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FEAST Your

EYES What makes a holiday meal truly special? Family, heartwarming traditions, and, of course, a festive tablescape.

OPENFORHERE THANKSGIVING TIPS


A special gathering calls for a fabulous table. So just in time for Thanksgiving, we asked four champion entertainers to share their best ideas for creating a warm, inviting space, along with their favorite holiday traditions and memories.

Lela Rose

MY FAVORITE THANKSGIVING TRADITION My mom and I make a pear upside-down cake every Thanksgiving. It’s a tradition I’ve carried on with my kids. I also just love the idea of people enjoying a home-cooked meal. I hope my children continue to do this for many holidays to come. MY TABLETOP I’m always thinking up new ways to do place

cards since they’re personalized and special. Every Thanksgiving, I embroider each guest’s name on a linen napkin, adding it above a previous visitor’s. Seeing who’s been at past dinners is a lot of fun, and it’s a creative alternative to a guest book. But if sewing isn’t your strong suit, you can use a piece of mottled yarn to create the initial of each guest as a place card.

“I love mixing textures, patterns, and colors whenever I can. I try to blend fashion and food.”

Ann Mashburn Designer of Ann Mashburn readyto-wear and accessories, owner of Ann Mashburn stores

MY FAVORITE THANKSGIVING TRADITION We play pass the pepper: We come up with a question like “What’s your most embarrassing grade school moment?” and then go around the table answering (and, obviously, passing the pepper grinder). It’s a great icebreaker, and learning new things about your friends and family is so much fun.

MY TABLETOP Candles and good music are the key to any great party. I have a mix of old and new candlesticks, and I set up some tall candles in the center of the table and smaller votives all around. I let my husband handle the music. He has an amazing album collection and makes a mean playlist.

“We’re very ad hoc. Less is more. People should just enjoy the holiday and cook

PORTRAITS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: STEVEN PAN. GUY D’ALEMA/COURTESY OF OWN. DONNA NEWMAN. ALI HARPER. TABLE SETTINGS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: QUENTIN BACON. MICHAEL BENNETT/OFFSET. TRAVIS MAGEE. RICHARD CLARK/GETTY IMAGES.

Designer of her namesake fashion label, author of Prêt-à-Party: Great Ideas for Good Times and Creative Entertaining (Rizzoli)


Merle Dandridge Stage and screen actress, star of OWN’s Greenleaf

MY FAVORITE THANKSGIVING TRADITION To truly capture the spirit of the season, I always start the day with a volunteer activity: My husband and I serve meals at a local shelter. Expressing your gratitude at the table is important, too— it’s a reminder that the day isn’t just about food and games. Thanksgiving is a wonderful opportunity to look one another in the eye and share joys, burdens, and laughter.

MY TABLETOP Think rustic fall colors. I love going to the grocery store, grabbing an armful of flowers, and mixing and matching them in several small bouquets in lowball glasses. Choose a colorful cocktail you can make in a huge batch and let guests help themselves. You can even scatter clear Christmas lights and a few mini pumpkins for a fast and fabulous table.

“Decorating doesn’t have to be expensive. Use your imagination... and maybe Pinterest!”

Darcy Miller Illustrator and author of the new book Celebrate Everything! Fun Ideas to Bring Your Parties to Life (HarperCollins)

MY FAVORITE THANKSGIVING TRADITION The thankful game brings all the generations together and gets everyone thinking about gratitude. Everybody writes what they’re thankful for on something that’s decorating the table (place cards, hand turkeys, paper leaves— it can be as simple or elaborate as you like). One person collects everyone’s answers and reads them aloud as guests take a guess at who wrote each one. Afterward, everyone

takes their own home so they can remember throughout the year what they appreciate. MY TABLETOP Gold is always my palette of choice. It works so well with everything, as either the main focus or just an accent. A touch of gold paint can go a long way. I’ll use it on pumpkins, branches, or even smaller, unexpected things like walnuts.

“Not only do we DIY, but we also DIT (do it together), which is the most important part.”


Every holiday should be rich in friends, family, and lasting memories. In a sustainable home that looks good, works well, and is friendly to your wallet. Because no matter what you do, who you are, or how much you make, you deserve to make the dream yours.

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Contents

114

FEATURES

Live Your Best Life

114 THE EARLY-BIRD THANKSGIVING Whether your idea of cooking is getting adventurous with new ingredients, hauling out the old standbys, prepping for days on end, or making good use of a can opener, these recipes and tips will help you create a spread that satisfies everyone—including you.

128 WHERE ARE YOU GOING? Leatrice Small expands her family and her heart in equal measure.

130 VOTING RITES Sarah Jessica Parker, Gloria Steinem, Congressman John Lewis, and more share what casting a ballot means to them.

134 FESTIVE IN A FLASH Party shoes, jazzy jewels, and genius makeup: 26 quick and easy ways to sparkle. ON THE COVER: Oprah photographed by Ruven Afanador. FASHION EDITOR: Jenny Capitain. HAIR: Nicole Mangrum. MAKEUP: Derrick Rutledge. MANICURE: Roseann Singleton using Dior Vernis at Art Department. SET DESIGN: Todd Wiggins for Mary Howard Studio. On Oprah: Dress, Ryan Roche. Earrings, Mish New York. Cuff, Roberto Coin. Chain-link bracelets, Selim Mouzannar. Ring, Nina Runsdorf. Booties, Aquatalia. Cover 2: “Feast Your Eyes,” table setting: Goblet, tumblers, and charger, William Yeoward Crystal. Dinner, bread, and butter plates, Astier de Villatte. Flatware, Puiforcat. Bookworm quill, Tom Dixon. For details see Shop Guide.

23 A woman who’s putting forgotten flowers to great use...Fox News host and author Megyn Kelly on living authentically...happy tales of foster pet parents... Josh Groban on making time for baseball—and his best buddy, Sweeney... O articles editor Katie Arnold-Ratliff ponders what made her good man so hard to find...and more. 38 THE WORLD ACCORDING TO GAYLE

May We Help You?

Love That!

41 ELIZABETH GILBERT

65 FAB FIND A bohemian

We all contain multitudes— and are stronger when we embrace them.

cross-body bag with style and substance.

47 DEAR LISA Mad money and odd coupling: Writer at large Lisa Kogan untangles it all.

2

and patterned knits that make every day cozier.

50 MARTHA BECK Are

68 ADAM’S STYLE SHEET Picture-perfect

you embracing your feelings—or wallowing in them?

little black dresses, plus all the accessories you need to go retro glam.

55 FARNOOSH TORABI

72 ADAM’S HOME STYLE SHEET Chinoiserie-

Four ways that gratitude enriches you.

Editor at large Gayle King bundles up in style and celebrates the history behind Hamilton.

NOVEMBER 2016

67 GREAT BUYS UNDER $100 Fireside flannels

@OPRAHMAGAZINE

inspired accents fill your house with good fortune.

80 THE BEAUTY OF GIVING O’s makeover maestros spotlight four women who are always shining their light on others.


80 107

90 130

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: CHRISTOPHER TESTANI. DEVON JARVIS. CHRIS BUZELLI. CARMELO DONATO. GREGOR HALENDA (2). GABRIEL HACKETT/GETTY IMAGES.

134 O, Beautiful!

Feeling Good

Reading Room

Let’s Eat!

87 FRESH BUDS

93 THE REFLECTION EFFECT Allison Gilbert

107 Billy Collins’s playful

143 THE POWER OF 3

and profound 12th poetry collection...a stunning debut novel with echoes of Toni Morrison...the thrilling return of an inscrutable Irish detective...new works from two wickedly funny women...ten titles to pick up now, including Taraji P. Henson’s passionate memoir and Mary Oliver’s inspirational essays...and more.

Our guide to turning three key ingredients into delectable dishes. This month: artichokes, red bell peppers, and olives.

A delicate floral scent with a dramatic effect.

88 STOP THAT! SKINCARE SLIPUPS

investigates the potential health benefits of nostalgia.

Nine ways your daily routine could be leaving you parched.

97 THE DIABETES DANGER ZONE How to

89 ONE BLOW-OUT, FIVE DAYS How to keep

99 BOOST YOUR HEALTH IN TWO MINUTES OR LESS

Monday’s blow-out looking fresh till Friday.

Five simple ways to banish tension, germs, and more.

90 VAL’S GUIDE TO GORGEOUS Beauty

100 BETTER, FASTER, STRONGER Stroke

director Valerie Monroe on a matte lipcolor that lasts, three chic compacts with big-city style, switching shampoos, and more.

survivor Merideth Gilmor’s road to recovery.

dial back your risk.

146 MIXING BOWL A cornucopia of Thanksgiving finds, favorites, and quick fixes, from a decadent all-inone dessert to cocktail mixers for every palate.

103 WINTER ADVISORY How Dr. Oz gets through cold-and-flu season snile-free.

OPRAH.COM

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NOVEMBER 2016

IN EVERY ISSUE 12 14 16 18 21 59

CONTRIBUTORS BEHIND THE SCENES THE QUESTION LET’S TALK! OPRAH: HERE WE GO! THE O LIST: NOW THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT EDITION 148 SHOP GUIDE 150 OPRAH: WHAT I KNOW FOR SURE


TM


Modern Classic Style Since 1947


WHAT’S YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO THANKSGIVING DINNER?

FOUNDER AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Oprah Winfrey

Tomato soup cake. Don’t knock it till you’ve tried it.

EDITOR IN CHIEF My appetite!

Lucy Kaylin EDITOR AT LARGE

Gayle King DEPUTY EDITOR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

DESIGN DIRECTOR

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

MANAGING EDITOR & DIRECTOR, EDITORIAL PARTNERSHIPS

Deborah Way

Adam Glassman

Jill Armus

Amy Maclin

Adam Bell

BOOKS EDITOR

BEAUTY DIRECTOR

WRITER AT LARGE

PHOTO DIRECTOR

Leigh Haber

Valerie Monroe

Lisa Kogan

Christina Weber

ART ART DIRECTOR Jessica Weit DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR Gillian MacLeod SENIOR DESIGNER Tova Diamond DIGITAL EDITIONS DESIGNER Liz Chan DIGITAL IMAGE SPECIALIST Carlos Paredes

ARTICLES ARTICLES EDITOR Katie Arnold-Ratliff FASHION FEATURES EDITOR Nicole McGovern SENIOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS Elyse Moody, Molly Simms ASSOCIATE EDITOR Zoe Donaldson ASSISTANT EDITORS Dotun Akintoye, June Jennings

PHOTO PHOTO EDITOR Scott M. Lacey ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR Viviana Quevedo PHOTO RESEARCHER Deirdre Read

FASHION FASHION MARKET⁄ACCESSORIES DIRECTOR

Robin Beck Nazzaro

I do impressions of my grandmother and my childhood next-door neighbor to make my parents laugh.

ACCESSORIES EDITOR Paula Lee FASHION MARKET EDITOR Kristina Lepore BOOKINGS EDITOR Alicia Bridgewater Lanigan FASHION ASSISTANT Stephanie Rodgers ASSISTANT TO THE CREATIVE DIRECTOR Bridget Rooney

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR

Megan F. Belair

COPY COPY CHIEF Adrienne Girard SENIOR COPY EDITOR Lisa DeLisle COPY EDITOR Christina Doka

STYLE CONTRIBUTING STYLE EDITOR Rae Ann Herman STYLE ASSISTANT Manouska Jeantus

RESEARCH CHIEF OF RESEARCH Naomi Barr SENIOR RESEARCH EDITOR Bradley Rife RESEARCH EDITOR Tracey Thomas Hosmer

BEAUTY ASSISTANT BEAUTY EDITOR Melissa Goldberg A D M I N I S T R AT I O N EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR IN CHIEF

A beautiful flower arrangement for the table’s centerpiece.

INTERNS ART Kathy Powell EDITORIAL Halle Liebman, Erica Sloan FASHION Meredith Coughlin, Rachel Harris,

Karla L. Gonzalez SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Kristi Stewart ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR AT LARGE Joseph Zambrano Making a reservation at a restaurant that has turkey dinner on the menu.

Usually some kind of pumpkin dessert to fuel my own pumpkin obsession.

Caroline Noce, Candace Richardson, Erin Saslawsky PHOTO Zerlina Panush STYLE Emma Johnson, Katherine Klein

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS AND WRITERS

Martha Beck, Nate Berkus, Donna Brazile, Brené Brown, PhD, Meredith Bryan, Michelle Burford, Kym Canter, Jenny Capitain, Susan Casey, Elizabeth Gilbert, Bob Greene, Sanjay Gupta, MD, Andrew Holden, Phillip C. McGraw, PhD, Mehmet Oz, MD, Maria Shriver, Farnoosh Torabi, Iyanla Vanzant, Peter Walsh

CONTRIBUTING FRIEND

Nikki Hensley

I N S TAG R A M M E R O F T H E M O N T H

@cheyennepalma

A dining room table that can seat 12. It’s by far the best furniture purchase I’ve ever made.

OPRAH.COM I take my teen EDITOR IN CHIEF Mamie Healey EXECUTIVE EDITOR Naomi Kim SENIOR WEB EDITOR Ruth Baron cousins to the WEB EDITOR Katherine Fung FOOD EDITOR Lynn Andriani HEALTH EDITOR Emma Haak BOOKS EDITOR Leigh Newman movies after dinner. CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR Myles Evans CONTRIBUTING WEB PRODUCERS Pamela Masin, Joann Pan, Ashley Sepanski Shout-out to Twilight and The Hunger CONTRIBUTING WEB ASSISTANT Hannah Freedman WEB INTERN Sara McBride Games for those November release dates!

NOVEMBER 2016

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WHAT’S YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO THANKSGIVING DINNER?

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT⁄PUBLISHER & CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER Gravy, which is way more important than most people realize. If the turkey, stuffing, or mashed potatoes aren’t on point, the gravy can save the meal.

Jayne Jamison ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER⁄SALES

Julia Fry

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER⁄MARKETING

Kristina McMahon

Cornbread casserole. It tastes like cake, but I’ve convinced myself it falls into the veggie category.

GENERAL MANAGER

Larry Greenblatt EXECUTIVE BEAUTY DIRECTOR Patricia Foster FOOD AND BEVERAGE DIRECTOR Mindy Miller STYLE DIRECTOR Christine Potter Mulhearne ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Making sure everyone’s drinks are always full. What’s a family gathering without cocktails?

Courtney Kumpf

ACCOUNT MANAGER Laura Quagliariello EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, HEALTH Ron Balasco SALES ASSOCIATE Kelsey Reynolds MIDWEST ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Robin Billie MIDWEST ACCOUNT MANAGER

Sarah Heckler

WESTERN ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kathleen Olson NORTHWEST ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Janet Yano DETROIT REPRESENTATIVE

Mary Pat Kaleth, Media Project Solutions SOUTHWEST REPRESENTATIVE

Staci Ferber, Wisdom Media LLC TRAVEL AND TOURISM REPRESENTATIVE

Ronda Thiem, Madden Media ITALIAN REPRESENTATIVE Robert Schoenmaker VICE PRESIDENT, HEARST DIRECT MEDIA

Christine Hall SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER, HEARST DIRECT MEDIA My dad passed away earlier this year, and he always made delicious oyster dressing. So this Thanksgiving I’ll be taking on that duty in honor of him.

Michael Rohr

P U B L I S H E D BY H E A R S T C O M M U N I CAT I O N S , I N C . PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Steven R. Swartz CHAIRMAN William R. Hearst III EXECUTIVE VICE CHAIRMAN Frank A. Bennack, Jr. SECRETARY Catherine A. Bostron TREASURER Carlton Charles HEARST MAGAZINES DIVISION PRESIDENT David Carey PRESIDENT, MARKETING & PUBLISHING DIRECTOR

Michael A. Clinton PRESIDENT, DIGITAL MEDIA Troy Young SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Debi Chirichella EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Ellen Levine PUBLISHING CONSULTANTS

Gilbert C. Maurer, Mark F. Miller FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE AND SUBSCRIPTION QUESTIONS,

such as renewals, address changes, email preferences, billing, and account status, go to service.theoprahmag.com, or write to O, The Oprah Magazine, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. See Shop Guide. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.

NOVEMBER 2016

CREATIVE SERVICES DIRECTOR Sarah Massimo EXECUTIVE MARKETING DIRECTOR

Ashley O’Brien

ASSOCIATE INTEGRATED MARKETING DIRECTOR Brittany Davis ASSOCIATE INTEGRATED MARKETING MANAGERS

Linet Beras, Hannah Hogensen SENIOR PROMOTION DESIGNER Amber Wolff MARKETING COORDINATOR Jennifer Lavoie CONSUMER MARKETING DIRECTOR Tracy Thomas ADVERTISING SERVICES DIRECTOR Felicia Kinscy Nutella-stuffed chocolate chip cookies, which are usually gone before dinner starts.

PRODUCTION⁄OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Chuck Lodato OPERATIONS ACCOUNT MANAGER Elizabeth Cascone PREMEDIA ACCOUNT MANAGER Karen Nazario BUSINESS COORDINATOR Katheryn Remulla ADVERTISING ASSISTANTS

Stephanie Ashton, Michelle Ann Clark, Colleen Kollar, Melissa Loughlin, Rishika Mahtani RESEARCH MANAGER Tina Giberti CENTRALIZED BILLING SERVICES COORDINATOR

Dominique Restucci ADVERTISING INTERNS Kristen Chiafullo, Grace You

MARKETING INTERNS

Molly Isebrands, Teona Ringgold

EDITORIAL OFFICES 300 West 57th Street, 36th Floor, New York, NY 10019

Five-cheese gourmet mac and cheese. It’s actually hard for me to share because it’s so yummy!

ADVERTISING OFFICES NEW YORK:

300 West 57th Street, 36th Floor, New York, NY 10019 (212-903-5366; fax: 212-903-5388) CHICAGO: One South Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL 60606 (312-251-5358; fax: 312-251-5311) DETROIT: Media Project Solutions, 943 South Shady Hollow Circle, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304 (fax: 248-644-1880) LOS ANGELES: 3000 Ocean Park Boulevard, Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310-664-2910; fax: 310-664-2913) SAN FRANCISCO: 550 Kearny Street, Suite 500, San Francisco, CA 94108 (415-844-6384; fax: 415-844-6397) SOUTHWEST: Wisdom Media LLC, 3131 Turtle Creek Boulevard, Suite 450, Dallas, TX 75219 (214-526-3800; fax: 214-526-1475) TRAVEL AND TOURISM: Madden Media, 345 East Toole Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85701 (phone and fax: 520-322-0895) ITALY: Hearst Advertising Worldwide, Via R. Bracco, 6, 20159 Milano, Italy (+39-02-62694441; rschoenmaker@hearst.it)

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Contributors Emily L. Foley, Writer “LATER BLOOMERS,” PAGE 26

It’s All Gravy

It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without... my mom and sister creating magazine cover–worthy cuisine, like beautifully braided bread. The day after Thanksgiving, I... decorate for Christmas. I used to think it should wait until December, but having kids made me want to maximize the holidays as much as possible!

Five of the creative minds behind this month’s issue give thanks and chow down.

Allison Gilbert, Writer My favorite post-turkey activity is... lingering over photos, reminiscing, and sharing stories about family. The day after Thanksgiving, I...go for a walk by the pond near my house. A little solitude in nature helps remind me of all I’m grateful for, not just on Thanksgiving but every day.

Jamilla Okubo,

Illustrator

Christopher Testani,

Photographer

“YOUNGER THAN THAT NOW,” PAGE 110

“THE EARLY-BIRD THANKSGIVING,” PAGE 114

If I could have one leftover from Thanksgiving dinner, it would be...macaroni and cheese, whether it’s a Southern version with layers of extra-sharp cheddar or one with Gruyère and Parmesan. My favorite post-turkey activity is...eating sweet potato pie.

It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without...my mom’s turkey gravy. It’s the only time of year she makes it, and I really look forward to it. My favorite post-turkey activity is... watching football, which turns into napping. It’s been this way since I was a kid, so it’s my unofficial tradition.

Ivy Pochoda, Writer “KILLING HER SOFTLY,” PAGE 107

This year I owe a huge thanks to...my nearly 2-year-old daughter. She’s reintroduced me to a world of wonder that I’d let slip away as I grew older. If I could have one leftover from Thanksgiving dinner, it would be...pie. It’s the only component of the meal that can stand alone, while all the other foods demand one another to be in harmony.

NOVEMBER 2016

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FOLEY: JAMIE ANNARINO. TESTANI: MEREDITH MUNN. GILBERT: ELENA SEIBERT. OKUBO: COURTESY OF JAMILLA OKUBO. POCHODA: JUSTIN NOWELL.

“THE REFLECTION EFFECT,” PAGE 93


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Behind the Scenes

A Warm

Welcome

“Isn’t this a beautiful door?” Oprah asked the crew as she sashayed

This holiday season, Oprah is getting into her comfort zone. THERE ARE LOTS OF WAYS to dress a turkey, but only one way to dress an Oprah—as we were reminded at this month’s cover shoot. “My clothes must make me want to lounge!” she said with faux-diva drama and perfect comic timing. This Ryan Roche knit dress did the trick: soft and stretchy enough for a little on-set dancing to Adele, chic enough for holiday hostessing. Makeup artist Derrick Rutledge also went for a soft look, using his trick for a subtle lip: a dusting of powder under the lipstick to mute the shade. “So I’m not saying ‘Come on in, y’all’ with bright red lips,” Oprah joked. As the conversation turned to gratitude, she shared her top tip for a joyful Thanksgiving: “Spend less time on the turkey and give more attention to the people at your table.” —NICOLE M C GOVERN

KNIT HITS

GO FOR THE GOLD

TASTEFUL NUDES

GRAY AREA

Dress, RVN, $495; rvnnyc.com Earrings, Sequin, $148; sequin-nyc.com Heels, $99; ninewest.com

Cardigan, White House Black Market, $98; whbm.com Sweater, $15, and pants, $30; uniqlo.com Belt, $95; reiss.com Clutch, $178; vincecamuto.com Sneakers, Aldo, $75; aldoshoes.com

Cardigan, $638; eileenfisher.com Sweater, $250; rebeccataylor.com Skirt, Nic + Zoe, $138; nicandzoe .com Belt, $50; vincecamuto.com Watch, $295; citizenwatch.com Boots, Mossimo, $50; target.com

NOVEMBER 2016

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OPRAH: SIOUX NESI (2). “KNIT HITS”: DEVON JARVIS/STUDIO D. STYLIST: NORINE SMITH/HALLEY RESOURCES.

For entertaining at home, head-to-toe knits are the right blend of polished and cozy. “At least one piece should be fitted or belted,” says O creative director Adam Glassman. “You can layer similar tones to create a long, lean line.”


The Question Spending my birthday in my homeland of Jamaica after living in New York for 25 years. The verdant countryside and sumptuous food set the tone for a happy year.

JAN DOLE Elk Mound, Wisconsin

Having the opportunity to spend nine wonderful years with our beloved family Chihuahua, Yoshi. She recently passed away, but the wonderful memories of her will always be treasured.

CARMEN GLOVER Bronx

Q THIS MONTH WE WONDERED...

Our Next Question

What was the last thing you were grateful for?

FOLLOW US

OFELIA NIEVES Livermore, California

Saying goodbye to my sister and cheerleader, Bobby, one last time. I flew to Philadelphia to be at her bedside in the hospital and thanked her for being the best sister ever. She told me, “That’s what sisters do.” There’s nothing I could be more grateful for than to have made it in time to say farewell.

What adventure would you love to share with your best friend? Tell us at oprah.com/ question or email us at thequestion@hearst .com, and your response could be featured in our January issue.

The friends I met in my early 20s. Through our penny-pinching days, raising children, and divorces, we’ve remained so close. Even though I now live two hours away, 208 miles round trip for lunch with them is nothing compared to the pleasure of their company.

Kayaking across the bay with my 9-year-old daughter this summer. We were alone on the water, so quiet and peaceful, when she just started singing, lost in her thoughts. Hearing her pure, sweet voice made me so thankful to be there in that moment with my bundle of wonder.

@oprahmagazine

facebook.com/ oprahmagazine

@O_Magazine

JULIE A. VOGELZANG San Diego pinterest.com/oprah

I have multiple sclerosis, and the first and last thing I’m thankful for is my husband, Ken, who meant it when he vowed “for better or worse” and “in sickness and in health.”

CAITLIN ROBINSON Marco Island, Florida

DELINDA KORREY MCDOWELL Sterling, Colorado

DONNA HOGAN Kennesaw, Georgia NOVEMBER 2016

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GLOVER: SAMARA BROWN. ROBINSON: PAUL MOSHANKO. HOGAN: COURTESY OF DONNA HOGAN. MCDOWELL: KEN MCDOWELL. SUBMISSIONS CHOSEN FOR PUBLICATION MAY BE EDITED FOR LENGTH AND CLARITY.

The unconditional love of my parents, who after 56 years still light up when I walk through the door.


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Let’s Talk!

New Ways of Seeing

FLAWLESSCLEAN AGELESSSKIN

Still learning, still growing, ever thankful.

ONE FOR THE BOOKS I became an admirer of O’s book reviews when I worked in a public library and saw the people, mostly women, who came there. You inspired them to read. In so many ways you have changed lives. What an incredible thing to have done.

KAREN POPE Tulsa

FOREVER YOUNG

#AGELESS

Oprah’s interview with The Underground Railroad author Colson Whitehead was utterly and profoundly moving. I may have to take time to ruminate and get myself ready for this powerful read. LORENA MARTÍNEZ Stevenson Ranch, California

ANGELA HOLLAND Bellaire, Texas September’s issue must have been written with me in mind! I have just begun training for a new job as an educational coach and workshop leader, and in less than a month I’m celebrating my 70th birthday. Oprah says that it’s not about a number, it’s about energy, balance, and joy. Amen to that.

MICHELLE BERGMAN Brooklyn

NOVEMBER 2016

CONNECT WITH US! To receive updates from the editors, sign up for our email newsletters at oprah.com/newsletters. To share your feedback on this issue, email us your full name, city, and state at youropinions@hearst.com. You can also visit facebook.com/oprahmagazine or tweet us @O_Magazine. (For subscription questions, go to service.theoprahmag.com.) Letters chosen for publication may be edited for length and clarity. All submissions and manuscripts become the property of Hearst Communications, Inc.

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COVER: RUVEN AFANADOR

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September’s theme, “Welcome to the AgeFree Life!,” motivated me to create a vision board featuring women at or around my age. I included Oprah’s joyous and happy face, and others like first lady Michelle Obama and Mrs. Tina Knowles Lawson. My focus is now on finding balance (between caregiving and self-care), energy (emphasis on health and wellness), and joy (for me it’s in faith, family, and friends). Thanks for the reminders that we all can live a happy age-free life!


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Here We Go!

T PROP STYLIST: PHILIPPA BRATHWAITE. FLORIST: ARIELLA CHEZAR.

HERE’S A monumental event on this nation’s horizon. It calls on us to share in one of our oldest traditions. It acknowledges the freedoms we enjoy as Americans—even though it often results in some unhappy parties. Oh, you thought I meant the election? I was talking about Thanksgiving. All kidding aside, I’m thrilled that we’ve reached the time of year when we gather together to revel in our gratitude—and our favorite foods. And I think you’ll be thrilled to discover just how easy it can be to make that gathering downright glorious. We’ve put together a game plan for every kind of cook, designed to help you get dinner on the table with minimal fuss so you can devote yourself to those you love most (page 114). Of course, the election is also upon us. However you feel about the candidates, it’s up to us to decide who makes it to the White House. To celebrate our ability to do just that, we asked a few of our favorite people to tell us about their most memorable time in the voting booth (page 130). Their stories will move you, amuse you, and remind you just how lucky we are. If this country isn’t worth being thankful for, I don’t know what is. Now please pass the turkey.

PHOTOGRAPH BY Christopher Testani

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Live Your Best Life

SUZY SIMONS/FRESHSTOCK

INSPIRATION

MOTIVATION

“Say that we are a puff of warm breath in a very cold universe. By this kind of reckoning we are either immeasurably insignificant or we are incalculably precious and interesting. I tend toward the second view.” —MARILYNNE ROBINSON

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NOVEMBER 2016

CELEBRATION


Live Your Best Life

The Gratitude Meter

OM

E!

Five things we can’t stop smiling about this month.

BY Zoe Donaldson

DRAW ATTENTION Want to spare your fridge door from a doodle deluge? Tasarim Takarim, a Turkish jewelry company run by two moms, can turn your kid’s drawings of disproportionate dolphins and goofy bears into one-ofa-kind brooches, bracelets— anything but macaroni necklaces. (etsy.com/shop/ tasarimtakarim)

TAKE NOTE

FUNNY PAGES What if Billie Jean King always carried a tennis ball in her purse? Or if Indiana Jones had a bullwhip in his satchel? Carry This Book is a kooky collection from Broad City star and illustrator Abbi Jacobson that imagines the personal effects hidden in the bags of real (Oprah!) and fictional (Forrest Gump) folks alike. ROCKET MEN Since December 2015, father-son duo Aaron Sheldon, a photographer, and Harrison, a pre-K student, have been roaming the country for their project Small Steps Are Giant Leaps, with Harrison posing in his spiffy space suit for every shot. See their photos, which celebrate how ordinary life can be out of this world, at smallstepsare giantleaps.com. PRACTICAL MAGIC On November 18, J.K. Rowling expands her universe with Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. The hero of this tale: Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne), a magizoologist who arrives in New York City, encounters America’s wizarding underground, and misplaces creatures both huggable and harmful.

HEART TO HEART

1960s Virginia. What about the project captivated you? Ruth Negga: The script. It was like I felt a sudden swirl of energy lift off the pages—as though it were actually alive. It’s a sparse script in terms of dialogue, but there’s an exquisite soulfulness about it. That’s a rare thing. MG: What drew you to Mildred? RN: I was fascinated with this shy woman who also had a steel thread running through her. And I couldn’t doubt my

Irish-Ethiopian actor Ruth Negga prepares to make a splash in the stirring drama Loving (November 4), in which she plays a humble American hero. Melissa Goldberg spoke with the rising star.

Melissa Goldberg: Loving is the true story of Mildred and Richard Loving, a black woman and white man who fought outdated laws to be legally married in NOVEMBER 2016

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personal connection to her: My parents, like Mildred and Richard, were in a mixed-race relationship. It’s hard to imagine how different my life would be if the Lovings hadn’t put their heads above the parapet. MG: You have such a clear understanding of Mildred; how would you describe yourself? RN: Do you know what a blatherer is? In Ireland, it describes someone who talks nonstop nonsense—I’m definitely a blatherer.

THE GRATITUDE METER, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: TIMOTHY GREENFIELD-SANDERS. COURTESY OF VIKING WITH ART BY ABBI JACOBSON. AARON SHELDON. JAAP BUITENDIJK/© 2015 WARNER BROS. AND RATPAC-DUNE ENTERTAINMENT. CAT DRAWN BY BRANDON REED; JEWELRY COURTESY OF COMPANY. NEGGA: JUSTIN COIT/TRUNK ARCHIVE.

W W TO AW E S

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Live Your Best Life From top: Grove picks up buckets of flowers from a wedding in Montauk, New York; a hospice patient in Brooklyn has her day brightened.

SECOND ACTS

Later Bloomers How one woman is nipping a floral fiasco in the bud.

BY THE NUMBERS

16 States—

teammates (right) restyle centerpieces into smaller arrangements for bedside tables.

NOVEMBER 2016

services.

COURTESY OF REPEAT ROSES (3)

JENNIFER GROVE CAN PINPOINT the precise moment she vowed to leave the event-planning industry: when she was pushing a cart of still-fresh wedding flowers toward a loading dock at the Four Seasons hotel in Baltimore in 2012. “I was looking at a sea of peonies, hydrangeas, and roses that had been enjoyed for a few hours and were headed for the trash,” says the 43-yearold New Yorker. “There were tall centerpieces, cocktail hour arrangements, even a floral wall installation—it was so depressing to see. And I knew if it was happening here, it was happening in the ballroom next door, in the hotel down the street, and around the world.” Within two years, Grove had devised a way to interrupt the centerpiece-to-landfill pipeline and allow bouquets to blossom a bit longer. Her New York City–based business, Repeat Roses, picks up floral arrangements after events— “When guests go home, my team shows up to do the middle-of-the-night work”; arranges them into smaller displays; and donates them to cancer treatment centers, hospice care, and the like. “We’re able to leave lovely bouquets for families at a women’s shelter,” says Grove, “or for a nursing home resident who’s never had a visitor.” And when the twice-enjoyed blooms have expired, Grove and her employees collect the flowers for composting and return vases to their inventory. “Otherwise,” she says, “we’d just be moving trash from one point to another.” By the end of this year, Grove estimates Repeat Roses will have rescued arrangements from 1,000 parties— approximately 100 tons of flowers. “Monday mornings are my favorite,” she says. “That’s when we get the nicest letters, like one from a nonprofit director who told us how wonderful it was for patients and staff to walk in and see flowers. That’s why we work hard.” —EMILY L. FOLEY

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Live Your Best Life

MY BEST LIFE

Josh Groban The Grammy-nominated singer, who makes his Broadway debut in the musical Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812 (opening November 14), gets a boost from Steve Perry and trips to the ballpark.

BEST SONGS TO SING IN THE SHOWER Journey’s greatest hits. I think of the shower as a little confidence cube: It gives me the courage to sing higher than I should. By the time I’ve gone through Journey’s catalog, I’m completely washed, shampooed, and conditioned—though I try to sing quickly so I don’t waste water.

BEST HIDDEN TALENT

“Magic tricks. When I go out to dinner, I’ll make the fork float and the saltshaker disappear.”

BEST GUILTY PLEASURE I turn into Mr. Magoo when I play iPhone games. Solitaire? I live for the card dance that happens when I win. Pokémon Go? If I’m not using my time on tour to catch them all, what am I doing with my life? BEST “PINCH ME” MOMENT Singing “Bridge over Troubled Water” with Paul Simon eight years ago at a concert. He was my high school hero. I remember sitting there, hearing our voices blend, and thinking, Man, high five to kid self! BEST WAY TO UNWIND Going to baseball games. It’s fascinating to see how different fans behave at ballparks around the country. Also, I think in the back of every guy’s head is the dream of becoming a professional baseball player.

BRIAN BOWEN SMITH

BEST COMPANION My wheaten terrier, Sweeney (yes, I named him after Sweeney Todd). He’s been on four national tours with me—and even comes up onstage for sound checks and wiggles around while I sing. —AS TOLD TO JOSEPH ZAMBRANO NOVEMBER 2016

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Live Your Best Life

WOMEN WHO MAKE BEAUTIFUL THINGS

Magic Carpets Alexandra Kehayoglou can really cut a rug.

Dyed-in-the-Wool “My entire life has revolved around carpeting,” says Kehayoglou, 34, whose Greek grandmother began making handwoven mats in the 1940s. “My grandparents opened a carpet company, El Espartano [which translates to The Spartan], in 1956,

Clockwise from top: Kehayoglou crafts a lush landscape; a three-bytwo-meter piece titled Human Nature Pastizal (2015); a moment of stillness in the meandering textile Shelter for a Memory (2012).

and my family still runs it.” But Kehayoglou, who studied painting in art school, didn’t immediately embrace her fuzzy fate. It wasn’t until she began designing commercial carpets for El Espartano in 2007 that she discovered she could make tactile canvases, and she started squirreling away scraps to experiment with. One year later, she held her first textile-art exhibition in Buenos Aires. “I realized I could use material from my family’s business,” she says, “to create my own vision.”

in bits of colored wool,” she says. “I’m okay with it. I don’t even own a lint roller.”

Spinning a Yarn

Open Floor Plan

Kehayoglou’s work philosophy echoes her environmental interests: She uses discarded or surplus wool for her pieces, which have caught the attention of homeowners, museum curators, and high-end designers alike. Kehayoglou handcrafts each rug with an electric tufting gun and then meticulously sculpts and trims strands with carpet scissors. Handling all that fiber means she often brings her work home— literally. “My black coats are always covered

Kehayoglou hopes her fluffy worlds imbue ordinary materials with enchantment. “My carpets are environments you can physically and mentally enter,” she says. “For kids, it’s natural to get down on the floor, but that doesn’t happen so often with adults.” Kehayoglou wants to change that. “Seeing people interact with my pieces is a whole new source of inspiration,” she says, “and I think my work can make you see something you might otherwise miss.” —MOLLY SIMMS

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BY THE NUMBERS

164 Approximate length, in feet, of the oneof-a-kind woodlandinspired runway Kehayoglou tufted for fashion designer Dries Van Noten in 2014.

KEHAYOGLOU: EMILIANO GRANADO. RUGS: FRANCISCO NOCITO/ COURTESY OF ALEXANDRA KEHAYOGLOU STUDIO (2).

FOR MOST OF US, a carpet is a way to keep our feet warm in winter. For Alexandra Kehayoglou, it’s an entire world: The textile artist uses scraps of yarn to create intricate, occasionally trippy topographies that evoke the natural beauty of her native Argentina, with its swirling blue lakes, rippling verdant grasslands, and craggy white glaciers.


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Live Your Best Life

CREATURE COMFORTS

Clockwise from far left: Miller and his dog, Buddy, a former PACT foster, in 2015; Saramarie cuddling with Luna Stars in fall 2013; the Behymers with Cabela, the Wolgin clan, and one of their own pups.

5 THINGS I KNOW FOR SURE

Megyn Kelly

REAL CONNECTION REQUIRES AUTHENTICIT Y. This is true of all relationships, even the one between a news anchor and an audience. Of course, being authentically boring is a problem, which is why I tell young reporters: Live an interesting life, take risks, make mistakes—so when you share your true self, people will have something they can connect to. READING NEGATIVE REMARKS ABOUT YOURSELF ONLINE IS LIKE BREATHING BUS EXHAUST. With each one you read, you let your detractors steal your mojo. Life’s too short for that. NO ONE’S COMING TO SAVE YOU. Not your spouse, not your boss, not some unknown savant. If you want to change your life, you must change it. NOTHING BEATS BEING A MOM. I’ve had a year of major political coverage, big interviews, red carpets— all exciting events. But one weekend this summer I sat on our porch swing with my three children and knew this is why I’m here. L AUGHTER REALLY IS THE BEST MEDICINE. My 100-year-old Nana was recently in the hospital. When we visited her, she said she had something to tell us. Oh God, we thought, what is it? We leaned in for the news. Nana gave it to us straight: “That male nurse is lookin’ at my can.”

Luck of the Paw When life tears you away from your dog or cat, who can you call to make sure your pet is cherished and cared for? Buzz Miller, whose nonprofit, PACT (People + Animals = Companions Together), helps find free temporary homes—almost 400 in the past six years—for four-legged kinfolk in need. Here, four stories of strangers stepping up. —M.S. THE CANINES: Bandit and Ruger, Rottweiler and pit bull

family moved into a Ronald McDonald House nearby. The only problem: Saramarie’s Yorkie couldn’t stay the night.

THE CRISIS: In summer 2013, Michael King was set to leave for his last tour of duty in the U.S. Air Force when housing for his dogs fell through. He faced abandoning his pets at a shelter.

THE HAPPY ENDING: Elizabeth Botti

THE HAPPY ENDING: PACT volunteers Gin Keefer and her husband, John Melleady, took in both pups for six months. Later, when King and his fiancée visited over Thanksgiving, Keefer and Melleady offered to host the couple’s wedding at their New Jersey farm. In May 2015, Bandit and Ruger (his ring bearer) followed King down the aisle. THE CANINE: Luna Stars, Yorkie THE CRISIS: In 2013, 3-year-old Saramarie Kohler needed a bone marrow transplant at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, so her NOVEMBER 2016

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rallied to Saramarie’s cause and fostered the young pup for three and a half months. After her treatment, Saramarie, who’d received a birthday box with a personalized quilt from Botti and her fellow retirees while in the hospital, rang Botti’s doorbell herself to pick up Luna Stars.

THE CANINE: Prince, boxer THE CRISIS: Bryan Curcic’s mother was diagnosed with stage III ovarian cancer two years ago. When Curcic cared for her while she received chemotherapy, he was forced to board his boxer, Prince, who’d been at his side since Prince was 8 weeks old. But after footing one $600 bill, Curcic needed a more sustainable solution.

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THE HAPPY ENDING: Carissa Fidik sheltered Prince for about six months and hosted Curcic when he visited his BFF. Curcic’s mom, who’s now in remission, was present for his happy reunion with Prince.

THE CANINE: Cabela, pit bull THE CRISIS: When Rachel Cole’s then fiancé, Bryce Behymer, went to work as a Black Hawk helicopter crew chief in Afghanistan, she had a difficult decision to make: desert Behymer’s 6-month-old pit bull or be evicted from their apartment complex, which had recently banned the breed.

THE HAPPY ENDING: Tori and Josh Wolgin welcomed Cabela into their home, where she snuggled up with their 11-year-old daughter every night. When Behymer returned, he and Cole settled into a new—Cabela-friendly—townhouse.

KELLY: PETER HAPAK/TRUNK ARCHIVE. CREATURE COMFORTS, FROM LEFT: COURTESY OF ALEX LOWY PHOTOGRAPHY. COURTESY OF PACT (2).

The host of The Kelly File on Fox News Channel—whose book, Settle for More, is out November 15—on humility and having a laugh.


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Live Your Best Life

CONNECTIONS

THE WAIT How did this marvelous man once struggle to find love? Katie Arnold-Ratliff— his girlfriend—ponders a mystery.

The author and Kevin one year after their first date, June 2016. Right: The Band, photographed outside Woodstock, New York, in 1968.

He took evident delight in me, asked twice when we could meet up. Maybe those girls weren’t dumb so much as conditioned to prize false indifference. On our date a week later, we talked for five hours over dinner—about music, lapsed faith, bourbon, books. “Do you want to hear my Allen Ginsberg story?” Kevin asked brightly. Once, he’d seen him on the street. Wow, he thought, a literary legend. Then he Googled: Ginsberg had been dead for ten years. “It was just a guy with a beard,” he said. I laughed for a solid minute. We went to the park and sat beneath a 69-foot obelisk. “We are totally doing this again,” Kevin said. I’d already loved him for like an hour. I flung his arm around me, deranged by my luck. He walked home with headphones on, grinning to Curtis Mayfield’s “Superfly.” Weeks later, he gave me a nickname: Girlf. Someday I’ll be his Wirlf. The reasons why some of us get snapped up and others don’t are too mysterious to untangle. Or maybe they aren’t, and it’s just that we’re repeatedly in the wrong place and time, and we miss love like we miss a train. The other night Kevin put on The Last Waltz, Martin Scorsese’s documentary of the Band’s final show. We draped ourselves over our couch. The TV was a parade of legends: Joni, Muddy, Van, Neil, Bob. Kevin turned and said, his voice small with wonder, “You really love me.” Everyone he knows has told me, “He waited so long for you.” I try, every day, to be worth the wait. KATIE ARNOLD-RATLIFF is O’s articles editor.

NOVEMBER 2016

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Who could dismiss such a man? I can only guess. Maybe on one date there was food on his chin. Maybe these girls were just dumb.

COURTESY OF KATIE ARNOLD-RATLIFF

T

HERE’S AN OLD photo of the Band on our wall: five men in a field, stony and still. I love that picture, and Kevin, for whom I bought it a month after we met. The Band inspires in him a dear reverence; in 2012, he even slipped through a fence at late drummer and singer Levon Helm’s house to pay his respects. When Kevin and I met, I’d just ended a ten-year marriage, and he’d been alone for a decade. One girl broke his heart. Two stopped calling. Several vanished after one date. Kevin has kind eyes, firm arms, and charm enough to win over fussy babies, ornery dogs, my ex-husband’s parents (long story). He went to college, reads heartily, is a great kisser. He’d rather pull his own teeth than tell a lie. Some days I come home to an old-fashioned and a steak twinkling with finishing salt. My friend calls him the Unicorn. Who could dismiss such a man? I can only guess. Maybe on one date there was food on his chin. Maybe he wore his glasses and the girl hated glasses. One girl told him he’d mislaid his “moral compass,” a judgment so bizarre you have to wonder whether she understood the phrase; maybe these girls were just dumb. If you’ve heard any song by the Band, it’s probably “The Weight.” The song is not inherently sad, but to me it’s always seemed to be imbued with weariness. Life can be like that. A person can, after serial defeat, carry on with grace but be burdened by loss—even for something he never had. Kevin has many friends. For years, he went alone to their birthdays, sat at the head of the table so the couples could sit together. In 2015, he attended an out-of-town wedding. His friends joked that on the plane home he’d be seated next to The One. Kevin couldn’t say why the joke stirred his hope, but it did. When he boarded, a grandma sat on one side, a grown woman clutching a teddy bear on the other. He laughed—it was funny. But he felt like a final thread had been cut. Hope had become a kind of torture. Four days later, he went to a concert. I was there. He asked to buy me a beer. He seemed young, a little lonely.


â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I know for sure is that transformation happens when you dare to be awakened to greater heights.â&#x20AC;?

A L S O AVA I L A B L E A S A N A U D I O B O O K


Live Your Best Life

Backstage with Lin in 2015. Far left: The Hamilton star in full Founding Father regalia.

WRITTEN IN THE U.S.A.

BEHIND THE CURTAIN

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO

Gayle O’s editor at large shares what she’s loving this month.

rarely gives interviews (believe me, I’ve tried), so I couldn’t wait to get my hands on his new memoir, Born to Run. And as I suspected, the Boss doesn’t disappoint. Springsteen opens up about his bouts with depression, his rocky relationship with his dad, and (twist!) how he thought his voice sounded like a cat with its tail on fire when he first heard himself on tape. That discovery pushed him to work on his writing and performing, which turned him into the legend we know and love today. Consider me rocked, Bruuuuce!

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

IT’S THAT TIME OF YEAR WHEN it isn’t cold enough for a full-on parka but even an Adam Glassman–approved sweater won’t keep out the chill. New York & Company’s knit puffer jacket is the best of both worlds. The lightweight coat comes in four colors—I like the sangria (above)—and it’s fitted on the sides, which means I can wear it without being mistaken for the Michelin Man. ($90; nyandcompany.com)

Want even more of Gayle behind the scenes? Follow @oprahmagazine.

Follow Gayle on Instagram and Twitter @GayleKing.

“She did it for us—for all of us. And none of us have to do that ever again. We never have to be the first again.” AMERICA FERRERA’S REMARK during a Democratic National Convention panel summed up how many in Philadelphia were feeling about Hillary Clinton’s historic nomination. Regardless of how you view her politics, I think everyone should take a moment to acknowledge how great it is that 96 years after women gained the right to vote, we finally have the choice to elect one for president. What took so long? NOVEMBER 2016

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WHILE COVERING the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, I was searching for a great breakfast spot. The top suggestion: Jack Flaps Urban Breakfast Shoppe. My pancakes were perfectly fluffy, but I couldn’t help noticing how much my makeup artist, Laz, was enjoying his Meat & Taters Waffle. I asked him for a taste—and thank goodness I did. The waffle is made from mashed potatoes and cake flour, then topped with smoked brisket, garlic-sautéed arugula, candied yellow beets, and apple cider vinegar syrup. Sweet, sour, and salty spell delicious in my book.

MIRANDA: COURTESY OF RADICALMEDIA/PBS. MIRANDA AND KING: BRUCE GLIKAS/FILMMAGIC/GETTY IMAGES. BORN TO RUN: COURTESY OF SIMON & SCHUSTER. STANDING BOOK: MARSHALL TROY. WAFFLE: COURTESY OF GAYLE KING. FERRERA: MICHAEL TRAN/FILMMAGIC/GETTY IMAGES. JACKET: KEVIN SWEENEY/STUDIO D.

HAMILTON tickets are even harder to score than one of Patti LaBelle’s sweet potato pies on Thanksgiving, so I was over the moon when I learned that PBS is serving up the next best thing: Hamilton’s America. The documentary is a behindthe-scenes look at the two years leading up to Lin-Manuel Miranda’s groundbreaking musical, revealing the blood, sweat, and tears that went into each song while also giving us the coolest lesson in American history. Says Lin, “I knew that Hamilton was going to change my life, but I didn’t anticipate how much we’d help Hamilton’s legacy in return.” As they say in the show, “I am not throwing away my shot” to catch this fantastic film when it airs October 21, and neither should you.


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ME, MYSELF,

AND I GILBERT: PETER ROSA/STUDIO D. HAIR: RAYYA ELIAS. MAKEUP: MICHELLE COURSEY AT NEXT ARTISTS USING DIOR ADDICT.

How to be the real you? Teach your various sides to live harmoniously. A FEW MONTHS ago, I found myself in a toxic situation with an old friend. For some mysterious reason, he had suddenly turned against me and would make snide comments to me every time we encountered each other. I had no idea what to do. My response to his hostility was to disintegrate into total emotional confusion, which always happens to me during interpersonal conflicts. I became splintered and overwhelmed. Part of me felt victimized and self-pitying, part of me felt like I was being oversensitive and should just shake it off, and part of me was so fierce with righteous indignation that I dreamed of taking the bastardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head off. I simultaneously wanted to run away from my friend, totally forgive him, and mercilessly destroy him in a savage counterattack. At first I wondered who all these rival voices in my head were, sending me such contradictory messages about how

ILLUSTRATIONS BY Julia Breckenreid

OPRAH.COM

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NOVEMBER 2016


Amy & Roscoe

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May We Help You?

to feel and behave. And which voice represented my true self? Thankfully, I was familiar with a concept that helped me understand why I was having so many different reactions at once. I had discovered the work of a therapist named Richard Schwartz, PhD, who suggests that perhaps none of us is really a single unified self, but instead a compilation of many various selves. He calls these rival selves our “parts” and claims that they often work at cross-purposes. We all understand this, instinctually. It’s what you’re referring to, after all, when you say things like “Part of me is excited, but another part of me is terrified,” or “Part of me wants to quit my job, but another part of me craves the security of a regular paycheck.” Schwartz reassures us that containing all these different parts doesn’t make us crazy; it merely makes us human. He also suggests that if we can identify and name the distinct parts of ourselves, we might have an easier time managing our lives. Inspired by this idea, I did some deep diving to try to identify the most prominent selves dwelling within me. After careful investigation, I was able to find and name three. So here I am. Rather, here we are: 1. Meet Lizzy. Lizzy is an anxious little kid who lives in terror of conflict and abandonment. Lizzy annoys me because she’s so helpless, but she also has great strengths. She feels compassion toward everyone because she knows how hard life is. Lizzy may be fearful, but she is also kind. Without her, I would have no heart. 2. Meet Elizabeth. Elizabeth is my inner creator. She’s a grand and passionate risk taker. I love Elizabeth because she’s so artistic (she’s the reason I’m a writer). But she also has a dark side: She can be reckless, and she stubbornly refuses to accept reality. 3. Meet Ms. Gilbert. Ms. Gilbert is

my most “grown-up” self. She’s the emotional opposite of both Lizzy and Elizabeth. She’s responsible, brave, organized, and independent. But she can also be a harsh and unforgiving critic of herself and others, and her only solution to any problem is “Everyone must do better!” When I asked these three selves how they felt about my conflict with my friend, each had a different answer. And I began to understand how this situation had triggered the worst qualities of each of my parts: Tiny Lizzy felt afraid and powerless, while Elizabeth the Utopian blindly denied there was a problem at all, and judgmental Ms. Gilbert was ready to banish this horrible person from her life forever. It was only when I invited OPRAH.COM

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all three of my selves to bring their best aspects to the table (Lizzy’s empathy, Elizabeth’s creativity, Ms. Gilbert’s strength) that I was finally able to talk calmly to my friend about our problems, and we resolved the dispute in a loving manner. The ancient Greeks believed that the height of human wisdom was to “know thyself,” but I think they had it wrong. The real trick is to know thyselves—because if you can find a way for all your parts to peacefully coexist, you might actually have a chance to live in harmony. And that, in the end, is what all of us want. ELIZABETH GILBERT is the author of, most recently, Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear.

NOVEMBER 2016

Tiny Lizzy felt afraid and powerless, while Elizabeth the Utopian blindly denied there was a problem at all.


“Each of us, at our core, longs to be loved, needed, understood, affirmed— to have intimate connections that leave us feeling more alive.” — Oprah Winfrey

LittleBooksandGuides.com ON SALE NOW A L S O AVA I L A B L E A S A N A U D I O B O O K


May We Help You?

DEAR LISA

Loan Moans, a Hesitant “Husband,” and the Bad Seed Redux

KOGAN: PETER ROSA/STUDIO D. HAIR: VASSILIS KOKKINIDIS AT NEXT ARTISTS USING SHU UEMURA ART OF HAIR WITH T3 STYLING TOOLS. MAKEUP: BARBARA STONE. STYLIST: ERIN TURON.

Q

Dear Lisa,

Last year I lent a friend $4,000 to send her daughter to a camp for overweight children. To date she’s paid me back $300. Now she tells me they’re taking a family vacation to London next summer! What do I do? —D EI R D R E, F LO R I DA

Dear Patsy... I mean Deirdre, C’mon, you already know what you have to do. The challenge is to do it without apology. Don’t kvetch. Don’t ramble. Don’t hem, don’t haw. You owe your friend nothing. She owes you four grand. Simply say, “Hey, lady, I need my money back by such and such date, so let’s make a payment plan.” If it means she can’t go to London, perhaps she can watch a Hugh Grant movie.

Dear Lisa, I’ve loved my friend Vincent since tenth grade. He’s kind, successful, funny...and gay. We’re both 34, and we both want a family. I keep trying to convince him that we have a better relationship than most couples we know. I’m even willing to turn a blind eye if he occasionally needs a male fling, but Vince is scared. I say we can make marriage and parenting work. Am I just being naïve? —S HA RO N , CH I CAGO

Sharon, my friend, Straight, gay, I don’t care—you shouldn’t need to “keep trying to convince” someone to marry you. By the way, how exactly do you define “occasionally”? Will you be turning a blind eye two nights a week? One week every other month? Will you make up a story when little Caleb and Violet (yes, I’ve taken the liberty of naming your children) ask where Dad is? What happens if on one of those fling nights Vincent fools around and falls in love? And what about your sex life? Being in bed with a man who’s just not that into you gets mighty lonely...or so I’ve heard. Dr. Maya Angelou said that when people show you who they are, you should believe them. Sharon, Vincent isn’t scared—he’s gay! Thinking you both could be fulfilled until death do you part is naïve at best. OPRAH.COM

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ILLUSTRATION BY Brett Ryder

Dear Lisa,

This may sound horrible, but I hate my best friend’s kid. He’s loud, mean to everyone, and has yet to age out of the terrible twos (even though he’s 5). I want to spend time with my friend, but she brings him everywhere. Help! —E L IZ AB E T H, AK RO N

Dearest Baby Hater, First let me just say that loud, mean 5-year-olds are dreadful little people, and I’m very sorry that through no fault of your own, you seem to be stuck with one. Could it be he’s difficult because his mother keeps dragging him into adult situations that he’s not equipped to handle? Is it that she can’t afford a sitter? Where’s Chucky’s dad? (That’s right, I’m naming this kid, too.) Is your friend simply hoping that two of her nearest and dearest will grow to adore each other? Might one of them have a bad case of separation anxiety? Could you quickly have a horrible child of your own with whom to torture her? Here’s a thought: Given that she’s your best friend, could you gently tell her you really miss seeing her one-onone and ask what’s up with Captain Tantrum? If not, try to remember that children grow up, and hard as it is to fathom now, this too shall pass. LISA KOGAN is O’s writer at large and the author of Someone Will

Be with You Shortly: Notes from a Perfectly Imperfect Life. To ask Lisa a question, email asklisa@hearst.com.

NOVEMBER 2016


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MARTHA BECK

Hooked on a

Feeling

It’s healthy to share painful experiences— but there’s a difference between honoring emotions and wallowing in them. ILLUSTRATIONS BY Carlo Giambarresi

RECENTLY I MET a new client (let’s call her Greta) who had been feeling worse and worse—depressed, defeated, devoid of energy and joy. After visiting doctors, therapists, astrologers, and psychics, she scheduled me for three days of intensive coaching, proclaiming that I was her last hope. She began by showing me her diary of poetry and illustrations, which seemed to describe every bad thing that had ever happened to her, from childhood bed-wetting to split ends. You could call it Greta’s Little Book of Hurt, except it wasn’t little. “Why do I still feel so horrible?” Greta sobbed. “I work so hard on myself.” True, she’d worked diligently—but not in any way that would help her feel better. Instead of honoring her emotions and healing, Greta had chosen to wallow in them. Everybody does this sometimes, including me. At my yearly retreat in South Africa, I often see my worst self in Cape buffalo, which are like cows, if cows were a gazillion times stronger and appeared to be full of seething rage. When they’re not trampling hunters, Cape buffalo spend their time wallowing in mud, ruminating, and probably dreaming of ways to kill. They’re metaphors for the way I can loll about in emotional negativity, rechewing stories from my own Little Book of Hurt. But wallowing only mires us deeper in the pit of despair. The reasons we wallow are part nature, part nurture. Like all animals, we’re biologically programmed to focus on injury; doing so helps us stave off threats to

NOVEMBER 2016

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@OPRAHMAGAZINE

BECK: PETER ROSA/STUDIO D. HAIR: VASSILIS KOKKINIDIS AT NEXT ARTISTS USING SHU UEMURA ART OF HAIR. MAKEUP: BARBARA STONE. STYLIST: ERIN TURON.

May We Help You?


May We Help You?

our survival. But we humans aren’t usually defending ourselves against hunters, so our painful memories don’t serve the same practical purpose. Humans also have a unique way of recovering from trauma: We need to share our hurts. Fortunately, pretty much everyone now knows that talking to a compassionate, nonjudgmental person can heal emotional wounds. But when our cultural focus on “the talking cure” joins forces with our natural inclination toward negativity, we can get stuck. That’s what had happened to Greta, who didn’t know that repeatedly telling a sorrowful story only lights up your brain’s pathways of suffering, so you’re essentially experiencing the tragedy over and over. At least buffalo wallow in soothing mud and rechew tasty grass. Humans wallow in emotional acid and ruminate on the bitterest moments of our lives. If you wonder whether you’re honoring your feelings or stewing in them, see if these statements ring true:

NOTED! In a series of studies at the University of California, Riverside, unhappy subjects who ruminated were less likely to come up with effective solutions to problems— and reported being less willing to implement solutions they did come up with.

Your thoughts often drift toward the same story of loss or injustice— and each time, you’re left unhappier. You can feel mildly peevish or gloomy, then brood until your feelings intensify into fury or depression. The agony feels perversely comfortable, like a pair of well-worn sweatpants. Your loved ones glaze over when you talk about your problems. You’re starting to bore yourself. Sound familiar? Chances are you’re up to your eyeballs in muck. Luckily, you can pry yourself out. Here’s the key: Change the way your story ends. A South African friend says that Cape buffalo look at you as if you owe them money. Emotional wallowers are also obsessed with unpaid debts: Someone has done them wrong, and they deserve reparations. That payback never comes, so the tale of woe isn’t resolved. In his book What Happy People Know, psychologist Dan Baker, PhD, says that joyful people finish their life stories on a very different note:

appreciation. Instead of going over and over what they’ve lost, they focus on what they’ve gained. He recalls a woman who reminisced fondly about her deceased husband: “I said something along the lines of what a good man he must have been. ‘No way,’ she said. ‘He was a womanizer and a drunk. A real pain in the butt. But we had more love than most people ever dream of.’ ” That’s a heroic ending if I’ve ever heard one. If you’ve suffered deeply and no one knows, by all means, find an accepting, empathetic person to talk to. You’ll feel a wave of pain, followed by ease, lightness, and freedom. After two or three tellings, those emotional waves will begin to subside. That’s the time to walk out of your wallow and see yourself as a hero. Yes, you went broke, but people who loved you stepped up to help. True, you totaled your car—but in the moment you thought you were about to die, you experienced a peace beyond fear that you’ve been able to access ever since. These aren’t stories of self-pity. They’re epic sagas that end with beauty, courage, or wisdom. You don’t have to feel that way immediately, but you’ll get there eventually if you can find a way to honor your own story without sinking beneath it. Alas, Greta’s pain did not abate during the days she spent reading to me from her Little Book of Hurt. You can’t pull a buffalo from the mud; it has to climb out under its own steam. When you can pull yourself out of your own muck, by giving your same old stories happier endings, you’ll find that rage turns to peace, pain to power, fear to courage. Now, that’s something to chew on. MARTHA BECK is the author of, most recently,

Diana, Herself: An Allegory of Awakening. OPRAH.COM

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NOVEMBER 2016


“There is no greater gift you can give or receive than to honor your calling.” — Oprah Winfrey

Edwidge Danticat, and more: inspiring true-life accounts of trial, error, and triumph.

ON SALE NOW A L S O AVA I L A B L E A S A N A U D I O B O O K


May We Help You?

1 FARNOOSH TORABI

This Is Your Money

on Gratitude SNAPSHOTS: ANDRESR/SHUTTERSTOCK. KEYBOARD: PETER DAZELEY/GETTY IMAGES. CARD: STUART TYSON/STUDIO D. TORABI: PETER ROSA/STUDIO D. STYLIST: ERIN TURON. HAIR AND MAKEUP: BIRGITTE FOR LAURA MERCIER AT SALLY HARLOR.

Counting your blessings not only leads to stronger relationships and a sunnier outlook—it can also boost your financial well-being.

AS WE FEAST WITH FAMILY and friends this month, many of us will take time to appreciate what we have. Feeling grateful is good for the spirit, and according to academic research, it’s also good for our bottom line. “Gratitude makes us value the future more,” says David DeSteno, PhD, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University. “It overcomes our mind’s bias toward immediate gratification. And the more we value future rewards, such as retirement or college savings, the easier it is to resist making impulse purchases.” Gratitude may also make us less materialistic—an attitude linked to insecurity, anxiety, and depression. But of course, amid life’s challenges and distractions, it’s easy to lose touch with all that’s going well for us. To help you regain focus, consider these simple strategies. Your wallet might thank you. FARNOOSH TORABI, personal finance expert and author of When She Makes More, hosts CNBC’s Follow the Leader and the podcast So Money.

REDEFINE WEALTH

While your bank account may have you believing you’ll never be “rich,” numbers aren’t the only way to measure well-being. Our health, friendships, ambition, and even access to technology are all invaluable assets that support a bountiful life. Says author and economist Julie Ann Cairns, “I don’t talk about wealth— I prefer to use the word abundance. That, to me, is so much bigger than money. It’s a way of being in the world that says ‘I am not afraid, and it’s okay for me to be generous.’” And try not to get hung up on the R word: Instead, think of your life as prosperous or fulfilled.

2

TAKE TIME FOR THANKS

DeSteno found that those who practiced gratitude frequently (say, three or four times a week) “showed the best ability to be financially patient.” Make a habit of jotting down a few notes in a gratitude journal and expressing appreciation to your friends and family regularly.

20 percent said they’ve spent at least $1,000 impulsively.

GENEROUS HELPINGS Money can buy happiness—if you spend it on someone else. A small 2008 study found that giving even $5 can lead to an uptick in your emotional well-being.

34

GIVE BACK, GET MORE

MONEY MENTALITY About half of Americans equate being rich to having an annual household income of over $200,000, according to a 2014 survey.

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You feel thankful when you help someone else. Life and business strategist Tony Robbins once told me, “Giving teaches your brain there’s more than enough.” Assisting the less fortunate can be a profound way to remind yourself of your true wealth.

NOVEMBER 2016

MAKE YOUR FEED MORE FRIENDLY

As entertaining as social media can be, it may also breed discontent. As author Ellen Rogin says, “It’s easy to see what others are doing and desire what they have.” Cairns advises unfollowing friends whose posts always leave you doubting your worth. And remember that many of the images we’re ogling, with their flattering filters and artful cropping, don’t depict the truth of people’s lives.


Sugar.

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P R E S E N T E D B Y S P L E N D A® S W E E T E N E R S

Sparkling

FALL SANGRIA This refreshing cocktail is the perfect way to toast the crisp, fruity flavors of the season. FROM THE KITCHEN OF DELISH.COM Yield: Serves 8 Ingredients: 1 orange sliced crosswise into ¼" thick rounds 1 Honeycrisp apple cut into 1'' pieces

1 bottle dry Spanish red wine* ½ cup brandy ¼ cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice

¼ cup pomegranate seeds

4 packets SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener or SPLENDA® Naturals Sweetener

3 cinnamon sticks

2 cups seltzer to top

1 Bosc pear, thinly sliced

LOVE THIS?

muddle

combine

orange slices in a large pitcher using a wooden spoon to release the juices.

fruit, cinnamon sticks, dry red wine, brandy, lemon juice, and SPLENDA® Sweetener.

stir

serve

all ingredients and chill for at least 1 hour and up to 1 day to allow flavors to meld.

chilled over ice in a large glass or mason jar. Top with ¼ cup seltzer. Enjoy!

THE SIMPLE SWAP: Use Splenda® Sweeteners just about anywhere you use sugar—from your favorite beverages to meals and baked goods. To find more tips, tricks, and recipes that swap out full sugar for Splenda® Sweeteners, visit sweetswaps.com. *This is for fans 21 & older. Please drink responsibly.

©2016 Heartland Consumer Products LLC. DELISH is a trademark of Hearst Communications, Inc.


Introducing

Find everything for your fall home in easy-to-shop Ashley lifestyles. Urbanology® / Vintage Casual® / Contemporary Living™ / New Traditions™ / Grand Elegance™ / Family Spaces® / Gen Now™ / Heritage Road™

More inspiration at AshleyHomeStore.com


The

NOW

THAT’S ENTE

RTAINMENT

st

PROP STYLIST: MEGUMI EMOTO

A few things we think are just great for a party!

Black Magic Your guests will ooh and aah over the pot as much as the soup. This castiron cocotte moves easily from oven to table and looks fantastic once it gets there. (Staub black pumpkin cocotte, $180; food52.com)

Tune in to ABC’s The View to see O creative director Adam Glassman reveal special savings from The O List on “View Your Deal.”

OPRAH.COM

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NOVEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPHS BY Gregor Halenda


Fish Fulfillment More durable than traditional nonstick pans, these have a textured surface engineered with a three-layer bonded matrix. Translation: They’ll evenly cook and brown your fish, veggies, or meat. (All-Clad d3 Armor eight-inch fry pan, $110, and fish pan, $200; williams-sonoma.com)

Graphic Content This three-quart pitcher, in a speckled pattern worthy of Jackson Pollock, can double as a centerpiece or a vase. (Crow Canyon Home black enamel speckle pitcher, $45; fishseddy.com)

Spread the Love These locally sourced jams from California—in intriguing flavors like Black Mission fig and Hungarian pepper—will render your toast unrecognizably delicious. ($13.50 each; innajam.com)

Special Delivery Knock, knock. Who’s there? The love child of a croissant and a rugelach—with incredibly light, flaky dough and melt-inyour-mouth chocolate—that ships to your door. ($48 for 24; breadsbakery.com)

Gilt Trip Spiced nuts look much tastier in gold-plated porcelain snack bowls, a very happy marriage of form and function. (Desert Gold bowls, originally $35 for set of four, now 20 percent off with code OPRAH; yedihouseware.com)

Get a Grip What’s better than a three-ply stainless steel roaster with an adjustable rack that holds everything from a turkey to a tenderloin? One that’s easy to lift out of the oven, thanks to extra-tall handles that accommodate your thickest oven mitts. (Cristel roaster, originally $230, now 20 percent off with code OPRAH; williams-sonoma.com)

Bottoms Up! It takes a global village: This sustainable oak paddle with nestled shot glasses was designed in London; made in Poland; and inspired by the bars of Tyrol, Austria, where home-brewed schnapps are often served on specially crafted wooden trays. (LSA International grand vodka set and paddle, originally $125, now 20 percent off; bloomingdales.com) NOVEMBER 2016

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@OPRAHMAGAZINE


WHEN FAMILIES GATHER, OURS CAN HELP™

© 2016 S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc. All rights reserved.

MAKE EVERYONE FEEL AT HOME. AND THINK IT’S HOMEMADE.


The Art of the Meal Give thanks for the adult coloring trend! This paper turkey placemat plus colored pencils, all made in the U.S.A., will keep guests of all ages entertained before dinner. Bonus: A portion of sales benefit the Wonderful Life Foundation. (Coloring turkey placemat set, pencils, and quill, originally $14 to $27, now 20 percent off with code OPRAH; hesterandcook.com)

Say It with Food Place ingredients in the slow cooker, set the temperature, and label your meal or leave a note for your loved ones in colored chalk. Message received. (Seven-quart chalkboard slow cooker, originally $40, now 20 percent off with code OPRAH; blackanddeckerappliances.com)

Bread Winner After one taste of this stuffing-flavored artisanal bread, Gayle King was momentarily speechless. Then she said, “Wow, didn’t see that coming.” It’s like having your entire Thanksgiving dinner in one bite. (La Brea Bakery, $6; amazon.com)

It’s in the Can The social media stars behind White Girl Rosé (@thefatjewish and @whitegrlproblem) are at it again, this time with a canned sparkling version. It’s a blend of Pinot Grigio and Primitivo varietals with hints of honeydew—and, with about 160 calories per 8.4-ounce serving, a guilt-free indulgence. (Babe Rosé with Bubbles, originally $13 for four-pack, now 20 percent off with code OPRAH; whitegirlwine.com)

Think Inside the Box

Super Bowl We’re raising a glass to this quite stunning, quite large (15-inch!) ice bucket, handmade in Portugal from eco-friendly cork. No leaking, no sweating, no kidding. (Quinta natural cork centerpiece bowl and ice bucket, $375; juliska.com)

Good Tines The rose gold standard of cutlery: This dishwashersafe, scratch-resistant set—with its ergonomic design, patented finger platform, and outer beveled tines—makes for a happy meal. (Antique copper titanium flatware, originally starting at $60 for fivepiece set, now 30 percent off with code OPRAH; knork.net)

Any Way You Slice It Ever used an electric knife? Chances are the cord got in the way and ended up covered in grease. Try this hassle-free cordless version: Once charged, it can slice 90 pounds of turkey! (Waring Commercial cordless lithium electric knife, originally $169, now 20 percent off with code OPRAH; webstaurantstore.com) NOVEMBER 2016

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@OPRAHMAGAZINE

What do you get when you mix the talents of famed chocolatier Louis Sherry and interior designer Miles Redd? Decadent handmade truffles in beautiful limited edition tins—which we’ll use as jewelry boxes after we devour all 12 flavors. (Patriot, Cubist, and Zebra tins, originally $40 each, now 20 percent off with code OPRAH; louis-sherry.com)


WHEN FAMILIES GATHER, OURS CAN HELP™

© 2016 S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc. All rights reserved.

TURKEY FOR 19. 18 OF WHOM GOT DIVERTED TO TULSA.


IGNITE SOMETHING O N LY T H E P E R F E C T C U T C A N U N L E A S H A DIAMONDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BRILLIANCE.

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Love That! THE NEW LBDS

REDHOT HOUSEWARES

COZY FALL FASHION

FAB FIND

A Modern Classic Meet the Goldilocks of autumn handbags—one that’s not too big or too small, too trendy or too boring. The ’70s-inspired cross-body is spacious enough for all your necessities (with a convenient exterior pocket), has a cool guitar-style strap and grommet details, and comes in five rich suede hues plus a black leather option. We think it’s just right.

PROP STYLIST: ALMA MELENDEZ/HALLEY RESOURCES

Brooklyn large camera bag, Michael Michael Kors, $398; michaelkors.com

PHOTOGRAPH BY Jonathon Kambouris

OPRAH.COM

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NOVEMBER 2016


Set your socks on seeing the world.

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Love That!

GREAT WALL Removable lily metallic wallpaper, $15 per square foot; tempaperdesigns.com

THE BRIGHT STUFF Safavieh Meander table lamp, $420 for two; jcpenney.com

TAG, YOU’RE IT Pagoda gift tags, $8 for ten; shop .alexapulitzer.com

Adam’s Home

STYLE SHEET

FANCY FOOTWORK Cambell heeled bootie, $160; samedelman.com

IN THE RED Lidded decorative urn, $25; HomeGoods stores

FINE CHINA Bring a touch of Far East style to your life with chinoiserie designs and cinnabar shades.

BUDDING BEAUTY Middle Kingdom porcelain mini gourd vase, $21.50; globaltable.com

CUSHY SITUATION Paradise coral 15-by-23-inch pillow, $130; signaturepillows.net

RING CEREMONY Dynasty napkin, $132 for four, and napkin ring, $76 for four; kimseybert.com

WINNER’S CIRCLE Creative Co-op stoneware bowls with large circle print, $30 each; wayfair.com

PLAY IT BY EAR Ben-Amun by Isaac Manevitz Silk Road drop earrings, $195; ben-amun.com

BLACK LIGHT Orient candle, $135; l-objet.com HOT SEAT Chinese Chippendale chair, $499; wisteria.com NOVEMBER 2016

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GOOD, CLEAN FUN Linen cocktail napkins, $48 for four; halohomebyksw.com @OPRAHMAGAZINE

RICHARD MAJCHRZAK/STUDIO D. PROP STYLIST: ALMA MELENDEZ/HALLEY RESOURCES. GLASSMAN: SERGIO KURHAJEC.

LION KINGS Seven-inch handmade chocolate Foo dogs, $45 each; woodhousechocolate.com


Shop online!

Store New York: Gudrun Sjödén Store | 50 GREENE STREET New York, NY 10013 | Tel: 212-219-2510 Customer service: Tel: 1-877-574-1486 | customerservice@gudrunsjoden.com

Stockholm | Est. 1976

Colorful WINTER in shades of grey


THE POWER OF 1O

EVERY YEAR L’ORÉAL CELEBRATES 1O WOMEN MAKING A BEAUTIFUL DIFFERENCE. OVER 1OO STORIES. OVER 1O YEARS. ©2016 L’Oréal USA, Inc.


I saw a statement that said, ‘life begins out of your comfort zone.’

We need to stand up and tell women they are valued, they are loved, and they can be protected.

SuEllen Fried Provides rehabilitation services for prisoners.

Jaha Dukureh SAFE HANDS FOR GIRLS Empowers and educates young girls about female genital mutilation.

THESE WOMEN EMBODY THE COMPASSION AND COURAGE INHERENT IN ALL WOMEN, AND THE DIFFERENCE ALL WOMEN CAN — AND DO — MAKE EVERY DAY. WE BELIEVE THEIR CAUSES ARE A CAUSE FOR CELEBRATION. learn more at WOMENOFWORTH.COM


We create networks of support. people healthy. Kathy Koenigsdorf Raises money for those struggling with addiction to afford treatment.

We help people who already do good work do more. Maria Rose Belding MEANS DATABASE Created a website to coordinate food donations.


Love That!

The

BEAUTY of These four stellar women are making the world a better place—and now it’s their time to shine. We enlisted fashion expert Mary Alice Stephenson, hairstylist Patrick Melville, and makeup artist Sarah Lucero to treat them to an unforgettable makeover that celebrates their beauty, inside and out.

GIVING Heidi Woolever PARTNER AT EDGEMERE FARM

Her Mission

GROW-GETTER Woolever on the farm, hanging with a rooster and prepping veggies.

BY Melissa Goldberg AND Nicole McGovern PORTRAITS BY Carmelo Donato PHOTO REPORTAGE BY Sioux Nesi

Nine years ago, Woolever, now 44, left her Washington, D.C., teaching job for greener pastures, moving to Maine with her husband to raise sheep. After her divorce in 2013, she realized her country skills could benefit city folk: “I was inspired by an article about a girl who lived in a New York City shelter with no access to real food,” she says. Not long after heading to the Big Apple herself, Woolever met a man who was converting a lot in Far Rockaway, Queens, into farmland. She jumped in and, in 2014, opened a farm stand that sells vegetables and herbs to residents of the lowincome neighborhood and accepts government vouchers as payment. Woolever hopes fresh food can help give other communities a fresh start. “Creating urban farms generates more jobs,” she says, “and everyone deserves affordable healthy food.”


Her New Look THE CLOTHES This Terani Couture gown was a big change from Woolever’s dirt-friendly getups: “I normally wear Carhartts and T-shirts.” The showstopping cape makes a statement on its own; gold jewelry adds even more glamour. THE HAIR AND MAKEUP Melville started with damage control, cutting three inches of dead ends, and added soft layers around Woolever’s face. Once he toned down her sun-bleached streaks, he painted on butterscotch highlights. To accentuate Woolever’s glowy skin, Lucero kept her makeup light: a caramel BB cream, shimmery taupe shadows, gray liner, and mascara.

HER REACTION

A whirlwind of changes led me here. I dropped teaching to raise sheep. I dropped sheep to start farming. Now I’m all gussied up. What an experience!

To learn more about Woolever’s work, go to edgemerefarm.org. GOWN, Terani Couture EARRINGS, Sarah Magid BANGLES, (from top) Vita Fede, Sarah Magid, Elizabeth and James RINGS, (from left) RLM SoHo, Stella & Dot

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Luana DeAngelis

Her New Look

FOUNDER OF YOU CAN THRIVE!

THE CLOTHES DeAngelis traded her typical neutral

Her Mission

s S DeAngelis perform HEALING POWER New York Cit y. in Reiki on a patient

After DeAngelis, 48, was diagnosed with breast cancer at 35, she hoped to supplement her treatment with alternative therapies—but to her surprise, she found nothing that met her needs. Undaunted, she remedied the problem herself, starting You Can Thrive!, which offers free or low-cost massage, reflexology, acupuncture, and other services to women with breast cancer. “After a few visits, their pain and stress decrease and quality of life increases,” says DeAngelis, who believes in treating the whole person, not just her disease.

outfits for something more sultry. The flare of the mermaid skirt on this daring Jovani dress perfectly balances the bold one-shoulder detail. And she loved the sexy fit: “I feel like Jessica Rabbit!” THE HAIR AND MAKEUP DeAngelis’s nearly waistlength hair needed shape, so Melville trimmed four inches, blended in long layers, and applied copper highlights that show up whether her hair is curly or straight. To complement her dress, Lucero created a custom lipcolor (combining dusty rose and mauve) and cheek color (blending peach and maroon). To learn more about DeAngelis’s work, go to youcanthrive.org. GOWN, Jovani NECKLACES, (from top) SparklePop, Sequin GOLD BRACELET, Alexis Bittar LEATHER BRACELET, Trina Turk. On models: Trunks, Tani USA

HER REACTION

I’ve had a rediagnosis and a long journey through a double mastectomy this year. I needed to feel like a queen for a day!


Love That!

Schinnell Leake FOUNDER OF EXTRAORDINARY BIRTHDAYS

Her Mission As a mom and former owner of Extra-Ordinary Moments, a business that provided unique children’s birthday parties, Leake set out to do the same for homeless kids. In 2010, Extra-Ordinary Birthdays was born. Now partnered with eight Washington, D.C.–area shelters, the 2015 L’Oréal Paris Women of Worth honoree gives each birthday boy or girl an “hour of magic” with gifts from their wish list and a personalized cake. She says, “I want these children to know that regardless of circumstances, they are special.”

PARTY PEOPLE Leake, armed with presents, celebrates birthdays at Barnaby and Chesapeake Houses in Washington, D.C.

Her New Look THE CLOTHES She’s around kids, crafts, and cake all day, so Leake, 57, favors flats, a denim shirt, and an apron. “I am always covered in icing!” she says. With this red-hot Jovani gown, she traded sweet for spicy. A plunging back, dramatic bell sleeves, and a sweeping train update a simple but elegant silhouette. THE HAIR AND MAKEUP To style her straightened hair, Melville applied a texturizing cream without alcohol, which can be drying. He pinned back the hair at the crown and brushed the rest into a pony, which he wrapped around the base to create a loose bun. For a polished look, Lucero used black eyeliner on Leake’s upper lashline, plum and peach blushes, and a mix of berry and true red on her lips.

HER REACTION

I just caught a glimpse of myself and thought, Who is that person? I feel so glamorous!

To learn more about Leake’s work, go to extraordinarybirthdays.org. You can vote for the L’Oréal Paris 2017 Women of Worth from October 10 to 28 at womenofworth.com. GOWN, Jovani EARRINGS and BRACELETS, Ben-Amun by Isaac Manevitz RING, Janis Savitt OPRAH.COM

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HER REACTION

I love my new hair! It fits perfectly into my shelter life... but my dogs didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recognize me at first!


Love That!

Erin Stanton

PET PROJECT Stanton and her furry clients—(clockwise from top) Jasmine, Donna, and Drake—from Animal Haven feel the love. (animalhavenshelter.org).

FOUNDER OF SUSIE’S SENIOR DOGS

Her Mission When her now husband adopted an older mutt five years ago, Stanton, 31, didn’t know Susie was going to change her life—but she did suddenly realize that many senior dogs need homes. She created a Facebook page to spread the word; when she wasn’t busy with her PR job, she’d visit shelters and post about adoptable canines. Within six months, Susie’s Senior Dogs had become Stanton’s main focus. To date, the organization has found families for about 700 dogs nationwide. “I love hearing people’s stories,” says Stanton, who shares some of them in her new book, Susie’s Senior Dogs. Helping vulnerable animals has become her purpose, and she owes it all to Susie: “Caring for that wonderful old girl helped me find my greatest passion.”

Fashion editor: Mary Alice Stephenson Hair: Patrick Melville for Garrison and Melville Salon NYC at TraceyMattingly.com Colorist: Dina Hasanovic for Garrison Melville Salon & Academy NYC for Goldwell Professional Makeup: Sarah Lucero for Stila Cosmetics Manicurist: Roseann Singleton using Chanel Le Vernis at Art Department Eyebrow specialist: Eliza Petrescu, owner of Eliza’s Eyes, 800-EYEBROW, elizaseyes.com Set design: Stockton Hall for Jed Root

Her New Look THE CLOTHES Stanton spends her days in “shelter clothes”—T-shirts and jeans—but she looked entirely at ease in a strapless Elizabeth Kennedy silk faille gown. An edgy necklace, a waist-defining metallic belt, and crimson leashes for her pups finished off the stunning look. THE HAIR AND MAKEUP Stanton was happy to try a radically different style, so Melville cut eight inches from her dark blonde hair and created a layered bob with buttery highlights. To emphasize her large brown eyes, Lucero used brown and gold shadows before applying a deep burgundy liner along her top and bottom lashes.

To learn more about Stanton’s work, go to facebook.com⁄susiesseniordogs. GOWN, Elizabeth Kennedy BELT, Reiss NECKLACE, Sequin RINGS, Vince Camuto On dogs: Collars and leashes, Canine Styles of New York

FASHION FOR A CAUSE For four years now, fashion expert Mary Alice Stephenson (seated) has teamed with O to give makeovers to deserving women through her organization, Glam4Good, which provides uplifting experiences for everyday heroes and people in need. “We use style and beauty to honor courage, raise self-esteem, and ignite joy,” she says. “Fashion has the power to do all that. These aren’t just makeovers—they’re life-changing moments for remarkable women.”

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ON SALE NOW Also available as an audiobook from Macmillan Audio, Read by Oprah Winfrey


O, Beautiful! SENSATIONAL SCENTS

HELP FOR DRY SKIN

PRETTY PALETTES

PROP STYLIST: ALMA MELENDEZ/HALLEY RESOURCES. ILLUSTRATION: GILLIAN MACLEOD.

Fresh Buds This one’s for you, tuberose lovers. A unique fusion of rich, intense tuberose absolute and a softer, more diaphanous distilled essence of the flower, Tubéreuses Castane is a standout among the six new Maison Lancôme Haute Parfumerie Paris Grand Cru Fragrances ($185 to $195; lancome-usa.com). Something tells us your signature fragrance awaits: Choose from the three floral and three oud (woody) scents that make up this dazzling collection.

PHOTOGRAPH BY Jonathon Kambouris

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O, Beautiful!

STOP THAT!

Skincare Slipups

You’ve made toning part of your daily routine. Even if you typically have an oily complexion, you may want to lay off the toner; many contain ingredients like alcohol and propylene glycol, which can intensify dryness, especially during winter, says Callender.

You’re still loyal to the moisturizer you used in your 20s.

Is a dehydrated complexion one of your cold-weather bugaboos? Your skincare routine might actually be making the problem worse. We discovered nine common mistakes that could explain why you’re looking parched.

We bet you’ve noticed: Skin texture changes as you age. The most notable difference? You’re not naturally producing as much oil. If you’re still using a lightweight lotion, replace it with a super-emollient formula containing a mix of hydrators like ceramides, which strengthen the skin barrier and prevent water loss, and hyaluronic acid and glycerin, which draw moisture to the skin, says Graber. Avène Tolérance Extrême Cream, $38; aveneusa.com

You wash your face in the morning and at night.

You’re trying to tackle several complexion issues with one cream.

Cleansing too frequently can strip the skin, leading to dry patches and irritation, says Emmy Graber, MD, president of the Dermatology Institute of Boston. At night, remove oil, dirt, and makeup with a gentle, nonsoap face wash. In the morning, don’t bother with a cleanser—for many complexions, a few splashes of water is enough.

You might love the convenience of a moisturizer with antiaging or acne-fighting ingredients, but a product with too many actives may irritate delicate skin, says Arielle Kauvar, MD, clinical professor of dermatology at New York University Langone Medical Center. It’s best to limit antiaging or acne-fighting ingredients to one product, like a serum; apply that first, then layer on a simple moisturizer. Perricone MD Pre:Empt Series Skin Perfecting Serum, $90; sephora.com

You love your super-sudsy cleanser. If it produces a rich, soapy lather, your face wash is likely too harsh for your skin, says Graber. Surfactants—ingredients that generate bubbles—can remove the skin’s natural oils (along with dirt and makeup), exacerbating dryness. Opt for a creamy formula. Fresh Soy Face Cleansing Milk, $38; fresh.com

You believe any moisturizer labeled natural or organic must be good for your skin. The reality: People can develop allergies to essential oils like chamomile, lavender, and tea tree, says Graber. If that’s the case, these ingredients can worsen redness, flakiness, and dryness. If you love oils, look for a product containing jojoba or olive oil—both hydrate while rarely causing irritation. Malin + Goetz Recovery Treatment Oil, $82; malinandgoetz.com

You rinse with hot water. While hot water may feel good, it can deplete your skin’s natural moisturizers, including fatty acids and lipids, says Valerie Callender, MD, a dermatologist in Glenn Dale, Maryland. Very cold water can also be damaging, so wash with lukewarm instead, says Graber.

You exfoliate every day.

Silicone has gotten an undeserved bad rap as a pore clogger—and it’s actually a fantastic hydrating agent, says Graber. To give your moisturizer a boost, apply a primer formulated with silicone, which prevents moisture loss, before foundation. It Cosmetics Bye Bye Pores Primer, $38; sephora.com

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DEVON JARVIS/STUDIO D

You avoid products with silicone.

A gentle face scrub or chemical exfoliant can brighten your complexion and slough off surface cells, allowing the active ingredients in your products to penetrate better, says Callender. But exfoliating more than once or twice a week or using abrasive scrubs can create microtears, resulting in parched, irritated skin, says Graber. Murad Rapid Resurfacing Peel, $44 for 16-pack; murad.com


One Blow-Out, FIVE DAYS If you can’t get through day three of a blow-out without a hat, you’ll appreciate New York City salon owner Lisa Chiccine’s guide to making your style last for the long haul.

DAY ONE Pre-blow-out, avoid heavily moisturizing shampoos, conditioners, and styling products—they typically contain strong conditioning agents that weigh down hair. With a fresh style, you don’t have to think about maintenance till nighttime: Before bed, if your hair is long enough, pull it

into a high pony at the crown of your head with a scrunchie, which will Scünci Scrunchie Bow Ties, $3 for two; Walgreens stores

prevent dents and creases. You can also wrap your ponytail around a Velcro roller and secure it with a styling clip. And swap your cotton pillowcase for satin, which creates less friction, so you’ll be less likely to rough up your style.

PETER ROSA/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM. PRODUCTS: COURTESY OF COMPANIES (6).

DAY TWO

DAY THREE It’s time to break out the dry shampoo. Try a powder formula, which gives you more control than a spray. The key is to use it sparingly; never apply it directly onto the hair. Instead, sprinkle it in your palms and rub between your fingertips, then Klorane Non- massage it into the roots. If your ends are Aerosol Dry drooping, add bounce by wrapping them Shampoo with Oat Milk, $20; around Velcro or hot rollers. kloraneusa.com

Hold off on using any styling products for as long as possible to avoid buildup, which will flatten your hair. If you wake up with some frizz at the hairline, mist the hair around your face

with a spray bottle and then blow-dry eSalon Everlasting Locks Style Saving Shower Cap, $14; esalon.com

with a small, round brush. Going to the gym? Bravo! Again, pull your hair back into a pony or a bun, and wear a sweat-absorbent headband. When showering, make sure to use a plastic cap with terry-cloth lining—it’s the best combination of fabrics for shielding your hair from moisture and steam.

DAY FOUR Repeat day three. Give your style a boost with Velcro or hot rollers at the crown. T3 Volumizing Hot Rollers Luxe, $119; t3micro.com

DAY FIVE

John Frieda Beach Blonde Sea Waves Sea Salt Spray, $9; drugstores

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The best tactic is to switch up your style. If you have long hair, slick it back into a sleek high ponytail. Wrap the ends of the pony around a wide-barrel curling iron to create tousled waves, which will conceal dullness. For shorter hair, mist with a sea salt spray before roughdrying to create a piecey, textured look. Still collecting compliments? Congrats, you made it!

NOVEMBER 2016

Styling MVPs For a great blow-out, you need great tools. Chiccine recommends a lightweight blowdryer with a wattage of 1,700 to 1,800 (for powerful airflow and reduced drying time), a cool button (finishing with cool air helps lock in style), and a thin nozzle (to direct the air). For the most volume, use a round boarbristle brush with a wooden base.


O, Beautiful!

Q Val’s Guide to After a Fashion Makeup artist Bobbi Brown is celebrating her company’s 25th anniversary with a captivating tribute to three style capitals: New York, Paris, and London. The Bobbi Brown City Collection palettes ($65 each; bobbibrowncosmetics.com)— with four shadows and a blush—have universally flattering shades, but I had to have them simply for the cute compacts.

O’s beauty director, Valerie Monroe, shares a few chic options for fall.

Here to Stay I love the lipcolor magic of Giorgio Armani Lip Magnet ($39; giorgioarmanibeauty-usa.com), a liquid formula that feels light as water (it’s actually a fusion of oils and water) but delivers an intensely pigmented matte finish. I blot it so the color looks more like a stain, but any way you wear it, you can expect it to last from your morning espresso through an evening cocktail.

Scent for All Seasons Though light floral fragrances are some of my favorites, they can seem too evanescent in the colder months. But Maison Francis Kurkdjian Paris Petit Matin ($215 for 2.4 ounces; neimanmarcus.com) is both luminous and bold, a bouquet of lemon, hawthorn, and amber. I’ll be wearing it all winter (and probably right through spring).

MATCHED SET Sonia Kashuk Exotic Artisan Vanity Cup, $11; target.com

Brushes with Luxury This Exotic Artisan Twelve Piece Brush Set by Sonia Kashuk ($40; target.com) is as pretty as it is practical. The bristles are luxuriously soft, and the wooden handles are embossed with a pattern inspired by Sonia’s travels in India. I leave my set on display—it not only helps me adorn my face, but does a fine job adorning my vanity, too. NOVEMBER 2016

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Maybe, says cosmetic chemist Ni’Kita Wilson, if you use shampoo containing conditioners that help detangle and prevent the stripping of oils. Depending on the level of these ingredients in your shampoo and how often you lather up, the conditioners may build up and leave you feeling as if your hair isn’t getting clean. In that case you might switch to a clarifying shampoo like Fekkai Apple Cider Shampoo ($20; fekkai.com) once a week.

If you have a question about makeup, skincare, or haircare, ask Val at askval@hearst.com or oprah.com/askval. Follow Val on Twitter @thisisvalmonroe.

DEVON JARVIS/STUDIO D. MONROE: PETER ROSA/STUDIO D. MAKEUP: BARBARA STONE. STYLIST: ERIN TURON.

GORGEOUS

Should I switch shampoos every couple of months?


BINGE-READING. IT’S ABOUT TO BE A THING.

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Veranda Retreats is a globe-trotting, sigh-inducing journey through the world’s most inspiring havens— from a sun-kissed villa on the Côte d’Azur, to a hushed mountaintop refuge in Aspen, to urban sanctuaries that feel a world apart from the city’s hustle and bustle. This gorgeous book is your first-class ticket to the luxe and sublime . . . without ever leaving your house!

available in hardcover wherever books are sold.


Feeling Good HEALTH HACKS

LIFE STRIDES

THE Reflection EFFECT Once considered a form of depression, nostalgia is getting a second look from psychologists, who increasingly see it as a source of strength. Allison Gilbert investigates.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY Riki Blanco OPRAH.COM

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WINTER WELLNESS


Feeling Good

IN THE PHOTOGRAPH, my mother and I are sitting on the stone lip of a large circular fountain in Paris. Shoulder to shoulder, we’re leaning into each other, fingers interlaced, my head tilted toward her cheek. It’s Saturday, August 31, 1985, and I’m 15 years old. We are in the Tuileries Garden, giddy tourists on a motherdaughter adventure that began just that morning when we landed in France from New York. Studying the photo now, I see not just that moment, but so many other joyous times I shared with my mother: horseback riding in Central Park, the raucous annual holiday parties she hosted. Those images and the feelings they bring—bliss, love, the sensation of being fully safe—have become more important to me with each passing year. A decade after the Paris photo was taken, my mother died of ovarian cancer. She didn’t get to come to my wedding, and she never met my children. Memories are what I have left, and I relish them. They help me feel whole. The Paris picture hasn’t always made me happy, though. For a long time, I kept it tucked away in an album, a reminder of what I’d lost. But as I began taking out photos and talking to my children about their grandmother, I discovered that looking back was helpful. Finding ways to stay connected brought me peace. Though the kind of longing I felt is nothing new—Homer and the Bible reference the concept—the word nostalgia once described a disease. In 1688, Swiss doctor Johannes Hofer coined the term to describe the persistent sadness and sometimes irregular heartbeats experienced by young people abroad. Their emotional and physical ailments, he wrote, were stirred by “continuous vibration of animal spirits through those fibers of

the middle brain.” Later, military physicians treating Swiss mercenaries, a group seen as particularly vulnerable to the ailment, theorized that it resulted from damage to their eardrums and brains from the incessant clanging of cowbells in the Alps. Since then, nostalgia has been variously classified as a compulsive disorder and a form of depression, but these days it’s simply defined as a sentimental longing for the past. And now researchers believe that being nostalgic may actually make us happier and healthier. According to a recent article in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, nostalgia may be a dynamic motivational force. Coauthor Constantine Sedikides, PhD, of the University of Southampton in England, a psychologist who has extensively researched the effects of nostalgia, says fond memories can generate feelings of engagement and selfesteem that leave us more optimistic, inspired, and creative. His research also suggests another upside that’s especially important for the bereaved: Nostalgia may assuage loneliness. Now considered a social emotion like empathy, it can draw us closer to others—the idea being that when we feel an intense bond with loved ones from our past, we’re more likely to feel similar bonds with those around us in the present. This profound sense of connection can lead nostalgic individuals to believe life is more meaningful, Sedikides and others have found, which may ease the pain of grief. Henry Louis Gates Jr., PhD, the Harvard professor who created the genealogy show Finding Your Roots, told me nostalgia is a way of “testifying to our loved ones’ continuing existence.” When we understand its power, Gates says, we recognize that “they haven’t passed on—they’ve passed into us.” NOVEMBER 2016

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Of course, we inherit more than just memories, and there’s emerging evidence that giving a loved one’s cherished possessions a new purpose may be another way nostalgia can help us heal. Researchers are studying people who lost family and friends on 9/11 and chose to donate objects in their memory to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum; the goal is to discover whether contributing precious relics—ID cards, phone messages, even shoes—made moving forward easier. So far, that seems to be the case, according to Brenda Cowan, associate professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology/SUNY, who launched the project. “For many, the opportunity to carefully sort through a beloved person’s belongings—with the knowledge that those belongings will forever be in the hands of preservationists—left them feeling relieved and satisfied,” she says. The nostalgic reverence attached to the objects affirms that the past is worth honoring and celebrating.

@OPRAHMAGAZINE

Fond memories can generate feelings of engagement and selfesteem that leave us more optimistic, inspired, and creative.


Feeling Good

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Kathy Rambo, whose son Jason died in a car crash at 19, says his possessions have helped her keep his memory alive. A year after the accident, Rambo began making teddy bears out of his jeans and shirts. When she completed 30 bears, she invited Jason’s brother, sister, best friend, grandmother, aunts, uncles, and cousins over for an afternoon of sharing stories about him. When they left, each chose a teddy bear to take home. She found that sewing gave her uninterrupted time to think about Jason, and parting with his clothing in this way reassured her that he’d always be loved. “It helped me remember and look forward at the same time,” Rambo says. “Nostalgia is where the healing happens,” explains Alan Pedersen, executive director of the Compassionate Friends, an organization that offers support to nearly one million bereaved parents, siblings, and grandparents across the United States. “We used to think it best to keep memories at bay because they were too painful. This is old thinking. We now say reminisce to the hilt.” Thirty years after that unforgettable mother-daughter trip, my husband and I took our kids to Paris. The first afternoon, we made a beeline to the Tuileries and found the fountain from my photo. My daughter and I bounded into place—mom on the left, daughter on the right. We would have gotten the identical shot, but I encouraged my husband and son to join us. In the moment that we posed for the friendly passerby who took our picture, I felt a rush of euphoria. We can all live our fullest lives when we accept that absence and presence can coexist. The new picture of my family is now framed on our piano alongside the old one of my mother and me. And I’m beaming in both.

mg

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125

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THE DIABETES

Danger Zone How to know if you’re in it, and what to do to get out.

YOU MIGHT THINK a prediabetes diagnosis is a harbinger of certain doom, but it doesn’t have to be. It’s really a wake-up call, warning you that it’s time to make some lifestyle changes if you want to stave off a full-blown chronic disease. The biggest problem with prediabetes? Many people don’t know they have it: Of the 86 million Americans living with the condition, nine out of ten aren’t even aware of it, either because they haven’t been screened or their health care provider hasn’t diagnosed or counseled them properly. In a recent University of Florida study, only 23 percent of patients whose blood tests came back positive for prediabetes received treatment—this despite the fact that without intervention, the condition is likely to develop into type 2 diabetes within ten years. The good news is that in this case, forewarned really is forearmed. Prediabetes means your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be considered diabetes. Those levels rise slowly over time—so you have the chance to get them under control before it’s too late. And the best ways to do that are relatively simple: diet, weight control, and exercise. Here’s what you need to know and do—consider it your diabetes prevention plan.

WATCH FOR WARNING SIGNS Prediabetes often has no symptoms, but it may present some of the same, sometimes under-theradar ones as diabetes, including increased thirst or hunger, frequent urination, blurry vision, fatigue, and tingling in your hands or feet. If you’ve noticed any of these, talk to a medical professional as soon as possible.

GET TESTED Tests your doctor may give you include the hemoglobin A1C test, which shows your average blood glucose levels over the past 12 weeks (5.7 to 6.4 percent is a red flag), and the fasting glucose test, which measures the glucose in your blood. Normal levels are less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), and the prediabetes hot zone is 100 to 125 mg/dL.

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SLIM DOWN STRATEGICALLY Extra fat cells can make your body more resistant to insulin, the hormone that delivers glucose to your cells—which helps explain why you’re at an increased risk for developing diabetes if you have a body mass index higher than 25. But you don’t have to get down to your fantasy size. Reducing your body weight by just 5 to 7 percent through diet and regular exercise can cut your risk of developing diabetes by more than half, according to a landmark study called the Diabetes Prevention Program. For someone who weighs 200 pounds, that’s a loss of only 10 to 14 pounds.

PRIORITIZE PROTEIN AND VEGETABLES Though carbohydrates cause blood sugar and insulin levels to rise, there’s no need to cut them out of your diet cold turkey. Instead, start off your meals with protein (like fish, lean meat, tofu) and salad before sampling a bit of pasta or bread. A study out of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York found that eating protein and vegetables before carbohydrates resulted in lower glucose and insulin levels in obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

GET ON THE MEAL-PLANNING BANDWAGON You already know you shouldn’t shop for food when you’re famished, but research has found that when people ordered or planned their meals even just hours in advance, they subconsciously made lower-calorie choices instead of giving in to cravings. Download a meal-planning app (try MealBoard) or sign up for a grocery delivery service (we like Farmbox Direct) to help you stay ahead of the game. You can also plan your meals using good old pen and paper. That’s a recipe for success. — JOY PAPE


Trademarks owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A., Vevey, Switzerland


Feeling Good

BOOST YOUR HEALTH IN

condition that can lead to stroke, even in people who were otherwise healthy or weren’t exhibiting any symptoms. If you topple easily, don’t panic— but it might be time to see your physician for a checkup.

Two Minutes or Less Five speedy tricks to work a little wellness into even the busiest days. BY Kate Rockwood

60 SECONDS: NUKE YOUR DISH SPONGE

TRY THIS!

5 SECONDS: REACH FOR THE STARS A small 2015 study in Health Psychology found that people who sit up straighter feel stronger than their slouchy counterparts. Before you start to sag, stretch. “You don’t even have to stand up,” says Renee Chester Levine, an instructor at Bloom Yoga Studio in Chicago. “Reach overhead, cross your right arm over your left, and touch your palms. You’ll release the tension that makes it so easy to slump.”

20 SECONDS:

When researchers from Cornell University studied the food that subjects kept on their kitchen counters, they found that women who had breakfast cereal on their counter weighed 20 pounds more, on average, than those who stashed it in a cupboard or didn’t buy it in the first place. The ones who displayed a fruit bowl were about 13 pounds lighter than women who did not. So swap that cereal box for a bowl of grapes.

STAND ON ONE LEG

“If I come back in my next life as a bacterium, I would love to live in a sponge. They’re moist and full of food— everything bacteria need to thrive,” says Charles Gerba, PhD, a microbiologist at the University of Arizona in Tucson. When Gerba analyzed 325 kitchen sponges, he found that about 15.4 percent contained salmonella and many more had E. coli. To nix the ick, microwave a damp sponge on high for one minute.

2 MINUTES: TAKE A LOOP AROUND THE OFFICE A quick stroll can help offset sedentary desk time. Sitting or standing didn’t have much effect on participants’ mortality risk in a 2015 study, but an extra two minutes of light movement per hour reduced it by 33 percent. So get going!

It’s a quick way to test your brain health: A 2015 study in Stroke found that the inability to balance on one leg for at least 20 seconds was linked to reduced cognitive function and an increased risk of cerebral small vessel disease, a OPRAH.COM

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Feeling Good

BETTER, FASTER,

BY THE NUMBERS

Stronger

Strokes among young people may not be as rare as you think: According to a recent study in the Journal of the American Heart Association, between 2000 and 2010, there was a

After a stroke, Merideth Gilmor got her life back, one step at a time.

ON NOVEMBER 1, 2014, when I was 38, my husband and son told me goodbye. The ER doctors had let Mark know I probably wouldn’t live through the night, so he brought Colin, who was 9, up to my hospital room. Colin had a tiny green stuffed whale he’d won at a carnival. He tucked it under my arm and gave me a kiss. The last time I’d talked with my son, hardly 24 hours earlier, I was driving from the Boston airport to the Berkshires, where my best friend was getting married. As soon as we hung up, I dialed into a conference call. I’m a sports publicist, and my cell phone is like an appendage. The wedding was picture-perfect. I gave the speech I’d memorized between calls in the car, and Mark and I danced our feet off. By the time we got back to our hotel, I was looking forward to spending the next day in bed reading the Sunday Times. And that’s when my world imploded. A strange ticklish feeling came over me— as though I’d pushed a dandelion up my nose—and then everything went black. I could hear, but I couldn’t see. Mark says I started to flop around like a fish on dry land. I felt like I was underwater, trying to scream. My mind was telling me to move my feet or start crying, but my body couldn’t comply. My words came out as grunts. I heard Mark call the front desk: “We need an ambulance. I think my wife is having a stroke.”

44 percent rise in hospitalization rates among people

The ER team confirmed his suspicion and gave me an anticoagulant to break up the blood clot and get oxygen to my brain. If you speak medicalese, I’d suffered an acute right middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke; in other words, a big piece of my right brain had died. The doctor told Mark that if I survived, I’d never be able to use my left side again—to walk, talk, or lift my arm. But I was young! And I didn’t have a family history of strokes, although I’ve since learned that I do have a patent foramen ovale, a small hole between two chambers of my heart, which is more common among people around my age who have strokes. My doctors have never pinpointed exactly why the stroke occurred, though they’ve speculated that birth control pills and frequent flying may have contributed. After a few weeks in the neurology ICU, I came home from the hospital. NOVEMBER 2016

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I knew it was a miracle that I’d defied my doctors’ expectations (just call me Miracle Mer), but I had a long road to recovery ahead: I could walk, but I was practically dragging my left leg behind me. My whole left side felt numb. I worked with occupational and physical therapists to try to get my strength and balance back, doing lunges across the floor to rebuild my left leg muscles and bouncing a small rubber ball to work my left arm, with mixed success. To this day I still can’t feel my left arm or hand. But the changes went even deeper. Before, I’d been such a type A gogetter. Now I just wanted to sleep. I had lost my sense of time—I couldn’t tell the difference between five minutes and two hours. My mouth drooped, and my words sounded jumbled, even to me. I couldn’t participate in my own life. One day in February, four months

@OPRAHMAGAZINE

ages 25 to 44 for ischemic strokes, despite a drop in the number of hospitalizations overall. Why? The reasons vary, but doctors suggest that increases in obesity, diabetes, and high cholesterol among young people may play a role.


after the stroke, I met Colin’s school bus at the end of our driveway. I thought his face would light up at the sight of me, but when he got off, he burst into tears. The kids on the bus had teased him. “You’re still sick!” he said. I told him I was fine. “No, Mommy, you’re not.” I took a breath. “What’s it going to take for you to believe that I am?” “I want it to be like before, when we’d play catch and ride our bikes together,” Colin said. “I want you to run, Mom!” Before the stroke, I’d run eight miles a day, but now the very idea seemed laughable—even insane. I’d struggled to muster enough energy just to get out of bed and down the driveway. And it felt selfish to add one more priority to my list when Mark was already taking care of the three of us and working full-time. But resisting Colin was impossible. And clearly the driven person I used to be was still somewhere inside me, because I decided that not only was I going to run again, I was going to check an item off my bucket list: run the New York City Marathon. Training started the next day with a slow walk to the mailbox and back. I felt like I was dragging my feet through mud. I may have looked like I was taking a leisurely stroll, but there was nothing leisurely about it. My doctors and physical therapists were on board with my plan. And my neurologist told me it was a good idea: Running increases blood flow to the brain, which could help speed my recovery. She said to make sure I ate plenty of protein and suggested I try fortified gelato. (Yum. I still eat it most days for breakfast.) But before I could graduate from walking to jogging, I had to relearn how to really pick up my legs and feet. That meant skipping across the room in physical therapy, even though my body felt like lead. In April, I flew to Italy to celebrate my dad’s 70th birthday. I wore compression tights on the plane and set

an alarm to stand up every three hours because I was so nervous about having another blood clot. But while we were there, I managed my first slow and steady jog: 20 minutes up the driveway of the house we were staying in. Encouraged, I started trying to jog my old two-mile route at home. Every single step was a challenge, with my legs and lungs burning and my left arm hanging at my side like a log. (Most runners gain balance and speed by pumping their arms—that’s not an option for me.) One morning I couldn’t tie my shoes, so I just punched the floor and screamed. But the stroke wasn’t going to break me: I’d done this before, and I could do it again. Eventually, a quarter mile turned into a mile, which turned into three. Then five. Then eight. Ironically, in some ways, my condition made training easier. Because I had no sense of time, I could measure my progress only by distance; I might be out for two hours without even noticing. I just put one foot in front of the other, logging the miles on an app. By August—many blisters and black toenails later—I was going for ten-mile runs. When I did my first 20-miler, I knew I’d be able to race. And on November 1, 2015, a year to the day after the doctors decided I was a goner, I was at the starting line in Staten Island, ready to make a run for it. When the first people finished, I was still in Brooklyn with at least 15 miles to go. Mark was by my side. He’d signed up for the race along with me. He hadn’t trained, but it wasn’t too challenging to keep up with my turtlelike pace. Even the walkers were passing me. Yet I felt so energized: The streets were lined with cheering people, and I’d made myself a victory playlist stocked with U2 and songs from the Rocky movies. During mile 23, my phone died, and I had to get through those last three hard miles without “No Easy Way Out” to push me. But I knew that the OPRAH.COM

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people who’d gathered around my bed the year before, praying I’d pull through, were waiting up ahead. I held Mark’s hand as I crossed the finish line in Central Park and gave Colin and my parents, wearing their I BELIEVE IN MERACLES T-shirts, a huge, sweaty hug. I’m still running, but these days I’m listening to a lot of Eric Clapton, my dad’s favorite. Nineteen days after the race, he went into cardiac arrest and had a stroke with multiple infarctions. I’ve gone from being a stroke survivor to being a stroke caregiver. I’m training for this year’s marathon, which is somehow even tougher now that I’m back at work and busy helping my mom. Every time I feel unmotivated, though, I think about my dad, who sat with me for hours while I was recovering. I can’t wait to see him at the finish line again.

NOVEMBER 2016

DID YOU KNOW? If one of your parents had an ischemic stroke before

age 65, you’re three times more likely to have one than someone without a family history, according to the American Stroke Association. The number one thing you can do to reduce your risk? Maintain healthy blood pressure.


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Feeling Good

Sleep on a Schedule

DR. OZ

WINTER

Advisory Want to stay healthy as the weather turns cold? Think like a doctor.

MOST PHYSICIANS DO everything they can to fend off winter bugs and blues. After all, if we’re not healthy, we can’t be there to help keep you healthy. Over nearly three decades in medicine, I’ve picked up plenty of cold- and flu-defying tips—and they work just as well outside the hospital.

OZ: PETER ROSA/STUDIO D. HAIR: ANNE SAMPOGNA-GROSS. MAKEUP: LINDA MELO DANZO.

Keep Your Hands Clean Doctors wash their hands a lot— before and after we see each patient. Scrubbing in for surgery, we typically wash all the way up our arms and under our nails. You don’t need to be that extreme; a 20-second session with soap and warm water should do the trick. But make sure you’re at the sink often enough. Of course, I wash before preparing food and eating, and after sneezing and using the bathroom. But I also suds up after eating and cleaning up. And I carry an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. (Look for a formula that’s at least 60 percent alcohol.) Keeping your hands clean helps prevent the spread of not only flu but also other germs, like those that cause stomach bugs.

For surgeons, sleep is a responsibility— you’ve got lives in your hands. But sleep also helps keep you healthy. One study found that people who slept six hours or less per night on average were around four times more likely to catch a cold. I follow a strict routine, going to bed and waking up at the same times every day. When your body gets used to a schedule, it will find a natural rhythm, making it easier to fall asleep. I also allow myself a nap if I need one: A 20-minute catnap helps me stay alert for the rest of the day without making it hard to doze off that night.

Boost Your Vitamin D One of the biggest challenges our bodies have in winter is getting enough sun exposure. When it’s cold outside, it’s easy to stay indoors all day, especially if you work long hours. But I’ve noticed that if I run short on sun, I start to feel down, so I make sure to step outside for 15 to 20 minutes every day. UV rays trigger your body to produce vitamin D; too little D has been linked to depression. Vitamin D also helps your body absorb calcium, which keeps your bones strong. On top of that, it supports your immune system and might actually lower your flu risk. I also take a vitamin D supplement of 1,000 IUs every day. If you’re worried your level could be too low, ask your doctor to do a simple blood test to check.

Protect Your Immunity Doctors know the importance of fortifying their immune system. Step 1: Sign up for the flu vaccine. Many hospitals require their health workers to do so, and I get mine every year. (I make sure my family members do, too.) If you haven’t gotten yours yet, it’s not too late: Peak flu season is from December to March. Vaccination takes just a few minutes; for busy people OPRAH.COM

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ILLUSTRATION BY Masa

THAT’S A FACT Got type 2 diabetes? Don’t skip the flu shot. It may cut your risk of being hospitalized for stroke by

30 percent and for heart failure by

22 percent, according to a recent study.

NOVEMBER 2016

like me, it’s a no-brainer. I also steep a cup of echinacea tea daily. Studies indicate this floral-derived brew can ward off colds or, if you do come down with one, ease your symptoms more quickly. And anytime I start to feel sick, I up my vitamin C intake to potentially shorten the sniffles. Luckily, the hospital cafeteria has an ample supply of orange juice, so I can easily get my fix.

Take Exercise Breaks I spend much of the day on my feet, but if you find me in my office, there’s a good chance I’m doing yoga. It’s a great way to fit in exercise when you don’t have the chance to be physically active outdoors—I’ve become good at working out in small spaces and short windows of time. A few sun salutations will keep you limber, get your blood flowing, and reenergize you. You can also throw in a few jumping jacks or push-ups. Easy exercises like these are great if you’re home and don’t want to go outside or to the gym. MEHMET OZ, MD, is the host of The Dr. Oz Show (weekdays; check local listings).


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Reading Room WISE WOMEN

TROUBLED TEENAGERS

STANDING BOOKS: MARSHALL TROY

W

KILLING HER SOFTLY The latest entry in a lauded writer’s oeuvre takes aim at the perpetrators of sexism...and murder. ILLUSTRATION BY Matt Murphy OPRAH.COM

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POPULIST POETS

HEN DETECTIVE Antoinette Conway was little, her mother invented tall tales about who her father was and why he wasn’t there, hoping to distract her from the unsavory, mundane truth. It didn’t work. Now Conway, the sole woman on the Dublin Murder Squad, has a zero-tolerance policy when it comes to nonsense. Her impatience is a defense mechanism, of course, one that will be constantly tested in Tana French’s brooding sixth novel, The Trespasser (Viking). French followers will remember Conway as Detective Stephen Moran’s bitter and somewhat inscrutable partner in The Secret Place, which was told from his perspective. Still a team and co-outcasts in their department, the duo is summoned to investigate what looks like a straightforward case of domestic violence—a woman found dead after a lovers’ quarrel. During the investigation, Conway must navigate her colleagues’ suspicious behavior and her own paranoia that everyone, her partner included, intends not just to undermine but to ruin her. Conway’s self-sabotage is hard to witness—her treatment at the hands of an all-male squad is even harder. French has always found a marvelous balance between the crimes at the heart of her novels and the personal and interpersonal lives of her detectives. In The Trespasser, that balance tips: Instead of venturing outward into the gritty details of the murder, as she did by taking Detective Cassie Maddox dangerously undercover in The Likeness, French turns inward, focusing first on the claustrophobic climate of her protagonist’s workplace (lots of tough guys fueled by caffeine), then going even deeper into the complex tangle of Conway’s mind. Ultimately, the murder itself is a supporting player to Conway’s incandescent and justifiable anger and the trenchant language through which she expresses it. The menace at the heart of The Trespasser is not the criminal himself, but the poisonous attitudes of a misogynistic culture, which can leave even the fiercest woman mortally wounded. —IVY POCHODA


Reading Room

COMIC RELIEF Feeling blue? Prescription: laughter.

The People’s Poet In his new collection, Billy Collins revels in the exquisite sadness and joy amid the everyday.

F ILLUSTRATION BY Chris Buzelli

IF TEEN YEARS AGO, in an Atlanta bookstore, I overheard a woman ask a clerk about someone she’d heard on Garrison Keillor’s radio show—you know, the poet who... Without hearing more, I interjected: Billy Collins? “Yes!” she exclaimed. It was an easy guess; long before I finally met Collins, I felt I knew him. Across 11 volumes of poetry, he has created a voice not just familiar but familial—what poets and their nephews and nieces might call avuncular. The vast audience that has made Collins that oddest of phenomena—a best-

selling poet—will find much to savor in his latest collection, The Rain in Portugal (Random House). Collins gains his readers’ trust through humor; it’s a way of descending the perch of authorial authority and sitting down next to you, as in the poem “Early Morning”: “You know, when I told that interviewer ⁄ early morning was my favorite time to write, ⁄ I was not thinking of this particular morning.” Devotees may come for his jokes, but they stay for the asides. The jovial and the grim coexist in The Rain in Portugal, especially in poems dedicated to a profound, if pleasing, melancholy. These range from “Oh, Lonesome Me” to “Poem to the First Generation of People to Exist after the Death of the English Language,” which, by the way, isn’t an elegy to the language that “seemed for so many of us ⁄ the only true way to describe the world ⁄ as if reality itself were English,” but rather a defiant celebration of the art form Collins loves. As in almost all his recent work, the new poems engage with the sorrow of losing loved ones, the distance of childhood, and the frustrations of aging—we turn to Collins for comfort in the face of such inevitables. Take “Only Child”: “Not until my parents entered their 90’s ⁄ did I long for a sister, a nurse I named Mary.” His invented Mary, Collins knows, is no less reassuring for being a wish. The Rain in Portugal reminds us of the importance of wishes, and that as long as we have poetry, we are not alone. —KEVIN YOUNG KEVIN YOUNG is director of the New York

Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and the author of, most recently, Blue Laws: Selected & Uncollected Poems 1995–2015.

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@OPRAHMAGAZINE

IF GOD IS IN THE DETAILS, then Satan is in the microaggressions, those assaults on your humanity too small to notice until, like psychological termites, they threaten the very foundation of your mental health. This month welcomes two new books that take on the pernicious minutiae of modern life. The gut- and patriarchybusting essay collection You Can’t Touch My Hair (Plume) marks the literary grand entrance of comedian Phoebe Robinson, who deploys pop culture expertise to call out society’s injustice to black women. With topics ranging from the damned-if-you-dodamned-if-you-don’t history of haircare to how to avoid the soul-sucking role of best black friend, Robinson shows us that life teems with casual racism, and the best way to root it out is with a razor-sharp wit. On the other side of the privilege spectrum is the new cringe comedy of manners from Maria Semple, who follows up her lauded farce Where’d You Go, Bernadette with Today Will Be Different (Little Brown), another novel about a white woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Eleanor Flood has 99 boutique problems, including a son interested in makeup, an overdue graphic memoir manuscript, and a quiet marriage to a hand doctor to the stars. But during one overwhelming day, these minor irritants coalesce into a perfect storm of frustration, threatening to expose Eleanor’s not-so-plush childhood. But just like with Robinson, what ultimately keeps Eleanor from toppling off the cliffs of insanity is her heroic sense of the absurd. Keep hanging on, these writers tell us, as together we laugh the devil back to hell. —NATALIE BEACH


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JAMES FREY, BRIGHT SHINY MORNING @ AMAZONKINDLE


Reading Room

Younger Than That Now A dazzling novel launches a bold new literary voice.

“Some have lost their wings because they found them too large, strange, and uncomfortable; some, because in use the wings had proved rather unpredictable, as if they had a mind of their own.” –from the story collection The Hot Climate of Promises and Grace by Steven Nightingale (Counterpoint)

BRIT BENNET T’S striking debut, The Mothers (Riverhead), unfurls in Oceanside, a sun-drenched coastal town just north of San Diego, a place populated by characters who move fluidly between the seaside settings of lazy bars and beach bungalows and the decidedly nonfrivolous Upper Room Chapel, the black church that is the novel’s crucible. Nadia Turner, Aubrey Evans, and Luke Sheppard are millennials who should be eager to start their adult lives. Instead, they are fractured, each privately nursing the pain of loss and disappointment; the bonds they forge with one another are urgent and intimate. Bennett plumbs these stormy attachments, taking her reader on a journey through the fraught twists and turns of first love. She focuses deftly on 17-year-old Nadia, the most complicated of the three, who struggles to reconcile her bottomless need for connection with her equally fierce ambition. The question for Nadia is whether, ultimately, her drive to succeed will take precedence over the needs of those she claims to love. Adding dimension and a sense of the otherworldly to this powerful story are the Mothers, a chorus of church

A HOUSE DIVIDED

I

N A MURDEROUS TIME,” wrote Stanley Kunitz, “the heart breaks and breaks ⁄ and lives by breaking.” You can feel that mourning in journalist Gary Younge’s Another Day in the Death of America (Nation Books). Younge looks at American gun culture through the lens of its most vulnerable targets—kids. He tracks down as many stories as he can find of people age 19 and younger who died in shootings on a single day. In these vivid chronicles, we meet, among others, Tyler, 11, and Edwin, 16, both accidentally shot by their friends, and Samuel, 16, gunned down in Dallas, the subject of the chillingly blasé headline “Teen Fatally Shot While Walking Down Street.” There is a quiet desperation in these pages, a tempered

ILLUSTRATION BY Jamilla Okubo

elders, resident moralists who offer a running commentary on everything from premarital sex to the power of prayer. In tone and cadence, their words evoke those of Toni Morrison, though these matrons are less saintly and more prone to judgment and gossip. Their flaws invite us to question issues of community, piety, tradition. America needs more books like The Mothers, which quietly, but critically, deepens our appreciation of the black experience, and expands our collective understanding of what it means now to be growing up and grasping for direction and affection. —NATALIE BASZILE

TV series on OWN.

Two writers tread our national fault lines just in time for election season.

outrage at the disturbing silence surrounding so many of the deaths. Sad, frustrating, but profoundly humane and ultimately illuminating, Another Day is political writing at its best. In a similar vein, Berkeley sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild cuts through the redversus-blue-state noise in her psychologically nuanced Strangers in Their Own Land (New Press). After several years of researching and getting to know and care about the white working-class communities of the conservative Louisiana bayou, Hochschild moves beyond the truism that less affluent voters who support small government and tax cuts are voting against their own economic interest. Instead, she argues, they are not ignorant but voting in their “emotional self-interest.” Hochschild NOVEMBER 2016

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unearths the “deep story”: a disorienting sense of alienation decades in the making, born of stagnant incomes, cultural

to remedy its grievances win such voters. Strangers overturns redneck caricatures to reveal people whose dignity is too often dismissed—men like Harold Areno, who quietly grieves the loss of the majestic cypress trees of his childhood home to petrochemical pollution and says to Hochschild upon their parting: “Only the Angel Gabriel knows when each of our times come. But when it does, and gravity leaves our feet, and we rise up, I know I’ll see you up there. And they say there are beautiful trees in Heaven.” —DOTUN AKINTOYE

@OPRAHMAGAZINE


10 TITLES TO PICK UP

NOW Nicotine

Juniper

by Nell Zink

GINSBURG: JOSH EDELSON/ZUMA WIRE/ALAMY LIVE NEWS

SUPREME STYLE “I prefer and continue to aim for opinions that both get it right, and keep it tight, without undue digressions or decorations or distracting denunciations of colleagues who hold different views.” –from My Own Words by Ruth Bader Ginsburg with Mary Hartnett and Wendy W. Williams (Simon & Schuster)

by Kelley and Thomas French

When Penny, an exceptionally normal 23-year-old, inherits the home that belonged to her late hippie father, Norm, she discovers a group of bohemian outcasts squatting on the property. Love, tragedy, and transformation ensue.

In this extraordinary memoir, two journalists—parents of the dangerously premature Juniper—write in alternating chapters about the ordeal to save their daughter’s life and the ethical implications of neonatal medicine.

Around the Way Girl: A Memoir

The Guineveres

by Taraji P. Henson

by Sarah Domet

At the peak of her powers, the megastar actress takes stock of her life thus far, revealing that to thrive as a black woman in Hollywood, her heart has had to be as large as her talent.

In an unidentified time and place during an unnamed war, four girls named Guinevere (Gwen, Win, Ginny, Vere) find themselves abandoned in a mysterious convent where they come of age and form an unbreakable sisterhood.

Upstream

News of the World

by Mary Oliver

by Paulette Jiles

In these songs of herself, the poet composes essays in praise of her great inspirations: untrammeled nature, muses Whitman and Wordsworth, and more.

A tender frontier novel about a 19th-century retired army captain who must return a young girl, held captive for four years by Native Americans, to the only family she has left.

Mister Monkey

American Ulysses

by Francine Prose

by Ronald C. White

A riotous ensemble—including down-andout actress Margot and horny pubescent child actor Adam—narrates this generous satire about a harebrained children’s musical and the characters caught in its cockamamy orbit.

Neither romanticized like his great rival Robert E. Lee, nor deified in martyrdom like Abraham Lincoln, nor given his full due for seeing Reconstruction through, Ulysses S. Grant has a legacy problem. This monumental biography attempts to redeem an American icon.

We Show What We Have Learned & Other Stories

Future Sex by Emily Witt

Witt distinguishes herself in the nascent young-single-urban-woman-Tinder-tellall-memoir genre by deploying admirable detachment and irony as she dabbles in orgasmic meditation, experiments with online dating, and navigates the disjuncture between sex and love. —D.A.

by Clare Beams

This debut collection is full of promise and surreal delight. In the shocking title tale, a teacher falls to pieces in front of her class, not emotionally or metaphorically, but literally. We hope there’s much more to come from this writer.

OPRAH.COM

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NOVEMBER 2016


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November

2016 Our showstopping recipes and timesaving tips will help you take Thanksgiving to new heights! (page 114)... Get into the civic spirit with stories of votes cast in elections past (page 130).... And with festive baubles, bags, sparkles, and scents, you’ll be the life of the season’s soirees (page 134)....

PEOPLE: GETTY IMAGES

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JVG Studio


Time-Saver See that gorgeous turkey? You can buy it already cooked. (Yes, really!)

PHOTOGRAPHS BY Christopher Testani


Early-Bird Whether you’re old school or a risk taker, time starved or sweets obsessed, there are all kinds of wonderful and delicious ways to whip up your holiday meal in advance—giving you lots more time to spend with the people you’re thankful for.

OPRAH.COM

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NOVEMBER 2016


Enamored of the classics, sure (dinner rolls, you’ve had a few)— but that doesn’t mean you don’t relish a tasty twist. Enjoy these spins on deviled eggs, roasted cauliflower, mashed potatoes

T RY T H I S

!

Want to venture beyond the standard pureed potato? This sophisticated side from chef Curtis Stone will edge you out of your comfort-food zone.

4 sweet potatoes (about 2 pounds), peeled, cut into 1½" pieces 2 parsnips (about 12 ounces), peeled, inner core removed, cut into 1" pieces 1 rutabaga (about 8 ounces), peeled, cut into 1" pieces 4 Tbsp. (½ stick) unsalted butter 1⁄3 cup fresh sage leaves Salt to taste 1 cup heavy cream Black pepper to taste 1. In a large pot, combine root vegetables and cover them by 1" with cold salted water. Bring to a simmer over high heat, then reduce to medium and simmer until very tender, about 30 minutes. Drain vegetables. 2. Meanwhile, in a medium heavy saucepan over medium-high heat, melt butter. Gently stir until light brown, about 2 minutes. Stir in sage leaves and cook until leaves are crisp, about 1 minute. Remove pan from heat. Using a slotted spoon, transfer sage leaves to a paper towel–lined plate. Sprinkle with salt and reserve. Return pan to medium heat, stir cream into browned butter, and simmer for about 5 minutes. Keep warm. 3. Transfer vegetables to a food processor. Cover and let stand for 5 minutes to allow steam to soften vegetables further. Stream in hot cream mixture while blending vegetables until smooth. Season with salt and pepper. 4. Transfer mashed vegetables to a serving bowl and garnish with crisp sage leaves. To make ahead: Prepare 1 day before; cover and refrigerate. Reheat over low heat, adding cream if necessary.

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MAKES 6 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 25 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 35 MINUTES

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If you’re not a broccolini buff, carrots or fennel work just as well.

com For the cauliflower recipe, head to oprah.com⁄make aheadtgiving.

OPRAH.COM

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com For the soufflé recipe, head to oprah.com⁄make aheadtgiving.

Just So You Know This so-easy-it’s-silly faux soufflé is delicious with any cheddar, but a sharp, aged option—like Cabot Clothbound—gives it dimension and class.

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Word to the Wise Stirring ¼ cup bourbon into the maple syrup mixture (when you add the heavy cream) lends a buzzworthy boost.


What’s that? You’re a...lazy cook? (Hey, you said it, not us.) Then you’ll love these ideas: a cheater’s “soufflé,” canned cranberry hacks (below), potatoes you can literally abandon, and a turkey you don’t even have to cook.

Time-Saver Slow-cooker mashed potatoes stay warm for hours—and won’t fight for stove space.

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THINK ROASTING IS FOR THE BIRDS? California’s Diestel Family Turkey Ranch ships a fully cooked turkey that’s surprisingly juicy, exceedingly flavorful, and entirely no hassle. Just heat up one of its hormone-free birds and serve. (From $75, including shipping; store.diestelturkey.com)

Berry Creative Canned cran can be a little lackluster, but with help from Claire Thomas of TheKitchyKitchen.com, the standard stuff can really sing. Just add ingredients to 2 cups of cranberry sauce and cook over medium heat for at least 5 minutes.*

Spiced Cranberry Chutney

Strawberry Balsamic Cranberry Sauce

Salsa Arandano (Mexican Cranberry Sauce)

2 tsp. grated fresh ginger ¼ tsp. ground cinnamon ¼ tsp. ground coriander 2 tsp. orange zest 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar Pinch of cayenne

1 cup crushed strawberries ¼ cup balsamic vinegar 2 Tbsp. honey ½ tsp. ground black pepper

1 tsp. ancho chili powder 1 tsp. ground New Mexico chili ¼ tsp. ground cumin ¼ tsp. ground cinnamon 1 Tbsp. fresh lime juice

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*Each can be made 3 days ahead and stored in the fridge.

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Time-Saver

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Make the butternut squash puree for the pancakes up to 3 days ahead—all you do on the big day is turn on the griddle.

For the pancakes recipe, head to oprah.com⁄make aheadtgiving.

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Time-Saver Using frozen puff pastry for the quiche’s crust makes it especially easy to assemble.

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Risk Taker Way to cook outside the box! No boring breast meat or staid stuffing for you—you’ve got pumpkin quiche, squash pancakes, and (below) daring turkey seasonings to try.

Turkey: The Ins and Outs Spice up your bird with these savory rubs and stuffing combinations from Lick Your Plate cookbook authors Julie Albert and Lisa Gnat.

CAJUN Outside: 2 Tbsp. paprika 1 Tbsp. oregano 1 Tbsp. garlic powder 1 Tbsp. onion powder 1 Tbsp. dried thyme 2 tsp. kosher salt 2 tsp. cayenne pepper (Mix in a small bowl up to 1 week in advance.)

Inside: 1 green bell pepper, seeded and quartered 1 jalapeño, seeded and quartered 1 celery stalk, sliced 2 garlic cloves, crushed

MEDITERRANEAN Outside: ½ cup Italian parsley 3 Tbsp. olive oil 1 Tbsp. lemon zest 1 Tbsp. rosemary 2 tsp. dried oregano 1 tsp. kosher salt 1 tsp. black pepper 1⁄3 tsp. red pepper flakes (Mix in food processor.)

Inside: 1 red onion, quartered Handful of parsley 1 lemon, quartered 6 sprigs rosemary 2 garlic cloves, crushed

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Outside: 2 Tbsp. smoked paprika 2 Tbsp. brown sugar 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. onion powder 2 tsp. kosher salt 1 tsp. black pepper (Mix in a small bowl up to 1 week in advance.)

Inside: 2 celery stalks, sliced 1 small yellow onion, quartered 1 orange, quartered 1 Granny Smith apple, cored and quartered

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NUTTIN’ BETTER! Chestnut spread is a French delight fit to smear on bread or biscuits—a magic tweak that takes mere seconds. Clément

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we found ours via Try the World, a purveyor of global treats. ($4; trytheworld.com)


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com For the carrot salad and collard greens recipes, head to oprah.comâ &#x201E;make aheadtgiving.

Time-Saver Ina Garten, who shared this recipe, recommends making the vinaigrette a day ahead and keeping it in the refrigerator.

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Enthusiast And who can blame you, given their vibrant beauty and flavor? Serve up collards, beets, and carrots—and learn (below) how to get even more of your

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Raghavan Iyer, author of Smashed, Mashed, Boiled, and Baked, has producecentric updates for the signature starch you can make up to 2 days before serving. Preheat oven to 350°. Peel and cut 2 beets into 1" pieces; arrange on baking sheet, drizzle with oil, and cook until tender. Salt and pepper to taste. Cut beets into ¼" pieces. Add to 2 cups potatoes with ¼ cup pine nuts. In a large skillet, warm 2 Tbsp. oil. Cook 2 garlic cloves, chopped, and ½ cup golden raisins for 3 minutes. Add 2 cups chopped mustard greens; cook until tender. Salt and pepper to taste, then add to 2 cups potatoes.

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Time-Saver Sturdy veggies like endive, radicchio, and beets tend to keep their crunch, so you can dress them well before you’re ready to serve.

In a skillet over medium heat, add 2 Tbsp. oil; 1 orange bell pepper, cut into ½" cubes; and 1 chopped Serrano pepper. Cook until blistered. Salt and pepper to taste. Add ¼ cup chopped dill. Stir into 2 cups potatoes.

Good Gravy! Smother your spuds in Iyer’s alternatives to the classic version. Each can be made 3 days ahead and refrigerated. In a saucepan, heat 2 Tbsp. drippings. Add 1 cup chopped eggplant and cook until tender. Add 1 Tbsp. flour; cook 1 minute. Add ½ cup malt vinegar; 1 apple, chopped; and 2 Tbsp. chopped oregano. Season with salt to taste. In a skillet, warm 2 Tbsp. oil. Add ½ cup each diced red onion and red bell pepper, and 2 Tbsp. golden raisins. Cook until onions are light brown. Stir in 1 tsp. garam masala. In a blender, add mixture; ½ tsp. cayenne; and 1 large tomato, diced. Puree until smooth. In a skillet, warm 2 Tbsp. oil. Add 1 onion and 1 jalapeño, both chopped, and cook until onion browns. Add 1 Tbsp. chickpea flour and 2 tsp. ground coriander; cook to brown flour, 1 minute. Pour in 1 cup vegetable broth and simmer until sauce thickens. Stir in 1 tomato, chopped, along with 2 Tbsp. chopped cilantro.


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You can have chocolate in every course. Roasted cacao nibs make a vinaigrette that pairs sweetly with savory bacon and blue cheese in a salad.

For the salad dressing recipe, head to oprah.comâ &#x201E;make aheadtgiving.

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Take heart, devoted desserters: Dinner doesn't have to be a dutiful prelude to the grand finale. We’ve gathered candyesque side dishes and cocktails to hold your interest until the last course—and, naturally, a sweet postmeal treat, in the form of a crackly creme brûlée cupcake.

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A blowtorch may seem like a kooky addition to your kitchen, but many cost around $25, and their rapidfire effect can’t be matched. (And no, you won’t burn the house down.)

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That’s the Spirit! Pamela Wiznitzer of the New York City cocktail bar Seamstress NY sweetens things up with three kicky recipes.

Cranberry Fiesta

Spiced Harvest

Thanksgiving Sparkler

In a cocktail shaker, put 1½ ounces tequila, ¾ ounce cranberry juice, ½ ounce lemon juice, and ½ ounce simple syrup and shake to combine. Strain over ice into a lowball glass. Garnish with fresh cranberries and serve.

In a cocktail shaker, put 1½ ounces rye, 1½ ounces sweetened condensed milk, 1 ounce milk, and a pinch each of nutmeg and cinnamon, and shake well to combine. Pour into a low glass over ice. Garnish with a cinnamon stick and serve.

In a highball glass, combine 1½ ounces aged cachaça, such as Novo Fogo; 1 ounce cold chai tea; 1½ ounces sparkling apple cider; ½ ounce lemon juice; and ½ ounce simple syrup. Serve.

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Mediterranean Deviled Eggs From Appetites, by Anthony Bourdain MAKES 24 DEVILED EGGS ACTIVE TIME: 15 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 30 MINUTES

com

BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE To learn how to make the rest of the delightful dishes in the previous pages, head to oprah.com/make aheadtgiving.

12 2 2 ¼

large eggs Tbsp. finely chopped preserved lemon Tbsp. harissa paste cup capers, drained, rinsed, and finely chopped, plus whole capers for garnish 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil 2 Tbsp. mayonnaise Salt to taste Finely grated lemon zest Finely chopped parsley Saffron threads

1. Gently place eggs in a medium pot. Fill pot with cold water and bring to a rapid boil. Remove from heat, cover, and let sit for 9 minutes, then transfer eggs to an ice-water bath to cool. 2. Peel cooled eggs. Cut each in half lengthwise. Separate yolks from whites. In a medium bowl, mash together yolks, preserved lemon, harissa, chopped capers, oil, mayonnaise, and salt. Transfer mixture to a pastry bag fitted with a star tip (or a plastic bag with one corner snipped off). Fill whites with mixture; garnish with lemon zest, parsley, saffron, and capers; and serve. To make ahead: Cook eggs, make filling, and refrigerate eggs and filling separately for up to 1 day; 1 to 2 hours before serving, fill eggs, cover well with plastic wrap, and refrigerate.

Broccolini Casserole From chef and O columnist Curtis Stone MAKES 6 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 10 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 35 MINUTES

3 Tbsp. olive oil, divided 12 ounces cremini mushrooms, thickly sliced ½ cup (3 large) finely chopped shallots 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tsp. chopped fresh thyme ¼ cup dry white wine 1½ Tbsp. all-purpose flour 1¾ cups whole milk ½ cup heavy cream 1 cup finely grated Parmesan, divided 2 bunches (about 1 pound) broccolini, trimmed and blanched for 30 seconds ½ cup panko crumbs 1. Position a rack in center of oven and preheat to 450°. In a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat, add 2 Tbsp. oil and mushrooms. Cook until tender, about 6 minutes. Add shallots, garlic, and thyme; cook until shallots soften, about 3 minutes. Add wine and simmer until wine evaporates, about 20 seconds. Sprinkle flour over top and stir to blend. Stir in milk and cream

and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer gently, stirring, until sauce thickens, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in ¼ cup Parmesan and remove from heat. Season with salt and pepper. 2. Pour half of mushroom mixture into an 8" baking dish. Arrange broccolini over mushrooms and top with remaining mixture. 3. In a medium bowl, mix panko, remaining ¾ cup Parmesan, and remaining 1 Tbsp. oil, then sprinkle mixture over top of casserole. Bake until panko is golden brown, about 12 minutes. To make ahead: Prepare panko mixture up to 2 days ahead; blanch and drain broccolini up to 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate both.

3 Tbsp. whipped butter 1½ tsp. kosher salt 1 tsp. ground black pepper 3 Tbsp. chopped fresh chives 1. Place potatoes in a slow cooker, then pour broth over top. Cover and cook on high for 4 hours (or on low for 8), until potatoes are soft. 2. Set a colander over a bowl and drain potatoes, reserving 1 cup broth; return to slow cooker. Add buttermilk, sour cream, reserved broth, butter, salt, and pepper. Mash, stir in chives, and serve. To make ahead: Cook 1 day ahead and refrigerate. Reheat in slow cooker a few hours before serving.

Maple Pie

Candied Bacon Sweet Potatoes

From How to Bake Everything, by Mark Bittman

From Danielle Walker's Against All Grain Celebrations, by Danielle Walker

MAKES 1 (9”) PIE TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR

Store-bought piecrust (or ½ of Mark Bittman’s Flaky Piecrust—see oprah.com/ makeaheadtgiving for recipe) ½ cup cream 2 Tbsp. cornstarch 1¼ cups maple syrup 4 Tbsp. (½ stick) butter, cut into cubes 2 eggs, beaten ½ tsp. salt 1. Heat oven to 425°. Butter one side of a piece of aluminum foil large enough to cover crust; press foil onto crust, butter side down. Scatter weights, such as dried beans, over foil and bake for 12 minutes; remove weights and foil. Reduce oven to 350° and continue baking until crust starts to brown, about 10 minutes. Cool slightly. 2. Meanwhile, whisk cream and cornstarch together. In a heavy saucepan, bring maple syrup to a simmer over medium-low heat. Whisk in cream mixture, reduce heat to low, and whisk frequently until thickened, 2 to 3 minutes. 3. Remove pan from heat. Stir in butter until melted. Let cool just until lukewarm. Add eggs and salt and beat until smooth. Place pie plate on a baking sheet, then fill with maple filling. 4. Transfer baking sheet to oven and bake until pie is golden brown, 45 to 55 minutes. Cool on a rack. Serve warm or at room temperature. To make ahead: Bake pie and refrigerate for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Slow-Cooker Mashed Potatoes From Skinnytaste Fast and Slow, by Gina Homolka MAKES 6 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 25 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 4 HOURS 25 MINUTES

3 pounds (8 medium) Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1" pieces 4½ cups reduced-sodium chicken broth ¾ cup low-fat buttermilk ½ cup light sour cream

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MAKES 10 TO 12 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 20 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR

3 6 ½ 1⁄3 1 ½ ½

pounds sweet potatoes, scrubbed ounces bacon, cut into 1” pieces cup pecans, coarsely chopped cup pure maple syrup tsp. chili powder tsp. fine sea salt tsp. cinnamon

¼ tsp. cayenne pepper 1. Preheat oven to 400°. Line two rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. Cut sweet potatoes into 1" cubes. In a bowl, toss potatoes with bacon, pecans, maple syrup, chili powder, salt, cinnamon, and cayenne. Spread in a single layer on prepared baking sheets. 2. Roast for 20 minutes. Stir and continue roasting until tender, about 15 minutes. Turn oven to broil and brown potatoes, 5 minutes. Watch nuts closely to ensure they don’t burn. Serve hot. To make ahead: Combine ingredients and store in an airtight container in refrigerator for up to 3 days. Bring to room temperature, then bake.

Pumpkin Quiche with Bacon From French Country Cooking, by Mimi Thorisson MAKES 6 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 45 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 2 HOURS 30 MINUTES

1 (1¼ pound) pumpkin or winter squash 1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling 1 sprig rosemary leaves 1 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground black pepper 3½ ounces bacon, cut into lardons or diced 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced 12 ounces puff pastry (thawed if frozen) 2 large egg yolks 1 cup heavy cream ¼ tsp. nutmeg 2 large egg whites


1. Preheat oven to 400°. Halve pumpkin, scoop out seeds, and slice into 6" wedges. Line a roasting pan with parchment paper. Place wedges on pan. Drizzle with oil and season with rosemary, salt, and pepper. Roast, turning once, until tender, about 30 minutes. Reduce oven to 350°. 2. Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan, heat 1 Tbsp. olive oil over medium-high heat. Add bacon and cook until browned, about 3 minutes. Pour off all but 2 Tbsp. bacon fat. Reduce heat, add onion, and season with ½ tsp. each salt and pepper. Cook until onion is tender, about 18 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, on a floured surface, roll puff pastry 1⁄8" thick. Line a 10" or 11" tart pan with pastry, trimming excess, and prick bottom several times with a fork. Freeze pastry until firm, about 10 minutes. Line pastry with foil and fill with dried beans. Bake until pastry starts to brown, about 30 minutes. Remove foil and beans and bake until pastry is dry, about 15 minutes. 4. Remove and discard pumpkin skin and, in a food processor fitted with a metal blade (or by hand), puree flesh. Put pumpkin puree in a bowl. 5. Stir egg yolks, cream, and nutmeg into pumpkin. Season with remaining ½ tsp. each salt and pepper. Add onion and bacon mixture. 6. Using an electric mixer, beat egg whites until stiff peaks form. Fold into pumpkin mixture. 7. Scoop pumpkin mixture into tart shell. Bake until pastry is crisp and golden and filling is set, about 35 minutes. Let cool 5 minutes and serve. To make ahead: Refrigerate pumpkin puree up to 3 days; bring to room temperature before using. Cook bacon 1 day ahead and refrigerate. Prebake pastry shell 1 day ahead—wrap well in plastic and store at room temperature.

Herb & Apple Bread Pudding From Cooking For Jeffrey, by Ina Garten MAKES 8 TO 10 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 40 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 2 HOURS 10 MINUTES

8 cups (¾-inch-diced) country bread cubes, crusts removed 4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter 3 ounces pancetta, ½-inch-diced 2 cups chopped yellow onions (2 onions) 1½ cups medium-diced celery 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled and chopped ½ cup medium or dry sherry 2 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary leaves Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper ½ cup chopped fresh parsley leaves 7 extra-large eggs 2½ cups heavy cream 1¼ cups chicken stock, preferably homemade 2 cups grated Gruyère cheese, lightly packed (6 ounces with rind), divided

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Creme Brûlée Cupcakes

2. Place the bread in a single layer on a sheet pan and bake for 20 minutes, tossing once, until lightly browned. Set aside.

From The Sprinkles Baking Book, by Candace Nelson

3. Meanwhile, heat the butter in a large (12-inch) sauté pan over medium-low heat. Add the pancetta, raise the heat to medium, and cook for 5 minutes, until browned. Stir in the onions, celery, and apple and cook over medium to medium high for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender. 4. Stir in the sherry, rosemary, 1 tablespoon salt, and 1½ teaspoons pepper and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes, until most of the liquid is gone. Off the heat, stir in the parsley. 5. Meanwhile, whisk the eggs, cream, chicken stock, and 1½ cups of the Gruyère in a very large bowl. Stir in the bread and vegetable mixture and set aside for 30 minutes to allow the bread to soak up the custard. Pour into a 9 x 13 x 2-inch ovento-table baking dish. Sprinkle with the remaining ½ cup of Gruyère and bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until the top is browned and a knife inserted into the middle comes out clean. Serve hot. To make ahead: Assemble early in the day, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate. Bake just before serving.

Beet Salad with Crème Fraîche From French Country Cooking, by Mimi Thorisson MAKES 4 TO 6 SERVINGS TOTAL TIME: 45 MINUTES

2 medium beets, peeled and thinly sliced ½ large head red cabbage, cored and very thinly sliced 3 red endives or 2 small treviso radicchio, leaves separated 1 large red onion, thinly sliced Seeds from 1 large pomegranate ½ cup pumpkin seeds, lightly toasted A few sprigs flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped 1 Tbsp. drained capers 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon Fine sea salt Ground black pepper ½ cup crème fraîche 1. In a medium bowl, combine beets, cabbage, endives, onion, pomegranate seeds, pumpkin seeds, parsley, and capers. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together olive oil and lemon juice and season with salt and pepper. Drizzle over salad. Divide salad among plates; top with crème fraîche and lemon zest. Serve.

MAKES 12 CUPCAKES ACTIVE TIME: 50 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR 10 MINUTES

PASTRY CREAM 1 cup heavy cream 2/3 cup whole milk ½ cup granulated sugar, divided 1/8 tsp. fine sea salt ½ vanilla bean, halved lengthwise and seeds scraped, or 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract 4 large egg yolks 3 Tbsp. cornstarch 1 Tbsp. unsalted butter CUPCAKES AND TOPPING 12/3 cups all-purpose flour 1¼ tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. fine sea salt 2/3 cup whole milk 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract 10 Tbsp. (1¼ sticks) unsalted butter, slightly softened, plus more for greasing ¾ cup plus 6 Tbsp. granulated sugar 2 large eggs 1 egg white 1. Make pastry cream: In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, combine cream, milk, 6 Tbsp. sugar, salt, and vanilla bean seeds and pod, and bring to a simmer, stirring. In a small bowl, whisk together egg yolks and remaining sugar. Whisk cornstarch into egg mixture until fluffy. Slowly pour about ½ cup of cream mixture into egg mixture, whisking. Reduce heat to medium-low, then slowly add egg mixture to cream mixture. Cook, whisking, until thickened, then boil for 30 seconds. Using a spatula, push custard through a strainer into a bowl, then whisk in butter. Cover with plastic wrap, pressing it against surface to prevent skin from forming. Chill for 2 hours. 2. Make cupcakes: Preheat oven to 350°. Butter 12 (4-ounce) ramekins (or a 12-cup cupcake pan with paper liners) and place on a baking sheet. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. In a small bowl, mix milk and vanilla. In bowl of a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, beat butter and ¾ cup sugar on medium-high until fluffy, 2 to 3 minutes. Reduce speed to medium-low, add eggs one at a time, and beat until creamy, 1 to 2 minutes. Slowly add half of flour mixture, then milk mixture, then remaining flour mixture, beating until blended. Add about ¼ cup batter to each ramekin. Bake until tops are dry, 16 to 18 minutes. Transfer pan to a wire rack to cool. 3. Assemble cupcakes: Using a small knife, cut a 1" circle in each cupcake. Fill each with 2 tsp. pastry cream. Using a spatula, spread 1 tsp. pastry cream over top of each. Sprinkle each with 1½ tsp. sugar. Using a brûlée torch, melt sugar until caramelized, 1 to 2 minutes. Serve.

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WHERE ARE YOU GOING?


LEATRICE SMALL mother

Finalizing the Adoption I’ve lived in and around Flint, Michigan, all my life. About seven years ago, I took in my 15-year-old niece, Ashlee, because her mom was having some troubles. The following year, Ashlee gave birth to a baby girl, Joi. Then, in February 2011, Ashlee passed away. Joi was 7 months old, and I became her guardian. I’d always planned to have kids, but not this way. Some days I’d wake up saying, “God, is this really what you want for me?” It was all new: babyproofing my house, having to say no to Chicago shopping trips with friends. But Joi was mine. I fought to adopt her for more than four years, through endless red tape:

hiring a lawyer, tracking down her father, enduring waiting periods, getting written consent. During that time, I had a son, Carrington, with my then boyfriend. This photo was taken on Michigan Adoption Day; after the judge gave the final order, she let Joi come up and bang the gavel. I could feel Ashlee’s presence in the room, like she was smiling down on us. Joi’s 6 now, and she lives up to her name. She’s so happy and curious, always playing with her little brother. I work full-time and used to worry I couldn’t handle the challenge of being a single mom, but I learned I have more strength than I knew. My heart is so much bigger than I thought.

THE FLINT JOURNAL VIA AP

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PHOTOGRAPH BY Jake May

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RIT ES On Election Day, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a no -brainer: Every eligible Am erica n sh ou ld sta nd up an d be co un te d. To celebrate this mo st powerful of privileg weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gath ered ins es, piring sto rie s of pa ss ion s ign ited, levers pu lle d, an d vo ices glo rio us ly he ard.


PHOTO ILLUSTRATIONS BY TOVA DIAMOND. ILLUSTRATION IMAGERY: “VOTE HERE”: ALAMY. VOTERS IN LINE: AFRO AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS/GADO/GETTY IMAGES. “VOTE BABY VOTE”: GABRIEL HACKETT/HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES. “VOTES FOR WOMEN” MAP: DAVID & JANICE L. FRENT/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES. WOMAN IN PATRIOTIC HAT: GALLERY STOCK. “NO MATTER WHO WINS”: BARNEY STEIN/NEW YORK POST ARCHIVES/NYP HOLDINGS INC. VIA GETTY IMAGES. OTHERS: GETTY IMAGES (10).

“The first election I voted in was Nixon versus McGovern. If you couldn’t get motivated to vote Nixon—the Darth Vader of his time—out of the White House, you probably didn’t have a pulse. We know how that turned out. Once again this year, the choices seem pretty stark. If you’re having trouble getting stoked to vote, better get your blood pressure checked.” —Carl Hiaasen, author of Razor Girl

“I always vote in the morning. Two reasons: First, so the day won’t get away from me—I don’t want there to be any excuse not to get into that booth! Second, I love that I VOTED sticker, because it proclaims that I exercised a right denied to so many for so long. On Election Day, I vote with them in mind. I rock my sticker and ask everyone I see, ‘Did you vote?’”

“I GREW UP BIRACIAL in a small college town in central Pennsylvania, a battleground childhood in a battleground state where class and culture collided even on the playground. Brown, nerdy, and terrified, I never got into fights, but I feared getting into one every day. All of which is to say, Election Day in 2008 was special for me. That Tuesday I rented a car and drove five hours back to Pennsylvania from New York, where I was in grad school. I wanted to vote with my Sri Lankan father, who long ago had become a naturalized citizen. We got dressed up because as brown men in a white county, we assumed we’d be granted a smidgen more dignity if we were wearing better clothes. The polling place was in a run-down mini-mall off a busy country highway. I was surprised when the volunteers recognized my dad, calling him by his nickname, Lucky. Still, one of them seemed flustered, saying she couldn’t find his name in the voter rolls—implying somehow that the fault was his. With some effort, I managed to keep my mouth shut. When it began to seem he really would not be permitted to vote, Dad said, “I should have brought my passport.” “No,” I said. You see, I’d researched this. That’s what you do when you are black or brown or Latino or Asian—you research what can stop you from voting. “You don’t need your passport to vote, Dad,” I told him, as the volunteer listened. “We’re registered right here.” She kept looking and eventually found his name. Back home, a neighbor snapped a picture of my 70-year-old father and me high-fiving in his yard. Eight years later, that picture is still stuck to his refrigerator.”

—Sunil Yapa, author of Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist

“I’m from the Bronx, and my parents always took me with them to vote. Back then, New York had those old-style voting machines with the knobs you had to flip and the big red lever you threw from one side to the other. My parents would let me pull the lever once they had decided. It made such a satisfying ‘cachunk.’ Super fun.”

“MY FAMILY AND I FLED

In 2004, I cast my vote for John Kerry, and when I found out he lost, I was overcome by despair. I realized that, yes, participating in a democracy can be exhilarating. But it can be heartbreaking, too.

—Chris Hayes, host of MSNBC’s All In with Chris Hayes

—Ava DuVernay, director of Selma and Queen Sugar OPRAH.COM

—Aasif Mandvi, actor

Nicaragua in 1980 as a result of a communist revolution. After a civil war lasting over a decade, democratic elections were held in 1990, and since then I’ve gone back several times as an election observer. Voting in Nicaragua is a time-consuming, cumbersome process typically involving multiple paper ballots and ink thumbprints. I have seen very old people vote for the first time. I have seen people with severe physical disabilities be helped to the polls. I have seen poor people next to rich, waiting for hours under a blazing sun or in heavy rains. There are few images more moving than seeing people once deprived of a vote cast it freely.” —Ana Navarro,

Republican strategist

“Too many of my friends gave their lives for our right to vote. I think about them every time I step into the voting booth. I remember their faces, the sounds of their voices. I wonder what could have been, had we not been cheated of their light—of their lives. We must never, ever forget their sacrifice. We must honor it and cherish it. Tell your friends: We must vote.” —John Lewis, congressman for Georgia’s Fifth District, civil rights hero, and author of March

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I never voted in a presidential election until Obama. I just wasn’t excited about anyone. But the lesson I’ve learned is that you can’t just vote when you’re excited. When you say ‘I’m not gonna vote,’ you are voting—to hand over your power. —Tyler Perry, actor and director “I have two strong memories of second grade: endlessly practicing cursive handwriting, and our class study of the 1984 presidential election, which culminated in a trip to a voting booth we’d made from a refrigerator box. Like my classmates, I suspect, I cast my vote the way my parents had that morning. I grew up in rural Virginia, and school had already familiarized me with how my hippie family was different. My dad didn’t hunt, my mom put sprouts on my sandwiches, and now we were voting for Mondale. My heart sank when my teacher announced the results just before setting us free for recess. Mondale lost badly in the real election, too. In 2008, as a fifth-grade teacher, I had my students study voting history in the run-up to the election. They learned about women’s suffrage, the poll tax, literacy tests—all the obstacles to voting Americans have faced. And then we built our own cardboard voting booth, but we didn’t vote for president. We voted about recess rules. Longer recess won by a landslide.” —Belle Boggs,

author of The Art of Waiting

“I JOINED THE MARINES IN 1992. When I deployed for the invasion of Iraq in 2003, the mission was to create a democracy like our own. I returned home before the first free Iraqi election, and my wife and I had our first daughter. Soon after, I began my second tour. It was a hard stint in Anbar Province, made harder because now I was a father. Casualties were high. I got wounded; men I’d come to know well were killed. This month my wife and I will drive the country roads to our little town hall in Michigan to vote, our girls in the back seat. War lifted my senses above partisanship and sloganeering. I want to know that my willingness to leave my daughter fatherless and my wife a widow is carefully considered by everyone old enough to vote. When I vote this month, I’ll be doing so with blood in my pen.” —Benjamin Busch, author of Dust to Dust

“In 1972, I went door to door with my mother canvassing for George McGovern. That year was my political christening. And now my children often accompany me to my polling place. They are starting to form their own opinions and ask hard questions. I try to summon my mother’s grace and thoughtfulness in answering them.” —Sarah Jessica Parker,

actress

“I grew up in Texas, a very proud red state, during the Reagan years. In a U.S. history class, my teacher would show us the presidential debates just so he could heckle the Democratic nominee from the back of the classroom. I was afraid to admit that I did not support Reagan. So in 1992, when I was first eligible to vote and I cast my ballot for Bill Clinton and he won, I cried with joy. My opinion mattered!”

“The hope and ideals of our country are bigger than the ego of any one person, and voting in accordance with your love of others is no small thing—it is and always will be a significant act of service.”

—Renée Elise Goldsberry,

U.S. senator for New Jersey

actress

—Cory Booker,


ILLUSTRATION IMAGERY: CITY HALL: FLIP SCHULKE/CORBIS/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES. “WOMEN! USE YOUR VOTE”: APA/GETTY IMAGES. “FREEDOM OF THE BALLOT”: MARSH PHOTOGRAPHERS/CINCINNATI MUSEUM CENTER/GETTY IMAGES. “BALLOT BOX”: ARCHIVE PICS/ ALAMY. “VOTING IS PEOPLE POWER”: GABRIEL HACKETT/GETTY IMAGES. “I VOTED ABSENTEE”: REDUX. OTHERS: GETTY IMAGES (8).

“The first time I voted in a general election was for Al Gore, in 2000. I went into the voting booth and was shocked by how many little switches there were—like the instrument panel of a Boeing. After several tense minutes of sweaty concentration, I flicked all necessary switches and then pulled the final big lever, a heavier-thanseemed-necessary piece of machinery that gave the whole process an element of steampunk drama. I remember thinking, Gosh, is voting technology due for an update? Well, I guess I got my answer.” —Jessi Klein,

author of You’ll Grow Out of It and head writer for Inside Amy Schumer

“Growing up, it was inconceivable to me that American women had the vote for only 60 years before I was born in 1980. In grade school, I collected Susan B. Anthony dollars, and whenever I got to choose a report topic, I picked something to do with the 19th Amendment. 1920, the year women got the vote, was my first ATM PIN. I guess I was a little obsessed.” —Anna Sale, host of WNYC Studios’

Death, Sex & Money podcast

Once I got into politics, I voted exclusively absentee. I was always working on Election Day.

—Nicolle Wallace, Republican strategist

“WHEN I WAS A HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR, IN 1984, I had Mr. Suddith for political science. Walter Mondale was running against Ronald Reagan, and that was a very big deal to us—it wasn’t every year a class got to study a presidential election as it happened. We held our own poll on Election Day, and then that night we gathered in the cafeteria to watch the results. It was a party! It was special. We felt grown-up and fortunate to participate in something bigger than us yet inherently about us and dependent on us. Thanks, Mr. Suddith! Party on!”

“The five of us kids grew up in a rambling house, and when we left home, my mother rented out our rooms. Sometimes she took in homeless young people and made sure they got signed up for social services and school. And she always made everybody register to vote. If you lived there, you voted.” —Bonnie Jo Campbell,

author of Mothers, Tell Your Daughters

—Connie Britton, star of Nashville

“Whenever I meet someone who vacillates on whether or not to vote because there isn’t a perfect candidate, I tell them the voting booth is the one place on earth where the least powerful and the most powerful are equal. Who would pass that up?” —Gloria Steinem, feminist icon and author of My Life on the Road

“I HAVE LIVED IN MY HEAD as an American since I was a child old enough to consider myself anything at all. Although my family moved to the United States from Nigeria when I was 4, I didn’t become a citizen for another 25 years or so, on a rainy spring day this April. As such, national elections have been paradoxical for me. As a college student, I pestered people on the street to register, knowing I couldn’t myself. I’ve written and argued for and against candidates without being able to back up all my talk. I’ve sat through election days like a grudging bystander. Naturalization is a matter of speaking an oath and receiving a piece of paper. I have to confess, I felt mostly relieved when the process was over—not changed in any way, no more or less an American than I’d been a few minutes before. But my first opportunity at the ballot this autumn feels different, a chance to instantiate beliefs and commitments I’ve held for a long time. A chance—if it’s not too grandiose to put it this way—to answer for my love, to be a citizen.”

—Dotun Akintoye,

O’s assistant books editor


FESTIVE 26 PART YREADY BEAUT Y AND FASHION TRICKS TO KICK OFF THE SOIREE SEASON. BY M E L I S S A G OL DB E RG A N D N IC OL E M C G OV E R N

1

TUR N UP THE HEAV Y METAL . Go for the bold in silver, the metallic to rock right now. A fresh, flashy manicure is simple with Jamberry Nail Wraps in Metallic Chrome Silver ($15; jamberry.com). And if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re feeling matchy-matchy, pair it with an equally sparkly clutch like this one from Jimmy Choo.

PHOTO G R A PH S BY G R EG OR H A L E N DA

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PROP STYLIST: SARAH GUIDO-LAAKSO/HALLEY RESOURCES. SOFT GOODS STYLIST: ANITA SALERNO/R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS.

2

In a pinch, a pop of unexpected color will take you from desk to dinner.

Before you head out, swap your sensible shoes for fancy footwear. A traditional metallic shade (gold, silver, copper) is always appropriate, but if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re feeling daring, a bright hue steps up any outfit. Kate Spade New York, $298 per pair; katespade.com


TO H I T R E F R E S H BE FOR E T H E BIG B A S H , I N DU LG E I N A B AT H . A deep soak can alleviate stress, reducing your levels of cortisol (a hormone that can disrupt collagen production and contribute to skin aging), says New York City dermatologist Whitney Bowe, MD. For a skin-softening effect, add a luxurious blend of oils like soothing rose and hydrating jojoba to warm water. Try Uma Absolute Anti Aging Body Oil ($90; umaoils.com).

3 Find a dress that gives you the most bang for your buck. You don’t have to spend a fortune on a gown; there are plenty of budget-friendly options that look highend. Choose a simple silhouette in a solid color that you can wear in any season. $100; zara.com

5

TOO BUSY TO GET YOUR ROOTS DONE? NO PROBLEM! Rita Hazan Root Concealer Temple & Brow Touch-Up Stick ($25; ritahazan.com) delivers an instant fix. The creamy, waterresistant formula, available in three shades, comes with a spoolie brush to easily comb the color through.

6 Say hello to an old friend: the bodysuit. You’ll always look put together in a streamlined, no-bulk layering piece, whether it’s tucked into a ball skirt or jeans. Tuxe, $130; bloomingdales.com

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G O FOR E Y E DR A M A W I T H A S W I PE OF R IC H LY PIG M E N T E D SH A D OW. For the ultimate intensity, use MAC Spellbinder Shadows ($22 each; maccosmetics.com), a super-velvety formula with a bright, metallic finish.


10

8

DO T H E T W I ST! Give stylish new life to a couple of single-stone necklaces by twisting them together. $188 each; lorenhope.com

Have a ball with your jewelry.

Les Bonbons two-, three-, and even four-tiered colorful woven earrings make a big statement but feel light as air (because they’re hollow!). Rebecca de Ravenel, $275 per pair; matchesfashion.com

Fair Isle is the new holiday sweater. Be both cozy and au courant at your next at-home affair in this classic piece, reborn in bright colors with sparkly adornments. $37; oldnavy.com

11 Get moving!

An afternoon run (or even a vigorous walk) will improve circulation, delivering more nutrients and oxygen to the skin, says Bowe. By party time, you’re luminous!

U P G R A DE YOU R PA RT Y PR EG A M E WITH A POWERFUL EYE MASK. Peter Thomas Roth 24K Gold Pure Luxury Lift & Firm Hydra-Gel Eye Patches ($75; sephora.com) contain tiny particles of the precious metal to brighten dark circles, caffeine to reduce puffiness, and glycerin and hyaluronic acid to moisturize.

13 Three words: Baby’s got back. In these killer heels, you’ll never be able to slip out unnoticed. They’re business in the front, party in the back—a brilliant complement to your LBD.

SJP, $455; luxury.zappos.com

$180; imaginevincecamuto.com

BCBG Max Azria, $248; bcbg.com

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Jessica Simpson Collection, $98; jessicasimpson.com

Nina, $129; ninashoes.com


WOR K SOM E M A SC A R A M AG IC ! To start the morning with a light touch and pump up the volume at cocktail time, try the innovative Clinique Lash Power Flutterto-Full Mascara ($21; clinique.com). The dial on the mascara’s barrel allows you to customize the amount of formula deposited on the brush. For flirty fringe in less than ten seconds, try L’Oréal Paris Voluminous Feline Mascara ($9; drugstores); just one coat delivers high shine and intense pigments.

15 A CLASSY RED DR E S S OU T W I TS A N Y CON F US I NG HOL I DAY PA RT Y DR E S S CODE S . Choose a silhouette that shows off your shape, a nonclingy fabric (like this gorgeous lace with floral appliqué), and a flattering deep crimson shade. Bonus: This dress easily goes from office hours to after-hours. White House Black Market, $220; whbm.com

16 Reach for the stars. This season celestial details are taking center stage. Steal the show with an embellished bag, a stellar heel, bejeweled earrings, or the shimmery Givenchy Gold Prisme Quator Eye Shadow ($63; sephora.com). BAG, Aldo, $45; aldoshoes.com HEEL, $70; express.com EARRINGS, Kate Spade New York, $78; katespade.com

G E T SOF T A N D SMELL DELICIOUS A L L AT ONC E . Byredo Mojave Ghost Body Lotion, Hand Cream, Body Wash, and Body Cream ($35 to $94 each; byredo.com) deeply hydrate parched skin, while notes of magnolia, sandalwood, violet, cedarwood, musk, and amber impart a warm, delicate, and slightly woody floral scent. NOVEMBER 2016

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M A ST E R T H E A RT OF C A SUA L DR E S S I NG . A no-fail dressy tee with stylish features like this flowing asymmetrical hem adds intrigue without being ornate. Pair it with skinny printed pants, jeans, or leather leggings and pumps to achieve a fabulous “Oh, I just threw this on!” look. DG2 by Diane Gilman, $70; hsn.com


Go hands-free.

SM E L L H A PP Y ! The right fragrance can instantly put you in a celebratory state of mind. Try a spritz of a scent with floral, citrus (orange, lemon, grapefruit), and vanilla notes, like Viktor & Rolf Bonbon Couture ($135; saksfifthavenue .com). When you feel stressed, choose a fragrance with calming lavender, ylang-ylang, or rose. Need a slight boost of energy? Look for citrus, peppermint, cinnamon, or rosemary.

A mini shoulder bag in place of a clutch lets you focus on more important things, like cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and hugs. From left: $528; furla.com Gracie Roberts, $38; freepeople.com

21

22 A QUICK HOLIDAY H A I R ST Y L E I S R IG H T AT YO U R F I NG E RT I P S . Two hours at the salon? We don’t think so. Try this instead: 1. A few quick spritzes of Oribe Gold Lust Dry Shampoo ($44; oribe.com) will keep your blow-out fresh. 2. A gold crystal pavé hairpin adds glamour to your twominute topknot. Jen Atkin x Chloe + Isabel, from $24; chloeandisabel.com

C R E AT E T H E MOST F L AT T E R I NG G LOW W I T H A H IG H L IG H T E R T H AT C OM PL E M E N TS YOU R S K I N TON E . If you’re fair, you’ll want a pearly one to add a sheen that’s subtle, not frosty. A golden shade enhances the natural warmth of a medium complexion, and those with deeper skin tones should use a rich copper or bronze to avoid looking ashy, says makeup artist Derek Selby. Try Cover FX Custom Enhancer Drops ($42; coverfx.com).

23 M A K E V E LV E T T ROUS E R S YOU R WA R DROBE M V P. Steel gray velvet pants can take you anywhere, whether you’re hosting at home or heading out to a shindig. Keep them casual with a cozy sweater, or dress them up with a slinky cami and heels. TROUSERS, Who What Wear, $35; target.com

SWEATER, $40; aerie.com MULE, Saachi, $105; saachistyle.com

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CAMISOLE, Highline Collective, $59; lordandtaylor.com SANDAL, $99; ninewest.com


25 DI SCOV E R E M E R A L D, T H E COLOR OF T H E S E A SON. It’s easy being green: Wear this radiant jewel tone on your lids (try a jade smoky eye with Clé de Peau Beauté Eye Color Quad in 315, $80; cledepeaubeaute.com), your hands (layer on glistening rings), or all over (this head-turning ombré dress is flattering on everyone). RING, $199; angeliquedeparis.com DRESS, Belle Badgley Mischka, $219; Dillard’s stores

For unexpected sparkle, try a glitzy watch. It can be worn solo during the day, is dressy enough for evening when stacked with bracelets, and ensures you’ll never be late to the ball. Caravelle, $120 to $130 each; caravelleny.com

G I V E YOU R G O TO S HOE S T H E C I N DE R E L L A T R E AT M E N T. The shoe clip is back! Just add a bejeweled style like these or your own vintage brooch, and your favorite footwear gets a whole new attitude. SANDAL WITH CLIP, $1,450, and CLIPS, $395 each; jimmychoo.com

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BEAUTIFULLY MOVING USA TODAY

POWERFUL

REFRESHING

WASHINGTON POST

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

A SENSUAL EXPERIENCE LOS ANGELES TIMES

EMOTIONALLY RICH ESSENCE

A VEHICLE FOR CHANGE EBONY

FROM VISIONARY FILMMAKER

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER

AVA DUVERNAY

OPRAH WINFREY

WEDNESDAYS 10|9c


Weight Watchers® Smart Ones® Enjoy the journey with smart, flavorful meals that help keep you on track. WEIGHT WATCHERS on foods and beverages is the registered trademark of WW Foods, LLC. WEIGHT WATCHERS for services is the registered trademark of Weight Watchers International, Inc. SmartPoints is the trademark of Weight Watchers International, Inc. Trademarks are used under license by Kraft Heinz Foods Company. © 2016 H.J. Heinz Company Brands LLC. © 201 6 Weight Watchers International, Inc. All rights reserved.


Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eat! PEPPER PICKS

A HOT CAKE

FOOD STYLIST: EUGENE JHO

The Power of

A trio of fabulous, simple-enoughfor-a-Wednesday dishes using these staples: artichokes, red bell peppers, and olives. RECIPES BY Marcia Kiesel PHOTOGRAPHS BY Marshall Troy OPRAH.COM

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Let’s Eat!

Ciabatta Pizza MAKES 4 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 25 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 40 MINUTES

TRY THIS! Artichokes are delicious in much more than creamy dips: You can use the mild yet rich veggie to make a meat-free dinner heartier.

2 Tbsp. olive oil 2 red bell peppers, seeded and cut into 1" pieces ¾ tsp. kosher salt ½ tsp. ground black pepper 6 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and cut into ½" pieces 14 pitted Kalamata olives, halved 1 (14-ounce) can whole artichoke hearts, drained and cut into 1" pieces 3 Tbsp. chopped Italian parsley 1 (1-pound) ciabatta loaf, halved lengthwise 1 garlic clove 2½ cups (½ pound) shredded Fontina 2 Tbsp. grated Parmesan 1. Preheat oven to 425°. Over medium heat in a large skillet, heat oil. Add red peppers and season with salt and pepper. Cover and cook, stirring a few times, until just tender, about 7 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook until tender, about 3 minutes. Stir in olives, artichokes, and parsley. Remove from heat; set aside. 2. Bake ciabatta, cut sides up, directly on oven rack until starting to crisp, about 5 minutes. Rub cut sides with garlic. Place on a baking sheet. Evenly scatter 1 cup Fontina over ciabatta. Spoon skillet mixture onto ciabatta. Top evenly with remaining Fontina, then Parmesan. Bake on top rack until cheese melts, about 8 minutes. Cut each ciabatta half into 4 pieces and serve.

Linguine with Peppers, Artichokes, Green Olives, and Shrimp MAKES 4 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 30 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 45 MINUTES

3 Tbsp. olive oil, divided 20 medium shrimp (½ pound), peeled and deveined 2 thin slices prosciutto (1 ounce), cut into thin strips 1 red bell pepper, cut into thin strips ¾ tsp. kosher salt, divided, plus more for pasta water ¾ tsp. ground black pepper, divided 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 10 pitted green olives, thickly sliced 1 cup (4 large) canned artichoke hearts, cut into thin wedges 1⁄3 cup dry white wine, such as Pinot Grigio 2 tsp. chopped thyme 10 ounces linguine 1 Tbsp. unsalted butter 1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. In a large, deep skillet, heat 1 Tbsp. oil. Add shrimp and cook over medium heat, without stirring, until halfway cooked and pink on bottom, about 1 minute. Turn shrimp, then scatter prosciutto over top; cook until shrimp are barely done, about 30 seconds. Put shrimp and prosciutto in a medium bowl and set aside. Add remaining oil to skillet. Add red pepper strips along with ¼ tsp. each salt and pepper, and cook over medium heat, stirring a few times, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook about 2 minutes. Add olives, artichokes, wine, and thyme and remove from heat. 2. Salt the boiling water, add linguine, and cook until al dente, about 9 minutes. Reserve ½ cup pasta water. Drain linguine and add to skillet. Add reserved shrimp, prosciutto, and any accumulated juices to skillet and cook over medium-high heat about 1 minute, stirring in reserved pasta water 2 Tbsp. at a time. Remove from heat, season with remaining salt and pepper, and stir in butter. Divide among 4 pasta bowls and serve.

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Olive, Kale, and Artichoke– Stuffed Peppers MAKES 4 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 30 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 1 HOUR 10 MINUTES

3½ 1 3 ¼ ½ 4 1 12 1 ¼ 1 1 4

Tbsp. olive oil, divided medium yellow onion, diced garlic cloves, minced tsp. kosher salt tsp. ground black pepper large kale leaves, stemmed and chopped (¼"-thick) slice salami (2 ounces), cut into ½” pieces pitted Kalamata olives, cut into ½" pieces (12-ounce) jar marinated artichokes, drained and cut into ½" pieces cup dry white wine, such as Pinot Grigio cup panko bread crumbs, divided cup (3 ounces) grated Parmesan, divided red bell peppers, halved and seeded

1. Preheat oven to 375°. Over medium heat in a large skillet, heat 2 Tbsp. oil. Add onion, garlic, salt, and pepper and cook, stirring, until softened, 5 minutes. Add kale and ¼ cup water, cover, and cook, stirring a few times, until kale wilts, 5 minutes. Stir in salami, olives, artichokes, and wine; remove from heat. Stir in ¾ cup each panko and Parmesan. In a medium bowl, mix remaining panko, Parmesan, and oil. 2. Put red peppers in a roasting pan. Fill each pepper with skillet mixture, then top with panko mixture. Add ½ cup water to pan, cover with foil, and bake until tender, 30 minutes. Uncover pan and broil peppers until crisp, 2 minutes. Serve.


Traditional Sausage Stufing 1 package JohnsonvilleÂŽ All Natural Fresh Italian Ground Sausage

1 | Preheat oven to 325°F.

3 celery ribs, chopped

2 | In a large skillet, cook sausage over medium heat for 5 minutes.

1 large onion, chopped

3 | Add the celery, onions and carrots.

FXSÂżQHO\FKRSSHGFDUURWV

4 | Cook and stir 5 to 10 minutes longer, until sausage is no longer pink and vegetables are tender.

1 package (12 to 14 oz) herb-seasoned VWXIÂżQJFXEHV 2 to 2 1/2 cups chicken broth

_ ,QDODUJHERZOFRPELQHVWXIÂżQJFXEHVDQG sausage mixture. Stir in broth, eggs and parsley; toss to combine.

2 eggs, lightly beaten

6 | Spoon into a greased 13-inch by 9-inch baking dish.

1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped

7 | Cover and bake for 30 minutes. 8 | Uncover and bake 10 minutes longer or until a thermometer reads 160°F and top is lightly browned.

11 Member Since 20

Š 2016 Johnsonville Sausage, LLC. Learn more about our family-owned company at Johnsonville.com.


Let’s Eat!

Dressed to Impress For a Thanksgiving side with a Cajun kick, O columnist Curtis Stone takes a cue from the bayou.

Andouille Rice Dressing MAKES 6 SERVINGS ACTIVE TIME: 35 MINUTES TOTAL TIME: 60 MINUTES

COURTESY OF CURTIS STONE

1⁄3 cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley, divided 1⁄3 cup thinly sliced green onions (about 4 onions), divided 1 Tbsp. fresh thyme leaves, divided 1 pound ground pork (20 percent fat) 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped ¾ tsp. garlic powder ¾ tsp. onion powder ¾ tsp. smoked paprika Kosher salt Ground black pepper 2 tsp. olive oil 8 ounces Andouille sausage, diced 3¼ cups reduced-sodium chicken broth, divided 1 onion, diced (about 1½ cups) 3 celery stalks, diced (about 1 cup) 2 cups jasmine rice 2 fresh bay leaves 1 Tbsp. butter

1. In a small bowl, mix 1 Tbsp. parsley, 1 Tbsp. green onions, and 1 tsp. thyme; set aside. Finely chop remaining thyme. In a medium bowl, mix chopped thyme, pork, garlic, garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, 1 tsp. salt, and 1 tsp. pepper. 2. Heat a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil and sausage and cook until brown and slightly crisp around edges, about 4 minutes. Add pork mixture and cook, stirring to break up meat, until meat is cooked through, about 5 minutes. Add ¼ cup broth and cook, stirring to scrape up browned bits, until liquid has evaporated and meat starts to stick to skillet, about 3 minutes. Add onion and celery and cook, stirring, until softened, about 5 minutes. 3. Stir in rice and 1½ tsp. salt and cook, stirring frequently, until rice is toasted, about 2 minutes. Add remaining 3 cups broth and bay leaves and bring to a simmer. 4. Cover and reduce heat to medium. Cook, without stirring, until liquid is absorbed and rice is tender, about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, 10 minutes. 5. Fluff rice with a fork. Stir in butter and remaining parsley and green onions. Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with reserved herbs and serve. For more of Curtis’s Thanksgiving sides, turn to page 116.


Let’s Eat!

THANKSGIVING SPECIAL!

Mixing Bowl The makings of a delicious month, from a seriously stacked cake to a new use for cider.

Tool to Try

Upper Crust If you consider yourself more adept with Play-Doh than pastry, Wilton’s silicone mold is about to make your holiday baking a lot more fun— and elegant. Simply press dough into the pearl, rope, or braid grooves, then arrange the patterned strips atop your filling. No one has to know how you made each slice so nice. Pie crust mold, $10; wilton.com

Easy Upgrade

THREE CHEERS Three-bottle set (eight ounces of each flavor), $25, or one 32-ounce bottle, $17; theowlsbrew.com

Spice, sweetness, or citrus—that’s what we want in a winter cocktail. With Owl’s Brew’s seasonal mixers, you’ve got the trifecta: Mix the Mulling Spices blend with red wine or the Salted Caramel Toddy with whiskey to make a warming mug drink, or sip either topped off with Champagne; Grapefruit Collins tastes crisp on the rocks with gin. We propose a toast!

KITCHEN ZEN

CONSIDER CIDER Katie Button, chef-owner of the Asheville, North Carolina, restaurant Cúrate and author of the new cookbook of the same name, uses very dry hard apple cider to infuse braised chicken, clams, gravy, and chorizo with funky sweetness. Button recommends choosing a cider with natural carbonation—such as the Spanish brands Trabanco or Castañón, or a craft American version, like Asheville’s Urban Orchard and Noble Cider. Add it to a holiday dish, and you’ll still have plenty left to drink with dinner.

“We would all stand quietly while the minister spoke a grace of thanksgiving. We always liked him, for he knew to keep it short.” —Edna Lewis, whose first cookbook, The Edna Lewis Cookbook, was just reissued in honor of the 100th anniversary of her birth

Granny Smith apple pie filling

YOU CAN HAVE IT ALL “Every Thanksgiving I run out of space on my dessert plate, so I wanted to put everything I love in one slice,” says Zac Young, pastry director of Craveable Hospitality Group. Consider this over-the-top cake a triumph of efficiency. Last year Young’s six-flavor, triple-decker PieCaken took the internet by storm. Now you can bring the five-inch-tall masterpiece to your holiday table, where it can satisfy up to 14 guests: As of November 1, PieCaken will be available for nationwide delivery. ($65; thepiecakenshop.com)

Cinnabon-inspired spiced buttercream frosting Sweet, crunchy oat crumble Apple spice cake: buttermilk, cinnamon, ginger, allspice

GENIUS IDEA!

Pumpkin pie: “It’s very lightly spiced,” says Young. “I’m a purist.” Pecan pie: toasted Texas pecans and bourbon vanilla

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Shop Guide ADAM’S STYLE SHEET PAGE 68 From left: Sequined dress, Michael Michael Kors, $395; michaelkors.com. Earrings, $188; lulufrost.com. Ring, $295; dannijo.com. Sheer-panel dress, BCBG Max Azria, $366; bcbg.com. Lace appliqué dress, $178; maggylondon.com. Choker, Tina Craig x Nouvel Heritage $1,500; nouvelheritage.com. Pin, Tina Craig x Nouvel Heritage, $6,500; nouvelheritage.com. Ring, Noir Jewelry, $48; noirnyc.com. Cuff, Stella & Dot, $98; stelladot.com. PAGE 69 Lipsticks, Maybelline Color Sensation The Loaded Bolds in (clockwise from top left) Fiery Fuchsia, Nude Thrill, Midnight Merlot, and Dynamite Red, $7.50 each; drugstores.

(All prices are approximate.) COVER On Oprah: Dress, Ryan Roche, $750; 718-388-1655. Earrings, $68,000; mishnewyork.com. Cuff, Roberto Coin, $27,500; Saks Fifth Avenue. Chain-link bracelets, Selim Mouzannar, $6,280 (left) and $10,160; 212-2061272. Ring, Nina Runsdorf, $26,000; Neiman Marcus. Booties, $495; aquatalia.com. COVER 2: FEAST YOUR EYES Fanny goblet, $99, Fanny tumbler, $54, Anastasia water tumbler, $110, and Rosemoor 13-inch charger, $477; williamyeowardcrystal.com. Dinner, bread, and butter plates, astierdevillatte.com. Forks, $95 each, and knife, $125, Puiforcat; michaelcfina.com. Bookworm quill, $12; tomdixon.net.

THE EARLY BIRD THANKSGIVING PAGE 115 Rallye 24 coffee cup and saucer, Hermès, $200; michaelcfina.com. Rallye 24 mini oval plate, $135; michaelcfina.com. PAGES 116 117 Orsay Goldo dinner and dessert plates, Haviland, $280 for 5-piece setting; michaelcfina.com. PAGES 118 119 Custom calligraphy, Paul Fittipaldi; paulfittipaldi.com. PAGES 120 121 Striped Harvard dinner plates, $32 each, and dessert plates, $29 each, Vista Alegre; michaelcfina.com. Rallye 24 round blue plate, Hermès, $190; michaelcfina.com. Brushed steel serving set, Duna by Cutipol, $48; abchome.com. Iridescent flatware, Cutipol, $195 for 5-piece set; abchome.com. Glass used as vase, Nason Moretti, $68; abchome.com. PAGES 122 123 Serving bowls, Janaki Larsen; atelierstgeorge.com for similar styles. FESTIVE IN A FLASH PAGE 134 Clutch, $2,295; jimmychoo.com.

O, The Oprah Magazine (ISSN 1531-3247) is published monthly, 12 times a year, by Hearst Communications, Inc., 300 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019, U.S.A. Steven R. Swartz, President and Chief Executive Officer; William R. Hearst III, Chairman; Frank A. Bennack, Jr., Executive Vice Chairman; Catherine A. Bostron, Secretary. Hearst Magazines Division: David Carey, President; John A. Rohan, Jr., Senior Vice President, Finance. © 2016 by Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. O, The Oprah Magazine is a registered trademark of Harpo Print, LLC. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and additional entry post offices. Canada Post International Publications mail product (Canadian distribution) sales agreement no. 40012499. Editorial and Advertising Offices: 300 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019-3797. Subscription prices: United States and possessions: $28 for one year. Canada and all other countries: $50 for one year. Subscription Services: O, The Oprah Magazine will, upon receipt of a complete subscription order, undertake fulfillment of that order so as to provide the first copy for delivery by the Postal Service or alternate carrier within four to six weeks. For customer service, changes of address, and subscription orders, log on to service.theoprahmag.com or write to Customer Service Department, O, The Oprah Magazine, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. Due to the high volume of submissions, the publisher cannot accept or return unsolicited manuscripts or art. Canada BN NBR 10231 0943 RT. Postmaster: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 707.4.12.5.) Nonpostal and military facilities: Please send address changes to O, The Oprah Magazine, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. Printed in the U.S.A. From time to time, we make our subscriber list available to companies that sell goods and services by mail that we believe would interest our readers. If you would rather not receive such offers via postal mail, please send your current mailing label or an exact copy to Mail Preference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. You can also visit http://hearst.ed4.net/profile/login.cfm to manage your preferences and opt out of receiving marketing offers by email.

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DEVON JARVIS/STUDIO D. STYLIST: ANITA SALERNO/R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS.

WORLD-CLASS STYLE Asian-inspired prints are everywhere this season. For more chinoiserie, check out Adam’s Home Style Sheet (page 72): ROBE, Natori, $320; neimanmarcus.com.

THE BEAUTY OF GIVING PAGE 81 Gown, Terani Couture, $583; edressme.com. Earrings, $298; sarahmagid.com. Bangles (from top): $375; vitafede.com. $328; sarahmagid.com. Elizabeth and James, $150; zappos.com. Rings (from left): RLM SoHo, $85; robertleemorris.com. Stella & Dot, $39; stelladot.com. PAGE 82 Gown, $590; jovani.com. Necklaces (from top): $48; sparklepop.com. Sequin, $278; sequin-nyc.com. Gold bracelet, $225; Alexis Bittar stores. Leather bracelet, $148; trinaturk.com. Trunks, $50; taniusa.com. PAGE 83 Gown, $500; jovani.com. Earrings, Ben-Amun by Isaac Manevitz, $480; ben-amun.com. Bracelets, Ben-Amun by Isaac Manevitz, $398 (left) and $270; ben-amun.com. Ring, Janis Savitt, $200; 212-245-7396. PAGE 84 Gown, $7,550; elizabethkennedy.com. Belt, $95; reiss.com. Necklace, Sequin, $378; sequin-nyc.com. Rings, $38 (left) and $48; vincecamuto.com. Collars and leashes, Canine Styles of New York; caninestyles.com.


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W hat I Know for Sure

NO MAT TER WHO YOU ARE or how you’re voting, I hope that when you cast your ballot this November, you’ll take just a moment to think about this great privilege freedom brings. The everyday news of the world is often so overwhelming that it numbs us to other people’s pain. (Though the picture of the 5-year-old Syrian boy, bloodied, stunned, and in shock— and all the suffering he represents—still haunts me.) What can we do? How do we make a difference? Vote! That’s our real voice and our real choice in matters that seem beyond our control. We get to put into positions of power people who are aligned with the way we want the world to operate. Though our dissonance and discord can be disheartening, the right to disagree is actually one we should cherish. It sets us apart from so many other societies around the world—as does the right to vote our feelings, our beliefs, our hopes! The people we choose to represent and lead us reflect our collective consciousness. We get the leadership we deserve, based on what the majority of us agree to. Casting a ballot isn’t just something you do for yourself—it’s for our collective future. So whatever you do, please don’t stay home on Election Day. Whether your polling place is a school, a fire station, or a post office, whether you pull a lever, press a button, or check a box with a pencil, do the patriotic thing, the American thing. Choose wisely. Choose.

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O the oprah magazine november 2016