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What to do during your mission PUT PEOPLE AT EASE • 

You’ll see us set up casual conversations by saying things like, “We’re talking to lots of people and want to hear your perspectives on XYZ,” “There are no right or wrong answers here; we’re only interested in your personal opinion,” and “If you ever feel uncomfortable, just tell us and we can redirect the conversation.” Follow suit!

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Speak and think their language. Avoid scary business jargon and abbreviations that might confuse or intimidate consumers.

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Use notebooks and not a computer

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Avoid corporate logos and formal business attire

ASSUME NOTHING & HAVE AN OPEN MIND • 

We are all consumers and have our own opinions, but people will surprise you with their knowledge. Don’t assume you know the whys behind peoples’ actions.

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Ask provocative, open-ended questions – questions that will get you more than a “yes” or “no” answer.

RELENTLESSLY SEEK THE ANSWER • 

Stay focused on the challenge at all times and use this precious time to get to the answers.

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Keep your eyes open for things that are filled with emotion, contradictory, surprising or even the things you may think are obvious (which can be easily overlooked).

USE ALL YOUR SENSES • 

These chats are as much about what you see and feel as what you hear. Follow your nose, not a discussion guide. If you hear something interesting ask about it. If you see something surprising, ask about that too.

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Don’t forget, the best question you can ask is “Why?”. You can always ask why without asking why – “what do you mean?,” “elaborate on that,” “tell me more”.

TRY NOT TO LEAD • 

As much as possible try not influence what your interviewee says by your comments. Do lots of nodding rather than offering up any strong reactionary comments. Remember they’re the expert, not you – play dumb but think smart.

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Don’t be afraid of silence! Use it to go deeper by letting them be the ones to fill it.

SCRIBBLE NOW, INTERPRET LATER • 

Don’t leap to conclusions - collect facts and verbatims, not interpretations.

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Write everything down – don’t filter until you choose your clues.

Questions, Comments, Concerns? Call Us! NAME - ###.###.####

NAME - ###.###.####

NAME - ###.###.####

Project Name Immersions SEPT 17, 2012


Our Challenge

WELCOME TO IMMERSIONS!

Our challenge is to… fill in the blank

WHAT ARE IMMERSIONS?

HOW TO CAPTURE CLUES:

Immersions are an opportunity to connect with consumers and experts by diving deep into their world for fresh insight into our business challenge. We do immersions to jump out of our patterns of thinking and into the minds and hearts of consumers. Don’t think of these as interviews or research, but as multisensory experiences that will inspire us to deliver meaningful innovation.

CLUES ARE NOT:

CLUES ARE: Seen, Heard, Felt, Experienced

OUR ROLES:

Discuss roles with your team. The roles sections may be optional. Feel free to use one of the following templates:

?What If! will handle introductions, lead the interview, and drive us toward our goal. Your role is to listen and capture: write everything down that’s interesting without worrying about filtering yet. Feel free to jump in and ask questions where you have them. We will work in tandem to drive toward our goal. Work out ahead of time with your teammates how you will divide up asking questions and listening/capturing. When capturing your observations, write everything down that’s interesting without worrying about filtering yet.

YOUR GOAL:

Think like a detective. Observe our consumers and experts and collect “clues” – notes on anything you see or hear that is interesting. We’ll use these little bits of information to build themes or hypotheses that will help us shape solutions to our challenge.

Written verbatim

CAPTURE THE RAW OBSERVATION OR QUOTE, NOT YOUR INTERPRETATION OF IT.

Express a single datapoint

Summaries of multiple observations Interpretations Information out of context (always provide a source!)

SAMPLE CLUE: Write the observation/quote (what you saw, heard, or read)

“I’ve always loved swimming because the weightlessness makes me feel like I’m flying. I can’t get enough of that freedom.” Sandy, 35, Mother of 2 Daughter (2), Son (5), New York City

Write the source (who & where)

GOOD VS BAD CLUES: CLUE

GOOD OR BAD

WHY

“The number of memberships at city pools has increased 12% over the past five years.” –New York Times, 5/9/12

Good

It’s something you’ve read and the source is identified.

People don’t swim in the ocean enough because they are grossed out by seaweed.

Bad

A generalization - an interpretation of the data. Multiple sources.

“The consumer can’t be bothered to get up early to swim before work.”

Bad

Too much judgment in ‘can’t be bothered.’ No source.

THE. SCHEDULE: (Include markets, dates, times, etc. This is NOT intended to house your interview grid!) TEAMS: (List teams and driver) WHO ARE WE SPEAKING TO? (Consumer, Expert, Naïve Expert breakdown)


Immersion Detective Guide