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T R I H E A LT H

S U M M E R 2 0 17 THE GOOD LIVING MAGA ZINE

REMOVING BARRIERS TO CONCEPTION WATER GARDENS VENICE AT TWILIGHT GETTING AHEAD OF CANCER

ALL ABOUT GENETIC TESTING NEW FIBROID CENTER

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SUMMER 2017 | $3.95 | TRIHEALTH.COM

C I N C I N N AT I H E A LT H & L I F E

CINCINNATI T H E

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{ CONTENTS }

FEATURES 13

NEW OB SPACES AT GOOD SAMARITAN

Maternity areas at the region’s premier provider of obstetric care are getting a top-to-bottom makeover.

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REMOVING CONCEPTION BARRIERS

The majority of couples who have difficulty getting pregnant can be helped without complex interventions.

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FIBROIDS: STATE-OF-THE-ART CARE

A new program at Bethesda Butler Hospital will offer a full range of treatment options for fibroids and other gynecologic problems.

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MAKING A SPLASH

Create the oasis you’re yearning for with a backyard water garden.

32 I N E V ERY I S S UE

4 6 4 2 4 6

GETTING AHEAD OF CANCER How genetic testing helps save lives.

W E LC O M E L E T T E R E D I TO R’S N OT E W H E R E TO E AT BE THERE

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{ CONTENTS }

36 20 DEPARTMENTS 10

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Our guide to new ideas, tips, trends and things we love in or near Hamilton County.

Twilight in Venice brings a magic that daytime tourists miss.

LOCAL BUZZ

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TAKE IT OUTSIDE

This summer, take advantage of the health benefits of outdoor exercise.

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TASTES

Dress up any occasion with these updated takes on filet mignon and lamb chops.

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ESCAPES

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GATHERINGS

Photos from recent events in Hamilton County.

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POWER FOOD

Asparagus: loaded with nutrients, tasty and easy to prepare.

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{ WELCOME LETTER }

CARE BEYOND COMPARE

World-class expertise.

Compassionate care. When it comes to complex surgeries, no one else comes close. We have world-class expertise in robotic surgery right here in Cincinnati. TriHealth surgeons perform procedures so advanced that doctors from around the world come to us for training. This leadership and knowledge creates the right plan for you—a plan that cuts down on recovery time and gets you back to the life you love.

To learn more about your surgical options,

visit TriHealth.com/robotics or call 513 569 5070

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At TriHealth, our mission is to improve the health of the people we serve, not just in a moment, but throughout a lifetime. To do so, we’re committed to building deep, lasting relationships with our patients and customers that are earned by consistently exceeding expectations for care quality, personal service, value and convenience. In fact, we’re so passionate about this commitment, we’ve recently launched a system-wide learning and development initiative to ensure that every individual we serve across our more than 140 sites of care is treated to our signature service experience. All 12,000+ TriHealth team members are receiving specialized customer-service training and support to equip them with the skills and know-how to consistently delight and surprise every patient, customer and fellow team member—at every interaction—with an experience that is second to none. Additionally, we’re expanding the range and location of services we offer to make it even more convenient to receive the best care possible close to home. Later this year, we’ll be unveiling a new ambulatory surgery center in Liberty Township. Plans are also underway to build a 50,000-square-foot, state-ofthe-art ambulatory surgery center in Anderson Township, due to be completed in 2019. And we’re expanding our Good Samaritan Western Ridge location to include Cancer Care, Women’s Services and Cardiology Care. Speaking of specialized services, our commitment to grow our clinical services has never been stronger. We’re making targeted investments to establish best-in-class regional centers of excellence for Cancer, Neurosciences, Cardiology and Women’s Health. Recent highlights include: • A new partnership with Mayfield Clinic to establish a Neurosciences Service Line with a one-of-a-kind brain-tumor and skull-based surgery program at Good Samaritan Hospital. • A five-year, multimillion-dollar facility expansion of our Bethesda North Comprehensive Care Center to offer full-service, on-site Cancer Care. • The extensive modernization of our Good Samaritan Hospital Women’s Health/Maternity Unit, which will ensure that every patient is cared for in a modern, private room, 100 percent of the time! You can read more about this on page 13. At every stage of life, and in every state of health, TriHealth is committed to being your preferred healthcare partner. We are privileged to serve you and look forward to doing even more in the years ahead to get healthcare right for our greater Cincinnati community.

MARK C. CLEMENT PRESIDENT AND CEO, TRIHEALTH INC.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT TRIHEALTH, VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT TRIHEALTH.COM.

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{ EDITOR’S NOTE }

STRIVING TO BE THE BEST

Every stage. Every step. Every milestone. We provide the best care possible for every moment of your life. No matter where you are in your health care journey, TriHealth is committed to providing expertise, care and support unique to your needs. From obstetrics and gynecology to urology and reproductive endocrinology, our dedicated Women’s Services physicians are with you at every stage of your life.

In the late spring and early summer, we celebrate parenthood: one day each for mothers and fathers. I recall asking my dad, “Why isn’t there a children’s day?” To which he, like countless fathers before him, replied: “Every day is children’s day.” That’s true in many ways. But it’s also true that every day is parents’ day. In between the clean-ups, the enforcing of rules and the refereeing of disputes, there are so many everyday moments of joy. The surprise hugs and sloppy kisses; the boundless laughter of childhood; the thoughtful moments of learning. And so we’re rewarded for our effort to always be the best parents we can be. Those recent celebrations of parenthood make this a perfect time to share exciting news about renovations to the maternity spaces at Good Samaritan Hospital, which we do on page 13. Upgrades—complete, underway and planned— will make all maternity rooms private, add the latest tech and create more efficient work areas for staff. Always striving to be the best health-care provider it can be, TriHealth currently is focused on more than maternity care. On page 24, learn about a new center for women’s gynecologic conditions that offers the latest in minimally invasive procedures. On page 32, we explain genetic testing and highlight a new multispecialty clinic—the only one of its kind in the Cincinnati area—created to help ensure that patients who have genetic mutations that put them at risk for multiple cancers receive the best possible preventive care. With summer weather comes a renewed focus on being outside, so we tell you about the advantages of exercising outdoors (page 16), and showcase inspiring backyard water gardens (page 26). Whatever you’re striving for this summer, we hope you succeed and that you have many opportunities to enjoy life’s best rewards: friends and family. Thanks for sharing some of your day with us. Warm regards,

MARIA K. REGAN EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Discover women’s care as unique as you. more at TriHealth.com/womens SUMMER 2017 | TRIHEALTH.COM 6Learn

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CINCINNATI RITA GUARNA

CARL OLSEN

PHYSICIANS, HOSPITALS AND COMMUNITIES WORKING TOGETHER TO HELP YOU LIVE BE T TER.

ART DIRECTORS

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T R I H E A LT H

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND DIGITAL MEDIA

PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

NIGEL EDELS HAIN

MARK C. CLEMENT

MARKETING ASSOCIATE

MANAGER INTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS

RICHARD IURILLI

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ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER

SENIOR MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS CONSULTANT

ED ITOR IN C HI EF KIJOO KIM STEPHEN M. VITARBO ED I T O R I A L

EXECUTIVE EDITOR MARIA K . REGAN

ASSOCIATE EDITOR DARIUS AMOS

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JIM ALLEN CATHY HERBERT TR AVIS MAR SHALL MARI S A SANDORA TRUDY WALZ ART

ART ASSISTANTS Y VONNE MARKI

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PUB LI S HER

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SENIOR ART DIRECTOR, AGENCY SERVICES KI JOO KIM

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CHRISTINE HAMEL

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WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Send your feedback and ideas to: Editor, Cincinnati Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; fax 201.782.5319; email editor@wainscotmedia.com. Cincinnati Health & Life assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts or art materials. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE is published 4 times a year by Wainscot Media, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645. This is Volume 2, Issue 3. © 2016 by Wainscot Media LLC. All rights reserved. Subscriptions in U.S.: $14 for one year. Single copies: $3.95. Material contained herein is intended for informational purposes only. If you have medical concerns, seek the guidance of a healthcare professional. ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Please contact Carl Olsen at 847.274.8970 or carl.olsen@wainscotmedia.com. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES To inquire about a subscription, to change an address, or to purchase a back issue or a reprint of an article, please write to Cincinnati Health & Life, Circulation Department, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; telephone 201.573.5541; email christine.hamel@wainscotmedia.com.

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Tirisi Jewelry is made of 18 Kt gold with high quality diamonds and fine handcut semi-precious stones

www.tirisi.com

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{ LOCAL BUZZ }

IN SEARCH OF THE

PERFECT SANDWICH

JEFF STRONG and Sheelah Parker are on a mission. They want to bring the perfect New York City deli-style sandwich to Cincinnati. Strong (who was born in New York) and Parker have realized that seemingly modest but actually quite daunting goal with the opening of the Grand Central Delicatessen on Montgomery Road in Pleasant Ridge. Strong has an extensive local culinary history that includes The Incline Public House, Jeff Ruby’s Carlo & Johnny, and plenty more. But he and Parker wanted to build something that they felt was missing from the Cincinnati scene, so they marshaled their forces, brought in Pleasant Ridge’s own David Rayburn to design a bar for them, and set about defining what it takes to make a great sandwich. The answer was relatively uncomplicated: plenty of fresh, tasty cold cuts and cheeses, with a wealth of condiments made right on the premises. From The Ridge (salami, prosciutto, mortadella, capicola, provolone, peppers and fixings) to The Best Mess (corned beef, Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, thousand island dressing on rye), and a condiment menu including the likes of cilantro-lime mayo and sundried tomato mayo, Grand Central keeps it real while offering a modern touch. There are vegan and vegetarian options too, as well as a full complement of apps, soups, salads and desserts. The décor gives you the feeling of being transported back to old New York. With wooden benches, walls adorned with pictures of a bygone era of the city, and plenty of period details designed to take you back to that pre-WWII golden age of the deli, the ambiance will give your taste buds a cue for what they’re about to experience.

IT’S A SERVICE DOG’S LIFE

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But with a combination of passion, dedication, smarts and community support, Circle Tail has been pairing people in need with dogs that can make an enormous difference in their lives for two decades. Explaining her own commitment to the cause, Circle Tail volunteer and board member Marcy Clarke says: “My husband, Dean, and I volunteer for Circle Tail because we respect the mission, love working with the dogs, and feel deeply moved and satisfied when we see these skilled and loyal canine partners empower and enrich the lives of people with disabilities. The positive changes these dogs make in people’s lives are amazing.” Want to volunteer or learn more? Check out their website at circletail.org.

COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK

THIS YEAR, Circle Tail Inc. is commemorating 20 years of training service dogs for Cincinnati-area residents with disabilities. And that’s a lot to celebrate. Service dogs can be a dream come true for people with physical challenges. In addition to the constant companionship that a faithful canine friend offers, these dogs assist with the nuts and bolts of navigating everyday life, performing an invaluable service by doing tasks their owners cannot. Service dogs can do everything from open and close drawers and cupboards to fetch wheelchairs, help tidy the house, bring in the groceries and even find the ever-elusive TV remote. Of course, these highly trained dogs don’t just pop up out of nowhere. That’s where Circle Tail comes in. This nonprofit organization is dedicated to training service dogs for the disabled and pairing the animals with people who need them. Raising and training a service dog is neither an easy process nor an inexpensive one: It costs about $15,000 per animal. Circle Tail pays for this costly process through a combination of grants, gifts from donors and classes they run for pet training and first aid. As you might imagine, keeping an organization like this afloat is no easy task. SUMMER 2017 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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COURTESY OF GETTY; SHUTTERSTOCK

ART ATTACK

STEVEN J. ROLFES is a man in love with history. But his passion has a pretty specific focus—he’s dedicated to uncovering and preserving the details of Cincinnati’s past, a history in danger of being forgotten in the noisy march of progress. And Rolfes has shared his hard-won knowledge with us by publishing it in his new book, Cincinnati’s Lost History: Before the Banks. Rolfes lives, eats and breathes local lore—he’s a volunteer at the Cincinnati History Museum and the author of a number of other books about the town’s treasured past. Paging through the fourthgeneration native’s newest offering, you’ll encounter one revelation after another. For instance, unless you’ve been digging through the city’s archives alongside Rolfes, you probably never knew about the Third Street bank that had a secret tunnel leading to the river, built for the clandestine passage of gold into its vault. That’s only a drop in the bucket, though. From the African-American slaves who used that same tunnel as a secret passageway to freedom during the pre-Civil War era to the rough-and-tumble street life of a riverfront populated not only with sailors and merchants but with ladies of the evening, con men and other unsavory characters, there are tons of stories to be told about old Cincinnati. And you’ll find the best of them within the pages of Rolfes’ book.

THE DOWNTOWN scene gained a new art gallery late last year, one that puts a new spin on what a gallery can be. An artist-run enterprise founded by Sara Pearce, Lisa Inglert and Phyllis Sadler, Gallery 708 opened its door on Walnut Street in November 2016 with an admirable, ambitious agenda. The founders—who had previously been part of the nearby 5th Street Gallery—are determined to promote the work of the best local artists and artisans and help the area’s art community to prosper and grow. Even the very notion of what an art gallery ought to include is being redefined by Pearce, Inglert and Sadler. In addition to paintings and sculptures, 708 also features everything from vases to handmade jewelry pieces (Inglert herself is responsible for some of the jewelry). Their modus operandi is inclusive and encompasses a multitude of artistic disciplines beyond those usually represented in a gallery. In the short time they’ve been pursuing their goals, Gallery 708 has made significant inroads. They’ve featured the works of dozens of local artists of all kinds, and have garnered enough interest on a grassroots level to begin making a difference in the way the Cincinnati art scene looks and works, especially downtown.

IN 2017, an estimated 246,000 women are expected to be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and an estimated 40,890 will die from the disease. But breast cancer also impacts men—this year, 2,600 men will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer and 440 will die from the disease. The Real Men Wear Pink campaign of Greater Cincinnati, presented by TriHealth, is working to raise awareness and funds to help defeat breast cancer in both women and men. Launched in 2016 for the first time in Cincinnati, the Real Men Wear Pink campaign raised over $110,000 for the fight against breast cancer. This campaign is different than other breast-cancer awareness efforts. Each campaign year is a unique class made up entirely of men who publically commit to join the fight and wear pink in October to signify their solidarity with the cause. In the 2016 inaugural class, 28 men raised 600 percent of the campaign goal, sending the Cincinnati campaign into 5th place out of 250 cities nationwide! If you or a man you know would like to learn more about this exclusive opportunity (there’s only one Real Men Wear Pink campaign per metro area each year!) please contact Carrie Powell at 888-227-6446 x4210. Your contributions and participation would help raise awareness about the incidence of breast cancer in our population, and help fund the efforts to find a cure.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

ALL-NEW OB SPACES COMING TO GOOD SAMARITAN

MATERNITY AREAS AT THE REGION’S PREMIER PROVIDER OF OBSTETRIC CARE ARE GETTING A TOP-TO-BOTTOM MAKEOVER.

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WE HAVE ALL THE MEDICAL CAPABILITIES TO OPTIMIZE PATIENT OUTCOME, WHETHER LOW OR HIGH RISK, AND NOW WE’LL HAVE MATERNITY FACILITIES OF THE SAME HIGH STANDARD.” —KRISTIN COPPAGE, M.D., MATERNALFETAL MEDICINE SPECIALIST AND SITE DIRECTOR FOR TRIHEALTH WOMEN’S SERVICES AT GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL

WIDELY REGARDED as one of the top delivery hospitals in Ohio, Good Samaritan Hospital will soon have stateof-the-art maternity spaces to match its clinical reputation. “TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Hospital provides the most comprehensive maternity services in the region,” says Melissa Kennedy, Executive Director of TriHealth Women’s Services. “From midwife-attended natural births to very high-risk, complicated deliveries, we are very proud of the excellent care that we provide and are thrilled to be able to offer an updated, welcoming environment with private rooms to all of our maternity patients.”

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Kristin Coppage, M.D., Site Director of Good Samaritan Hospital and a specialist in maternal-fetal medicine agrees, adding: “What’s so wonderful about these renovations is that they don’t just involve one unit. They touch the whole spectrum of care for obstetric patients. It’s amazing to see all of the infrastructure being put into place to support the care of pregnant women, from before they’re in labor through delivery and into postpartum.”

PRIVATE MATERNITY ROOMS The first phase of the project—fully updating the Mother and Baby Unit—was completed last year. All postpartum rooms

are now private. Currently underway: renovations for the Special Care Unit for high-risk maternity patients who need to stay in the hospital, sometimes for weeks, during their pregnancy. These rooms also will be private. “Being able to ensure that all pregnant patients have private rooms throughout their stay is very important to us,” says Dr. Coppage. “We want all of our patients and families to have the best possible experience.” At both Good Samaritan Hospital and Bethesda North Hospital, family-centered care is a core value. “We pride ourselves on the fact that we involve patients in

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decision-making that occurs during their pregnancy and delivery,” says Dr. Coppage. “We want them to feel that their families also are welcome and involved. Private maternity rooms help to facilitate this.” Women need the support of their families before, during and after giving birth. “That support can be a huge benefit to patients, whether going through an uncomplicated delivery or a significantly complicated course,” says Dr. Coppage.

UPCOMING RENOVATIONS The new maternity gateway will be through the main Dixmyth entrance. Twenty-four-hour valet parking will be available, and it will be easy to access the new OB triage area, which will be twice the size of the current space. Construction will begin in July and be completed in January 2018. “The OB triage area will be located together with the maternity greeting area,” says Dr. Coppage, “and is where all patients will come for initial assessment, whether they’re in labor or are experiencing pregnancy complications.” From here, women will be registered bedside and admitted for monitoring or delivery. A final set of renovations in Labor and Delivery will include two new critical care labor-and-delivery rooms, providing state-of-the-art care for the highest risk deliveries.

PERSONALIZED CARE All of these renovations—complete, underway and planned—will benefit all TriHealth maternity patients. Bethesda North Hospital provides excellent care for patients whose babies are born after 32 weeks of pregnancy. Patients at high risk and those who may need the clinical resources of a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit can be cared for at Good Samaritan Hospital. High-risk patients from across the TriHealth system will benefit from the renovation of Good Samaritan Hospital’s Special Care Unit should any complications arise during their pregnancy. Such cases are often referred to TriState Maternal Fetal Medicine, a group of 11 high-risk specialists who care for patients at both Bethesda North Hospital and Good Samaritan Hospital. When needed, inpatient stays are at Good Samaritan Hospital. This crosshospital coverage facilitates the seamless transition of patients to allow for the best care, as determined by each clinical situation. “Every day we strive to make sure that we’re meeting the needs of our obstetric patients,” says Dr. Coppage. “We have all the medical capabilities to optimize patient outcome, whether low or high risk, and now we’ll have maternity facilities of the same high standard.”

WORLD-CLASS OB CARE FOR HIGH-RISK PATIENTS TriHealth is renowned as a premier provider of high-risk maternity care. TriState Maternal Fetal Medicine, a group of 11 board-certified specialists, offers complete prenatal, delivery and postpartum care for high-risk pregnancies, whether the increased risk is due to an underlying or preexisting maternal health condition or to a fetal complication, such as an anomaly or birth defect. Pregnant women with cardiac illness present unique and technical care challenges, and those challenges create additional risks. The Center for Maternal Cardiac Care at Good Samaritan Hospital is a unique program that combines the talents of clinical experts in the fields of maternal-fetal medicine, adult cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, adult and adolescent congenital heart disease, and cardiac and obstetric anesthesia to create a plan of care for women facing these challenging pregnancies. The goal: to help women with cardiac issues have the babies they have always dreamed of.

NEW SPACES. Renderings show how maternity areas at Good Samaritan Hospital will look after renovations are complete. Left: Labor-and-delivery room. Center: Maternity reception area. Right: Family waiting room.

TO FIND A PHYSICIAN IN YOUR AREA OR TO SCHEDULE A TOUR AT GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL OR BETHESDA NORTH HOSPITAL, CALL THE TRIHEALTH WOMEN’S HEALTH LINE AT 513 475 4500. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SUMMER 2017

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EXERCISING OUTDOORS BEATS THE GYM BY A MILE SURE, A CLIMATE-CONTROLLED gym with all the bells and whistles can be a pleasant place to work out, especially in winter, but science suggests there are powerful benefits to leading an active lifestyle in the great outdoors. When the weather permits, take your activity out in nature for a variety of benefits to body, mind and soul. Writer Laura Ingalls Wilder was on to something when she said, “Some oldfashioned things, like fresh air and sunshine, are hard to beat.” And now, there’s research to support her claim.

BOOST ENERGY AND REDUCE TENSION For example, a team from England’s Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry analyzed 11 trials that included

DON’T LET ALLERGIES KEEP YOU INDOORS Do you love exercising outdoors but fear an allergy attack? Three key strategies will help you stay comfortable:

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more than 800 adults. They found that, when compared with indoor exercise, outdoor exercise was associated with increased energy and revitalization, as well as decreased confusion, anger, depression and tension. Outdoor exercisers also reported enjoying their workouts more, and were more likely to say they planned to repeat them than exercisers who were holed up inside a gym. Many also had lower levels of cortisol (a hormone produced in response to stress) than their indoor counterparts, and said exposure to sunlight improved their mood. In addition, people who walked outdoors completed an average of 30 minutes more exercise per week than those who exercised indoors. So, which outdoor activities provide the greatest benefit? Walking is at the

1. PREP YOUR SYSTEM. During days or seasons when your allergies are at their worst, use an overthe-counter antihistamine before you exercise. This will help stave off allergens’ effects and may prevent an attack before it starts.

top of the list. It boosts cardio, is gentle on the joints, strengthens bones, can be done almost anywhere and is free. From a mental-health standpoint, it can reduce stress, improve mood and spark creativity. Gardening is another favorite outdoor activity for many. It promotes tranquility and relaxation, and has many physical benefits as well. According to the Centers for Disease Control, moderate activity, such as active gardening, for as little as twoand-a-half hours each week can reduce risk of obesity, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and depression.

KEEP IT SIMPLE AND START KIDS EARLY Outdoor activities can be as simple as teaching a grandchild to ride a bike, shooting hoops with friends, hiking or going for a brisk swim. If you have children, introduce them to outdoor fun at an early age. They’ll be more likely to carry your example into their teen and adult years, when stressbusting and health-enhancing activities become even more vital. Being active outdoors lets you improve your fitness, while enjoying nature and relieving daily stress in the process. Now that’s what we call effective multitasking.

3. KEEP ALLERGENS OUTSIDE. After exercising, shower, wash your hair and change your clothes. You might also wish to rinse out nasal cavities using a neti pot filled with a saline solution—allergens tend to accumulate in nasal cavities after exercise.

2. PICK YOUR TIME. If you have a pollen allergy, exercise early morning or late evening when pollen counts are lowest. If you’re allergic to mold, avoid exercising right after a rain shower, when molds are at their peak. Check the weather and use smartphone apps to review allergen counts in your area.

SUMMER 2017 | TRIHEALTH.COM

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SOME OLD-FASHIONED THINGS, LIKE FRESH AIR AND SUNSHINE, ARE HARD TO BEAT.” —LAURA INGALLS WILDER, WRITER

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

REMOVING BARRIERS TO

CONCEPTION

A MAJORITY OF COUPLES WHO HAVE TROUBLE CONCEIVING CAN BE HELPED WITH LIFESTYLE CHANGES AND MEDICATIONS. KATIE GREINER BARNES was just 28 years old when she was diagnosed with cervical cancer. Her doctors successfully treated the cancer with surgery, but like so many young cancer survivors, she worried about the effect it would have on her fertility when she and her husband, Andy, decided to start a family two years later. After three months trying to conceive without success, her OB/GYN suggested she consult a fertility specialist. “I went to see Dr. Reynolds at Bethesda Fertility Center on the recommendation of a co-worker,” says Katie. “This had the potential to be really stressful, but she made me feel so comfortable, and within two weeks of starting fertility treatments, I got pregnant.” She and her husband had a daughter in July 2015. TriHealth offers fertility care at Women’s Services Reproductive Endocrinology in Blue Ash and fertility care is also available through the Bethesda Fertility Center, a service of Bethesda Inc., where Katie saw Medical Director Kasey Reynolds, M.D. “Most couples, about 85 to 90 percent, should conceive with one year of trying to get pregnant,” Dr. Reynolds explains. “If you are unable to conceive after one year, you should consult a physician.”

Kasey Reynolds, M.D. Bethesda Fertility Center, a service of Bethesda Inc.

Jennifer Thie, M.D.

TriHealth Women’s Services Reproductive Endocrinology

However, for women like Katie who have a history of cancer or other conditions that could affect fertility, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and endometriosis (an inflammation in the reproductive system), it’s best to seek help sooner. Age is also a consideration. “Women 35 or older should get fertility consultation after six months of trying,” says Dr. Reynolds. “And women over 40 might want to seek help immediately because time is a factor.” The initial consultation with a fertility specialist usually involves a comprehensive medical and reproductive patient history from both partners. In some cases simple lifestyle changes, like reducing stress and weight loss, may be extremely beneficial in helping a couple conceive. There also are simple tests that can help pinpoint the problem. For women, a blood test can provide information about the ovaries and help diagnose certain conditions, while a pelvic ultrasound allows a visual inspection to check egg count and look for fibroids, polyps or blockages in the reproductive organs. In about 20 percent of cases, fertility issues come exclusively from the male, so a semen analysis is performed to evaluate sperm count and motility. If a severe fertility issue is diagnosed in the male, he may be referred to a urologist for treatment. One of the most common causes of fertility problems among women is Isela Robertshaw, M.D. PCOS, an endocrine Bethesda Fertility Center, a service of Bethesda Inc. condition that af-

fects about 10 percent of all women. With PCOS, hormone imbalances can lead to irregular menstrual cycles that make it hard to get pregnant. “We can use drugs to ensure eggs are being ovulated, and to help the woman ovulate on a regular schedule,” explains Isela Robertshaw, M.D., of Bethesda Fertility Center. “The longer it takes to get pregnant, the more aspects of the process we’ll try to control,” says Jennifer Thie, M.D., a reproductive endocrinologist and gynecologist who treats patients at both locations. “For most women, we’ll start with oral fertility medications. Then we may add an injection in the middle of the cycle that triggers an egg to be released. And if that doesn’t work, we can add insemination.” Intrauterine insemination can be used together with fertility drugs for couples having trouble conceiving naturally. The man will provide a semen sample at Bethesda Reproductive Studies Lab. “The laboratory does a count of the sperm and checks motility, then they wash and concentrate the sample to improve the chances of pregnancy,” explains Dr. Thie. Once the sample is prepared, it’s deposited directly into the uterus, which also increases the likelihood of the sperm finding the egg. When Katie visited Bethesda Fertility Center, she received a combination of oral and injectable medications, and conceived on the very first cycle. She was so happy with the outcome that she and her husband returned to Bethesda when they wanted to have a second child, and again conceived on the first cycle. “I was very lucky,” she says. “Having a doctor who understood precisely what we needed to do to have kids was so reassuring.”

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT TRIHEALTH REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY AND FERTILITY OR TO CONTACT ONE OF OUR PHYSICIANS, VISIT TRIHEALTH.COM/WOMENS.

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WOMEN 35 OR OLDER SHOULD GET FERTILITY CONSULTATION AFTER SIX MONTHS OF TRYING, AND WOMEN OVER 40 MIGHT WANT TO SEEK HELP IMMEDIATELY BECAUSE TIME IS A FACTOR.” —KASEY REYNOLDS, M.D., MEDICAL DIRECTOR, BETHESDA FERTILITY CENTER

Katie Greiner Barnes with husband, Andy, and daughter, Lucy. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SUMMER 2017

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A CUT ABOVE

SUMMER ISN’T ALL ABOUT THE GRILL. DRESS UP ANY OCCASION WITH THESE UPDATED CLASSICS.

Reprinted with permission from Paleo Monday to Friday by Daniel Green © 2016 Kyle Books. Photographs © Peter Cassidy.

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{ TASTES }

Filet Mignon with Caramelized Onions Serves 2 INGREDIENTS n 2 7-oz. filet mignon steaks n 3 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil n Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper n 8 oz. fresh mushrooms (any variety), chopped n 1 Tb. chopped fresh thyme n ž cup red wine n 5½ oz. carrots For the caramelized onions n 3 onions, thinly sliced n 3 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil, plus more as needed n Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS n First make the caramelized onions: Place the onions in a large frying pan over medium-high heat, cover and cook, stirring infrequently, until they are dry and almost sticking to the pan (about 20 minutes). n Stir in the oil and a large pinch of salt, then reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally and adding oil as needed to keep them from sticking without getting greasy, for 40 to 60 minutes, depending on how silky you want them. Season to taste and set aside. n Meanwhile, brush the steaks all over with a little olive oil and season lightly with salt and pepper. Place a large grill pan over medium-high heat and, when hot, add the steaks and cook for 2 to 3 minutes on each side (or until done to your liking), then remove from the pan and set aside. n Add the remaining olive oil to the pan, add the mushrooms and cook over high heat for 5 to 10 minutes until golden brown. n Add the wine and thyme to the pan, bring to a simmer and cook for 3 to 4 minutes until the wine has reduced slightly. n Plate the steaks with a spoonful of sauce, the caramelized onions on the side and a few carrots too, if you like.

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{ TASTES }

Grilled Lamb Chops on Carrot Purée with Roasted Garlic Serves 4

INGREDIENTS n 1.3 lbs. carrots, peeled and roughly chopped n 12 lamb chops or cutlets (about 4 oz. each), trimmed of fat n 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced n 4 sprigs fresh rosemary, cut into thirds n 2 Tbs. olive oil n Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS n Preheat the oven to 350°F. n Place the carrots in a saucepan of boiling water and cook for 20 to 25 minutes until soft. n Meanwhile, using a sharp knife, cut a few incisions in the lamb and slide in a few garlic slivers and a sprig of rosemary in each chop. Place on a foil-lined baking pan and roast in the oven for 10 to 12 minutes (depending on size). n Drain the carrots, transfer to a food processor and add the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste and process to a smooth purée. n Serve the lamb with the carrot purée and garnish with some fresh rosemary.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

FIBROIDS:

State-of-the-Art Care A NEW PROGRAM AT BETHESDA BUTLER HOSPITAL WILL SPECIALIZE IN THE TREATMENT OF FIBROIDS, ENDOMETRIOSIS AND OTHER GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS, OFFERING A FULL RANGE OF THERAPY OPTIONS.

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WE CAN HELP EACH PATIENT SELECT THE BEST TREATMENT ALTERNATIVE—AMONG ALL AVAILABLE OPTIONS—FOR HER INDIVIDUAL NEEDS.” —DEVIN D. NAMAKY, M.D., LEADER OF BETHESDA BUTLER HOSPITAL’S NEW PROGRAM FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE GYNECOLOGIC SURGERY

AT SOME POINT in their lives, 85 to 90 percent of women will have fibroids—small benign tumors in the uterus. For about 20 percent of women, fibroids cause significant pain and/or heavy periods. These and other gynecologic conditions, such as endometriosis, can be treated effectively with minimally invasive procedures, though some must be performed by specially trained physicians. As a result, few women’s health practices offer a full range of treatment options for their patients. A new program at Bethesda Butler Hospital will do just that. It will be led by Devin D. Namaky, M.D. Fellowship-trained in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery, Dr. Namaky has the knowledge and experience to provide his patients with all available options to manage pelvic pain and menstrual disorders. “Fellowship-trained practitioners are uniquely experienced to provide these services,” he says. “Patients often ask, ‘Is this the best option?’ or ‘Is this the only option?’ We can help each patient select the best treatment alternative—among all available options—for her individual needs.”

FIBROID TREATMENT OPTIONS For women who want to preserve the option to have children, fibroids can be removed by traditional or minimally invasive methods. Traditional open surgery requires larger abdominal incisions through which the surgeon removes the fibroids. This type of procedure is accompanied by pain and risk of infection, hernias and other complications. Hospitalization is required. Although incisions heal within four to six

weeks, full recovery can take longer. Minimally invasive fibroid removal (called myomectomy) can be done in several ways. In laparoscopic surgery, the surgeon makes several very small abdominal incisions into which narrow tubes are inserted. The surgeon then inserts tiny surgical instruments into the tubes and uses them to remove the fibroids. In a hysteroscopic procedure, a tiny camera is inserted into the vagina and through the cervix. Instruments are passed through the camera to remove fibroids. In these procedures, which carry less risk of infection and other complications, the patient typically goes home on the day of surgery and feels normal within a week or two. Women who have finished having children may decide to have a hysterectomy or endometrial ablation. Hysterectomies remove the entire uterus. The procedure can be performed as open surgery or as a minimally invasive laparoscopic technique (with or without robotic technology, which is appropriate for some patients). A vaginal hysterectomy is another minimally invasive option. Endometrial ablation may be a good choice for patients who have heavy bleeding and whose fibroids are located inside the uterus. In this procedure, a tube is inserted through the vagina into the uterus and a heated device burns the lining of the uterus. Afterward, women generally experience less bleeding. It is most effective when combined with hysteroscopic myomectomy. At Bethesda Butler Hospital, we’re excited to provide this new program and offer high-quality care with a full range

of minimally invasive options so that our patients, together with their physicians, can select the treatment that best meets their individual healthcare needs. We make sure that patients have all the options available not just for fibroids, but also for endometriosis and many other gynecologic conditions.

KNOW YOUR OPTIONS If you’re experiencing symptoms such as pelvic pain or heavy bleeding, Devin D. Namaky, M.D., leader of Bethesda Butler Hospital’s new program for minimally invasive gynecologic surgery, recommends these steps: •G  et an opinion from more than one healthcare provider. Your physician should always offer you more than one option. • It’s okay to educate yourself. Research treatment alternatives to help determine which options you would like to know more about. When you visit your doctor, ask questions. • Ask about how options compare in terms of procedure time and recovery time. When will you be able to return to normal activities? Do the things you love? Pick up your children or grandchildren? Garden?

TO LOCATE A PHYSICIAN IN YOUR AREA, CALL THE TRIHEALTH WOMEN’S HEALTHLINE AT 513 475 4500 OR VISIT TRIHEALTH.COM/WOMENS. CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SUMMER 2017

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{ HOME }

MAKING A SPLASH

WITH THEIR SOOTHING SOUNDS AND TRANQUIL BEAUTY, WATER GARDENS CREATE THE OASIS YOU’RE YEARNING FOR WHILE ENHANCING YOUR BACKYARD. WHY NOT TAKE THE PLUNGE?

Water lilies enchant with their wide leaves and beautiful blooms, which last three or four days before sinking beneath the surface.

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Incorporating a variety of textures and heights adds energy to a water landscape and keeps it interesting over time. In this garden by Allison Landscaping & Water Gardens, wood decking, wispy grasses, dense evergreens and blossoms large and small team up to engage anyone who passes.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLISON LANDSCAPING & WATER GARDENS BY ELIZABETH PAFF, CINCINNATI

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{ HOME }

Splashing water is one of the most soothing sounds around. And it can help mask background noises you'd rather not hear, like passing traffic. This dramatic double waterfall created by Allison Landscaping & Water Gardens is gorgeous, but even small waterfalls and fountains can add serenity to your garden.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLISON LANDSCAPING & WATER GARDENS BY ELIZABETH PAFF, CINCINNATI

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Goldfish and koi not only look pretty, they also keep the water circulating and eat algae and harmful insects, such as mosquito larvae. Bottom left: Oversized stepping stones make a perfect path across a large backyard pond, putting visitors in the midst of water lilies and the pond life below.

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{ IN GOOD HEALTH }

GETTING AHEAD OF CANCER 32

HOW GENETIC TESTING HELPS SAVE LIVES.

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THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT FOR ALMOST EVERY TYPE OF CANCER THERE’S SOME TYPE OF SCREENING OR PREVENTION WE CAN PUT INTO PLACE WHEN WE KNOW SOMEONE IS AT INCREASED RISK.” —KEVIN SCHULER, M.D., GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGIST AT TRIHEALTH CANCER INSTITUTE

CANCER THAT’S FOUND EARLY, before it has a chance to grow and spread, often is easier to cure. Genetic testing takes that idea one step further: It allows doctors to offer care options at the earliest possible point in time—before cancer has even developed. Genetic testing identifies patients who are at increased risk for specific cancers because they inherited a certain genetic mutation (a permanent alteration in a gene). For example, a mutation in the BRCA1 gene is known to increase a woman’s lifetime risk of developing breast cancer by age 70 from about 12 percent (risk in the general population) to about 60 percent (range 46-87 percent). That same mutation also causes a woman’s lifetime risk of ovarian cancer to jump from 1.5 percent to 35-40 percent. Finding out whether you carry a genetic mutation that increases cancer risk can be challenging emotionally. However, most people find that difficulty is far outweighed by the potential benefit and empowerment their knowledge can provide. “Some people either don’t think anything can be done or are afraid of finding out their results,” says Kevin Schuler, M.D., a gynecologic oncologist at TriHealth Cancer Institute. “What many patients don’t know is that options often exist that can drastically reduce or even prevent certain cancers from arising all together. Unfortunately, avoiding this information doesn’t make your risk go down. On the other hand, knowing your risk and how it may be mitigated empowers you to make a decision that could be important for you and your family.”

PREVENTIVE MEASURES Options to reduce cancer risk may include surgery, earlier and more frequent screen-

ing or biopsy, and medications. These can have a dramatic impact on cancer risk. For example, for BRCA1 carriers preventive mastectomy can reduce breast-cancer risk by 90-95 percent, and removal of ovaries, fallopian tubes and/or uterus can have a similar effect on ovarian-cancer risk. High-risk patients who take the medication tamoxifen for five years can cut their breastcancer risk by half. Lifestyle changes may further reduce risk. In addition to genetic mutations tied to breast and ovarian cancer, researchers have discovered mutations linked to colon, endometrial, thyroid, pancreatic and other cancers. Today, multiple genes are tested simultaneously in a panel format. Genetic counselors are health professionals specially trained in medical genetics

and counseling to help individuals and their families understand and manage risk for inherited cancer. The first step in the genetic-testing process is a risk-assessment consultation with a counselor.

THE TESTING PROCESS “Most patients are referred by their physician, but some self-identify as having risk factors,” says Karen Huelsman, MS, LGC, a board-certified genetic counselor at TriHealth Cancer Institute. “The purpose of the first genetic-counseling visit is to assess level of risk, determine whether a patient is a candidate for genetic testing, and determine the best strategy,” she explains. This includes deciding which genes should be tested, which family member should be tested first, and which lab is the

HELP FOR PATIENTS AT RISK FOR MULTIPLE CANCERS TriHealth’s new Hereditary Cancer Multidisciplinary Clinic is a medical resource— unique in the Cincinnati area—for patients who have genetic mutations associated with risk for multiple cancers. Kevin Schuler, M.D., a gynecologic oncologist at TriHealth Cancer Institute, explains the clinic’s value: “Our patients benefit from the expertise of not only our geneticscounseling team, but also a multidisciplinary physician team, including breastsurgical oncology, medical oncology, gynecologic oncology and gastroenterology, all working together as one integrated unit,” he says. “This allows us to coordinate our thoughts, expertise and efforts to achieve a fully-formed opinion regarding all of a patient’s multiple needs and to coordinate care going forward in a unified way.” In addition to genetic counselors and physicians, the Clinic includes a psychologist and a nutritionist. “All of us are thinking about what we can do to help each patient stay healthy and cancer-free,” says Karen Huelsman, MS, LGC, a board-certified genetic counselor at TriHealth. “TriHealth has a uniquely integrated team of specialists that is well equipped to serve those at highest risk.”

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A PRIMARY MOTIVATION FOR MANY PATIENTS UNDERGOING TESTING IS TO PROVIDE INFORMATION FOR THE NEXT GENERATION.” —KAREN HUELSMAN, MS, LGC, BOARD-CERTIFIED GENETIC COUNSELOR AT TRIHEALTH CANCER INSTITUTE

best fit for the patient’s needs. If patients are eligible and decide to pursue genetic testing, the genetic counselor will coordinate testing for them, managing everything from obtaining a DNA sample and selecting a lab to requesting pre-authorization from the patient’s insurance company. This is done before a test is run so that any out-of-pocket cost is known in advance.

COVERING THE COST “Most of the time,” says Huelsman, “if patients have risk factors that meet testing criteria and we send a request to the insurance company, including Medicare and Medicaid, it gets authorized.” Grants and financial support that can help cover testing are also available. “Families these days shouldn’t let cost be a barrier to having genetic testing or at least exploring the option,” says Huelsman. Once the results are available, generally in about two to four weeks, the counselor will manage the patient’s follow-up. “If it’s an entirely negative result, especially when we already know the mutation in the family, this is very reassuring,” Huelsman explains. “These patients can follow typical background-level screening for general population risks.” For patients with a strong family history but no detectable mutation to explain the cancer, a screening plan is created based on the patient’s cancer risk. Sometimes repeat testing is offered to those families as new genes are identified. If a high-risk genetic mutation is found, the counselor will schedule a second appointment to map out the associated

cancer risks and options for preventive action that can be taken. “During this visit,” says Huelsman, “the genetic counselor will identify specialists who can address specific needs, such as gynecologic oncology or breast surgery, to bring together a team of care providers focused on the patient’s unique needs.” The final step is to identify which other family members are in the inheritance path of the mutation and offer testing for siblings, children, parents, cousins and other relatives who may be affected. Since starting her genetics practice in 1994, Huelsman has seen a common theme: “A primary motivation for many patients undergoing testing is to provide information for the next generation,” she says. “They want to give their sons and daughters the ‘heads-up’ they never had.”

THE COUNSELOR’S ROLE Genetic counselors are a patient’s ally in the testing process, translating highly technical data into information that patients can use. “Overall,” says Dr. Schuler, “genetic counselors are an invaluable resource to patients and physicians alike.” For people with a family history of cancer, genetic testing can provide important and potentially life-saving information. “People may avoid learning more about testing because they don’t realize there are preventive steps that can be taken,” says Huelsman. “The good news is that for almost every type of cancer there’s some type of screening or prevention we can put into place when we know someone is at increased risk.”

RED FLAGS FOR INHERITED CANCER You may benefit from genetic counseling and testing for inherited cancer if your personal or family history includes: •C  ancer that occurs at an early age (50 or younger) • Two or more close relatives who have the same type of cancer or related cancers •C  ancer that has occurred in more than one generation •M  ore than one cancer in the same family member, especially certain combinations such as cancers of the breast/ovary, colon/uterus or melanoma/ pancreas • A close relative with a rare type of cancer or tumor •C  ancer that develops in both breasts, both ovaries, both kidneys, etc. • Other factors associated with inherited cancers, such as multiple colon polyps

TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT WITH ANY OF OUR TRIHEALTH GENETIC COUNSELORS, PLEASE CALL 513 862 2759.

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Looks like we’re expecting too.

New renovations and all private rooms for maternity patients are coming soon. Announcing something new just for you. In the coming months, we will be renovating to create a brand-new welcome area and all private rooms for maternity and special care obstetric patients. Twenty-four-hour valet parking, bedside registration and concierge services are just a few of the amenities designed to support the expert maternity and NICU care provided by our staff and physicians.

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Schedule a tour or make an appointment with one of our OB-GYNs today.

Call 513 475 4500 or visit TriHealth.com/womens

5/4/17 11:43 1:12 PM 5/17/17 AM


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{ ESCAPES }

VENICE BY TWILIGHT EARLY EVENING IN THE “CITY OF CANALS” BRINGS A SPECIAL MAGIC THE DAYTIME TOURISTS MISS. BY EVERETT POTTER

YOU’RE INTRIGUED, no doubt, by the Venice that draws travelers—the historic city of canals, the place that inspired Shakespeare and Thomas Mann, the venerable citystate that 800 years ago was a trading power with no peer. So yes, sightsee as much as you like during the day. But twilight is when this magical place—the best walking city I’ve ever visited—becomes a stage set with a glorious role for you. The ochre walls seem to glow, the lights of the palazzos go on and there’s little doubt that you’re in the most romantic city in the world. CONTINUED

Evenings in Venice are known more for their lively cafes than crowded nightclubs. Venetians are known to partake in highly ritualized consumption of light cocktails and food throughout the night.

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Opposite: With a labyrinth of canals, alleys and passageways, Venice at twilight can be seen by land or sea. This page: As the sun disappears, so do the tourists, leaving daytime destinations like famed St. Mark’s Square peacefully quiet.

Feel those cooling breezes wafting in from the lagoon? Pretty soon you’ll notice that the masses of day trippers have departed with the sun—budget tourists who’ve left for their hotels on the mainland in Mestre. That’s fine. Now the curtain has risen and Venice has become your secret show. But this isn’t Berlin, Rome or Prague—it’s not a place for partying. The fact is that restaurants are stacking their chairs not long after 10 p.m., while many bars close by 11. It’s the rare boîte that stays open until midnight. So I prefer to be in league with the locals, who choose twilight to leave their homes for a local bar or café for an aperitivo. In Venice, that drink is a highly ritualized one and is typically either an ombra or a spritz. An ombra is a tiny glass of red or white wine that is tossed back quite quickly. A spritz is an aperitivo of white wine, Campari and a shot of seltzer or sparkling water. Prosecco, the bubbly white wine made in the hills of the Veneto region, is also a favorite. This is also when classic Venetian wine bars, or bacari, offer snacks called cicchetti, the Venetian version of tapas. They can include baccalà mantecato (creamed salt cod) on warm polenta, or polpette (breaded morsels) of meat, cheese or tuna. There could be sardele in saor (sardines with sweet and sour onions and sultanas) or ovosodo con arringa (hard boiled egg topped with herring fillet). My favorite is seppioline alla griglia (grilled baby squid). The best way to enjoy these true Venetian cicchetti is to do as many locals do and engage in a giro di ombre, literally an ombracrawl, hitting various small bacari. In this twilight ritual you literally rub shoulders with a wide range of Venetians relaxing. And after a while you realize you’ve also eaten dinner—there’s no need for a formal meal. It’s a cool melange of sightseeing, dining and drinking. But where to go? For decades, the favorite tourist haunt for an aperitivo has been Harry’s Bar, which opened in 1931 and claims to have invented the Bellini, named after the Venetian painter

Giovanni Bellini. The cocktail consists of prosecco from the Veneto blended with white peach purée and served ice cold. It’s beyond delicious, and having just one requires willpower. You’ll be in good spiritual company here—Truman Capote, Orson Welles and Charlie Chaplin all haunted Harry’s, as did Ernest Hemingway and the heiress and art patron Peggy Guggenheim. Today there will be well-dressed Venetians inside and perhaps too many tourists. So visit Harry’s at least once. But for a true giro di ombre, head to other places for a tipple as the sun goes down, to bacari that are more local and more chic. Wander the streets as the many church bells mark the time, with a backdrop of kids shouting in a square as they thump a soccer ball off a thousand-year-old wall. One memorable night I stood outside of La Fenice, the fabled opera house. The performance was sold out but you could hear opera emanating from the windows and doors, filling nearby streets with a performance too big to be contained within four walls. No other city is quiet enough for quite this experience. Your next stop could be Al Prosecco, which is on Campo San Giacomo all’Orio, one of Venice’s great neighborhood squares and away from the well-worn tourist routes. Here you can watch the locals on the square and sip some of the city’s finest prosecco, even sampling the slightly more sophisticated prosecco fermo, a non-effervescent version. Venice is remarkably safe after nightfall. I’ve always thought that for that reason it’s the best city on Earth in which to get lost. Eventually you’ll find your way to wherever you’re going, thanks to the kindness of strangers or maybe a street map from your hotel stuck into a back pocket. (Note that your phone’s GPS may not work well in the stone maze.) I know from experience about getting lost. One night I left a restaurant with a group of friends, offering to lead everyone back to our hotel. I pride myself on my innate sense of direction, and so CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SUMMER 2017

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we walked left and then right, down one passageway and then another, into a square and beyond, as they talked and I navigated with confidence. Less than 10 minutes later, we found ourselves standing in front of the restaurant we had just left. Was it a touch too much prosecco? Or had we been bewitched? So throw caution to the wind. For a glimpse of the real Venice, head to Osteria al Squero, which has a terrific northern Italian wine selection and a creative array of cicchetti. It’s across a canal from one of Venice’s last remaining squeri, or gondola workshops, and you can watch this ancient craft while sipping your wine. Then head back to the labyrinth of canals big and small, of twisting alleys and winding passageways leading in and out of myriad squares. Even at twilight, it’s an architectural feast for the eyes, with stone doorways and balconies and elaborate stairways, worn by hundreds of years of footsteps and weather. If you want to go really local, squeeze into Osteria alla Ciurma in the Rialto. It will be jammed with regulars standing, or perched on a stool if they’re fortunate, under a ceiling hung with vintage fishing boats. Have an ombra, order some cicchetti and try to blend in. For a hipper locals’ place, go to Al Merca, also in the Rialto. A bar by default, it serves ombra and cicchetti but there’s nowhere to sit. You can stand on the edge of the square and rub shoulders with some of the city’s cooler kids. Feeling full now? Just walk some more. The Adriatic laps at the city’s feet and the crush of visitors has left its mark, but never has decay seemed quite so splendid. By this point, the need for gelato has probably kicked in. Lots of small shops sell it, but I love Gelateria Nico on the Dorsoduro, which is ridiculously good. I like to end my evenings in Venice by walking across St. Mark’s Square. It’s when the Café Florian is emptying and it’s a good time to sit, listen to a budding Vivaldi playing to the nighttime crowd and have a final glass of wine or a coffee. Then to the pier to be transported like an Italian film star in a vintage wooden launch to the Belmond Hotel Cipriani, which lies across the Grand Canal on the island called Giudecca. I first stayed here 25 years ago—it dazzled me then and it still does. It has extraordinary views of the Doge’s Palace and the Venetian Lagoon. There are rooms with balconies overlooking the water and the hotel’s private garden, as well as suites in various sizes, all decorated in an opulent, gilded style. Few places in Europe can rival the sense of grandeur here. Outside there are elaborately tended gardens along the water and the only swimming pool in Venice, remarkable especially for its Olympic size. The legend is that the measurements were mistakenly given in meters rather than feet; hence the gargantuan dimensions of this salt water pool. It will be spotlit when you return late at night, so head to bed and arise by midmorning for a palatial breakfast. Then join the gathering sunbathers around its perimeter in midmorning. Put on your hippest shades and relax, for this is the ultimate spot in Venice to recover from the previous evening’s giro di ombre. 40

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Opposite, from top: Visitors of the Belmond Hotel Cipriani can dine with a magnificent view. Seafood Antipasti is a popular dish at A Beccafico. This page: Even after a long day, a gondolier works into the evening and seeks his next riders.

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{ WHERE TO EAT }

AMERICAN

ARNOLD’S BAR AND GRILL The city’s oldest bar, featuring traditional American comfort food and a wide beer selection, 210 E. 8th St., 513.421.6234 BJ’S RESTAURANT AND BREWHOUSE Handcrafted burgers and deep-dish pizzas with beers brewed onsite, 11700 Princeton Pike, Unit J1A, 513.671.1805

bar food with a European influence, 1211 Vine St., 513.834.8670 MELT ECLETIC CAFE Vegetarian restaurant specializing in sandwiches and meat substitutes, 4165 Hamilton Ave., 513.681.6358

T Vs, 5955 Boymel Dr., Fair field, 513.874.1992 THE ROOKWOOD BAR AND RESTAURANT Burgers, pasta and other traditional American classics, 1077 Celestial St., 513.421.5555

METROPOLE Contemporar y dishes cooked in a wood-burning fireplace, 609 Walnut St., 513.578.6660

THE RUST Y BUCKET Relaxed, family-friendly neighborhood tavern, Liberty Center, 7524 Bales St., Liberty Township, 513.463.2600

BRAZENHEAD IRISH PUB Three floors of dining and entertainment with an extensive beer menu, 5650 Tylersville Rd., Mason, 513.229.0809

MITCHELL’S FISH MARKET Specializing in off-theboat-fresh fish, 9456 Water Front Dr., West Chester, 513.779.5292

RYAN’S TAVERN Authentic Irish pub and gathering place situated in a restored 1890s building, 241 High St., Hamilton, 513.737.2200

CHARLEY’S STE AKERY Ser ving quality Philly steak s for more than 25 years, Liber ty Center, 7100 Foundr y Row, Liber ty Town s hip, 513.755.1626

NORTHSTAR CAFE Hearty, healthy American fare with a renowned brunch ser vice, Liberty Center, 7610 Sloan Way, Liberty Township, 513.759.0033

SALAZAR Casual contemporar y American fare with farm-inspired lunch and dinner menus, 1401 Republic St., 513.621.7000

THE CHEESECAKE FACTORY Inventive American cuisine with an extensive dessert menu focusing on cheesecake, Liberty Center, 7612 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.755.2761

ORCHIDS AT PALM COURT Contemporar y American food at Hilton’s well-established fine-dining restaurant, 35 West Fifth St., 513.421.9100

SENATE RESTAURANT Casual contemporar y American eater y specializing in upscale hot dogs, 1212 Vine St., 513.421.2020

THE EAGLE FOOD AND BEER HALL Southern comfort food and beer hall, 1342 Vine St., 513.802.5007

THE ORIGINAL MONTGOMERY INN Cincy staple well-known for its BBQ ribs, 9440 Montgomer y Rd., Montgomer y, 513.791.3482

SKYLINE CHILI It’s a Cincy staple, famous for its chili ser ved as Cheese Coneys and 3-Ways, multiple locations including 10792 Montgomer y Rd., 513.489.4404

FLIP SIDE BURGER & BAR Burger, shake and craft beer concept featuring Ohio grass-fed beef and free-range chicken, Liberty Center, 7622 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.777.6328

PALACE RESTAURANT Inventive fine-dining establishment located inside the historic Cincinnatian Hotel, 601 Vine St., 513.381.3000

SLATTS Relaxed neighborhood pub with plenty of plasma T Vs for watching the game, 4858 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, 513.791.2223

PAXTON’S GRILL Relaxed, friendly spot housed in one of Loveland’s oldest buildings, 126 W. Loveland Ave., Loveland, 513.583.1717

STONE CREEK DINING COMPANY A varied menu of sandwiches, salads, seafood and steaks, multiple locations including 9386 Montgomer y Rd., Montgomer y, 513.489.1444 and 6200 Muhlhauser Rd., West Chester, 513.942.2100

THE GOLDEN LAMB Comfort food that may just be worth the half-hour trek to Lebanon, 27 S. Broadway, 513.932.5065 HOLY GRAIL TAVERN & GRILLE Lively sports bar with casual fare and drink menu, 161 Joe Nuxhall Way, 513.621.2222 INCLINE PUBLIC HOUSE Upscale pub food including NYC-style pizzas ser ved against a stunning view of the city, 2601 W. 8th St., 513.251.3000 J. AUSTIN’S RIVERBANK CAFE Southern-style specialties like grilled catfish and shrimp po-boys, 102 Main St., Hamilton, 513.795.7640 KRUEGER’S TAVERN Contemporar y American

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PIES & PINTS Authentic craft piz za and beer establishment featuring bar food, Liberty Center, 7621 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.755.7437 THE PRESIDENTS ROOM Eclectic menu that blends contemporar y American, Italian and German flavors, 812 Race St., 513.721.2260 RED ROOST TAVERN Contemporar y American fare with organic, farm-to-table ingredients, 151 W. 5th St., 513.579.1234 RICK’S TAVERN & GRILLE Friendly neighborhood drinker y ser ving up pub grub amid 50 flat-screen

TANO BISTRO & CATERING Contemporar y bistro in historic Loveland, featuring fresh ingredients and a menu that changes with the seasons, 204 W. Loveland Ave., 513.683.8266 TERRY’S TURF CLUB Laid-back burger joint with large portions and vegetarian options, 4618 Eastern Ave., 513.533.4222 TOM + CHEE Specializes in tomato soup and grilled cheese, multiple locations including 9328 Union

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Centre Blvd., West Chester, 513.860.0638 W.G. KITCHEN & BAR Neighborhood bistro and retail wine shop where you can buy a bottle to take home, 3371 Princeton Rd., Hamilton, 513.887.9463 THE WILDFLOWER CAFE Farm-to-table fare ser ved in a converted centur y-old farmhouse, 207 E. Main St., Mason, 513.492.7514 ZBGB Gourmet burgers ser ved on artisan buns made in-house, 1438 Race St., 513.744.9242

EL PUEBLO Authentic Mexican fare made from secret family recipes, 4270 Hunt Rd., Blue Ash, 513.791.4405 JEFFERSON SOCIAL Upscale Mexican fare with extensive cocktail weekend, 101 E. Freedom Way, 513.381.2623 MAZUNTE TAQUERIA MEXICANA Casual Mexican eater y with trendy, festive decor, 5207 Madison Rd., 513.785.0000

BBQ

NADA Trendy Mexican cantina ser ving creative cock tails and modern twists on traditional south-ofthe-border favorites, 600 Walnut St., 513.721.6232

MONTGOMERY INN BOATHOUSE Ribs, burgers and other BBQ specialties, 925 Riverside Dr., 513.721.7427

QDOBA Casual Mexican grill featuring fresh, handcrafted meals, 2721 Edmonson Rd., 513.351.2269; Liberty Center, 7100 Foundr y Row, Liberty Township, 513.755.0486; Mason, 5030 Deer field Blvd., 513.770.0301; Blue Ash, 9749 Kenwood Rd., 513.984.2629; Florence, 7683 Mall Rd., Florence, KY, 859.647.0296

MIDWEST BEST BBQ & CREAMERY BBQ joint and ice cream parlor launched by the popular local BBQ sauce and rub company, 7832 Glendale-Milford Rd., Camp Dennison, 513.965.9000

SMOQ Southern BBQ soul food cooked low and slow, including ribs, brisket and pulled pork, 275 Pictoria Dr., Springdale, 513.671.7667

FRENCH

JEAN-ROBERT’S TABLE Exquisite French cuisine with a weekly changing lunch menu, 713 Vine St., 513.621.4777 TASTE OF BELGIUM Waffles and crepes (both sweet and savor y) at this local favorite, multiple locations including 1133 Vine St., 513.381.4607

GREEK/MEDITERRANEAN

ABIGAIL STREET Inventive cuisine with cheese menu and wine on tap in a trendy but casual setting, 1214 Vine St., 513.421.4040 DURUM GRILL Small, casual gyro eater y loved by the locals, 4764 Cornell Rd., 513.489.4777 PALOMINO Offering a mix of Mediterranean and contemporar y American cuisine with a view of Fountain Square, 505 Vine St., 513.381.1300 PHOENICIAN TAVERNA Mediterranean cuisine in a trendy but casual setting, 7944 S. Mason Montgomer y Rd., Mason, 513.770.0027 RAYA’S LEBANESE Mediterranean food, specializing in kabobs and gyros, 801 Elm St., 513.421.0049 ZULA Eclectic menu of Greek tapas dishes and extensive wine and craft beer lists, 1400 Race St., 513.744.9852

ITALIAN

BOCA French and Italian dishes, NYC-style pizzas and a gluten-free menu, 114 E. 6th St., 513.542.2022 BRIO TUSCAN GRILLE Ser ving high-quality steaks, housemade pasta and flatbreads prepared in an authentic Italian oven, Liberty Center, 7600 Gibson St., Liberty Township, 513.759.4500 BRAVO CUCINA ITALIANA Upscale-casual chain ser ving Italian classics with a twist amid Romanruin decor, multiple locations including 5045 Deerfield Blvd., Mason, 513.234.7900 and 9436 Water front Dr., West Chester, 513.759.9398

PIZ Z A

37 COAL-FIRED PIZZA An artisan pizzeria that fuses rustic Italian traditions with the smoky flavors of the U.S. Southwest, 9321 Montgomer y Rd., Montgomer y, 513.834.5460; Xavier, 3701 Montgomer y Rd., 513.834.5460 DEWEY’S PIZZA Specialty pizza pies with seasonal menu, multiple locations including 7663 Cox Ln., West Chester, 513.759.6777 GOODFELLAS PIZZERIA Pizzeria with large slices and late-night hours, 1211 Main St., 513.381.3625 LAROSA’S PIZZERIA Casual pizza joint ser ving the area for more than 60 years, multiple locations RICHARDS PIZZA Local chain ser ving up pies since 1955, multiple locations including the original at 417 Main St., Hamilton, 513.894.3296 SBARRO Casual eater y ser ving up New York-style piz za and pastas, Liberty Center, 7100 Foundr y Row, Liberty Township, 512.443.8300

STEAK HOUSE

BISTRO ON ELM Located within the Millennium Hotel Cincinnati, this bright spot offers steaks, seafood and pasta, 150 W. 5th St., 513.352.2189 CARLO & JOHNNY Another winner from Jeff Ruby ser ving prime steaks, seafood options and bountiful sides in an elegant space that was once a stagecoach stop, 9769 Montgomer y Rd., 513.936.8600 CELESTIAL STEAKHOUSE Upscale steak house and seafood restaurant with an impressive view, 1071 Celestial St., 513.241.4455 JAG’S STEAK & SEAFOOD Sur f and tur f is ser ved in the dining room or the high-energy piano bar, 5980 West Chester Rd., West Chester Township, 513.860.5353 JEFF RUBY’S STEAKHOUSE Reser vations highly

recommended at this high-end steak house, 700 Walnut St., Ste. 206, 513.784.1200 MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S Steak house and seafood with extensive bar menu and tapas options, 21 E. 5th St., 513.721.9339 MOERLEIN LAGER HOUSE Fine-dining establishment and artifact-adorned beer bar with a wonder ful view of the river, 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, 513.421.2337 MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE Popular steak house and seafood restaurant overlooking Fountain Square, 441 Vine St., 513.621.3111 PARKERS BLUE ASH TAVERN Elegantly rustic restaurant known for its prime rib and award-winning wine list, 4200 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, 513.891.8300 THE PRECINCT The original Jeff Ruby’s location features fine steaks and seafood in a turn-of-the-centur y setting, 311 Delta Ave., 513.321.5454 PRIME 47 Upscale menu featuring prime cuts and a wine vault, 580 Walnut St., 513.579.0720 RODIZIO GRILL Bra zilian steakhouse ser ving up succulent meats and authentic sides, Liber ty Center, 7630 Gibson St., Liber ty Township, 513.777.4777 TONY’S OF CINCINNATI Huge portions of prime beef and the freshest seafood (salad and potato included) are the hallmarks of this steak house from Tony Ricci, 12110 Montgomer y Rd., 513.677.1993

SUSHI/ASIAN FARE

ASIAN PARADISE Asian fusion restaurant and lounge offering popular happy-hour specials, 9521 Fields Ertel Rd., Loveland, 513.239.8881 BIBIBOP Healthy Korean meals that include quality proteins, vegetables, gluten-free grains and Asian sauces, Liberty Center, 7616 Blake St., Liberty Township, 513.310.6615 CRAVE Sushi bar that also features a selection of casual American fare, 175 Joe Nuxhall Way, Ste. 125, 513.241.8600 FUSIAN Sushi bar with create-your-own rolls, fresh juices and healthy side dishes, 600 Vine St., 513.421.7646 KAZE Trendy sushi and Japanese gastropub featuring a beer garden, 1400 Vine St., 513.898.7991 KONA GRILL Innovative exotic entrees, awardwinning sushi and fresh fish, 7524 Gibson St., Liberty Center Mall, Liberty Township, 513.322.5860 LORDS SUSHI Fresh Japanese and Korean fare, 6679 Dixie Hwy., Fair field, 513.870.0067 QUÁN HAPA Asian fusion and gastropub with trendy setting, 1331 Vine St., 513.421.7826

THAI

MANGO TREE THAI & SUSHI Casual eater y ser ving fresh, authentic Thai cuisine and sushi, 7229 Wooster Pike, 513.271.0809

NICOLA’S RISTORANTE Italian cuisine featuring fresh pastas and an extensive wine list, 1420 Sycamore St., 513.721.6200 PITRELLI’S A true mom-and-pop dining experience with cuisine from several regions of Italy, 404 2nd Ave., Mason, 513.770.0122 PRIMAVISTA Traditional Italian entrees with wine menu and a view of the city, 810 Matson Pl., 513.251.6467 SOTTO Trendy Italian restaurant ser ving small plates and handmade pastas, 118 E. 6th St., 513.977.6886 VIA VITE Casual dining of stone-fired pizza and fresh pastas with alfresco courtyard seating, 520 Vine St., 513.721.8483

MEXICAN

BAKERSFIELD Authentic Mexican street food with extensive tequila and whiskey menus, 1213 Vine St., 513.579.0446 CHUY’S Eclectic Tex-Mex eater y featuring handmade tortillas, 7980 Hosbrook Rd., 513.793.2489

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{ GATHERINGS }

1

2 3

THE BETHESDA FOUNDATION SUPPORTS

THE ROBOTIC CENTER OF EXCELLENCE

AT BETHESDA NORTH HOSPITAL 44

NEARLY 400 GUESTS attended the Bethesda LYCEUM to help raise almost $150,000 in support of The Robotics Center of Excellence at Bethesda North Hospital. During the reception, guests enjoyed cocktails and a hands-on robotics experience with the daVinci XI robotics platform. The reception was followed by dinner and an introduction from TriHealth’s President and CEO, Mark C. Clement. Dr. Mark Delworth, TriHealth System Chief of Surgery and Director of the Robotics Program at Bethesda North Hospital, shared the

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4 features of the robust program at Bethesda North Hospital, which ranks #1 in robotic surgery volume in Ohio, per Intuitive Surgical Inc. Dr. Delworth’s presentation was followed by this year’s keynote speaker, Dr. Hugh Herr, Director of the Biomechatronics group at The MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Herr shared how a mountaineering accident, which left him as a double amputee, inspired him to devote his life to advancing technology for prosthetic devices. All proceeds from the Bethesda LYCEUM benefit the development of The Robotic Center of Excellence at Bethesda North Hospital. Roboticassisted surgery is an innovative technology that allows surgeons to perform routine and complex surgeries through a few small openings, decreasing invasiveness and improving patient outcomes. Bethesda North Hospital, the regional leader in robotic-assisted surgery, is embracing this next frontier in minimally invasive surgery by adding the newest and most advanced robotic surgical system, the daVinci Xi. The success of this event was made possible by sponsors and individuals who shared a passion to support a transformational project at Bethesda North Hospital. A special thanks to Presenting Sponsor, Bethesda Inc., Speaker Sponsor, TriHealth and Reception Sponsor, The Bethesda Auxiliary.

5

6

7

ALL LISTINGS ARE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT 1. M  ark C. Clement, TriHealth President & CEO 2. Dr. Hugh Herr, Director, Biomechatronics group at The MIT Media Lab. Dr. Herr also is on the left in each photo listed below 3 & 6. Tim Beischel, LYCEUM Committee Chair and Project Executive for R.J. Beischel Building Company; Andy Swallow, President & CEO Bethesda Foundation; Matthew Lang, LYCEUM Committee Member and Clinical Sales Manager Intuitive Surgical Inc - ISRG

8

4. Dr. Mark Delworth, TriHealth System Chief of Surgery and Director of the Robotics Program at Bethesda North Hospital 5. Nancy & Bob Mitchell. Bob is a Bethesda Foundation Board Member and Chief Marketing Officer for Cintas Corporation. Cintas is also a corporate sponsor for Bethesda LYCEUM 7. T  erri & Matt Tomaszewski. Matt experienced firsthand the benefits of robotic-assisted surgery at Bethesda North Hospital 8 . Beth & Ken Ryan. Ken is a LYCEUM Committee Member and Vice President Director of Institutional Relationship Management for Fort Washington Investment Advisors. Fort Washington is also a corporate sponsor for Bethesda LYCEUM

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT BETHESDAFOUNDATION.COM CINCINNATI HEALTH & LIFE | SUMMER 2017

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{ BE THERE }

INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION, Fountain Square, July 3.

NOW-SEPTEMBER 30 Having arrived safely at Cincinnati Museum Center from a galaxy far, far away, STAR WARSTM AND THE POWER OF COSTUME, a traveling Smithsonian exhibition, is set to entertain audiences throughout the summer. Featuring more than 60 handcrafted costumes from all seven films in the Star Wars saga, this collection is sure to be a hit with fans young and old, as well as film buffs, designers and fashionistas. The exhibit gives an inside look at the artistry of George Lucas and his team of exceptionally talented costume designers, their creative process and the challenges they encountered along the way. If you’ve seen even one Star Wars film, you know the extent to which costumes can create not only individual characters, but whole worlds. Organized into nine chapters including, “Dressing a Galaxy,” “Outlaws and Outsiders” and “Darth Vader: Iconic Villain,” the exhibit includes the costumes of Jedi Masters, Galactic Senators, Queen Amidala, Chewbacca and more. Short videos feature interviews with artists, designers and actors. Get the full story and buy tickets at cincymuseum.org/star-wars. JUNE 24 Coming off like a combination of Harry Houdini and Evel Knievel, DAVID BLAINE has redefined the idea of what it means to be a magician. A new kind of 46

entertainer for a new era, he constantly pushes himself to the limit and beyond, creating an extreme new vision of the magician's art. His latest tour finds him challenging himself every night by attempting feats he's never tried before. So his Taft Theatre show will be something utterly unique. Get more info at tafttheatre. org/events/2017/06/david-blaine.

JULY 3 Are you anxious to get started celebrating the Fourth of July this year? Get a jump on the fun by beginning the festivities a day early. There'll be an INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION Monday from 7 to 11 p.m. at Fountain Square. All the impatient revelers who turn up at the Square will be treated to a full-on fireworks display, of course, but they'll also be able to catch some great live music, and the Fountain Square concessions will be offering specials for both soft drinks and adult beverages. For more, go to myfountainsquare.com/event/ independence-day-celebration-3.

JULY 15-23 Be there when Mozart makes his way to the Queen City. The Cincinnati Opera will be presenting a production of Mozart's legendary opera THE MAGIC FLUTE, an immortal work where epic fantasy and timeless music meld into one. An evil queen, an

endangered princess, a star-crossed love story, an intrepid hero—this iconic opera's got it all. And there's just as much magic in the music. For the full details, take a look at cincinnatiopera.org/magic-flute.

JULY 15 When CHICAGO hits the

Riverbend Music Center, the venue will be temporarily transformed into a classic-rock paradise. After all, this iconic band has been running steady for nearly five decades now, and has more than enough hits up its sleeves to leave an audience overwhelmed. When the group that brought you "Saturday in the Park," "25 or 6 to 4," "If You Leave Me Now," and so many more memorable songs hits the stage, the phrase "embarrassment of riches" really comes into play. Get more info at riverbend.org/event/Chicago.

JULY 15 and AUGUST 19 When you show up for one of the CASTLE DAYS AT LOVELAND CASTLE, you're not just turning back the clock for a trip into history, you're in for a day full of fun. You can get the feel for what life was like in and around a medieval castle, stroll through the castle gardens, visit a marketplace offering handcrafted items, and catch plenty of live entertainment, including music, comedy and historic reenactments—all in keeping with the period theme. For further information, visit lovelandcastle.com.

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JULY 19 MACY'S KIDS, CULTURES, CRITTERS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL will be a very special day at the Cincinnati Zoo. For one thing, admission to the Zoo will be a jaw-dropping $1, which should be enticement enough. But there's plenty more to show up for—multiple stages with international musical offerings from samba to brass bands, kids' crafts, face painting and animal encounters are only the start of it. The best part: You’ll be supporting the Learning Through Art childhood literacy program by attending. Learn more at cincinnatizoo.org/events/kids-culturescritters-and-crafts-festival.

JULY 27-29 How much R&B talent

can be contained under one roof? Well, if you take the roof off and make it Paul Brown Stadium, then the CINCINNATI MUSIC FESTIVAL seems like it's fully prepared to answer that question. By putting Mary J. Blige, Usher, Fantasia, En Vogue, Bell Biv DeVoe, Kem and plenty of others onstage over the course of a couple of consecutive nights, the festival will offer up some of the best in R&B of yesterday and today. Get the lowdown by visiting cincymusicfestival.com/lineup.

AUGUST 4 Once in every generation or so, a voice comes along that's unlike any other, and two such titanic talents will be coming together for one night at the Riverbend Music Center for a one-of-a-kind evening. Rock 'n' roll giant ROD STEWART, the man with decades of hits to his name, from "Maggie May" to "Forever Young" and beyond, will be joined by CYNDI LAUPER, the woman who redefined '80s pop with gems like "Girls Just Want to Have Fun" and "Time After Time." It's a lot of talent for a single stage to hold. For ticket info, take

a look at riverbend.org/event/rod-stewartwith-special-guest-cyndi-lauper.

AUGUST 12 At this year’s GOURMET MELODIES event, sip on fine wine and craft beer, savor delicious gourmet hors d’oeuvres and dance to tunes from some of the best local musicians, all at the beautiful Anderson Pavilion in Smale Riverfront Park. As Hospice of Cincinnati celebrates 40 years of providing comfort, compassion and personalized end-of-life care to those in need, you can honor their legacy in the community and support their work—all while enjoying a great evening out with friends old and new. Along with great music and food, guests will be able to bid on exciting silent-auction items and enjoy a spin on Carol Ann’s Carousel! The event begins at 7 p.m. and tickets are $100, with all proceeds benefitting Hospice of Cincinnati. For tickets and sponsorship information, visit BethesdaFoundation.com. AUGUST 12-20 If you want to see some serious tennis, here's your chance. The WESTERN & SOUTHERN OPEN has been going since 1999, and it's the oldest U.S. tennis tournament that still occurs in its city of origin. There are millions of dollars at stake in the purses for the men's and women's events. But there's plenty of action off the court as well, with music from dozens of bands, locally sourced food concessions, bars and even a retail plaza. Get the rest of the story at wsopen.com. AUGUST 24-26 Beer and comedy are a pretty unbeatable combination, and the 10th annual CINCY BREW HA-HA will make that crystal clear when it rolls

around to Sawyer Point Park this summer. The largest beer and comedy festival in the country, it features more than 75 comedians on its four stages over the course of three nights. And it's a suds lover's delight, with more than 120 different beers on offer. Not content just to watch? You can apply to perform online. Find out how to get in on the fun by taking a look at cincybrewhaha.com.

AUGUST 26 When you attend the 5th annual installment of TASTE OF OTR, not only are you setting yourself up for a uniquely delicious experience, you're taking part in an important community event. The locally sourced food and craft beer you'll encounter comes from the finest Over-theRhine folks in the business. And besides patronizing local culinary talent, you'll also be doing your part for a good cause: raising money for Tender Mercies, an organization that provides housing and support to homeless people with mental illness. Get more info at tendermerciesinc.org/5thannual-taste-otr. SEPTEMBER 2-30 Even

William Shakespeare had trouble writing sometimes. At least that's the way the funny, romantic SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE tells it. Based on the screenplay from the hit film of the same name, the play tells the tale of Shakespeare being inspired by the girl of his dreams to write Romeo and Juliet, with plenty of complications along the way. Directed by Blake Robison, artistic director for Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, this irresistible blend of comedy, romance and drama will be making its way to the Marx Theatre. For ticket info, go to cincyplay.com/index.php?option=com_ production&id=125.

Send event listings to: Cincinnati Health & Life, 110 Summit Ave., Montvale, NJ 07645; or email editor@wainscotmedia.com. Listings must be received two months before the event and must include a phone number/website that will be published.

TASTE OF OTR: August 26.

DAVID BLAINE: June 24.

WESTERN & SOUTHERN OPEN: August 12-20.

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almighty

{ POWER FOOD }

ASPARAGUS LOADED WITH NUTRIENTS, THESE DELICIOUS SPEARS ARE PACKED WITH POWERFUL HEALTH BENEFITS.

THIS TASTY VEGETABLE is tender, easy to prepare and packed with nutritional benefits. So maybe it’s time to make these succulent stalks a menu regular in your home.

POWER UP Asparagus helps the heart in several ways. It’s rich in fiber, which can reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, and full of inflammation-fighting antioxidants. It also packs plenty of B vitamins, which help regulate the amino acid homocysteine, high levels of which can be a danger to your arteries. What’s more, one ½-cup serving of this powerhouse vegetable provides 57 percent of your daily requirement of vitamin K (which helps blood clotting and strengthens bones), and 34 percent of the daily requirement for folate (needed to produce DNA and to help the body’s cells divide properly). Asparagus also contains a type of soluble fiber that helps us absorb nutrients by supporting the colon’s probiotic bacteria. You get all that—and distinctive taste, too—for only 20 calories!

Pre-cooking prep is minimal. Use a vegetable peeler to remove the outer skin of the stem’s thicker bottom portion, which tends to be tough and stringy. Don’t cut the tips off! Wash asparagus under cold water to remove any sand, soil or pesticide residue and then cook stalks whole to maintain nutrients. Serve asparagus as a side dish by sautéing in your choice of vegetable or chicken broth, olive oil or water, or by baking in the oven, lightly sprinkled with Parmesan cheese. In the mood for a breakfast with a difference? Asparagus makes a flavorful addition to any omelet. Or liven up that lunchtime salad by chopping up asparagus spears—raw or cooked—and tossing them into the mix.

the vegetable, but only 20 are edible. They come in green, white and purple. While green asparagus sprouts out of the ground and is harvested when it’s six to eight inches tall, white asparagus grows under a layer of mulch—it’s white because, lacking sunlight, it doesn’t develop chlorophyll content. (It’s also more tender and delicate in flavor.) Purple asparagus is harvested much smaller than green, at just two to three inches tall, and tends to be fruitier in flavor. It also has a higher sugar content; phytonutrients called anthocyanins give it its purple hue and provide additional nutritional benefits.

DID YOU KNOW? China and Peru are the world’s top asparagus producers. There are about 300 varieties of

BUY/STORE/SERVE Choose stalks that are round and neither fat nor twisted. The stems should be firm and thin with deep green or purplish closed tips. To store your spears, wrap a damp paper towel or cloth around the ends and place in your fridge. Try to consume asparagus within 48 hours of purchase, when it’s at its best both in taste and nutritional value.

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Memories are the one gift you give to yourself.

Elevate your stay with an intimate place to belong beyond your hotel room. The Ritz-Carlton Club Level is an exclusive space with unique amenities and services where guests enjoy fine culinary presentations ideal for families and business travelers. ritzcarlton.com/resortsofnaples

NAPLES____________ NAPLES GOLF__________

Š

2017 The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C.

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“A Regular Night at Tony’s is a Special Occasion” -CinCinnati EnquirEr

“Top Food Rating Among Steakhouses.”

–Zagat

“Steaking a Claim on Perfection” —SophiStiCatEd Living MagaZinE

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A T O NY R IC C I STEA K H OU S E 401 West Main Street 12110 Montgomery Road center registration Lexington, KY 40507 Cincinnati, OH 45249

859.243.0210

reverse application

513.677.1993

Additional bliss revealed at tonyssteaksandseafood.com

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Cincinnati Health & Life: Summer 2017  

The Good Living Magazine from TRIHEALTH

Cincinnati Health & Life: Summer 2017  

The Good Living Magazine from TRIHEALTH