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ANCOATS URBAN VILLAGE

PUBLIC REALM STRATEGY C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S


FINAL Draft 21.11.2002

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

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AN C O AT S U R B A N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C REALM STRATEGY

CONTENTS

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

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AN C O AT S U R B A N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C REALM STRATEGY

01 INTRODUCTION 02 PROJECT BACKGROUND 1 Study Area 2 Purpose of the Strategy 3 Project Brief 0 3 ANCOATS URBAN VILLAGE 1 Village Context 2 Evolutio n of the Village 3 Revelation of the Grid

0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

0 4 THE PUBLIC REALM 1 Public Realm defined 2 Public Realm located 3 Public Realm Anatomy and Pu r p o s e Safe s treets Multi-purpose squares Useful yards Quiet gardens Two lo ng parks Making connections Playscape 0 5 TRAFFIC AND MOVEMENT 1 20mph Zone Reduced carriageway widths Staggered on-street parking Two-way streets Raised junctions Unsigned junctions Tight radii at corners

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2 Signage and Line Language Road markings Signage on the threshold 3 P a r k i n g St r a t e g y Controlled Parking Zone Residents Parking P a r k b y Vo u c h e r Park and Ring Multi-storey Car Park Great Ancoats Street & Oldham Road

A L E E C T S

1 Street Surfacing Materials 2 Street Construction 3 Ty p i c a l J u n c t i o n 07 NEW SAINT PETER’S SQUARE 08 CANAL SQUARE 0 9 P U B L I C A RT S T R AT E G Y 1 2 3 4 5

Purpose Narrative I m p l e m e nt a t i o n Budgets Project Management

1 0 I M P L E M E N TAT I O N 1 2 3 4

Development Context Delivery Mechanisms Prioritisation of Construction Funding


AN C O AT S U R B A N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C REALM STRATEGY

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AN C O AT S U R B A N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C REALM STRATEGY Figure

01

CITY CONTEXT

Figure

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STREET TYPES DISTRIBUTION

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ANCOATS URBAN VILLAGE AERIAL PHOTO

Figure

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CONTROLLED PARKING ZONE

Figure

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ANCOATS URBAN VILLAGE STUDY AREA

Figure

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ON-STREET PARKING FOR FUTURE EXTENDED GRID

Figure

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LISTED BUILDINGS

Figure

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VICTORIA SQUARE AND ‘HEART OF ANCOATS’

Figure

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VACANT BUILDINGS

Figure

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ROYAL MILLS AND MURRAY MILL

Figure

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EVOLUTION OF THE VILLAGE

Figure

75-80

Figure

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REVELATION OF THE GRID

Figure

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PROPOSED VEHICLE SURFACES

Figure

16-21

SAFE STREETS

Figure

82

Figure

22-27

MULTI-PURPOSE SQUARES

1 NARROW ALLEY (RECLAIMED SETTS | ASPHALT)

Figure

28-32

USEFUL YARDS

Figure

83

Figure

33-38

QUIET GARDENS

2 WIDE ALLEY (RECLAIMED SETTS | ASPHALT)

Figure

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Figure

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3 NARROW STREET (RECLAIMED SETTS | ASPHALT)

Figure

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Figure

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Figure

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LOCATION

4 WIDE STREET (RECLAIMED SETTS | ASPHALT)

Figure

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CONNECTORS

Figure

86

Figure

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NETWORK

JUNCTION HENRY ST / JERSEY ST

Figure

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LONG PARK TYPICAL SECTION

Figure

87

JUNCTION LOOM ST / COTTON ST

Figure

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MAKING CONNECTIONS

Figure

88

Figure

52-57

THE ARCHITECTURE OF CONNECTION

JUNCTION JERSEY ST / GUN ST

Figure

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Figure

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PLAYSCAPE

SAINT PETER’S SQUARE CONCEPT PROPOSALS

Figure

63-65

EXAMPLES OF 20MPH ZONE SIGNS

Figure

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CANAL SQUARE PROPOSALS

Figure

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WALKING TIME CONTOURS AND CROSSING POINTS

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CANAL SQUARE AXONOMETRIC VIEW

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STREET TYPES

Figure

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CANAL SQUARE DETAILED DESIGN

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STREET TYPES AND USES (1-4)

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STREET TYPES AND USES (5-6)

TWO LINEAR PARKS LONG PARKS

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SURFACING MATERIALS

PUBLIC ART


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E • P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y

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INTRODUCTION


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 1 I N T R O D U C T I O N

Camlin Lonsdale Landscape Architects were commissioned in September 2001 by Ancoats Urban Village Company to prepare two complementary documents whose purpose shall be to inform and guide future development of the public realm in Ancoats Urban Village. In addition to an area-wide Public Realm Strategy, a Conservation Plan for the Public Realm has been prepared which should be read in conjunction with this report. The commission also required the preparation of preliminary design proposals for two squares. One of these is immediately southwest of Saint Peter’s Church and is referred to as ‘New Saint Peter’s Square’. A second square is proposed for the Rochdale Canal Locks at Great Ancoats Street. Camlin Lonsdale have been assisted in their task by the following specialist sub-consultants: • Martin Stockley Associates

Traffic & Pedestrian Movement

• Heritage Architecture

Conservation Plan

• Simon Fenton Partnership

Cost Consultants

The contents of this report have been discussed at length with representatives of AUVC Board, Manchester City Council, English Heritage and other interested parties.

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E • P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y

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PROJECT BACKGROUND 1 Study Area 2 Purpose of the Strategy 3 Project Brief

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 2 P R O J E C T B A C K G R O U N D

1 Study Area The study area defined as Ancoats Urban Village comprises the central part of a larger area formerly known as Ancoats. It is bounded by Great Ancoats Street, Oldham Road, the Rochdale Canal and Rodney Street. A small area of later 20th Century housing to the extreme northeastern corner of this rectangle is excluded from the study, but the recommendations for the Urban Village would apply here also in the event of future redevelopment.

River Irwell

ad Ro l m r a na o dh rrid Ca Ol e o l C da ch Ro

Victoria Station

As hto n

Figure 02

ANCOATS URBAN VILLAGE - AERIAL PHOTO

Ca na l

City Centre

NEW EAST MANCHESTER INNER RELIEF ROAD CANAL / RIVER RAILWAY

Figure 01

CITY CONTEXT

oad

oats S

ANCOATS URBAN VILLAGE

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Piccadilly Station

Rochdale Canal

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 2 P R O J E C T B A C K G R O U N D

ER TL BU ET RE ST

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ET RE ST OM S OS ET RE ST OD HO

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ET RE ST L IL DH RE

Figure 03 ANCOATS URBAN VILLAGE STUDY AREA

ST RE ET

Study Area Rochdale Canal Study Area

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hd ale

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00METRES METRES

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Rochdale Canal150 100 100 150

0 METRES

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 2 P R O J E C T B A C K G R O U N D

2 Purpose of the Strategy

3 Project Brief

Within the study area the Strategy provides specific guidance with regard to the following issues:

At a national and local level the case has been made for high quality purposeful public realm both by investors and policy makers. An elegant, robust and sustainable Public Realm is not an optional commodity for the contemporary city. In Ancoats the Public Realm answers none of these three descriptions and is for the most part in an advanced state of dillapidation.

• a specific range of Public Realm types appropriate to location • a series of street types according to street width (back of pavement to back of pavement) • a traffic management regime for Ancoats Urban Village • recommendations for pedstrian linkage to neighbouring areas • a parking strategy for Ancoats Urban Village • a specification including carriageway and footway materials for future streetworks • lighting recommendations

By contrast, the original 17th and 18th century configuration of the Public Realm is largely intact in the form of a remarkably rigid street pattern. The future functions which the Public Realm will have to perform allied to the historic significance of the area makes the implementation of a coherent, lucid strategy a priority. Key objectives arising from the project brief and subsequent consultations with interested parties included:

• public art procurement It is intended that future investment in Ancoats Urban Village by either the public or private sector shall respond in full to the recommendations and prescriptions set out in the Strategy.

• to articulate a vision for the Public Realm, its function and appearance • to respond to the historic context • to provide practical solutions to perceived problems • to provide for flexibility due to future unknown situations • to allow for phased implementation Recent implementation of the phase one Public Realm works was also examined as part of the brief development process. It was observed that this work although recognised as an improvement, did not score well on four principal criteria: • poor response to the historic context • no reduction in street clutter (signage and the like) • poor resistance to damage by heavy goods traffic due to highway geometry • non standard street lighting components which may lead to replacement problems in future

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 2 P R O J E C T B A C K G R O U N D

Analysis of the project brief therefore led to the definition of a series of questions to which convincing answers were required • What is the public realm? • Where is the public realm? • What functions does it perform and how does it work now? • What functions should it perform and how should it work in the future? • What should it look like? • How will it be built? • How much will it cost? • Who will pay for it? • Who will manage and maintain it?

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E • P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y

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A N C O AT S U R B A N V I L L A G E 1 Vi l l a g e C o n t e x t 2 E v o l u t i o n o f t h e Vi l l a g e 3 Revelation of the Grid

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 3 A N C O AT S U R B A N V I L L A G E

Figure 04

Figure 05

LISTED BUILDINGS

VACANT BUILDINGS

Listed Listed Buildings Buildings Grade Grade 22 Grade 2

Grade 2* Grade 2* Grade 2*

Victoria Square Flats

Beehive Mill Crown & Kettle Pub

Express Building St Peter's Church

New Little Mill

Jersey Mill Waulk Mill

Derros Building Paragon Mill

Miller House

Decker Mill Engine House Murrays Main Mill Block

Sedgewick New Mill Royal Mill

Sedgewick Mill (part of Royal Mill)

1 Village Context The Ancoats area of Manchester is remarkably compact and well contained within clearly defined boundaries. Great Ancoats Street, Oldham Road and the Rochdale Canal combine on three sides to prevent the all too prevalent sprawl which characterises the recent evolution of many urban communities. A profound sense of containment or separation from the rest of the city contributes to a palpable sense of place within the village area. The northwestern boundary at Rodney Street and Butler Street is less distinct although evidence of the former canal arm, east of and parallel to Poland Listed Buildings Street, suggests a possible edge to the existing ‘village’. This feature and a second canal arm running south between Jersey Street and Naval Street Grade 2 represent elements of Ancoats’ past which have progressively disappeared over recent years. Evidence of their existence remains however to suggest Grade 2* future responses to a still potent cultural landscape. In addition the area possesses several very fine buildings and an extremely distinctive character to its streets marking the place out as a unique part of Manchester’s industrial heritage. Despite these qualities, business and other activities in Ancoats are not fulfilling their potential. The town centre management adage that ‘no business equals no town’ is relevant, but in addition the resident community that once inhabited the area has dwindled to the extent that many streets are effectively deserted. The core of the area’s public realm may be seen as the cruciform street pattern centred on the now vacant Saint Peter’s Chuch. The key issue here is the lack of generous space for vehicle circulation to the detriment of pedestrians attempting to negotiate the narrow streets and alleys. As a consequence the activities which traders, residents and others may engage in are extremely limited. To unlock the potential of Ancoats’ Public Realm will require an uninhibited assessment of what purpose the street will serve, who will manage its various functions and how. C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 3 A N C O AT S U R B A N V I L L A G E

2 Evolution of the Village Study of figure ground plans dating from 1787 to the present day reveals the origin of Ancoats as a planned settlement. The area is set out in accordance with a rigorous grid of streets and alleys and is bounded on three sides by exceptionally distinct and defensible edges, namely Oldham Road, Great Ancoats Street and the Rochdale Canal. A fourth edge is formed by Rodney Street/Butler Street but this was historically less distinct and more recently has been eroded almost entirely.

1787

The zenith of Ancoats development occurred in the late nineteenth and into the early twentieth centuries when the area now referred to as ‘Ancoats Village’ was almost fully occupied by buildings with open space in the form of streets and yards. Little if any space was provided for recreational use. The character of the study area at this time may therefore be described as a densely packed and homogeneous working/living environment.

1848

1896

Historically therefore, Ancoat’s public realm has resided in its streets. During the latter part of the twentieth century however, decay to this fabric is extremely severe from both an inspection on the ground and from the figure ground analysis. Although many of the buildings on Great Ancoats Street, Oldham Road and Redhill Street remain, much of Ancoats’ original fabric has now disappeared including all of the area between Poland Street and Rodney Street.

1908

1932

2002 Figure 06-11

EVOLUTION OF THE VILLAGE

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Ancoats’ environment also suffers from the current condition of its streets. With the exception of recently resurfaced areas around Anita Street the majority of the area is characterised by patched bitmac pavements and poor quality vehicle carriageways. PAGE 14


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 3 A N C O AT S U R B A N V I L L A G E

1787 Figure 12-15

1896

2002

Future imagined

REVELATION OF THE GRID

3 Revelation of the Grid A common factor in each of the areas of study undertaken may be referred to as the ‘Ancoats grid’. The phenomenon is already referred to in supplementary planning guidance for the Ancoats Conservation Area and its significance for the Public realm is profound. High density living is a stated desire for the future of the village but on a different socioeconomic model to that of the 17th and18th centuries. It has been observed that the original implementation of the grid was followed by dire public health consequences and social deprivation. While the grid in itself was not the cause of deprivation narrow streets and dense occupation did initially result in overcrowding and lack of infrastructure. Future resposes to the grid and aspirations for high densities must therefore pursue sustainable approaches to urban design in the provision of a humane Public Realm. It is recommended that adherence (or at least a demonstrable response) to the grid will be a determining factor for future development proposals. Eventually this could encompass the provision of new infrastructure northeast of Poland Street and the reinstatement of the former canal arms. Responses to the grid should also recognise that the areas either side of Henry Street follow different orientations with the city centre grid crossing Great Ancoats Street into the village In summary, future implications for the public realm include the following : • Future redevelopment of existing factory sites north of Poland Street to follow the original grid rather than the current layout. • Future extension of the grid from Poland Street to Rodney Street • Possible commercial or residential development on open space at Rodney Court and Wadeford Close in order to reassert the regular street pattern • Potential for new streets arising from the above • Potential for pedestrian connections with neighbouring areas at extremities of grid including footbridges over the Rochdale Canal to New Islington • Provision of a new square at the heart of the grid to reintroduce a community focus C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

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THE PUBLIC REALM 1 Public Realm defined 2 Public Realm located

3 Public Realm Anatomy and Purpose Safe streets Multi-purpose squares Useful yards Quiet gardens Tw o l o n g p a r k s Making connections Playscape

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 4 T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

1 Public Realm defined The public realm is defined as all those areas which are freely accessible to the public usually (but not always) at all times of the day and night. This may include such places as arcades, shopping malls or churches where the public are encouraged to inhabit privately owned space. The fact that some parts of the public realm are not ‘open’ 24 hours per day is consistent with a public park which may be closed from dusk till dawn and should not be regarded as a negative factor. Certainly included are those parts of the city defined as recreational or leisure facilities such as squares parks and gardens, some of which may have civic functions or identities as well as their more prosaic roles. More importantly though the Public Realm must be seen as a part of the city’s infrastructure which enables it to function efficiently in the same way that sewers or power supplies do. In this context and specifically with regard to how people move around, streets, major roads and their associated structures are all included as a part of the broader and complete definition.

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2 Public Realm located In Ancoats Urban Village at present the public realm occurs for the most part in the streets. The nature of these highways and the movement networks they create largely determine the character and purpose of the Public Realm. the scale and function of streets vary from narrow footpaths carrying pedestrians only to urban dual carriageways which form part of a city wide traffic infrastructure. Apart from streets few other types of open space exist. One exception is the small area of open grass parkland adjacent to Wadeford Close. Despite its intentions this ‘park’ remains uninhabited and is regarded by some residents as a threatening environment. Similar responses are evoked by the open space around Rodney Court whose sole purpose seems to be to separate the tower block from its neighbours. Neither space has a legible identity or function.

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 4 T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

3 Public Realm Anatomy and Purpose A successful Public Realm is an inhabited one. For people to inhabit a place they need reasons to be there. The principal reason to occupy Ancoats’ public spaces at present is for movement and most of the movements which take place are vehicle related.In addition to streets however, a small number of additional types of space either exist now or could exist in the future. A full range of spatial types for Ancoats would include: • Streets • Squares • Yards • Gardens • Parks Each of the above types of space will perform different but sometimes overlapping functions. Their functions will in turn be influenced by the buildings that front onto or contain them so that future development of plots and Public Realm investment cannot be divorced from one another.

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 4 T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

Safe streets - the skeleton or framework upon which The Village is and will continue to be built. The most important function of Ancoats’ streets will be to provide access to and movement through The Village for both vehicles and pedestrians. These movements must be safe and convenient. As well as this and because Ancoats does not have large areas of publicly owned open space, several other activities will take place in the street. The streets will therefore have to cater for a wide range of users: • Residential vehicle traffic • Commercial vehicle traffic • Emergency vehicles • Pedestrian traffic • Disabled users • Children playing • Car parking • Street markets • Festivals and processions • Casual seating

Figure 16-21

SAFE STREETS

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 4 T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

Multi-purpose squares - large, people friendly, traffic free, hard wearing spaces which will serve a diverse range of functions : • Gathering places • Festivals and special events • Performance and street theatre • Terraces to pubs & restaurants • Casual seating • Markets • Settings for special buildings • Traffic free but with service access

Figure 22-27

MULTI-PURPOSE SQUARES

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 4 T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

Useful yards - small, enclosed, hard paved spaces within the block to accommodate ‘harder’ uses including vehicular access :

• Pedestrian and/or vehicle entrance courtyards to buildings • Delivery access to avoid large vehicles blocking the street • Drying areas or similar ‘utility’ spaces for residential or commercial buildings

Figure 28-32

USEFUL YARDS

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 4 T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

Quiet gardens - small enclosed (but overlooked) spaces away from the boisterous activity of the street and typically located within the block. Their purpose and qualities shall be: • Quiet sitting places • Supervised toddlers play • Commercial leisure uses including restaurants & pubs • Communal gardens for residential developments • Decorative - shrubs, trees and grass • Traffic free • In ideal circumstances with a southwestern aspect

Figure 33-38

QUIET GARDENS

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 4 T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

Two long parks - large, open, traffic free, recreational spaces Supplementary Planning Guidance assumes that the two derelict canal arms connecting to the Rochdale Canal shall be preserved for reinstatement at some future date. It is proposed that the area occupied by these is developed as urban parkland. Development briefs for adjacent sites shall include a requirement to maintain a 16 metre minimum width to allow the construction of open space which provides for passive recreation and pedestrian circulation away from the street. New development will also be encouraged to locate active frontage facing onto the parkland.

It should be emphasised however that the provision of such space should respond to need in order that open space is not neglected or abused through lack of use. Where possible priority should also be given to locations were open space will be bordered by active frontages to buildings.

• Quiet walking/energetic running • Formal and informal games • Relaxation • Green space and water - trees, grass, canals It is further recommended that future development of a more extensive network of open spaces to serve more active pursuits such as tennis, 5-a-side football and the like should be located on sites directly connected to the ‘canal arm parks’. This would provide a connected sequence of spaces distributed throughout the village whose configuration responds to the existing grid in the same way that the streets do now.

Figure 40-46

Figure 39 TWO LINEAR PARKS

LONG PARKS

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16

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Figure 48

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Figure 47

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16

16

appr. 6 min to edge of Ancoats

appr. 6 min to edge of Ancoats

appr. 6 min to edge of Ancoats

16

16

16

Figure 49

LOCATION

CONNECTORS

within easy reach inside the- urban village urban village easy access to green green space of spaces inside - creating a network of spaces inside the village - within easy reach inside the urban- within villageeasy reach inside-the - providing green green space - creating a network of spaces inside the village providing easy access to green green spaceeasy access to- providing - creating a network the village - catering and games, runs, formal and informal games, catering for walks and runs, formal for andwalks informal - catering for walks and runs, formal- and informal games, relaxation, green space relaxation, green space relaxation, green space

NETWORK

two linear parks two linear parks two linear parks two linear parks two linear parks two linear parks two linear parks two linear parks two linear parks various parts of- additional the villagespace for specific recreational - additional spaceactivities for specific recreational activities site URBA N V- located I L L AonGthe E historic | Pcanal U- located BL I ConRtheEhistoric A L Mcanal S T-site R AT E Gvarious Y | parts 0 4ofTthe Hvillage E- connecting P U B L Ivarious C RE A -Lconnecting parts ofM the village - additional space for specific recreational -ANCOATS located on the historic canal site connecting activities

two linear parks | location

two linear parks | connectors

two linear parks | a network

• located on the historic canal site

• connecting various parts of the village

• additional space for specific recrea-

• within easy reach inside the urban village

• providing easy access to green spaces

• catering for walks and runs, formal and informal games, relaxation, green space

tional activities

• creating a network of spaces inside the village

columnar tree planting appr. size of historic canal 4

8

4

linear park as a green street • walking route • seating • play • active frontage : eg. cafe, creche C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

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Figure 50 LONG PARK - TYPICAL SECTION PAGE 24


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 4 T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

Making connections

MAKING CONNECTIONS

One of Ancoats special qualities is its well defined boundary or edge formed by Oldham Road, Great Ancoats Street and the Rochdale Canal. Although this contributes to a strong sense of identity and belonging which should be safeguarded there is also a risk of severeance to pedestrian movements into the village area. It will be important therefore to make sure that the Village area is well connected with neighbouring parts of the city such as the City Centre, Northern Quarter, New Islington and Miles Platting. New connections or alterations to existing ones such as pedestrian crossings or footbridges over the canal, must be carefully sited so that they are safe and follow obvious routes.

Figure 5

It is particularly recommended that in order to increase opportunities for pedestrian movement between Ancoats and New Islington that one and possibly two new footbridges are provided across the Rochdale Canal at Murray Street and/or Bengal Street. The precise location of these structures will depend on future proposals for development east of the canal.

Figure 52-57

THE ARCHITECTURE OF CONNECTION

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 25


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 4 T H E P U B L I C R E A L M

Playspace As a place for families, Ancoats Village will require places for people of all ages to play, from toddlers to retired adults. Such places must be both safe and attractive. Different age groups will need different types and sizes of play space. At present the streets of Ancoats provide the only available playspace. With current traffic behaviour this makes normal activities such as riding a bicycle a risk for young children. With a proposed speed limit of 20mph it is intended that Ancoats’ streets should become safe to play in for all but the youngest age group. Proposed new squares and gardens will allow for a number of age groups to ‘play’ either separately or together provided that the spaces are overlooked. More energetic or even boisterous games are best suited to larger spaces such as the two proposed parks. Toddlers play is the most difficult to provide for because of the need for supervision. Recent attempts to provide open space for this function have failed though abuse of the space by older children. It will be necessary to investigate the provision of managed play spaces or creches as part of the future development of the village.

Figure 58-62

PLAYSCAPE

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 26


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y

05

TRAFFIC AND MOVEMENT 1 20mph Zone Reduced carriageway widths Staggered on-street parking Tw o - w a y s t r e e t s Raised junctions Unsigned junctions Thight Radii at corners 2 Signage and Line Language Road markings Signage on the threshold 3 Parking Strategy

Controlled Parking Zone Residents Parking P a r k b y Vo u c h e r Park and Ring Multi-storey Car Park Great Ancoats Street & Oldham Road

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

1 20mph Zone It is proposed to make Ancoats Urban Village a maximum 20mph zone. All entrances to the area will be provided with the required 20mph speed limit signs on both sides of the carriageway with additional signs indicating that Ancoats is a pedestrian priority area. There are currently 12 road entrances to the area. There is no requirement to repeat the 20mph sign within the area, according to current legislation. It has become generally accepted that the 20mph zone sign provides a warning that drivers are entering an area where they can expect to encounter closely spaced traffic calming measures. For this reason, individual traffic calming measures do not require additional signage. In Manchester the police are currently unable to enforce 20mph speed limits so the recognised approach is to use design measures to reduce vehicle speeds. Proposed measures to reduce speeds in Ancoats Urban Village are: In line with current government guidelines, the movement strategy seeks to shift emphasis from facilitating vehicular through movements within a mixed use, mainly residential area towards the promotion of civilised streets with pedestrian priority. The area is defined by Great Ancoats Street to the south, Oldham Road to the west, The Rochdale Canal to the east and Butler Street/ Rodney Street to the north. The clear existing grid and network of streets in Ancoats provides the potential for excellent access within the area. The north-east of the area is currently less permeable as the earlier street patterns have been lost or broken. The Walking Contours (Figure 66) illustrates that pedestrian movements within the area are in no way torturous nor time consuming and this provides a good basis for future movement patterns. As can be seen on this drawing, Oldham Road and Great Ancoats Street are significant barriers for pedestrians and cyclists moving to and from the area. Traffic on these major routes is relatively fast and where provided, signal controlled pedestrian crossings are phased in favour of vehicles. This results in considerable waits for pedestrians and frequent occurrences of pedestrians crossing against the signals or crossing on non-controlled sections. C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

• Reduced carriageway widths • Staggered on-street parking • Two-way streets • Raised junctions • Unsigned junctions • Tight radii at corners Figure 63-65

EXAMPLES OF 20MPH ZONE SIGNS (ref. Traffic advisory Leaflet 09/99: 20mph Speed Limit and Zones)

PAGE 28


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

ER TL BU ET RE ST

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3 min walking contour 6 min walking contour

ST RE ET

3 minutes walking contour

3

Pedestrian crossing

6 minutes walking contour

Restricted pedestrian Pedestrian crossing crossing

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

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0 METRES 0 METRES

50 50

0 METRES

100 100

50

Restricted pedestrian acce 150 150

100 PAGE 29

150


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

Reduced carriageway widths All existing roads have been measured from back of footpath to back of footpath and categorised into six types, depending on their widths. From this the potential for on street parking has been assessed and ascribed to each street type. The various road types are described on Figure 67 and in more detail on Figure 68 and 69.

Street Type

Definition

Width (metres)

1

Narrow Alley - No parking. No kerbs

0-4.2

2

Wide Alley - No parking. No kerbs

4.2 - 6.6

3

Narrow Street - No parking Kerbs on both sides, min 1.2m

6.6 - 9.1 Highway 4.2m

4

Wide Street – Partial parking on one side. Kerbs on both sides, min 1.8m

9.1 – 11.0 Highway 5.5m

5

Wide Street - Perpendicular parking on one side. Kerbs on both sides, min 1.8m. Parking 90º.

15.4 – 16.5

Canal-side - end-on parking one side Flexible parking, 45º or parallel.

9.0

6 Figure 67

STREET TYPES

Type 1 & 2: Alleys - These are streets which are too narrow to provide separate road carriageway and footpaths. No on-street parking will be provided. The road surface will be flush with no upstand kerbs and these are intended as pedestrian streets with vehicular access. Vehicle speeds will be further reduced to 10-15mph on these narrow alleys by their very limited width. No additional speed limit signs would be needed. C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

Type 3: Narrow Streets - These streets have a minimum road carriageway width of 4.2 m to allow two-way traffic. Footpaths on both sides of the carriageway will be a minimum of 1.2m. No on-street parking will be provided. Type 4: Wide Streets - On these streets footpaths will be a minimum of 1.8m and the road carriageway 5.5m. This width allows two way traffic and on-street parking on one side of the road. The side on which parking would be accepted will alternate along the street in order to force vehicles to give way and reduce speeds further. The parking bays will be arranged to allow two cars to pass each other next to a parked car at a very low speed and gaps will be provided between bays to create passing points. Type 5: Boulevard – Perpendicular parking - These streets are wide enough to provide both perpendicular parking and wide footpaths. The carriageway in these cases will still be kept to a minimum width to assist with speed control. As seen on Figure 69 the carriageway can be narrowed to a minimum of 3m in order to force vehicles to give way. Type 6: Redhill Street - Flexible car parking / Multiple use of public spaces - Another option for wide streets is flexible parking. This could mean that parallel parking is used most days, in combination with two way vehicular access and footpaths as in type 4. On days where there is a value in encouraging more visitors by providing additional parking, such as bank holidays, market days and weekends, the parking could be angled to increase parking capacity. This will be marked on the road and on clear signs mounted on the canal wall. The carriageway would be kept to a minimum and as elsewhere, pedestrians would have priority. PAGE 30


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

1. - Narrow Alley < 4100

Limit ed widt h prohibit s roadside parking - Double yellow lines

Space for t wo lane t raffic - Limit ed widt h prohibit s roadside parking - Double yellow lines

>1200

Foot pat h on bot h sides, 1.2m. - Space for t wo lane t raffic - Limit ed widt h prohibit s roadside parking - Single yellow line

4200

3. - Narrow Street

>1200

6600 - 9100

4100 - 6600

2. - Wide Alley

Part ial parking along one side - Normal vehicles can pass, large vehicles wait or are wait ed for - Single yellow line

5500

Figure 68 STREET TYPES AND USES (1-4)

>1200

9100 -1 100 0

>1200

4. - Wide St reet

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

Full parking along one side - Normal vehicles can pass, large vehicles wait or are wait ed for - Double yellow lines

3000 >1800

6000

>1800

5. - Boulevard

6b. - Flexible Parking / 45ยบ parking (Redhill St reet )

6a. - Flexible Parking - Parallell ( Redhill St reet )

Can revert t o angular parking 4 5ยบ for special occasions, such as market days et c Gaps will be provided bet ween bays t o creat e passing point s Double yellow lines

Parallell parking most days, similar t o t ype 4, but f oot pat h on one side only Gaps will be provided bet ween bays t o creat e passing point s Double yellow lines

L

S T R E E T

5500

3500

R E D H I L

Figure 69 R O C H D A

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

L E

C A N A L

STREET TYPES AND USES (5-6)

PAGE 32


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

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(1) Narrow alley

Ro c hd C an al e al

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(4) Wide street

street type 2: WIDE ALLEY

Rochdale Canal

CR

d)

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street type 3: NARROW STREET

street type 4: WIDE STREET METRES METRES 0000METRES METRES

50 50 50 50

100 100 100 100

150 150 150 150

ROCHDALE CANAL

TA

T EE TR FS RIF

ET RE ST ER EW BR

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 33 METRES 00 METRES

L

T EE TR LS AL ST AY

50 50

100 100

150 150


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

Staggered on-street parking The approach is to provide easily accessible on-street parking for visitors to local people and local businesses during the normal working day. As described above, carriageway widths will be reduced and the cars parked on-street will act as a speed calming measure. The narrow carriageways force drivers to engage in eye-to-eye contact with each other and to give way as necessary, which also contributes to a sense of good citizenship. Approximately 300 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 350 on-street car parking spaces can be provided within the area and an estimated further 150 spaces in the potential new road network in the northeast. This is illustrated on Figure 71-74.

Two-way streets To improve legibility, simplify movement in the area and to assist in reducing vehicle speeds, it is proposed that all streets should be twoway within the Urban Village. In the short term, George Leigh Street, Blossom Street and Jersey Street should be kept one way between Great Ancoats Street and Gun Street. These streets should become two-way once the nature of the new urban village is known and the potential impact on Great Ancoats Street can be considered in the wider context.

Raised junctions Junctions and vehicular entrances and exits will be raised to improve the pedestrian movement, in particular for people with limited mobility or buggies etc. These raised crossings will occur in Ancoats at no greater than the recommended 60-100m (DTLR Traffic Advisory Leaflet 9/99) so additional speed humps will not be needed in the area.

Unsigned junctions There will be no road signs at the raised junctions. Drivers will have to stop or slow down and look and make sure that the way is clear before approaching a junction. Pedestrians will have priority and drivers have to give way to them and to each other.

Tight radii at corners In combination with the above described measures, corners should have tight radii (2m) to reinforce the need for reduced speeds. C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

2 Signage & Line Language Road markings

Signage on the threshold

Yellow lines:

Signage can be kept to a minimum in 20mph zones, as trafficcalming signs are not required. High quality, clutter free street environments can therefore be more easily achieved.

1 Narrow Alley

no parking

double yellow lines

2 Wide Alley

no parking

double yellow lines

3 Narrow Street

no parking

single yellow line

4 Wide Street

partial parking on one side

single yellow line and marked parking bays

5 Wide Street

perpendicular parking on one side

double yellow lines and marked parking bays

6 Canal Side

partial parallel or 45º parking on one side

double yellow lines and marked parking bays

All the entrances will be fitted with signs clearly indicating the pedestrian priority in the area. Signs will be put up at both sides of the 12 entrances, preferably on the same posts as the CPZ- and 20mph-signs. Existing give way signs or traffic signals will be kept on approaches to Great Ancoats Street and Oldham Road as George Leigh Street, Blossom Street and Jersey Street will be kept one way between Great Ancoats Street and Gun Street.

In principle, roads with kerb up-stands will have single yellow lines and roads without kerb up-stands will have single yellow lines painted. Roads with 90° or 45° parking will also have double yellow lines. In conservation areas such as Ancoats, thinner yellow and white lines can be used. Also, a pale yellow (primrose) can be permitted for the yellow lines in such areas. Special permission is needed from the Department of Transport, Local Government and the Regions (DTLR). DTLR approval will also be needed if sign sizes other than the standard are required. Single yellow lines will be painted at the junctions. Other road markings: Parking bays will be marked as one bay, rather than individual bays. In conservation areas, thinner yellow and white lines can be used: Width of the lines: 50mm Distance from the edge of carriageway: 150mm Distance between lines: 50mm Yellow colour: Primrose paint

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 35


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

(d

chd Ro

ale

is u

se

d)

al Can

Ancoats Public Realm Strategy, Parking Ancoats Public Realm Strategy, Parking

During the daytime, on-street parking is provided as a short-stay schem for visitor During theparking. daytime,Pay on-street parking is provided as a short-stay schem andvisitor display parking in marked spaces only, for parking. Pay mon-sat 8am-6pm. and display parking in marked spaces only, mon-sat 8am-6pm. Residential parking is accommodated either within the development itse or within designated car parking schemes. Residential parking ismulti-storey accommodated either within the development itse or within designated multi-storey car parking schemes.

Speed Restrictions Speed Restrictions Represents 20mph speed restriction zone Represents 20mph speed restriction zone

Car Parking Figure 71 Car Parking Represents 1 unit of on-street parking. ~500 units of on street parking drawn, including 150 units on-street car parking on the new grid.

Represents 1 unit of on-street parking. ~500 units of on street parking CONTROLLED PARKING drawn, including 150 units on-street car parking on the new grid. Represents location of protected sites for future multi-storey car parking Represents location of protected sites for future multi-storey car parking ZONE, CPZ, The drawing does not show the proposed new road widths. proposed The drawingby does not show the proposed new road widths. Manchester City Council

(Currently being implemented.)

Proposed Controlled Parking Zone, CPZ Proposed Controlled Parking Zone, CPZ This scheme is currently being implemented. This scheme is currently being implemented.

Residents parking

Residents parking Residents parking Pay and Display

Pay and Pay andDisplay display Loading

Loading Loading

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

d)

se isu

(d

Ro c

hd ale

C an al

CR

0 METRES 0 METRES

50 50

100 100

150 150

PAGE 36


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

Figure 72 (d

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ON-STREET PARKING FOR FUTURE GRID Parking AncoatsEXTENDED Public Realm Strategy,

d)

al Can

During the daytime, on-street parking is provided as a short-stay schem for visitor parking. Pay

and display parking in marked spaces only, During the daytime on-street mon-sat 8am-6pm. parking is provided as a shortResidential parking is accommodated either within the development its or within designated multi-storey car parking schemes. stay scheme for visitor parking. Restrictions pay Speed and display parking in marked Represents 20mph speed restriction zone spaces only, 8am-6pm. Ancoats mon-sat Public Realm Strategy, Parking

Ancoats Car Parking Public Realm Strategy, Parking

During the daytime, on-street parking is provided as a short-stay sche

Ancoats Public Realm Strategy, for visitor During theparking. on-street parking is provided ason a Parking short-stay sche Represents 1daytime, unit ofPay on-street parking. ~500 units of street parking Residental parking is accommaandvisitor display parking in marked spaces for parking. drawn, including 150Pay units on-street car only, parking on the new grid. 8am-6pm. During the daytime, on-street parking isonly, provided as a short-stay sche and display parking in marked spaces datedmon-sat either within the developfor visitor8am-6pm. parking. mon-sat Represents location Pay of protected sites for future multi-storey car parking parking is and displayor parking in accommodated marked spaces either only, within the development it ment Residential itself within designated or within 8am-6pm. designated car parking schemes. mon-sat Residential parking ismulti-storey accommodated either within the development it or within designated multi-storey carschemes. parking schemes. multi-storey car parking Residential parking accommodated either the development it The drawing does notisshow the proposed newwithin road widths.

Speed Restrictions or within designated multi-storey car parking schemes. Speed Restrictions Represents 20mph speed restriction zone Speed Restrictions Represents 20mph speed restriction zone 20mph speed restriction zone Car Parking Represents 20mph speed restriction zone Proposed Parking Zone, CPZ Car ParkingControlled Represents unit on-street parking. ~500 units of on street parking This scheme being implemented. One unitis1 currently of ofon-street parking drawn, including units on-street car ~500 parking on of theonnew grid. Car Parking Represents 1 unit150 of on-street parking. units street parking (~500 units of on-street parking drawn, drawn, including 150 units on-street car parking on the new grid. Residents parking Represents location protected sites grid) for future multi-storey carparking parki 1 uniton of of on-street parking. ~500 units of on street incl. 150 units the extended

drawn, including 150ofunits on-street carforparking the new grid. Represents location protected sites future on multi-storey car parki

Pay and Display

Represents location of protected sites for future multi-storey car parki Location of not potential sites forroad The drawing does show the proposed new widths. Loading The drawing does not show thecar proposed new road widths. future multi-storey parking The drawing does not show the proposed new road widths.

d)

se isu

(d

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Proposed Controlled Parking Zone, CPZ Zone, CPZ Proposed Controlled Parking Zone, CPZ Residents parking

This scheme is currently being implemented. Proposed Controlled Parking 0 METRESThis scheme 50 100 150 is currently being implemented. This scheme is currently being implemented.

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

Residents parking Pay and Display Residents parking Pay and Display Loading Pay and Display Loading Loading

PAGE 37


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T 98

SE RO IM PR

92

AD RO

88 86 84

AM DH OL

ET RE ST EY S R JE

ET RE ST

80

Murray Mill ET RE ST AY RR MU

T 50.0m

JE RS EY

ST RE ET

70

ET RE ST AL NG BE

SIL

EE TR KS

Vict oria Square

Royal Mill FB

50.3m

36 34

ET RE ST

PI CK FO RD

57

47

ST RE ET

Heart of Ancoat s

ET RE ST IGH E L GE OR GE

Figure 74

Royal Mill and Murray Mill.

BL

OM LO

Figure 73

M SO OS

ET RE ST

ET RE ST

OD HO

ET RE ST

VICTORIA SQUARE AND ‘HEART OF ANCOATS’

Vict oria Square and Heart of Ancoat s.

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

List ed buildings List ed buildings List ed buildings Listed building List ed buildings Pr oposed new building, 'Heart of Ancoat s' Pr oposed new building, 'Heart of Ancoat s' Pr oposed new building, 'Heart‘ Heart of Ancoat Proposed new building of s'Ancoats’ Pr oposed new building, 'Heart of Ancoat s' Carriageway Carriageway Carriageway Carriageway Carriageway Footpath / pedestrian priority Foot pat h / pedest rian priorit y Foot pat h / pedest rian priorit y Foot pat h / pedest rian priorit y Foot pat h / pedest rian priorit y Par king spaces Par king spaces Par king spaces Par king spaces Single or double yellow lines Single or double yellow lines Single or double yellow lines Single or double yellow lines

ET RE ST

Ro c Ca hd na ale l

AL NG BE

ILL DH RE

List ed buildings List ed buildings Pr oposed new building, 'Heart of Ancoat s'

Pr oposed new building, of Ancoat MILL s' ROYAL MILLS AND'Heart MURRAY Carriageway Carriageway Foot pat h / pedest rian priorit y Foot pat h / pedest rian priorit y Par king spaces Par king spaces Parking spaces Single double yellowyellow lines Singleor or double Single or double yellow lines

lines

These two illustrations, showing two parts of Ancoats in more detail, indicate the layouts of the existing listed buildings and the proposed layout of the new block called ‘Heart of Ancoats’. The parking and potential road layouts illustrate how the parking arrangements can act as a traffic calming measure in conjunction with widened foot paths and reduced carriageways. A L E E C T S

PAGE 38


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

3 Parking Strategy Controlled Parking Zone Proposed new city centre Controlled Parking Zone, CPZ (Figure 71) A new controlled car-parking zone will be created in Ancoats, similar to the City Centre Controlled Parking Zone which includes the area inside the Inner Relief Road. On street car parking is proposed to be provided for visitors only and controlled by pay and display regulations. Car parking will only be permitted in marked bays and maximum time will be 2-3 hours, between 8.00am to 6.00pm, Monday - Saturday, and unrestricted on Sundays and in the evenings. Parking areas will be outlined (as one bay) rather than individual bays, see Figure 73 and 74. In the Controlled Parking Zone, waiting signs need to be displayed at all entrances to the area and will not have to be repeated within the area.

Residents Parking Residents parking and long stay parking should not be provided on the streets, but within the individual development sites. Commuters are not to be provided for unless it is decided that one of the legitimate businesses of the Urban Village is parking. Ancoats public spaces should not be designed to cater for the demand in car parking, but for a reasonable amount of visitors/cars.

Park by Voucher There may be a concern by businesses in the area that their customers will desert Ancoats when â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;pay and displayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; measures are introduced, in which case a voucher system could be considered. Business owners would buy, or be provided free of charge but in limited numbers, pre-paid vouchers that their customers can be given when visiting. Voucher parking would still be time limited.

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 39


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 5 T R A F F I C A N D M O V E M E N T

Park and Ring

Great Ancoats Street & Oldham Road

An alternative to pay and display and parking meters is the park and ring system, which has been introduced in other European cities. Drivers pay for their parking from their mobile telephones by telephoning the parking management company free of charge to log on, and the procedure is repeated when the car is picked up, to log out. Drivers only pay for the actual time they park. The fee is taken from the drivers pre-paid park and ring account. This system does not require any parking meters, so clutter can be further reduced. This is a system that could be implemented in Ancoats at a later stage.

Ancoats Urban Village is bordered by two major roads, Oldham Road and Great Ancoats Street, the latter being part of the Inner Relief Route. These roads are both significant barriers to movement to and from the urban village and in particular reduce the quality of pedestrian and cycle linkage to the city centre. Although there are a number of signal controlled crossings on Great Ancoats Street, these have been introduced piecemeal and there is therefore a lack of coordination and cohesion to the existing provision.

Multi-storey Car Parking A number of development sites, such as Murrays Mill and Royal Mill, which are listed and very densely developed will only be able to provide a limited amount of car parking spaces within their own sites. Multi-storey car parks should therefore be provided within Ancoats to provide car parking for local businesses and residents. Three possible sites are proposed to be reserved for this purpose, see Figure 72.

There is a need now to review the pedestrian and cycle linkage across Great Ancoats Street from Oldham Road in the west to Old Mill Street in order to take account of the changes occurring in Ancoats Urban Village and New Islington Millennium Village. The aim should be to raise the quality of movement to and from these emerging new local areas and the city centre.

In order to gauge the likely number of parking spaces that might be required for this, a computer model has been set up. The model uses the current proposed developments as a guide and analyses the area of each development committed to different uses, ie commercial, retail, residential. The different uses are then allocated a factor for parking provision. For residential this is 75%, for retail units it is one or two spaces per unit, similar for commercial units. From this the model calculates the likely requirement for additional parking provision assuming future developments follow similar patterns to current proposals. The model can be adjusted if patterns of development change. On this basis the first multi-storey car park should be completed to coincide with completion of the first phase of current proposals. If we assume this first phase will take a further three years and a straightforward multi-storey car park might take two years from start of design to completion, then design and planning work on the first car park should start around one year into the first phase. We have assumed that the multi-storey car parks would have a capacity of 700-800 cars. Clearly, the timing and capacity of the car parks needs to be constantly re-assessed by adjusting the model to include actual figures for take up of parking spaces and future proposals. C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 40


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y

06

M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N 1 Street Surfacing Materials 2 Street Construction 3 Ty p i c a l J u n c t i o n

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

1 Street Surfacing Materials Reconstruction & restoration - As noted above, with the exception of those streets resurfaced under the phase one Public Realm implementation, most of Ancoats’ streets are in a poor state of repair. Carriageways are typically thin applications of bitmac or asphalt over original stone setts. Pavements formerly of sandstone with granite kerbs have been replaced throughout with precast concrete slabs and concrete kerbs. It is inevitable that most of the existing streets will require resurfacing in the near future, either to be comensurate in quality with new development or in the interests of public safety. With the recommendations for the creation of alleys rather than streets, reduction in carriageway widths and consequent adjustments to levels and falls, this represents a process of reconstruction and not restoration of the original fabric. Conservation priorities - The overarching principle in responding to conservation issues shall be to safeguard the character of the Public Realm. That character has been defined as a ‘spatial phenomenon’ arising from the narrow street widths and tall buildings. The visual manifestation of the phenomenon will be best served by a rigorous observance of line and level when setting out new street works. Upstand kerbs and central channels must adhere to a legible and strictly controlled pattern which reinforces the regularity of the existing street pattern.

Figure 75-80

Palette of materials - All street types will follow a consistent specification for surface materials. A single departure from this will be the use of hot rolled asphalt in place of reclaimed setts for ‘vehicle‘ surfaces while noting that all streets will be subject to pedestrian priority. Central sections to all ‘alleys’ shall be paved with stone as will all pavements and drainage channels to ‘streets’. An area of the Village has been defined where the use of reclaimed setts will be a priority, see Figure 81. The criteria for the selection of this area were: • Providing a setting for existing buildings on Redhill St and Jersey St • Encompassing the area of earliest known street construction between Cotton St and Great Ancoats St.

SURFACING MATERIALS

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 42


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

ER TL BU ET RE ST ET RE ST

RT ZA MO E OS CL

ET RE ST EY S R JE

L NA CA (d

C RO

al Can

E AL HD chd Ro

ale

is u

se

d)

EET N STR UNIO NEW

JE RS EY

ST RE ET

ST RE ET

PI CK FO RD

L IL DH RE

ST RE ET

LE DA T CH EE RO R ST

Figure 81

L NA CA

PROPOSED VEHICLE SURFACES Vehicle surface paved with setts

Ro c hd C al an e al

ST RE ET

ET RE ST

E OS CL

LU NA

EY DN RO

RD FO DE WA

T IET RR HA

ET RE ST ND LA PO

ET RE ST

ST RE ET

T EE TR DS O HO

ET RE ST

GU N

ST RE ET

T EE TR LS

M DIU RA

AL NG BE

ST RE ET

ET RE ST

ET RE ST

HE NR Y

ST

ET RE

AY RR MU

TS

ET RE ST

ET RE ST

CO TT ON

ET RE ST

VA NA

T EE TR HS G I LE

OM LO

AN CO A

H EIG EL RG O GE

ET RE ST

GE OR GE

OM LO

M SO OS BL

GR EA T

T EE TR ES S O IMR T PR EE TR KS L I S

ET RE ST

ET RE ST

R DE T CIN REE ST

M DIU RA

AL NG BE

ITA AN

ET RE ST TT RA ER SH

T EE TR LS EL RN CO

AM DH OL

AD RO

AD RO

ET RE ST

ND LA PO

AM DH OL

AL UG RT PO

Vehicle surface paved with asphalt STREETS WITH SETTS

Rochdale Canal

STREETS OF ASPHALT

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

d)

se

5050 50 50

ROCHDALE CANAL 100 100 100 100

150 150 150 150

isu

METRES 00 METRES METRES 00 METRES

(d

Ro c

hd ale

C an al

CR

METRES 00 METRES

50 50

100 43 100 PAGE

150 150


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

2 Street Construction Four generic street types will be applied to the study area on the basis of street width, ie width from build frontage to building frontage. The designs for each type are based on a ‘Manchester model’ and are referred to as (Figure 67): Type 1 Narrow Alley Type 2 Wide Alley Type 3 Narrow Street Type 4 Wide Street Types 1, 2 and 3 will not provide for on street parking, while type 4 will do so in defined parking bays on a two hour maximum stay pay and display system. A further two types are proposed which relate to specific locations, referred to above as ‘boulevard’ and ‘flexible parking’ arrangements, see Figure 68 and 69. The proposed traffic management for Ancoats and the new configuration proposed for street design has been the subject of consultation with Manchester City Council Planning and Highways Departments. The objectives are welcomed by all concerned, however key areas which are subject to legislation such as statutory signage and road markings require further investigation. This is proceeding and it is anticipated that conclusions which will deliver the principal objectives of the strategy are achievable. C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 44


0.3 0.45 0.45

0.3

0.45

0.45 0.45

0.45

1B 1B

traffic

traffic

Narrow alley one way traffic Narrow alley one way traffic no parking no parking

1 NARROW ALLEY (RECLAIMED SETTS | ASPHALT)

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

0.45 0.45

0 - 4.2 0 - 4.2

0 - 4.2

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

1B 1B

dished dished stone stone channel channel

flat stone flat stone channel channel

asphalt asphalt

0.3

0.3 0.3

0 - 4.2

Figure 82

dished dished stone stone channel channel

flatflat stone stone channel channel

asphalt asphalt

dished dished stone stone channel channel

flat stone flat stone channel channel

reclaimed reclaimed settssetts

ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

0.45 0.45

0.3

0.45 0.45

0 - 4.2 0 - 4.2

Narrow alley one way traffic no parking Narrow alley one way traffic no parking

PAGE 45


0.45

1.2

0.45

0.45

1.2

0.45

0.45 0.45

4.2

1.2 1.2

0.45 0.45

6.6

1.2

0.45

0.45

1.2

0.45

4.2 6.6 4.2 6.6

2B 2B

de alley two way traffic de alley two way traffic parking parking

Wide alley two way traffic no parking Wide alley two way traffic no parking

2B 2B

0.45 0.45

dished dished stone stone channel channel

sawn sawn stone stone setts setts

flatflat stone stone channel channel

asphalt asphalt

dished dished stone stone channel channel

sawn sawn stone stone settssetts

0.45

4.2 4.2 6.6 6.6

6.6 4.2

Figure 83

flat stone flat stone channel channel

asphalt asphalt

dished dished stone stone channel channel

sawn sawn stone stone setts setts

flatflat stone stone channel channel

reclaimed reclaimed setts setts

dished dished stone stone channel channel

sawn sawn stone stone settssetts

flat stone flat stone channel channel

reclaimed reclaimed setts setts

ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

1.2 1.2

0.45 0.45

4.2 4.2 6.6 6.6

Wide alley two way traffic Wide alley two way traffic no parking no parking

2 WIDE ALLEY (RECLAIMED SETTS | ASPHALT)

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 46


3A 3A

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

4.2

4.2

6.6 9.1 6.6

6.6 9.1 6.6 9.1

3A 3A

3B 3B

Narrow street two way traffic Narrow street two way traffic no parking no parking Narrow street two way traffic Narrow street two way traffic no parkingno parking

Figure 84

vehicular/ shared surface vehicular/ shared surface asphalt asphalt

vehicular/ shared surface vehicular/ shared surface asphalt asphalt

stonestone kerb, kerb, appr. appr. 75 upstand 75 upstand

footways in stone flags flags footways in stone

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

min 1.2

4.2

4.2

9.1

stonestone kerb,kerb, appr.appr. 75 upstand 75 upstand

footways in stone flagsflags footways in stone

vehicular/ shared surface vehicular/ shared surface reclaimed setts setts reclaimed

stonestone kerb, kerb, appr. appr. 75 upstand 75 upstand vehicular/ shared surface vehicular/ shared surface reclaimed reclaimed settssetts

footways in stone flags flags footways in stone

75 upstand stonestone kerb,kerb, appr.appr. 75 upstand

footways in stone footways in stone flagsflags

ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

6.6 9.1 6.6 9.1

6.6 9.1 6.6 9.1

min 1.2 min 1.2

3B 3B

Narrow two way traffic Narrow street two street way traffic no parkingno parking Narrow street two street way traffic Narrow two way traffic no parkingno parking

3 NARROW STREET (RECLAIMED SETTS | ASPHALT)

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 47


min 1.8

min 1.8

min 1.8

min 1.8

min 1.8

min 1.8

min 1.8

5.5

min 1.8

vehicular/ sharedshared surface vehicular/ surface reclaimed setts asphalt

min 1.8

5.5

5.5

5.5

9.1

9.1

9.1

11

11 9.1

11 9.1

11

11

4A

4B 4B

Wide street two way traffic partial parking one side

4B

min 1.8

min 1.8

min 1.8

5.5

11 9.1

Wide street two way traffic Wide street two way traffic partial parking one sidepartial parking one side

min 1.8

5.5

9.1

11

Figure 85

vehicular/ vehicular/ sharedshared surfacesurface asphaltasphalt

min 1.8

5.5

4A 4A

stone kerb, upstand stone appr. kerb, 75 appr. 75 upstand

stone kerb, stoneappr. kerb,75 appr. upstand 75 upstand

footways in stone flags flags footways in stone

footways footways in stone in flags stone flags

vehicular/ shared surface reclaimed setts

stone kerb, shared appr. 75surface upstand vehicular/ vehicular/ shared surface reclaimed reclaimed setts setts

footways in stone flags

footways footways in stone in flags stone flags

stone kerb, stoneappr. kerb,75 appr. upstand 75 upstand

ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

Wide street two way Wide trafficstreet two way traffic partial parking one side partial parking one side

4B

4A

Wide street two way traffic Wide street two way traffic partial parking onepartial side parking one side

4 WIDE STREET (RECLAIMED SETTS | ASPHALT)

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 48

W pa


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

Typical Junction Maintaining the integrity of the block corners and responding to the rigour of the grid shall be a priority and demands that the configuration of street junctions is addressed as a key issue. Modern highway design rarely recommends the type of alignments that would have been seen in the Ancoats of 1900. A contemporary solution shall therefore be adopted which permits the movement of large modern vehicles while maintaining adequate levels of safety and pedestrian comfort. Typical arrangements have been tested against several existing junctions in the study area and are proposed as a model for future construction, see Figure 86-88. C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 49


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

Figure 86 JUNCTION HENRY ST / JERSEY ST Street paved with reclaimed setts meets street paved with reclaimed setts

RECLAIMED SETTS Setts reclaimed from existing or similar imported Laid in staggered courses with nom. 8mm joint width NEW STONE SETTS Granite with sawn + fine picked top, 150 coursed x 100 thickness x random lengths (150-300), laid with nom. 8mm joint width

STONE FLAGS Yorkstone, 600 coursed x 75 thickness x random lengths (600-900), laid with nom. 5mm joint width NEW STONE SETTS Granite, 70-90 cubes, laid with nom. 8mm joint width STONE KERB Granite 250 x 250 fine picked Generally 75 upstand (reducing at junctions) STONE KERB, at junction Granite 250 x 250 fine picked 6 upstand (bullnose)

CHANNEL Formed with granite setts

FLUSH KERB Granite 250 x 250 fine picked

RAISED CARRIAGEWAY to achieve reduction in kerb upstand from nom. 75 to 6 (bullnose) SINGLE YELLOW LINES Marked with paint yellow lining

BLISTER TACTILE PAVING Disabled access at junction

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 50


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

Figure 87 JUNCTION LOOM ST / COTTON ST Alley paved with asphalt meets alley paved with reclaimed setts

RECLAIMED SETTS Setts reclaimed from existing or similar imported Laid in staggered courses with nom. 8mm joint width

ASPHALT

STONE FLAGS Yorkstone, 600 coursed x 75 thickness x 300/150, laid with nom. 5mm joint width

FLAT STONE CHANNEL fine picked granite, width 450

DISHED STONE CHANNEL fine picked granite, width 300

FLUSH KERB Granite 250 x 250 fine picked

DOUBLE YELLOW LINES Marked with paint yellow lining

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 51


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 6 M AT E R I A L S S P E C I F I C AT I O N

Figure 88 JUNCTION JERSEY ST / GUN ST Street paved with reclaimed setts meets alley paved with reclaimed setts

RECLAIMED SETTS Setts reclaimed from existing or similar imported Laid in staggered courses with nom. 8mm joint width NEW STONE SETTS Granite with sawn + fine picked top, 150 coursed x 100 thickness x random lengths (150-300), laid with nom. 8mm joint width

STONE FLAGS Yorkstone, 600 coursed x 75 thickness x random lengths (600-900), laid with nom. 5mm joint width NEW STONE SETTS Granite, 70-90 cubes, laid with nom. 8mm joint width STONE KERB Granite 250 x 250 fine picked Generally 75 upstand (reducing at junctions) STONE KERB, at junction Granite 250 x 250 fine picked 6 upstand (bullnose)

CHANNEL Formed with granite setts

FLUSH KERB Granite 250 x 250 fine picked

RAISED CARRIAGEWAY to achieve reduction in kerb upstand from nom. 75 to 6 (bullnose) SINGLE AND DOUBLE YELLOW LINES Marked with paint yellow lining

BLISTER TACTILE PAVING Disabled access at junction

STONE FLAGS (ALLEY) Yorkstone, 600 coursed x 75 thickness x 300/150, laid with nom. 5mm joint width

FLAT STONE CHANNEL (ALLEY) fine picked granite, width 450

DISHED STONE CHANNEL (ALLEY) fine picked granite, width 300

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 52


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y

07

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

NEW SAINT PETER’S SQUARE


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 7 N E W S A I N T P E T E R S ’ S S Q U A R E

New Saint Peter’s Square Successful urban public realm is a public realm that is inhabited and in order to inhabit a place people need a reason to be there. Gratuitous provision of open space without reference to the uses of adjacent buildings has proven to be at best fruitless and at worst a detrimental act. In simple terms this points to the need for open space to be bounded by active frontages which generate footfall. Purposeful, robust public realm alongside buildings which serve a community or at least a communal use will be more likely to succeed than otherwise. Given the proposals for Saint Peter’s Church, investment in a New Saint Peter’s Square for Ancoats is therefore timely and appropriate. Tangible benefits will accrue to both the square and the church if an integrated approach is taken to their design. To this end consultations have taken place between ABPT’s consultant architects and Camlin Lonsdale. Arising from that process a concept proposal for the square has been prepared which sets out a series of principles for the complimentary use of the square and the church. ‘Tu es Petrus’ Christ’s declaration to peter, ‘You are the rock upon which I will build my Church’ is a fitting inspiration for a new square which seeks to be the foundation of an extensive public realm infrastructure. The square will therefore incorporate art and architecture whose narrative responds to the symbolism of Peter, custodian of the keys to paradise and named as ‘Pontificus Maximus’ ‘the great bridge builder’.

Habitation of the square is encouraged by the provision of places to sit and objects to sit on such as canopy structures, tree surrounds and a raised dais rather than formal seating. At the heart of the square a very shallow incline is proposed which marks out potential space for events such as performance or street markets, but also permits unassisted wheelchair access to a level equal to that of Saint Peter’s internal finished floor level. If future provision of new openings to the southeast elevation of the church is desired, these may therefore avoid the need for incongruous ramps which conflict with the architecture of the church. Paving to the junction of Blossom Street and Sherratt Street recognises the significance of the campanile as a potent marker for the Ancoats Grid. In addition it marks the main entrance to the church by providing an elegant, high quality threshold. The composition of the square, its dimensions and proportion has its roots in the geometry of the church itself, taking the rhythm of columns which define the nave and extending this into the square. In addition to promoting complimentary uses, the architecture of each may therefore be seen as part of a single composition. By adding to these potential simultaneous redevelopment of the remainder of the block bounded by Blossom Street, Murray Street, Hood Street and Cotton Street an opportunity arises to invest the scheme with still further clarity and purpose.

Edges to the square shall be formed on two sides by buildings while on the other, longer, sides alignments of trees form permeable boundaries. The southeast edge also incorporates a canopy structure whose ultimate purpose may be to provide a ‘cloistered’ link between the two buildings. Larger trees are placed on the north western side of the square in response to a southern aspect while to the southeast lighter more columnar species are proposed both for their architectural quality and to permit sunlight to enter the space.

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 54


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 7 N E W S A I N T P E T E R S â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S S Q U A R E

trees towards Blossom Street: row of large/ imposing trees e.g Ailanthus altissima "Tree of Heaven"

BLOSSOM STREET

paving to street junction reinforces location of church campanile in relation to the 'Ancoats grid' 50.00

SECTION

50.55

seating features around trees functioning as border to square

+50.301

+0.555

+0.555

Tower

line in paving representing the influence of the city centre grid

+50.250

+50.00 +50.09

+50.18

TOR +50.185

TOR +50.37

dimensions of square composition extends geometry of St Peter's nave shallow incline to give access to nave of church at proposed reinstalled floor level

+0.555

+50.555

+50.620

Nave

ground recessed lighting and/or water channel connecting the two buildings - incorporate narrative of 'tu es petrus', baptism,the keys to heaven.

50.620

row of medium trees of symmetrical form such as Corylus colurna

raised dais +0.555

Figure 89

+0.555

Fon t

redevelopment of adjacent block to provide active frontage and containment to square

+0.555

SAINT PETERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SQUARE CONCEPT PROPOSALS

+0.555

+0.555

50.620

South Porch

50.600

canopy and seating form permeable edge to Hood Street 50.309

50.365

PLAN HOOD STREET

50.60 50.309

SECTION C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

CR

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 55


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y

08

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

CANAL SQUARE


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 8 C A N A L S Q U A R E

NM

T EN

AT ER

M OO

RY

W IG H

BO AT

M OO

L

RI N

G

-H

TE SI

DA

CA NA

IG

UN BO

BO AT

AL

T EN

C CR AN OSAL SI NG

NG DI IL S BUING E A T LD M UI XI B RO EW P N AP OR F

NM

RI N

G

NG DI IL S BUING E A T LD M UI XI B O W R E P N AP OR F

IG AL

Figure 90 W AT ER

RAMP

(n o.8 2) -

LO

W

CANAL SQUARE PROPOSAL

CA NA LL OC

K

RAMP

RAMP

RAMP

CR

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 57


ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 8 C A N A L S Q U A R E

Figure 91 CANAL SQUARE AXONOMETRIC VIEW

C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

S D H I T

A L E E C T S

PAGE 58


1i

n1 5

MO OR IN G

CA NA LL OC K

RA MP

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 8 C A N A L S Q U A R E

Figure 92 CANAL SQUARE DETAILED PROPOSAL C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y

09 PUBLIC ART STRATEGY 1 Purpose 2 Narrative 3 Implementation 4 Budgets 5 Project Management

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 0 9 P U B L I C A RT S T R AT E G Y

1 Purpose

2 Narrative

Public art in a town or city has the function of humanising the spaces in which we live, giving voice to the often unspoken values and aspirations of residents. Visible manifestations vary from the celebratory such as monuments which commemorate certain events, places or people, to the subtle interventions that add a quality and personality to previously unnoteworthy areas.

Time will need to be taken, talking to and observing the people who live and work here. We should be concerned with trying to find the heartbeat of the place, what motivates it and what inspires its progress. Artists working in any medium will respond most effectively to a narrative which emerges from a study of the cultural context for their work.

Landmarks or symbols, from the grand gesture to the rueful observation may offer inspiration, information and on occasion, entertainment. Public spaces may provide a place to pause, but it is the sculpture, the fountains and the weather vanes that often give reason to linger.

The story which is woven into a piece of work may be unique to that piece or a personal expression of a more widely appreciated general theme. In either case the narrative may be stated in the form of a brief to the artist. Existing narratives for Ancoats are exceptionally rich but may be unstated in any formal sense. Assembling an archive of the myths and history should be a first step in pursuing a strategy.

New artworks will commemorate the past and look forward to the future. Perhaps one of the most important functions will be to give voice to the relationship between the residents of Ancoats and their cultural roots.

Figure 93-97

An example of this approach, ‘Tu es Petrus’ is contained in the text which accompanies outline proposals for New Saint Peter’s Square.

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3 Implementation

4 Budgets

The commissioning of art within an overall scheme may operate on several different levels. The following framework illustrates several methods for the integration of a comprehensive programme of artworks:

At each stage of the development process, budgets should be prepared, which include the following: A Employment of lead artist for strategic design work. B Employment of specialist artist/designers. C Large scale individual commissions. These will require separate budget headings as ‘stand alone’ projects. D Costing of any works including fabrication and installation, which might be in excess of integral budgets. Every attempt should be made to include public art as an integral part of cost planning. With the exception of artists’ fees (which depend on the timing and scope of an artist’s input), this is readily achieved where functional features such as signage or street furniture are being designed and costed.

Appointment of lead artist In the absence of a narrative it is common to appoint a lead artist or artists to work alongside design teams in order to formulate proposals which may be taken forward either as commissions or as a policy to be adopted for subsequent public or private investment activities. The role of the artist in a scheme will involve clarifying the public art strategy and identifying the opportunities for ‘artists’ to contribute to the overall design The value of generating working briefs in this way is that a theme or narrative will be defined in collaboration with designers so that the ‘bolt on’ artefact may be avoided. Patrons, local stakeholders and designers are thus involved with the development of a narrative, participate in drawing up briefs and join the selection process for individual artists. Specialist Artists / Designers for detailed design work Artists specialising in certain areas of practice such as ironwork, ceramics or stone carving may be contracted to work alongside specific design teams. The contracts can be devised in a similar way to the lead artist, ie. as designers rather than makers. Alternatively, specialists may be engaged to produce discrete elements of work to a design either by themselves or others.

5 Project Management It is strongly recommended that an organisation or individual is appointed to be responsible for determining, administering and reporting on the strategy including the management of budgets, appointment of artists and administration of contracts. A sum would need to be set aside to cover this work within future cost models.

Large scale Commissions Where opportunities are identified for large scale sculpture commissions these should be offered as individual commissions on a competitive interview basis. A clear brief including the design intention should be prepared for each commission. A proposed obelisk for Canal Square provides a vehicle for such a commission where it is recommended that an artist be selected to join the appopinted design team. C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

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10

I M P L E M E N TAT I O N 1 Development Context 2 Delivery Mechanisms

3 Prioritisation of Construction 4 Funding

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ANCOATS URBA N V I L L A G E | P U B L I C R E A L M S T R AT E G Y | 1 0 I M P L E M E N AT T I O N

1 Development Context The regeneration of Ancoats Urban Village is neither plan led nor wholly development led, but a combination of both. Consequently, as the process evolves so too will the emphasis placed on plan or development inspired objectives. The Public Realm Strategy therefore provides a context within which AUVC’s intentions are clearly stated. Those intentions are compatible with all exisitng policies and guidance which together constitute a plan for the study area while permitting a design dialogue with the development industry to ensure that the performance and quality of the Public Realm meets the highest standards achievable.

2 Delivery Mechanisms In addition to the clarity of purpose contained within the strategy, a means of delivery has been devised based on a number of models arising from AUVC’s in house knowledge and experience. Five approaches may be identified which are categorised in relation to whether the Public Realm construction precedes development, cooincides with it or follows completion of a private sector scheme in addition to individual Public Realm projects. Pre development construction These will typically be infrastructure related projects such as the Phase One Public Realm around Anita Street where funding and construction is implemented separately and in advance of future private sector investment. The purpose of such schemes will be to both enhance the environment for existing occupiers of the village and to inspire confidence in the development sector.

Post development construction The forthcoming Public Realm Phase Two contract will follow the Gleeson City Living scheme referred to above to capitalise on the regeneration effect and ensure that incremental improvements are linked and progressive rather than sporadic or disjointed. Phased coordination with development Where large sites are taken up by the private sector, combinations of the above three approaches will be entirely appropriate. The intention will be to secure early design input for comprehensive schemes, planned investment and funding certainty where construction will be spread over extended timescales and the ultimate delivery of more extensive Public Realm investment than might otherwise be possible. Stand alone Public Realm projects Where areas of the Public Realm such as Canal Square are not directly related to a new development discrete packages of work will be appropriate provided that they demonstrate a proven affect on the wider regeneration objectives. The strategy recommends implementation of new traffic orders across the village area. Ideally these should be implemented in a single phase and will be separate from development off the highway. Accordingly new traffic orders and the associated signage may also be seen as a stand alone project which will have a profound effect on the Public Realm.

Simultaneous construction Current work at Pickford Street exemplifies the partnership approach where public and private sector investment is combined in the context of the strategy’s recommendations to enhance quality.

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3 Prioritisation of Construction Several factors will influence the timing of Public Realm investment. These are summarised as follows: • timing of completion • opening/marketing of development • enhanced perceptions • disruption • provision of utilities • detailed design & specification • quality control • logical progression to achieve coherent PR infrastructure

4 Funding Current estimates place the total cost of implementing the strategy at £10m. It is suggested that public sector funding will be sought from three principal sources in the following proportions: NWDA £4m ERDF £4m THI £2m It is further assumed that where the Public Realm occupies100% publicly owned land that projects will be funded entirely from public funds. In the short term private sector investment in the Public Realm will be unlikely on the grounds that developments currently underway such as Pickford Street are grant aided already. A requirement for developer contributions under section 106 or similar would therefore simply increase the grant required to make the type of development desired viable. In the medium to longer term however, and depending on values achieved by development, it is anticipated that such contributions may become a reality. Appropriate vehicles for such investment include development briefs and the development agreements which arise therefrom, Section 106 agreements and Section 278 agreements for highway works. C A M L I N L O N L A N D S C A P E A R C

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Ancoats Public Realm Strategy  

Public realm strategy for Ancoats Urban Village

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