Manor House to honor Mary Jo Cropper and the Angel recipients who mirror her kindness and compassion. Angel recipients Kelli Kolkmeyer and Anna Frank were honored for their strength as cancer survivors themselves, but also for the care and compassion they have provided to others battling cancer. Following the live auction of the event, Susan Weinberg, MD, announced that the Good Samaritan Foundation will also be matching the Bethesda Foundation’s support to help with the purchase of the van!   FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT BETHESDAFOUNDATION.COM

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HIKE for HOSPICE NEARLY 1,000 WALKERS and runners came out to support Hospice at this year’s Hike for Hospice of Cincinnati & Hamilton! Runners, walkers and volunteers enjoyed friends and fellowship as they came together to walk in memory of friends and family who received care from Hospice of Cincinnati or Hospice of Hamilton. Proceeds will ensure both Hospice organizations can continue to provide the best possible, most meaningful end-of-life experience for all who need care and support in our community.

 Hospice of Cincinnati Team Members Janet Montgomery, Terri Ellsworth and Nan Zupanic „ Proud supporters of Hospice of Cincinnati

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{ BE THERE }

Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour: February 27

Let’s face it—just about everybody loves the guitar. Whether you play one, or you always wished you did, or you just love to watch other people play it, there’s no instrument in American culture that’s more iconic. But the history of the guitar goes back centuries and spreads all over the world. That’s just one of the things you’ll discover at the Cincinnati Museum Center exhibition GUITAR: THE INSTRUMENT THAT ROCKED THE WORLD. Besides chronicling the instrument’s predecessors going all the way back to the Nile Valley’s nyatiti in 3000 BCE, the exhibition features interactive encounters with the guitar’s inner workings, videos and, of course, the chance to pick up the axe for yourself. See cincymuseum.org/guitar for info.

THROUGH JANUARY 6 Plenty of people out there consider chocolate to be the best reason for having taste buds. But even though the delectable substance is a worldwide obsession, how much do you actually know about it? After 46

a visit to CHOCOLATE: THE EXHIBITION you’re sure to learn plenty, like the part chocolate has played in history throughout the centuries, how it’s made, how many different kinds are made and how it has been presented to the public. Show up on the right day (check the schedule) and you’ll even be able to experience a delicious chocolate tasting with the Cincinnati State Midwest Culinary Institute. Get set by going to cincymuseum.org/chocolate.

DECEMBER 5–7 However much we might wish it were possible, we’ll never get to hear the legendary Nat “King” Cole perform live on stage, but we can still experience the next best thing. Singer/actor Evan Tyrone Martin from Chicago has taken it upon himself to bring the spirit, the soul and the sound of Cole to the concert stage for the generations that weren’t lucky enough to experience the magic firsthand. The highly acclaimed Martin doesn’t merely offer up an imitation, he becomes Cole, inhabiting classic tunes from the Cole catalog like “Mona Lisa,” “The

Christmas Song” and more with an uncanny vocal presence. Get the lowdown on the show at cincinnatiarts.org/events/detail/nkc.

DECEMBER 21–23 OVER THE RHINE (the group, not the neighborhood) has been a national name and its members local heroes since the ‘90s, with husband-and-wife team Linford Detweiler and Karin Bergquist crafting a distinctive Americana sound. And one part of their unique musical personality is their passion for holiday tunes. Over the years they’ve put out three seasonal releases, sometimes featuring classic Christmas songs and sometimes consisting of newly written material. And for the last couple of decades, they’ve been bringing some of those songs to the stage for a special holiday concert every December. They’ll be bringing AN ACOUSTIC CHRISTMAS home to the Memorial Hall for three very special nights. For more, see memorialhallotr. com/cincinnati-shows/an-acousticchristmas-with-over-the-rhine.

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM / GETTYIMAGES.COM

THROUGH JANUARY 6

Cincy Winter Beerfest: February 2–3

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DECEMBER 8 When you get right down to it, there are two kinds of people in this world: those who dress their pets up and those who don’t. And when the MOUNT ADAMS REINDOG PARADE takes place, the streets will be overrun by those that do…and they’ll be bringing their dogs. But this isn’t your average, everyday sort of animal dress-up we’re talking about. In the spirit of the yuletide season, the participants in the parade will be draping their dogs in all sorts of holiday themes, whether they make their mutts up to look like Santa Claus, a reindeer, a wrapped present or anything else that seems apropos. Celebrity and sponsor judges will be on hand to pick the prizewinners, and there’ll be food and beverages available whether you’re parading your pooch or just having fun watching. To learn more, take a walk over to spcacincinnati.org/events

JANUARY 10–27

Chicago’s SECOND CITY comedy troupe has been making America laugh since 1959, staging live performances with one generation after another of comedians who would come to national renown. Stephen Colbert, Dan Aykroyd, Bill Murray, John Candy and Tina Fey are just a few of the countless comic talents who got their start with Second City. The group is still going strong today, and bringing a new show to the Shelterhouse Theatre. IT’S NOT YOU, IT’S ME takes a gut-busting look at the way romance plays itself out in modern relationships, exploring love in all its glorious absurdity. Get the details at cincyplay.com/ productions/the-second-cityit’s-not-you-it’s-me.

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM / GETTYIMAGES.COM

JANUARY 13 Before the rise of JEFF DUNHAM, it would have been impossible to imagine an entire arena full of people gathered to see a ventriloquist work with his puppets. But the phenomenal success of Dunham’s brand of comedy

has reshaped our ideas about such things. With his hilarious cast of characters including Peanut, Walter, Bubba J and more, Dunham has become a comic institution and set multiple attendance records with his shows along the way. He’ll be heading to the BB&T Arena for his PASSIVELY AGGRESSIVE tour, but rest assured he won’t be alone— he’ll be bringing all his aforementioned cohorts with him to make for an evening of endless laughter. See thebbtarena.com/eventsand-tickets/event-details/ Jeff-Dunham.

FEBRUARY 2–3 For two days in February, the Duke Energy Convention Center will become one of the brightest spots on the map when it hosts the CINCY WINTER BEERFEST. Craft beer lovers will be coming from far and wide to sample hundreds of different examples of the brewing arts, enjoy lots of live music, snap up tasty snacks and commune with their fellow suds connoisseurs. More than 150 breweries will represent their output in

the biggest party of the winter when the 11th annual Cincy Beerfest arrives. Get in the loop by visiting cincybeerfest.com/winter/.

Chocolate: The Exhibition: Through January 6

FEBRUARY 10 They call JOHN MELLENCAMP the king of heartland rock, and he’s been bringing his gritty, organic brand of infectious rock ‘n’ roll riffs, raw emotion and sharply observed lyrics from the Midwest to the rest of the nation since becoming a rock hero in the ‘80s. He’s ventured down various musical roads over the years, but he’s never departed from his primary mission of crafting tunes that resound with the reality of American life. From “Jack and Diane” to “Pink Houses” and “Small Town,” he’s created a classic catalog of tunes over the years, and he’ll be bringing them along with him when he hits the Aronoff Center for THE JOHN MELLENCAMP SHOW. For ticket info: cincinnatiarts.org/ events/detail/mellencamp.

FEBRUARY 27 There will never be another like ELTON JOHN, the iconic pop superstar who raised the art of

the singer/songwriter to new levels with ‘70s smashes like “Your Song,” “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road,” “Someone Saved My Life Tonight” and scads of others. The British songsmith remains a vital force, but at 71 he’s apparently reached a point in his career where it’s time to stop touring. So he’s closing out his time as a touring musician with a giant global trek that will take him all the way into 2021. His FAREWELL YELLOW BRICK ROAD TOUR is a fond goodbye to his fans that will leave them with a last loving memory of his live prowess, and it stops at the US Bank Arena for an unforgettable night: usbankarena.com/ event/2019/02/elton-johnfarewell-yellow-brick-roadtour.

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{ POWER FOOD }

SQUASH

FOR EVERY SEASON RICH IN HISTORY AND NUTRITION, SQUASH OF ALL KINDS PACKS PLENTY OF ANTIOXIDANTS—AND GOOD TASTE. DID YOU KNOW? Squash’s history in the U.S. predates European settlement by thousands of years. Originating in Central America and Mexico, it was a staple for Native Americans for more than 5,000 years. Europeans were introduced to squash during their explorations of North and South America. Today, Florida, Michigan and California lead the country in squash production.

POWERS There are a variety of health benefits attributed to squash, which is typically grouped into two categories: winter squash (such varieties as acorn, pumpkin and butternut squash) and summer squash (which include zucchini and yellow crookneck squash). Summer squash is more tender and has a thinner, edible rind. Both types are high in Vitamins A and C, powerful antioxidants. They’re also chock-full of carotenoids, particularly lutein and zeaxanthin, which have been recognized for reducing the risk of chronic eye diseases, like age-related macular degeneration and cataracts, and for their anti-inflammatory properties, which may be beneficial to both the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Recent studies also suggest that the polysaccharides found in squash, which come from its high carbohydrate content, may help protect against diabetes and aid in insulin regulation.

BUY | STORE | GROW The main difference between summer and winter squash is the stage of maturity at which it’s harvested. Summer varieties 48

are harvested while immature and tender, while winter varieties are allowed to harden. Choose winter squash that have dull, hard rinds. Available now through March, winter squash can last anywhere from one week to six months, depending on the type. They should be stored in a cool, dry place. Refrigeration is only recommended once the squash is cut, otherwise the humidity will cause deterioration. When shopping for summer squash, which are available year-round, inspect the rind and opt for those that have a sheen and are blemish-free. Store summer varieties in an airtight container in the fridge for up to seven days, and avoid washing them until you’re ready to use them. Should you choose to grow your own squash next year, methods will vary depending on the kind you want to cultivate. In general, squash need considerable growing space, lots of sun and good drainage. Usually, the plants are prolific producers, so you’ll have plenty to use and share. Summer squash can be harvested when they’re young—no more than 6 to 8 inches long. Winter squash are harvested when fully mature, at the end of the growing season.

TASTY TREAT Squash seeds make a nutritious snack. Remove the seeds from a winter squash (pumpkins, butternut or acorn work well). Rinse them with water and remove strings and squash remnants. Pat dry and place 1 cup seeds in a small bowl. Stir in 1 tablespoon of olive oil and ½ teaspoon salt (or to taste), until evenly coated. Spread evenly on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake at 275 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes, or until the seeds start to pop. Remove from oven and cool before serving. Enjoy!

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Memories are the one gift you give to yourself.

Elevate your stay with an intimate place to belong beyond your hotel room. The Ritz-Carlton Club Level is an exclusive space with unique amenities and services where guests enjoy fine culinary presentations ideal for families and business travelers. ritzcarlton.com/resortsofnaples

NAPLES____________ NAPLES GOLF__________

2017 The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C.

Š

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Cincinnati Health & Life: Winter 19  

The Good Living Magazine from TRIHEALTH

Cincinnati Health & Life: Winter 19  

The Good Living Magazine from TRIHEALTH