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Canadian Fine Art Auction Monday 23 November 2015

Waddingtons.ca


Canadian Fine Art Auction Monday 23 November 2015 at 7:00 pm

On View Friday 20 November 2015 from 12:00 Noon to 5:00 pm Saturday 21 November 2015 from 12:00 Noon to 5:00 pm Sunday 22 November 2015 from 12:00 Noon to 5:00 pm Monday 23 November 2015 from 10:00 am to 12:00 Noon Select lots may be viewed otherwise by appointment. Preview and Auction to be held at Waddington’s 275 King Street East, 2nd Floor Toronto Ontario Canada M5A 1K2 This auction is subject to the Conditions of Sale printed in the back of this catalogue. All lots in the auction may be viewed online at CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

Waddingtons.ca


Front Cover Lot 46 JEAN-PHILIPPE DALLAIRE STILL LIFE (detail) Inside Front Cover Lot 50 KATHLEEN MOIR MORRIS, A.R.C.A. HORSE DRAWN CARRIAGES, WINTER (detail) Title Page Lot 47 JEAN-PAUL RIOPELLE, R.C.A. SANS TITRE, 1955 (detail) Inside Back Cover Lot 54 FREDERICK ARTHUR VERNER, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. OJIBWAY CAMP AT NORTHWEST ANGLE, LAKE OF THE WOODS (detail) Back Cover Lot 45 WILLIAM KURELEK, R.C.A. THE SKATING PARTY

All lots in the auction may be viewed

online at CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca This catalogue and its contents © 2015 Waddington McLean & Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Photography by Waddington’s

Specialist Linda Rodeck 416 847 6176 lr@waddingtons.ca Fine Art Administrator Erin Rutherford 416 504 5100 er@waddingtons.ca Corporate Receptionist Kate Godin 416 504 9100 kg@waddingtons.ca Accounts Manager Karen Sander 416 847 6173 ks@waddingtons.ca Absentee and Phone Bidding 416 504 0033 (Fax) bids@waddingtons.ca Online Bidding www.invaluable.com Communications Tess McLean 416 504 9100 tm@waddingtons.ca


Our 2015 major fall auction of Canadian Art will be the fifth sale I have directed since returning to Waddington's. There have been myriad changes and improvements to the Canadian Art department since the summer of 2013. A new catalogue design, changes to the exhibition space, the introduction of didactic panels, augmented ancillary material both in the print and online versions of the catalogue and increased learning sessions hosted by Waddington's, specifically our WoW (Women of Waddington's) events. And I am happy to say we have done all of this without an increase in costs to either our buyers or sellers. We continue to seek out the most interesting works we can find to include in our sales, and are not driven by dollar value alone. Rather, we have always aimed to find quality at all price levels and have been fortunate this season to discover, for your bidding competition, important watercolours by Fortin from the mid-1920s, one of the earliest Verner Indian encampments (based on a sketch in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada), a very large mid-1950s Riopelle watercolour and ink, sumptuous and insightful portraits by Florence Carlyle, Randolph Hewton and Paul Peel, and superb still lifes by Dallaire, FitzGerald and Goodridge Roberts. There are also wonderful works on paper by William Armstrong and Washington Friend, by E.J. Hughes and Lawren Harris. From Krieghoff to Kim Dorland, the sale is replete with examples of Canadian Art at its best. Finding, valuing, researching, cataloguing and, ultimately, selling works of art at our twice yearly catalogue sales and seasonal Select Online Sales is a team effort. In addition to our regular and part-time staff, we have been fortunate to avail ourselves of the writing expertise of Christine Boyanoski, PhD., Amy Korczynski, PhD., Melissa Alexander, M.A., and Elizabeth Johnston, M.A. The catalogue and the sale are born out of the fortitude, creativity and expertise of the core staff of the Canadian Art Department. I extend my gratitude to Anna Holmes, M.Litt., and Marina Dumont Gauthier, M.A. for their unfailing ability and willingness to do what it takes to get the job done. In particular, I would like to single out Erin Rutherford, M.A., and Mover of Mountains. Thank you to all who take an interest in the work we do here at Waddington's. It continues to be our great pleasure to serve you. — Linda Rodeck Senior Specialist, Canadian Art Vice President, Fine Art


Waddington’s

Leadership Team

Waddington’s is Canada’s largest and most diverse provider of fine art auction services. Through our appraisal, auction, private sale, estate management and downsizing expertise, we provide a complete range of services. Based on our successful legacy in the industry, we are focused on anticipating changing markets and client needs.

Waddington’s leadership team brings together three of the industry’s best. The combination of their experience, knowledge of market trends and client networks builds on Waddington’s 160 year legacy of growth and dominance.

Waddington’s is Canada’s original auction house, with a history of conducting auctions since 1850. We are also an international auction house, providing access to world markets and international opportunities through our networks and technological capabilities. Waddington’s is innovative. We enjoy new challenges and pushing the limits. From the marathon auction of the contents of Canada’s iconic hockey stadium Maple Leaf Gardens, to the estates of Canada’s elite, and our newly created Fine Wine & Spirits Division, we are driven to find what’s new and exciting and what you want to buy or sell.

Waddington’s by Department Asian Art Canadian Fine Art Contemporary Art Decorative Arts International Art Inuit Art Fine Jewellery & Watches Fine Wine & Spirits Numismatics Appraisals Estate Management & Downsizing Benefit Auctions & Community

Duncan McLean, President, is Waddington’s corporate leader, responsible for strategic development and innovation realization. Under his direction Waddington’s strives to not only continuously evolve to meet the needs of our clients and address the demands of the market, but to push the boundaries, with integrity, creativity and passion. Mr. McLean has been involved in the auction industry for over 35 years, as art specialist, appraiser, auctioneer and corporate leader. His knowledge base spans the diversity of Waddington’s offerings, with internationally-recognized expertise in Inuit Art. As Vice President Business Development, Stephen Ranger is focused on identifying new markets, new clients and new ways to do business. For example, Mr. Ranger launched Waddington’s Contemporary Art venture, Concrete Contemporary, to reach an exciting new sector of art enthusiasts and artists. Under Mr. Ranger’s guidance, new partnerships are also being created resulting in edgy new offerings like our Pop-Up Gallery series debuting in 2013. Mr. Ranger brings over 25 years of diverse experience as an auctioneer, appraiser and consultant in the art and fine wine auction industry with specific expertise in Canadian Fine Art. Linda Rodeck, Vice President Fine Art, is one of Canada’s most trusted and respected Canadian Art specialists. Her impressive career of 25+ years includes leadership roles in the country’s most distinguished auction houses. Ms. Rodeck’s keen understanding of the market and her extensive network are invaluable in her role of sourcing the best works and providing the best service to our clients. As Vice President of Waddington’s Fine Art, Ms. Rodeck plays a critical role in developing new business leveraging her success in the Canadian art market.


Canadian Fine Art

Concrete Contemporary Auctions and Projects

Waddington’s has been a major force in the Canadian art sector for over five decades, beginning with our first auction of Canadian Fine Art held at the Queen Elizabeth Building at the CNE in 1967. Since that historic event, Waddington’s has offered some of the most important Canadian works, set record prices and has been an integral part of driving the Canadian art market.

Waddington’s launched its newest division, Concrete Contemporary Auctions and Projects in 2012 with a vision and mandate to create a secondary market for contemporary Canadian art.

Linda Rodeck Senior Specialist, Canadian Art Vice President, Fine Art

Concrete Contemporary Auctions merges the worlds of traditional auction and the retail gallery, where our relationships with artists, art dealers, curators and collectors result in exciting new sources of contemporary works. The auctions are tightly focused on Canadian contemporary art created since 1980 with an emphasis on mid- and late-career artists with exhibition history in the private and public sphere. Concrete is committed to exploring new ways to connect, expand and support the arts community.

Stephen Ranger Senior Specialist, Contemporary Art


Asian Art

Jewellery, Watches and Numismatics

Waddington’s Asian Art department is Canada’s leader in serving the demands of the rapidly growing Asian market supported by our recognized and credible expertise. Our ability to achieve exceptional prices for works, including the Canadian record for the highest price for an Asian work of art, is based on our international reputation and network with the community.

Waddington’s has conducted auctions of Fine Jewellery and Numismatics for close to three decades. Highly respected expertise and in-depth knowledge of both domestic and international markets is the anchor of our ongoing success and the popularity of our auctions.

Our Asian Art department represents works of art from China, Japan, Korea, South East Asia, South Asia and Himalaya.

Our auctions include unmounted gemstones, finely crafted pieces by many of the most desirable names in jewellery including Tiffany, Cartier, Gucci, Hermes, Van Cleef & Arpels, etc., fine watches, as well as antique pieces, coins and banknotes.

We specialize in bronzes, jade, paintings, porcelain, religious works of art, textiles, woodblock and export wares.

Donald McLean Senior Specialist, Jewellery, Watches and Numismatics Chih-En Chen Specialist, Asian Art


Decorative Arts

International Art

Decorative Arts at Waddington’s encompasses a broad and diverse variety of objects From ancient to modern, delicate to deadly, Waddington’s Decorative Arts department redefines the term, bringing much more than traditional silverware and porcelain figurines to market, and with remarkable success.

Waddington’s International Art department presents auctions of fine art from around the world. A major element of Waddington’s legacy, our International Art auctions thrive on Canada’s cultural diversity. The combination of our expertise and that of our substantive network ensures the highest standards of authentication and research.

Waddington’s reputation for developing new markets is well represented by our Decorative Arts department, as is our ability to present large collections – notable recent sales have included Charles Bronfman’s Claridge Collection, Contemporary Studio Glass, Scientific Instruments and Militaria. The department regularly offers auctions which include: bronzes, items of Canadian historical interest, ceramics, devotional works of art, lighting, mirrors, objets du vertu, porcelain, silver, travel and exploration maps.

Sean Quinn Specialist, Decorative Arts

Bill Kime Senior Specialist, Decorative Arts

Rare and important paintings, sculpture, photographs and prints are offered in our live auctions and online auctions, attracting international clients.

Susan Robertson Senior Specialist, International Art


Fine Wine & Spirits

Inuit Art

Waddington’s is the only auction company to be able to provide fine wine and spirit auction services in Ontario. Awarded an exclusive contract under the authority of the LCBO in September 2015, Waddington’s presents its first auctions in the fall of 2015.

Waddington’s is internationally recognized as one of the leading authorities in Inuit Art. No other auction house has been as intrinsically linked to the development of a market for this art form. From our first landmark auction of the William Eccles Collection in 1978, Waddington’s has offered thousands of works, set record prices, and expanded the market well beyond Canada’s borders.

The popularity of collecting wine as an investment grows every year. Many wines offered at auction will appreciate in value, especially rare and acclaimed vintages, making auctions an excellent way to build a fine wine portfolio. Auctions provide an opportunity to buy wines that aren’t available through other channels and allow restaurants to build world-class wine lists. Waddington’s will conduct live and online auctions of fine wines and spirits providing client access to worldwide markets.

Our legacy of successful Inuit Art auctions, our ability to achieve continually increasing values and our creation of an international market have been key factors in establishing Inuit Art as an integral part of the Canadian and international art scenes.

Christa Ouimet Senior Specialist, Inuit Art Ryan Corrigan Specialist, Fine Wine & Spirits

Stephen Ranger Vice President, Business Development


“Off the Wall” Art

Appraisals

Our Off The Wall auctions are a unique opportunity to offer accessible art. Drawing from our International, Inuit and Canadian Art divisions, Off The Wall features paintings, prints and sculpture in an online auction format.

Waddington’s has been providing quality appraisal services for over 160 years. Our specialists are internationally recognized as experts in their fields. We create comprehensive written appraisals with objective, justified values that can be prepared to ISA and USPAP standards.

The monthly online auctions are always an eclectic selection of affordable works – a great way to learn, enjoy art and start building a collection. Working closely with all our other divisions, Off The Wall has developed a diverse and extensive network of clients.

Whether a simple valuation for sale or a complex inventory, we can provide you with the information you need to make informed decisions. We can also provide verbal appraisals when circumstances warrant a more informal, lower cost approach. Our clients include fiduciaries, executors and beneficiaries responsible for settling estates, as well as private clients looking to downsize and turn their material encumbrances into a monetary resource.

Doug Payne Specialist, Fine Art

Ellie Muir ISA member USPAP certified Appraisals Coordinator


Philanthropy and Community

Social good is an important part of our business philosophy. For over 50 years, we have donated our time, services and expertise in support of a wide range of charitable organizations. From conducting major event auctions to fundraising appraisal clinics and supporting museum acquisitions through the Concrete Contemporary Auctions and Projects Fund, our team combines personal passion and skills to create real impact in the community. Currently we participate in over 25 events each year, helping to raise $2,000,000 annually in support of causes we care about. Our network of knowledgeable collectors, nurtured relationships and our online platform, allows us to assist the non-profit sector to raise funds in an exciting – and impactful way.

Organizations we support include: The Advocates Society Best Buddies Birdlife International, Ottawa Canadian Art Foundation Gala Canadian Film Centre Canadian Opera Company Casey House, “Art with Heart” Centre For Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) Covenant House Lake Ontario Waterkeepers Montreal Children’s Hospital Music and Beyond, Ottawa Nyota School, Kenya OCADU, “Project 31” Princess Margaret Hospital Ratanek International “Buy Art Not Kids” Robert McLaughlin Gallery Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival Serve Canada St. Mary’s General Hospital, Kitchener St. Michael’s Hospital “ARTGEMS” STOP Foodbank Toronto Symphony Orchestra Varley Art Gallery Art Gallery of Windsor


Canadian Fine Art Lots 1–135


CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

1 GRAHAM NOBLE NORWELL, O.S.A. WINTER LANDSCAPE oil on canvas signed 26.25 ins x 30.25 ins; 66 cms x 78.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $4,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

2 MAUD LEWIS THREE CATS oil on board signed 12 ins x 14.25 ins; 36.2 cms x 30.5 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario (acquired directly from the artist circa Summer 1966) Private Collection, Ontario (by descent) Literature: Lance Woolaver, The Illuminated Life of Maud Lewis, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, 1996, page 63 for a closely related work entitled Black Cats, reproduced in colour. $6,000–8,000

3 MAUD LEWIS DEER oil on board signed 11.75 ins x 13.75 ins; 34.9 cms x 29.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario (acquired directly from the artist circa Summer 1966) Private Collection, Ontario (by descent) Literature: Lance Woolaver, The Illuminated Life of Maud Lewis, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, 1996, page 91 for a closely related work entitled Winter Scene, reproduced in colour. $5,000–7,000

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4 PHILIP HENRY HOWARD SURREY, R.C.A. MOUNT ORFORD PARK, EASTERN TOWNSHIPS, QUEBEC oil on panel signed and dated ‘45 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $3,000–4,000

5 BRUNO JOSEPH BOBAK, R.C.A. THE HARBOUR oil on canvas signed 18 ins x 26 ins; 45.7 cms x 66 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario (acquired circa 1961) Private Collection, Hudson, Quebec (by descent) $3,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

6 JOHN GEOFFREY CARUTHERS LITTLE, R.C.A RUE FABRIQUE, QUEBEC oil on masonite signed 17.75 ins x 24 ins; 45.7 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Colin S. MacDonald, A Dictionary of Canadian Artists, 3rd edition, Canadian Paperbacks, Ottawa, 1975, pages 871872. $15,000–20,000

Note: Following two years of study at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, John Little left his native home to continue his artistic pursuits in New York City. In 1949, Little worked as an assistant on the popular aviation adventure comic strip Bruce Gentry (which ran in newspapers from 1945-1951) before returning to Montreal in 1951 to begin working as a draughtsman in his father’s architectural firm (Luke & Little). It is easy to trace to the influence of the streets of New York, the playful appearance of comic strips and the precision of a draughtsman, in the works that Little would go on to produce following his 1953 decision to turn exclusively to painting. Rue Fabrique, Quebec is an exceptional example of Little’s work from this period. Côte de la Fabrique lies in the heart of Quebec City’s bustling commercial district. Little’s panoramic vantage point rests at the spot where the street intersects with the Rue Saint-Jean. A light rain shower has cast the road with a glistening dampness, which slickens the pavement and heightens the vivid hues Little employs. Patrons of the bistros and shops which line the streets, spill out into the scene, going about their business in a cacophony of activity and colour. Little’s spectacle is not only a pleasure to admire visually, but it also creates an easily imaginable soundscape. A businessman barters with a horsedrawn cab for hire; a merchant on a bicycle cart whistles at the swoosh of a woman’s tangerine-coloured skirt; children attentively listen to the instructions of their nanny; two nuns deliberate on the state of modernity; men settle wagers in front of the pub; impatient drivers in cars and delivery trucks honk their horns; streetcars trundle noisily down the tracks – bells ringing, steel squealing.

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7 NICHOLAS DE GRANDMAISON, R.C.A. PAPOOSE pastel signed 11.25 ins x 9 ins; 28.6 cms x 22.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Hugh A. Dempsey, History in Their Blood, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver/Toronto, 1982, page 16. Note: De Grandmaison did not often title his portraits of women and children, preferring to label them generically as “Squaw” or “Papoose.” Belatedly, he realized the historical significance of recording the names of all his subjects, as he did for the Indian Chiefs he drew. Nonetheless, his portraits of children such as this lot were far from being stock types and were said to be so faithful to their subjects that, according to Dempsey, a relative might exclaim: “Ki-ai-yowww” or “it’s just like him (or her).” $10,000–15,000

8 NORMAND HUDON DOUBLE ACCROCHAGES, 4 MINUTES acrylic on masonite signed, titled and dated ‘87 18 ins x 24 ins; 45.7 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Galerie Beauchamp-Joncas, Quebec Private Collection, Montreal Literature: Jacques de Roussan, Normand Hudon: Humour and Humanism, Roussan Éditeur Inc., Montréal, 1988, page 127, reproduced in colour. $9,000–12,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

9 MARC-AURÈLE FORTIN, A.R.C.A. LE PORT, VUE DE L’ÎLE SAINTE HÉLÈNE watercolour signed; inscribed “Le Port” and “Fortin” on the reverse 12.25 ins x 13.25 ins; 30.5 cms x 33 cms Provenance: Galerie de Bellefeuille, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal Exhibited: Retrospective M.A. Fortin, Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal, septembre 1979, no. 15 Musée Marc-Aurèle Fortin, Montreal, 15 May 1984, #15 Literature: Esther Trépanier, Marc-Aurèle Fortin (1888-1970): Retrospective Exhibition (catalogue), Walter Klinkhoff Gallery, Montreal, 2006, page 6. Michèle Grandbois, (ed.), Marc-Aurèle Fortin: The Experience of Colour (catalogue), Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec, 2011, page 103, and page 104, cat. 33 for a closely related work, reproduced in colour.

Note: Trépanier writes: “At the end of the 1920s, Fortin had most certainly become one of the noteworthy artists of his generation” and works such as this lot (see also Lot 21) would make Trépanier’s statement self-evident. Grandbois concurs: “When Fortin began to devote himself to this demanding technique in the early 1920s his painting changed radically and began to explore pure colour. This is when he became the bold colourist whose work attracted attention in pubic exhibitions.” While Fortin did not view himself as a modern painter per se – in fact, he rejected this description of himself – he had by this time developed a personal style that while representational was unconventional and devoid of academicism, if not precisely Modern. His robust colour, and subjective proportions rendered work that was both personal and original. Trépanier refers, in particular, to “the techniques used to demonstrate the obvious pre-eminence of experimentation over the desire for realism, as for example, the ‘holed’ surface effect of certain watercolours,” as evidenced by this lot. She continues: “Fortin’s prospects of Île Sainte-Hélène illustrate this typical technique of his early experiments. He created some fifteen watercolours of the same scene on different-sized paper. The views varied according to the effect sought, but were identical in construction: trees and a winding path in the foreground, embellished with people strolling and fishing; in the middle ground, ships plying the river; and in the background port buildings and a train.”

$12,000–15,000

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10 EDWARD JOHN HUGHES, R.C.A. WOODED SHORELINE graphite signed, and with the artist’s colour notations 14.75 ins x 11 ins; 36.8 cms x 27.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $3,000–5,000

11 EDWARD JOHN HUGHES, R.C.A. ROCKY SHORELINE graphite signed 11 ins x 14.75 ins; 27.9 cms x 36.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $3,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

12 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS STUDY FOR NORTH LABRADOR, 1930 graphite with artist’s colour notations

Literature: Bess Harris and R.G.P. Colgrove, (eds.), Lawren Harris, MacMillan of Canada, Toronto, 1969, page 8 for the related painting North Labrador, 1930, reproduced in colour. Jeremy Adamson, Lawren S. Harris, Urban Scenes and Wilderness Landscapes, 1906-1930 (catalogue), Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1978, for the related painting North Labrador, 1930, cat. no. 171, reproduced.

7.5 ins x 10 ins; 17.8 cms x 24.1 cms Provenance: Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario

Note: A closely related pencil sketch entitled North Labrador, 1930 is in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (no. 42124).

$7,000–9,000

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13 JOHN YOUNG JOHNSTONE, A.R.C.A. QUEBEC FARMHOUSE oil on panel, mounted to board signed and dated 1915 5.5 ins x 7.25 ins; 14 cms x 18.4 cms Provenance: Estate of a Private Collector, Illinois, U.S.A. Literature: A.K. Prakash, John Young Johnstone (1887-1930): Retrospective Exhibition (catalogue), Galerie Walter Klinkhoff, 2005, pages 2, 3, and 5. Note: According to A.K. Prakash, John Young Johnstone’s early work (1911-1915) “shows a delicacy of perception indicating that like most foreigners of his generation who trained in Paris, Johnstone studied not only the original Impressionists, but also the followers. For instance, the work of Suzor-Coté was surely influential in his treatment of perspective.” Working on little panels, mirroring the practice of J.W. Morrice, Johnstone accentuated the intimacy of the settings he depicted. $7,000–9,000

14 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT, P.R.C.A. FARM IN AUTUMN oil on canvas signed and dated ‘37 18 ins x 24 ins; 45.7 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Crystal S. Parsons, Maurice Cullen and His Circle, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 2009, page 15. Note: One of Pilot’s most important artistic influences was his stepfather, Maurice Cullen. As a child, he often spent time sketching in Cullen’s Montreal studio and when he was thirteen, confessed to Cullen his dream of becoming a painter. After some consideration, Cullen responded: “Well, you won’t make any money but you’ll have a happy life.” Like Cullen, Pilot also trained in Paris, but unlike his stepfather he developed a much brighter, vividly-coloured palette. His landscapes often feature daring strokes of undiluted orange, blue, and green, perfectly captured in Farm in Autumn. $8,000–12,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

15 FRANK HANS JOHNSTON, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. OCTOBER PLOUGHING oil on masonite signed; titled on the artist’s label on the reverse 24 ins x 34.5 ins; 61 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $20,000–30,000

Literature: Roger Burford Mason, A Grand Eye for Glory: The Life of Franz Johnston, Dundurn Press, Toronto/Oxford, 1998, page 80. Ross King, Defiant Spirits: the Modernist Revolution of the Group of Seven, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver, 2010, page 379. Note: Ross King writes: “After leaving the Group of Seven, Frank Johnston put geographical as well as artistic distance between himself and his former colleagues,” thereby earning a number of detractors. These were primarily fellow artists, who felt that Johnston had committed, in King’s words “a kind of apostasy” as he ventured away from the more prescribed style of the Group. But with a family to support, Johnston gambled that he could succeed as well, or perhaps even better, on his own. It was a gamble he won, which may have rankled the Group. In fact, Johnston enjoyed tremendous commercial success. His paintings of pastoral subjects such as this lot were, and remain, enormously popular. As proof of this, Burford notes “that of the eighty paintings (Johnston) exhibited in the Eaton’s show of 1943, more than half sold in the first three weeks at prices ranging from fifty to one thousand dollars...” But it wasn’t exclusively economic success that Johnston enjoyed; his paintings were critically popular, too. Burford writes that the Globe and Mail’s critique of Johnston’s 1944 exhibit at Eaton’s College Street enthused that “the workmanship was utterly remarkable,” a truth, says Burford that “even Johnston’s greatest detractors had to allow of his work.”

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16 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. ABANDONED FARM - HALFWAY LAKE, 1958 oil on board signed; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse (twice) 12 ins x 15 ins; 30.5 cms x 38.1 cms Provenance: Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $20,000–30,000

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Note: A.J. Casson distinguished himself from other members of the Group by painting the rural villages and houses of Ontario. Throughout his career, Casson’s oils and watercolours often indicate a human presence in the landscape. Nineteen fifty-eight was the year that Casson ended his career as a commercial artist, retiring from Sampson-Matthews where he had been vice-president and art director. Thus began his life as a full-time artist and his relationship with the Roberts Gallery in Toronto which held his first oneman show in 1959. The Roberts shows exposed Casson to a much broader audience than had previously known his work. Abandoned Farm – Halfway Lake was painted in the autumn of 1958 in the Madawaska Valley which Casson had begun visiting in the 1940s. His interest in translating natural forms into abstracted patterns that began in the previous decade can be seen in this sketch, particularly in the paddleshaped trees and cloud formations. The stark geometry of the human structures (the farm buildings) is contrasted with the organic quality of the gentle curving hills covered in muted tones of autumn foliage. This contrast of forms that Casson used in his pictures of rural houses and villages—the relationship between man-made structures and the landscape—is particularly effective here, heightening the eerie quality created by the black forms of abandoned buildings. Casson would have encountered many such abandoned buildings in his drives through the northern Ontario countryside searching for subject matter—the traces of earlier settlement patterns and the changes brought about by industry and transportation over time.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

17 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON, R.C.A. FISHING BOATS ON THE RIVER AT SUNSET

Note: Born in Hamilton and educated both in Canada and abroad, Robinson began painting the Quebec landscape around 1908 and soon after moved to Montreal permanently.

oil on canvas signed

According to the gallery label on the reverse of this painting, this canvas dates to circa 1909 which would likely place it in Quebec rather than France from whence Robinson had returned by 1905 and which he would not visit again until 1911.

12.25 ins x 17.25 ins; 31.1 cms x 43.8 cms Provenance: Walter Klinkhoff Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, U.S.A. Literature: Robert Pilot, “Foreword,” in Thomas R. Lee, Albert Henry Robinson, The Painter’s Painter, Galerie Walter Klinkhoff, Montreal, 1956. $20,000–30,000

In his foreword to the catalogue that accompanied the 1955 retrospective of Robinson’s work at the Art Gallery of Hamilton and the National Gallery of Canada, Robert Pilot links Robinson’s early work to that of the great James Wilson Morrice and it is quite easy to see why. Both shared the distinction of being able to paint with subtlety, “in low tones but high key.” Pilot celebrated Robinson’s muted, but joyous, colours and cautioned that “the simplicity of their facture could be easily misunderstood.” Singling out Robinson’s maritime subjects, Pilot observed: “Seaports, also, he loved and how well he painted them. The wharves, the shipping and the dancing sea.” Thomas Lee notes that a cousin of Robinson’s was a harbour paymaster in Montreal so the artist had open access to the docks. The only challenge he faced was the abundance of rats. Robinson explained that “if some of his pictures seem short on detail and scope... it’s because the great number of rats on occasions forced him to pick up his easel and run.” Nonetheless the first sale Robinson made after coming to Montreal was a harbourfront scene.

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18 JOHN GEOFFREY CARUTHERS LITTLE, R.C.A RETURN OF THE BIRDS TO BAILE STREET oil on canvas signed 18 ins x 24 ins; 45.7 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $10,000–15,000

19 BARKER FAIRLEY, R.C.A. SUBURB - ON DAWLISH AVENUE oil on canvas signed; also signed and titled on the overflap and stretcher 20 ins x 24 ins; 50.8 cms x 45.7 cms Provenance: Collection of Paul and Polly Sweetman (acquired as a wedding gift directly from the artist, 1942) Private Collection, Brighton, Ontario (by descent) Literature: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, “Barker Fairley at 93,” Spectrum, 1981. Note: Fairley knew the Group of Seven, accompanied them on a number of expeditions and frequently defended them against criticism. However, Fairley’s landscapes demonstrate that the Canadian landscape is not restricted to the northern wilderness. Fairley asserted that, “There’s just as much to paint near home as further away.” The artist was keenly familiar with the suburb depicted in this lot. By 1926-1927, Fairley had established a residence at 197 Dawlish Avenue. See Lot 87 for a portrait of Paul Sweetman. See website for additional information. $5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

20 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. BARK LAKE, 1949 oil on board signed 12 ins x 15 ins; 30.5 cms x 38.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, British Columbia $20,000–30,000

Note: Bark Lake is located in the Madawaska area south of Algonquin Park which A.J. Casson visited in the late 1940s in search of subject matter. At that time, he was employed as an art director in the commercial art firm of Sampson-Matthews, and since the time available for sketching trips was limited, he could not go too far afield. Madawaska was near enough, and Casson painted the region many times (including Lake Kamaniskeg, and the area around Barry’s Bay), especially in autumn. Autumn appealed to the artist, for with the changing colours of the season, distinct landscape forms visually separate themselves one from the other like a sequence of staggered stage flats, an effect that Casson emphasized in this sketch of Bark Lake. Here the yellow band of trees on the far shore stands in front of a reddish hill on the left, behind which rises a higher mauve-coloured hill. This band of colour across the middle of the picture holds the eye, while the zig-zag of the water in the foreground adds dynamism to the composition. Typical of the Madawaska pictures, Casson was interested in the effects of light, and has painted a pattern of dark clouds and grey sky with thin veils of rain falling in the distance. The artist effectively conveys the unstable weather conditions characteristic of the fall season in this northern Ontario location.

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21 MARC-AURÈLE FORTIN, A.R.C.A. COIN DU PORT DE MONTRÉAL, C. 1925 watercolour signed; inscribed “Le Port” on the reverse 12.25 ins x 14.75 ins; 31.8 cms x 38.1 cms Provenance: Galerie de Bellefeuille, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal Exhibited: Retrospective M.A. Fortin, Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal, septembre 1979, no. 16 Literature: Esther Trépanier, Marc-Aurèle Fortin (1888-1970): Retrospective Exhibition (catalogue), Walter Klinkhoff Gallery, Montreal, 2006, pages 12 and 14. Michèle Grandbois, (ed.), Marc-Aurèle Fortin: The Experience of Colour (catalogue), Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec, 2011, page 104, cat. 33 for a closely related work, reproduced in colour. $12,000–15,000

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Note: While Fortin’s bold colouration alone would place him firmly among postimpressionist painters, in Coin du Port, Fortin – who did not view himself as a modern painter but rather one with nationalist motives foremost in mind – uses a classic composition typical of his watercolours from this period. Trépanier writes: “He would place himself at a distance from the modern city in order to paint it from afar, viewing it from the low-lying hills of Hochelega, Saint Helen’s Island or atop Mount Royal... the pictorial elements inherent to the modern city – buildings, working-class housing, industrial and port constructions, railways – are usually situated between the foreground and the background and framed or enveloped by elements belonging to a natural or rural environment,” just as they appear in this lot. She continues: “more often than not, the tiny human figures that appear at the city’s edge are associated with traditional rural occupations: farm workers next to haywagons, long-skirted women usually accompanied by a child, and so forth.” Trépanier reminds us that “urbanization in Quebec was in full swing and metropolitan areas accounted for 60% of the population in the 1930s.” Fortin’s work “predicted or captured the tension between city and neighbouring countryside that was slowly being overtaken by urban spread.” See also Lot 9.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

22 WILLIAM KURELEK, R.C.A. GOD PROVIDES, 1964 watercolour and gouache on card signed with initials 14 ins x 9 ins; 35.6 cms x 24.1 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto Literature: William Kurelek, Lumberjack, Tundra Books, Montreal, 1974, unpaginated. $15,000–20,000

Note: Determined to study art in Europe, William Kurelek found himself in lumber camps of northern Ontario and Quebec – earning and saving funds to pay his way as quickly as possible. Deemed unfit by the foreman upon his first sight of the artist, Kurelek later quipped that it was in the wilds of the forest that he earned his reputation as “a worker.” Much like Kurelek himself, the lumberjack depicted in this lot finds himself isolated in a dark and dense surround. He pauses for a moment – resting from his hardship to be soothed by the cool, refreshing waters of a forest stream. Through the heightened white bark and the phosphorescent greens of the lichen and the moss, Kurelek creates a magical atmosphere. The presence of the warbling bird in the top right hand corner of the scene suggests that, to Kurelek, divine intervention may have led the labourer to refreshment. As technology ushered in more efficient and faster methods for harvesting, the number of lumberjacks dramatically diminished. Kurelek writes, “Was our old way, for all its hardships, more romantic, more humane, more socially satisfying? I leave the answers to others. I only know I am glad to have been a part of that good life before it passed into history.”

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23 SOREL ETROG, R.C.A. THE COUPLE, 1965 bronze signed and numbered 2/10 height 13 ins; 33 cms Provenance: Evelyn Aimis Fine Art, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Pierre Restany, Sorel Etrog, Prestel Verlag, Munich, London, New York, 2001, page 77. Note: In 1963 Sorel Etrog discovered Etruscan sculpture while visiting Florence, Italy. This encounter would have a significant impact on the artist’s own sculptural works: “One of the most challenging dilemmas sculptors face,” he writes, “is how to join different parts of the body, or different shapes, without gluing or welding them. I was lucky to have discovered the Etruscan links which showed me how to join multiple shapes organically. ‘The Link’ created a tension at the point where they joined, where they pulled together or pulled apart.” $8,000–10,000

24 TAKAO TANABE HERE & THERE A DEWDROP GLISTENING oil on canvas signed and dated ‘58 35.75 ins x 26 ins; 90.8 cms x 66 cms Provenance: The Women’s Committee of the Art Gallery of Toronto Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Ian M. Thom et al., Takao Tanabe, Douglas & McIntyre, Toronto, 2005, page 110 and page 58 for a similar work entitled Untitled (NYC), 1952, reproduced. Note: “Tanabe developed the confidence to refrain. Many of his works embrace the pleasures of near monochrome, constrained middle greys, rounded landforms and non-agitated, curvilinear flowing lines, generating tranquil, transcendent pictures.” Tanabe’s White Paintings were a series of works that the artist began in England and continued to paint through to 1958 in Vancouver. Titles for most of these works, explained Tanabe, were formulated only once the paintings had left the studio for exhibition. They were often drawn from poetry which Tanabe was reading at the time. Here & There a Dewdrop Glistening seems no exception to this method of naming. Painted in the year prior to his first trip to Japan and in the final year of the White Painting series, the work exudes a refrain of colour over geometry. In swoops of shades and pigment, Tanabe creates phantoms, passionate whispers on the canvas. See Lot 33 for another work from this series. $6,000–8,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

25 LÉON BELLEFLEUR, R.C.A. FIN D’ÉTÉ oil on canvas signed and dated ‘63; also signed, titled, dated ‘63 and inscribed “Paris” on the reverse 32 ins x 25.5 ins; 81.3 cms x 64.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal

Literature: André Breton in Guy Robert, Bellefleur: The Fervour of the Quest, Iconia, Montreal, 1988, page 101. Note: “A painting always comes out of the imagination, and it is always someone else’s imagination that the painter speaks to.” Painted during his last season in Paris, before his return to Montreal in the fall, Fin d’été depicts Bellefleur’s attempt to capture the ephemeral. Letting his inner world invade the canvas in an impromptu meeting of colours and lines, the painter masterfully gives form to fragments of his imagination.

$10,000–15,000

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26 JOHN GEOFFREY CARUTHERS LITTLE, R.C.A RUE ST. FRANÇOIS XAVIER MONTRÉAL oil on canvas signed; also signed, titled and dated ‘70 on the reverse 12 ins x 15 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $8,000–10,000

27 RITA MOUNT, A.R.C.A. A GATHERING CROWD, WINTER oil on canvas signed and indistinctly dated 20 ins x 22.25 ins; 55.9 cms x 50.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. Note: In this painting by Rita Mount, curiosity is sparked by an avian ami. A crowd gathers at the market – distracted from their mundane purchases and daily on-goings by the chirps and warbles of a trained bird. A flash of emerald green against the snow (given its colouration one would suspect the bird to be a green linnet or a parakeet), the cheerful bird’s song cuts through the cold of a winter day. Attended by its keeper, or bird fancier – whose dedication and ongoing enthusiasm helped to cultivate its mellow and musical tones – the small creature acts as a welcome music box for the community. See website for additional information. $7,000–9,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

28 JOHN KASYN, O.S.A. OLD HOUSES IN WINTER (EAST END), TORONTO oil on masonite signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 20 ins x 16 ins; 50.8 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $6,000–8,000

29 JOSEPH FRANCIS PLASKETT, R.C.A. ARTICHOKES oil on canvas signed and dated 1985 38.25 ins x 42 ins; 97.2 cms x 106.7 cms Provenance: Bau-Xi Gallery Ltd., Vancouver Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Joseph Plaskett, A Speaking Likeness, Ronsdale Press, Vancouver, 1999, pages 186-189, and 256. Note: For more than forty years, Joseph Plaskett painted still lifes and portraits in his studio in the Marais, which lies inside of Paris’ 3rd and 4th arrondissements. With its proximity to the city’s most venerable markets, including Les Halles, Plaskett’s studio was crowded with precious objects and natural wonders he purchased, was gifted, or found. Plaskett wrote quite passionately of his artistic relationship with food and flora in his 1999 memoir, A Speaking Likeness. He was also entranced by textures in nature, stating that the advantage of painting food was that “the good raw materials are there for both chef and painter to turn into masterpieces.” $8,000–12,000

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30 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. RINGWOOD, 1947 watercolour signed Sheet 15 ins x 18 ins; 38.1 cms x 45.7 cms; Image 14.25 ins x 16.25 ins; 36.2 cms x 41.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: A.J. Casson and Paul Duval (foreword), A.J. Casson: My Favourite Watercolours, 19191957, Cerebrus/Prentice Hall, Ontario, 1982, page 114 and page 115, reproduced in colour. $20,000–25,000

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Note: A.J. Casson was a founding member of the Canadian Society of Painters in Watercolour and many consider Casson’s watercolours to be among his finest works. Reminiscing about this lot in A.J. Casson: My Favourite Watercolours, Casson writes: “It was a very cold winter day when I began sketching this watercolour on the outskirts of Ringwood, just north of Markham. I was with my friend Joe Gauthier and neither of us had the inclination to remain outside too long, sketching in that weather. Accordingly, this painting was begun on location but finished in the comfort of my studio. This watercolour is, of course, another example of my interest in rural architecture and my fondness for scenes which were so typical of the life of the outskirts of Toronto at the time.”


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

31 DAVID BROWN MILNE PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS watercolour signed and dated 1939; titled and inscribed “David Milne” and “1939” on the reverse 15 ins x 19 ins; 38.1 cms x 48.3 cms Provenance: Douglas Duncan, Picture Loan Society, Toronto Art Gallery of Toronto Women’s Committee Collection of Lady Kemp, Toronto (1948) Laing Galleries, Toronto (1956) Collection of Percy Bower, Winnipeg (1967) By descent to his family Private Collection, Ontario $40,000–50,000

Exhibited: Recent Water Colours by David Milne, 11 - 24 January 1941, Picture Loan Society, Toronto, no. 13 Women’s Committee Purchase Sale Exhibition, 30 October - 04 November 1948, Art Gallery of Toronto Literature: David P. Silcox, Painting Place: the life and work of David B. Milne, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1996, pages 307-308 and page 309 for this lot, reproduced. David B. Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume II: 1929 - 1953, Toronto, 1998, page 702, no. 401.21 for a related drawing in the Milne Estate and for this lot, reproduced. Note: According to Silcox and Milne Jr.: “The subject (of this work) is the provincial legislature building at Queen’s Park, Toronto, seen from the south and lit by flood lighting at night. Milne painted an oil version in January 1940, Parliament Buildings at Queen’s Park, 401.42, and the building is in the background of Shrine and Saints I and II, 404.10-11.” Silcox refers to the period in which this lot was produced as a productive one for Milne, but it would be erroneous to view such painting as commonplace. In fact, Silcox notes: “The watercolours, which were now carrying all the freight of Milne’s thought, not only had to survive Milne’s severe editing and repainting process, but also had to run the gauntlet of (dealer Douglas) Duncan’s fussy critical eye and his commercial concerns... On 28 October 1940 he (Duncan) recorded that he had taken home a bundle of watercolours and destroyed 68 (mostly inferior versions).” It would be fair to surmise that those which remained - such as this lot - were among those that Duncan and Milne deemed superior.

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32 LIONEL LEMOINE FITZGERALD STILL-LIFE WITH APPLE oil on canvas, mounted to card 11.5 ins x 10 ins; 29.2 cms x 25.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Aurora, Ontario Note: In Still-Life with Apple, it is easy to see the influence of Cézanne, whose work FitzGerald once claimed to be his greatest help. FitzGerald first saw Cézanne’s works in person in 1930, during a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and began incorporating Cézanne’s pictorial devices into his still lifes in the late 1940s. Much like Cézanne, the tabletop in the work is tilted forward and the background space compressed, which seems to push the piece of fruit towards the picture plane and the viewer. Apples were one of FitzGerald’s favourite subjects and provided an endless source of formal investigation. He returned to this subject again and again. $8,000–12,000

33 TAKAO TANABE SCINTILLA oil on canvas signed and dated ‘56; also signed, titled and inscribed “Winnipeg” on the stretcher 18 ins x 34 ins; 45.7 cms x 86.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Vancouver (acquired directly from the artist) Canadian Fine Arts, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

Literature: Roald Nasgaard, “Adventures in Abstraction, or ‘Perhaps I was Always a Landscape Painter,’” in Takao Tanabe, Ian M. Thom, (ed.), Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, 2005, pages 38-42. Note: While in London circa 1953, Tanabe began his series of White Paintings, which he continued when he left London for Winnipeg in 1955. Tanabe used white in the paintings as a tool in what he called a formal “cleaning up” process, which he explained was a way to temper colours that were excessively full or opaque. Although the White Paintings are non-figurative, after completion Tanabe often saw them as landscapes and later referred to them as such. Their titles, usually taken from poetry he was reading, are often indicative of that. See Lot 24 for another work from this series.

$5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

34 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. LAKE OF TWO RIVERS, ALGONQUIN PARK, ONTARIO oil on board signed 9.5 ins x 11.25 ins; 23.5 cms x 29.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A.

Note: Algonquin Park with its rolling hills, clear lakes and rivers, rugged highlands and abundant wildlife have been a source of inspiration for many Canadian artists, including A.J. Casson, since its establishment in 1893. Casson visited Algonquin Park many times throughout his career and was particularly active there from 1942-1945. In this lot, Casson has selected a view of the hilly shoreline of Lake of Two Rivers which he depicts under a dramatic sky. The work reflects Casson’s characteristically considered composition and expert rendering of alternating bands of light and shadow. As Ian Dejardin notes, Casson’s contribution to the Canadian canon is work that “is always hugely attractive and technically adept, while steering clear of any rough edges.”

Literature: Ian A.C. Dejardin, Painting Canada: Tom Thomson and The Group of Seven, Philip Wilson Publishers Ltd., London, 2011, page 25. $20,000–30,000

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35 FREDERICK SIMPSON COBURN, R.C.A. THE COUNTRY DOCTOR oil on canvas signed and dated ‘37 14.5 ins x 17 ins; 36.8 cms x 43.2 cms Provenance: Loch Mayberry Fine Art Inc., Winnipeg Private Collection, Montreal Literature: Evelyn Lloyd Coburn, F. S. Coburn: Beyond the Landscape, The Boston Mills Press, North York, 1996, pages 75-89. Note: At certain points in his career, Coburn had supported himself as an illustrator, establishing his reputation with the 1897 publication of the illustrated volume of W. H. Drummond’s The Habitant. It is in an illustration from Drummond’s 1901 volume, Johnnie Courteau, that Coburn first approaches the subject of the country doctor. Coburn’s earlier illustrated work shows the development of a visual vocabulary for describing the lives and work of the people of Quebec which he used to advantage throughout his career. $8,000–10,000

36 MARC-AURÈLE DE FOY SUZOR-COTÉ, R.C.A. EFFET DU SOIR oil on board signed and dated 1908; inscribed “8 Septembre 1908/Oak Ridge, Virginia” and “Hommage à Mademoiselle B. Clark” on the reverse 8.5 ins x 10.25 ins; 22.2 cms x 26 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Nova Scotia Literature: Laurier Lacroix, Suzor-Coté: light and matter, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 2002, pages 182-184. Note: Suzor-Coté arrived in Oak Ridge, Virginia, in late August 1908, at the behest of railway magnate Thomas Fortune Ryan. Ryan, a passionate collector and the first American patron of Auguste Rodin, had purchased the sprawling Oak Ridge estate in 1901. Suzor-Coté was commissioned to decorate the breakfast room of the villa. He painted two large paintings and two lunettes depicting the surrounding views of the countryside. Effet du Soir was painted in the first few weeks of Suzor-Coté’s six-month stay and emphasizes the same luminous twilight that can be seen in some of the final landscapes. $7,000–9,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

37 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN, R.C.A. HARBOUR SCENE oil on panel signed 8.25 ins x 10.5 ins; 21 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Nova Scotia Literature: Crystal S. Parsons, Maurice Cullen and His Circle, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 2009. Note: Maurice Cullen arrived in Paris to study at the École des BeauxArts in 1888, when the Impressionists were at their height. When he returned to Canada seven years later, he brought their emphasis on light and atmospheric conditions with him. Cullen’s landscapes and urban scenes capture the light in all seasons, weather systems, and times of day. However, unlike the Impressionists, Cullen was uninterested in capturing fashion or leisure pursuits, instead focusing on the modernization and industrialization of urban centres. Though harbour scenes were an infrequent subject for Cullen, he painted their bustling views in Montreal, where he lived and worked, and in St. John’s, Newfoundland, where he painted in 1907 and annually from 1910-1912. $9,000–12,000

38 MARC-AURÈLE DE FOY SUZOR-COTÉ, R.C.A. LA LUNE BLEUE oil on board signed 2.75 ins x 4 ins; 7 cms x 9.5 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Nova Scotia $4,000–6,000

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39 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN, R.C.A. WINTER WOODS, LAC TREMBLANT oil on panel signed 10.5 ins x 13.75 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.9 cms Provenance: Joyner Fine Art Inc., Canadian Art Auction, November 1987 Private Collection, U.S.A. Literature: William R. Watson, Maurice Cullen, R.C.A.: A Record of Struggle and Achievements, Ryerson Press, Toronto, 1931, pages 25-31. Barry Lord, The History of Painting in Canada: Toward a People’s Art, NC Press, Toronto, 1974, pages 110 and 114. $12,000–18,000

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Note: Maurice Cullen, known as the father of Canadian Impressionism, studied in Paris from 1887 to 1895. When he first arrived there, it was his intention to master the practice of sculpture. However, he soon realized that he preferred to express himself in paint. Cullen’s impasto brushstrokes are not without traces of sculptural technique, however, as we see in Winter Woods, Lac Tremblant. Cullen achieved a degree of success while living in Europe, but upon returning to Montreal in 1895 found the Canadian market much more difficult to penetrate. It took a number of years for his work to attract any critical or popular attention. In 1920, Cullen realized his dream “to have a studio of my own, a shack in the mountains, an acre for a garden and every winter heavy with snow,” when he purchased a cabin at Lac Tremblant in the Laurentians. Gradually, Cullen’s landscapes began to gain favour among Canadian collectors. Ultimately, he exhibited often, and with great success. Winter Woods, Lac Tremblant is a remarkable example of the mature work that emerged from this period. Cullen preferred to work with a limited palette; rarely using more than eight colours and blending his own hues on the canvas. He has been described as an outstanding craftsman who “believed strongly in keeping the colours as separate as possible to achieve the balance between vision and subject by means of a well-defined interplay of light and dark hues.” Cullen Inventory No. 1472


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

40 FRANK HANS JOHNSTON, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. NORTHERN MORNING IN MARCH, IN THE NORTHERN NIPIGON COUNTRY oil on masonite signed; titled on the artist’s label on the reverse 24 ins x 36 ins; 61 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $30,000–40,000

Literature: Roger Burford Mason, A Grand Eye for Glory: The Life of Franz Johnston, Dundurn Press, Toronto/Oxford, 1998, page 62. Note: Burford astutely notes Johnston’s reputation as a painter who excelled in capturing “the elusive beauty of light effects.” Remarking on his northern paintings, Burford suggests: “Perhaps the thrill of danger and the isolation were an integral and necessary part of Johnston’s heady experience of painting the northland; numerous stories circulated in the press and among Toronto’s artistic community of his being lost in snow, or in impenetrable bush, or being snowed in with diminishing supplies. But whatever the case, he continued to study the nature of snow and light in painting trips in northern Quebec, and in the country around Lake Nipigon, throughout the 1930s, through which he developed his very special facility for painting the effect of light and shadow on snow, a theme which informs some of his most popular work from that period.” Whether the stories of northern hardship were authentic or a clever marketing tool, paintings such as this lot, nevertheless, irrefutably exemplify Johnston’s mastery of the effects of light and shadow on snow.

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41 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. PATTERSON SUGAR HOUSE, LACHUTE, QUE, MARCH 1965 oil on panel signed; also signed, titled, dated and inscribed “Reserved for Mrs. Porter” on the reverse 10.5 ins x 13.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.3 cms Provenance: Lawrence T. Porter Collection Sale, Joyner Fine Art, November 1987 Private Collection, U.S.A. $18,000–22,000

Literature: A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited, Toronto/Vancouver, 1958, page 56. William R. Watson, Recollections of a Montreal Art Dealer, Toronto, 1974, page 49. Dennis Reid, Alberta Rhythm: The Later Work of A.Y. Jackson, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1982, page 98. Note: Jackson frequently drew inspiration from Quebec, though as William Watson notes, the artist never stayed long in the city on his visits: “...he was generally in a hurry to get to the country and especially so in winter. He loved the old Quebec villages... and made superb rhythms with them.” Jackson’s own recollections of Quebec were fond ones, wherein jugfuls of cream, “chicken and maple syrup were much in evidence.” Dennis Reid notes that from March 20 until April 12, 1965, A.Y. Jackson was sketching in the Ottawa-Gatineau region while staying in Grenville, Quebec with friends. Given Grenville’s close proximity to Lachute, it seems plausible to surmise that Jackson executed this work during these spring months sugaring off season. This lot sold together with a photograph of the artist painting the work.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

42 KATHLEEN MOIR MORRIS, A.R.C.A. YELLOW HOUSE AT SAINT SAUVEUR, QUEBEC oil on panel signed (twice) 10.5 ins x 14 ins; 26.7 cms x 35.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario (acquired as a wedding gift directly from the artist, 1948) Private Collection, Ontario (by descent) $20,000–30,000

Note: Kathleen Moir Morris painted this charming oil sketch at Saint Sauveur, a community north-west of Montreal on one of her winter sketching trips. Her friend, A.Y. Jackson, told Morris that she was lucky to be painting in Quebec where good subject matter was everywhere to be found. Because of her physical inďŹ rmity, Morris would have to be taken by sleigh to the location and left to paint, dressed warmly and standing in the sleigh tracks if the snow was deep. A typical scene would feature a gathering of people outside a church or at market and include waiting horses, covered with brightly coloured blankets against the cold, hitched up to sleighs. The subject of this sketch is less common. Its focus is a typical house in rural Quebec and the winter activities that take place within its ambit (snow shoveling). It has a familiar quality for people living in a northern climate and the topography and bellcast roof identify the location as Quebec. The human quality that characterizes much of the work of the Beaver Hall artists sets it apart from their Group of Seven contemporaries. Undated, the work may have been painted in the 1930s. A work of this title was exhibited in the 1932 Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (R.C.A.) Annual Exhibition, in the 1938 R.C.A. Exhibition and in a four-woman show in the Print Room at the Art Gallery of Toronto in 1941 (with Mabel Lockerby, Pegi Nicol and Marian Scott), where it is dated 1934. Morris was an associate of the Royal Canadian Academy (1929) and also showed at the Art Association of Montreal, with the Ontario Society of Artists and the Canadian Group of Painters.

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43 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ALGOMA oil on board signed; also signed, titled and inscribed “Early sketch” on the reverse 10.5 ins x 13.75 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.9 cms Provenance: Laing Galleries, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario $80,000–100,000

Literature: Peter Larisey, A Portfolio of Landscapes by Lawren S. Harris, The National Gallery of Canada, Bulletin 23, 1974. Paul Duval, Canadian Impressionism, McClelland & Stewart Inc., Toronto, 1990, page 128, and page 129 for the closely related oil sketch by Franz Johnston, Painted Hillside, 1918, (McMichael Canadian Art Collection), reproduced in colour. Note: Early in 1918 Lawren Harris was suffering from a severe depression brought on by the death of his brother Howard who was killed in action overseas. The loss was felt all the more acutely since it followed closely on the death by drowning of Tom Thomson in July 1917. Harris was discharged from the army for health reasons on May 1, 1918 and moved to his cottage near Lake Simcoe to recuperate. His friend, Dr. James MacCallum suggested that they take a sketching trip to Algoma to help in Harris’s recovery. This trip, Harris’s first to Algoma, began a fertile and important period of landscape painting for the artist and led to his organizing six subsequent trips to the region for himself and other members of the Group of Seven between September 1918 and autumn 1921. This is possibly one of the sketches Harris made on that first trip to Algoma in the spring of 1918. The location has been identified as “Algoma,” and “Early sketch” has been inscribed on the verso. In the exhibition “Algoma Sketches and Pictures by J.E.H. MacDonald, ARCA; Lawren Harris, Frank H. Johnston” held in April-May 1919 at the Art Gallery of Toronto, Harris showed two canvases and forty-six oil sketches, including six identified simply as “Spring 1918.” This oil sketch is not characteristic of what Peter Larisey calls the “wall of wilderness” compositions that characterize Harris’s early Algoma work, nor of the more expansive later examples. However, the spring-like palette of fresh greens broken up by pink strokes of granite could well have been Harris’s first impression of a region as yet unexplored by him. While this lot is undated, it shares many of the characteristics of a related work by Franz Johnston executed in 1918 entitled Patterned Hillside. Like this lot, the Johnston sketch shows a strong influence of Impressionism in its colouration and use of open brushwork.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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44 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. LIGHTHOUSE AT BRONTE, 1927 oil on board signed; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse 9.25 ins x 11.25 ins; 22.9 cms x 27.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Nova Scotia $40,000–50,000

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Literature: Christopher E. Jackson, A. J. Casson: An Artist’s Life, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg, 1998. Note: Lighthouse at Bronte was painted following the defining year of Casson’s career. In 1926, not only was Casson made a member of the Group of Seven, he was also elected associate of the Royal Canadian Academy and founded the Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour. Casson had been associated with the Group for six years, and by this time he was a firmly established artist. He was exhibiting regularly and was already represented in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada. Upon joining the Group, Casson became wary of their strong influence and took measures to maintain his own style. When selecting sketching locations, Casson focused on rural towns and villages in Ontario as a way to develop his own niche. Lighthouse at Bronte was painted in Bronte Village in Oakville, one of the oldest communities in Ontario.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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45 WILLIAM KURELEK, R.C.A. THE SKATING PARTY mixed media on masonite signed with initials and dated ‘76; titled on the reverse 7.5 ins x 11.75 ins; 19.1 cms x 29.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: William Kurelek, Someone With Me, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 1973, page 127. $25,000–30,000

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Note: Snow scenes number among William Kurelek’s most popular and beloved subjects. The Skating Party brings many generations of a family together in a playful narrative. Teetering on skates, both the old and the young tumble and zip across the ice clad in warm, vividly-coloured winter wear. While some are sure-footed on the slippery, blue surface, others are encouraged or supported by their loved ones to hold firm to their balance. There is an excitement and an energy to the wintry scene, a feeling of love and camaraderie, that remains unfettered by the cold. Recalling his own childhood experiences of winter on the Manitoba prairies, Kurelek writes, “When (the blizzard is) over, there is an equally dramatic aftermath! A crystal clear sky and temperature down to 40 degrees or so below zero. The air is so crisp, clear and still that sounds carry in it like magic...” In The Skating Party, Kurelek takes the bitter out of the cold and replaces it with a magical, warm-glow usually reserved to a cup (or two) of cocoa.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

46 JEAN-PHILIPPE DALLAIRE STILL LIFE oil on canvas signed; also signed and inscribed “Painting” on the reverse

Note: Dallaire’s love affair with France began early in his artistic career when, following one of the first showings of his works in 1938, he departed for studies at the Atelier d’art sacré and l’Académie André Lhote. While in Paris, Dallaire was confronted by Cubism and Surrealism in the works of painters such as Joan Miró and Pablo Picasso. These styles would go on to influence Dallaire’s oeuvre, amalgamating with the artist’s sensible, workingclass beginnings to culminate in a humanistic approach to modernism.

21 ins x 25.75 ins; 61.6 cms x 64.8 cms Provenance: Dominion Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Ontario

In contrast to the often impersonal qualities of these modern styles, Dallaire’s works are festive and highly personal. Dallaire used the strategies of abstraction to feel liberated in his work: transforming highly schematized forms into rich and animated representations.

Literature: Guy Robert, Dallaire, Éditions FranceAmérique, Montreal, 1980, page 111.

Michèle Grandbois writes, “Dans la nature luxuriante qui baigne des scènes aux couleurs chatoyantes, la douceur de vivre s’empare des hommes et des femmes, d’ici et d’ailleurs, d’un autre siècle très certainement.”

Michèle Grandbois, Dallaire (catalogue), Musée du Québec, Québec, 1999, pages 114 and 151.

This painting bears a strong resemblance to still lifes which we know the artist to have executed during his time in Vence, France, where he lived from 1959 until his passing in 1965. Comparisons indicate that the work was most likely painted during the later portion of this timeframe. The work was entered into the Dominion Gallery inventory books in 1964, alongside fifty-five other Dallaire works that came into the gallery between November 1963 and August 1965. Given the gallery’s contract system, which provided monthly payments to artists in exchange for an agreed upon number of works, one may speculate that this painting was acquired by Max Stern directly from Dallaire himself.

$20,000–30,000

Inspired by the light, the plentifulness, and the colours of the Mediterranean, there is a spontaneity and an edginess to this still life which evokes both Cézanne and Braque. “À Vence,” says Grandbois, “Jean Dallaire s’abandonne entièrement au ludisme de la couleur, de la ligne et de la texture...”

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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47 JEAN-PAUL RIOPELLE, R.C.A. SANS TITRE, 1955 watercolours and inks on paper, marouflé signed and dated ‘55

Note: The catalogue raisonné for Riopelle records approximately 60 ink and watercolour works by the artist for the year 1955. The size of this lot places it among the largest works in this medium.

Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal

Monique Brunet-Weinmann notes that for the most part these watercolour and ink works were produced at Belle-Île-en-Mer, Riopelle’s summer painting locale from 1947. In contrast to the masculine oil paintings of the mid-fifties, Brunet-Weinmann describes these works on paper as lyrical, delicate, sensitive and fragile. They are, of course, all these things and more, making them strongly sought after by collectors.

Exhibited: Galerie Didier Imbert, (possibly) 1990, cat. no. 121 Riopelle, Centro de Exposiciones y Congresos, Museo Camon Aznar, Saragosse, Spain, 18 october - 22 november, 1991, cat. no. 41

Whether they may be described as “aquatiques” or “aériens” (aquatic or aerial), fragile or lyrical, it is hard not to agree with Patrick Waldberg “(qui) parle joliment des aquarelles et des dessins qu’il considère avec justesse l‘indispensables à l’intelligence de sa peinture. [...] Là, se discerne plus aisément le cheminement vers la transparence, l’intime fusion des souvenirs, bribes de réalité fugace teintée par l’émotion, qui jaillissent dans un éblouissement de phosphènes à travers les mailles de l’ombre.”

Literature: Yseult Riopelle, (ed.), Jean-Paul Riopelle, Catalogue Raisonné, Tome 2, 1954-1959, Hibou, 2004, pages 52-54.

It was in 1955, the year this work was executed, that Riopelle first met fellow artist Joan Mitchell who would later become his companion of many years.

27 ins x 60 ins; 55 cms x 124 cms

$80,000–120,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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48 GERSHON ISKOWITZ, R.C.A. SUMMER PAINTING #2, 1972 acrylic on canvas signed and titled on the reverse 44 ins x 32 ins; 111.8 cms x 81.3 cms Provenance: Gallery Moos Ltd., Toronto Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Roald Nasgaard, “Toronto: The Second Generation, 1960s,” in Abstract Painting in Canada, Douglas & McIntyre and Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Vancouver and Halifax, 2007, page 244. Roald Nasgaard, “Gershon Iskowitz,” in The Gershon Iskowitz Prize 1986 to 2006, Laurel MacMillan, (ed.), Library and Archives Canada and The Gershon Iskowitz Foundation, Toronto and Ottawa, 2009, pages 9 and 12. $20,000–30,000

Note: When asked why he painted, Gershon Iskowitz replied simply “I needed it for my sanity;” a necessity that was precipitated by his experience in the Nazi concentration camps at Dachau during the Second World War. Liberated by the Americans in 1944, Iskowitz managed to survive internment and in 1949 emigrated to Toronto. The rest of his family were killed however, and the horrors of this and other painful Holocaust memories continued to haunt his work and life after his move to Canada. Iskowitz gradually turned to landscape painting in the early 1950s and after receiving a Canada Council travel grant in 1967, he organized a helicopter ride from Winnipeg to Churchill, Manitoba. This is often cited as a seminal moment in Iskowitz’s career, as after this trip new colour arrangements and spatial patterns began to emerge in his work. The last remaining signs of representational form can be seen in his works from 1972, with subsequent paintings being purely abstract in form and content. The Summer Painting from 1972 is indicative of this transitional period in his career. The bright blue background both grounds the piece with a sense of lightheartedness and serves to balance the fervor of the irregular shapes which accent the painting. When combined, the abstract forms conjure the dreamy qualities of summer, with the lush possibilities of summer nights being hinted at by the touches of grey. The German philosopher Theodor W. Adorno’s oft-quoted phrase that “to write lyric poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric” is salient in the ongoing critique of Iskowitz’s work. A common interpretation of his work follows that his use of bright, electric colours and abstracted landscape imagery is his method of psychological and emotional healing. Yet his response to the controversy surrounding a Holocaust film complicates this reading. He stated that “if you showed it the way it really was, you wouldn’t be able to watch it for a second.” His work can thus be understood as an attempt at confronting the paradox of artistic representation: that is the tense negotiation that exists between aesthetic pleasure and the reality of the events being depicted. Chosen to represent Canada at the Venice Biennale in 1972, his paintings illustrate a colourful and jubilant Canada. Portraying an image in which dread and darkness have been subsumed by brightness and hope; a radical idea considering the grim political climate of the time. Summer Painting is a painting of summer, a painting of Iskowitz’s tragic past, a painting of the wars, strife and conflict that coloured the year of 1972, it is a painting that reminds viewers that while it celebrates the art of painting, it also celebrates the promise of life.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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49 PETER CLAPHAM SHEPPARD, O.S.A., R.C.A. THE MARKET, NOVEMBER oil on canvas signed 24 ins x 30 ins; 61.6 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist Private Collection, Ontario Exhibited: 51st Annual Spring Exhibition, 19 April-13 May, Art Association of Montreal, Montreal, 1934, no. 318. Literature: A. H. Robson, Canadian Landscape Painters, Ryerson Press, Toronto, 1932, page 164. Colin S. MacDonald, A Dictionary of Canadian Artists, 3rd edition, Canadian Paperbacks, Ottawa, 1975. Evelyn de Rostaing McMann, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Spring Exhibitions 1880-1970, University of Toronto Press, Toronto/Buffalo/London, 1988, page 350 for The Market, November listed. $40,000–50,000

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Note: Toronto-born Peter Clapham Sheppard served as an apprentice lithographer before training as a painter under George Reid, John William Beatty, and William Cruickshank at the Central Ontario School of Art and Design and the Ontario College of Art. After 1912, he set off to travel throughout Europe and the United States. He became a member of the Ontario Society of Artists in 1918 and an Associate of the Royal Academy in 1929, exhibiting regularly with both organizations alongside contemporaries such as J.E.H. MacDonald, Tom Thomson, and Frederick Varley. Sheppard worked in oil, watercolour, and pencil to depict the landscapes and cityscapes he observed in Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Ontario. Developing a wide range of subject matter and figure groupings, he focused his compositions on capturing urban and industrial activities in cities like New York, Montreal, Toronto, and Ottawa. The bustle and small economy of the marketplace is a subject he approached in a number of ways in his maturity as a painter. The Market exhibits many of the facets of Canadian Impressionism while reinterpreting the lessons he had taken from European Symbolism and Expressionism. At the height of his renown in Canada, Sheppard was invited to participate in a number of international exhibitions: the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley (1925); L’Exposition d’Art Canadien in Paris (1927); and the New York World’s Fair (1939). Today, his work is represented in the collections of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Canadian War Museum and the National Gallery of Canada. While there is an R.C.A. exhibition label attached to the back of the frame which gives the title of the painting, there is no painting listed for the R.C.A. exhibitions from this period that precisely corresponds. There are other market scenes that were shown at the R.C.A. at this time including Fruit Market (exhibited in 1933) and Hamilton Market (exhibited in 1934). However, a work of this same title is listed as having been included in the records for the 1934 A.A.M. exhibition.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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50 KATHLEEN MOIR MORRIS, A.R.C.A. HORSE DRAWN CARRIAGES, WINTER oil on canvas signed 21.5 ins x 18 ins; 54.6 cms x 45.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario (aquired as a gift directly from the artist circa 1963) Private Collection, Ontario (by descent) $80,000–120,000

Note: Kathleen Moir Morris was primarily a painter of winter scenes. Born into Montreal’s Anglophone establishment, she studied at the Art Association of Montreal with William Brymner and Maurice Cullen around 1906, sketching outdoors with Cullen and Robert Pilot until 1917. That she worked en plein air in the middle of winter was remarkable considering that she suffered from a congenital condition which impaired her speech and coordination throughout her life. It was at the Art Association that she met Sarah Robertson, Anne Savage, Mabel May and Lilias Torrance Newton who would join together with other artists in 1920 to form the Beaver Hall Group. Morris would be affiliated with the group. Although the group lasted only a short time officially, the women members continued to exhibit together and support each other’s creative endeavours long after the group disbanded in 1922. Their work included landscapes of Quebec, but unlike the wilderness versions painted by the Group of Seven, their landscapes often contained a human presence. This lot is typical of Morris’s subject matter which included urban streets, picturesque Quebec towns, the Laurentians, and the market in Ottawa where she lived from 1923 to 29. In Ottawa she was encouraged by Eric Brown, director of the National Gallery of Canada, who bought one of her pictures for the collection in 1924. Morris’s work captured the culture of everyday life in rural Quebec and later, in the streets of Montreal where she returned to live in 1929. Morris’s post-impressionist style shows the influence of J.W. Morrice (particularly his Quebec scenes) whose work she admired. This canvas is unusual in her oeuvre in that the entire upper half of the canvas is given over to a skillful rendering of the distant landscape. The vertiginous viewpoint may be the result of Morris painting from an upper storey window. She was praised by critics for her use of colour; here, the brightly coloured buildings enliven the composition which is otherwise restricted to various tones of blue and white. In the past, Morris and her work have received less attention than many of her contemporaries; however, she is well represented in The Beaver Hall Group: 1920s Modernism in Montreal, an exhibition held at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts from October 24, 2015 to January 31, 2016 and continuing to other venues.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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51 JOHN WILLIAM BEATTY, O.S.A., R.C.A. WINTER LANDSCAPE oil on canvas 18 ins x 22 ins; 45.7 cms x 55.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: David Silcox, The Group of Seven and Tom Thomson, Firefly Books, Richmond Hill, 2003, page 22. $20,000–30,000

Note: Beatty’s early paintings were heavily influenced by the Dutch school, like many of his Canadian colleagues in the first decade of the twentieth century. However, by the mid-teens and into the following decades, Beatty began to employ the characteristically brighter palette of the circle of painters who orbited, or were to become, the Group of Seven. This was, perhaps, inevitable as Beatty was intimately involved in the discourse that gave birth to the emerging nationalistic school of art and had, prior to the Group’s formation, been “staking claims that were similar to the Group’s,” according to David Silcox. Beatty was very much part of the milieu of the most forward thinking painters of the day. He knew Lawren Harris as early as 1911 and it was he who helped Harris get elected as a member of the O.S.A. When the Studio Building was erected in 1913, he was among its first tenants. In cooperation with MacDonald, Beatty helped raise the cairn to Thomson after he drowned in Canoe Lake. And it was Beatty who nominated J.E.H. MacDonald for membership in the R.C.A. in 1931. The overlapping membership in both art societies as well as the Arts & Letters Club meant Beatty could not help but contribute to the emerging state of mind as it related to a new national school of art and certainly by 1913 he was a “convert from Dutch to Canadian Art, a born again prophet of the new nationalism.” Furthermore, just as the O.S.A. had acquired works by MacDonald, Lismer and Jackson for the province of Ontario from 19111913, so Beatty had paintings selected for the Ontario Collection every year from 1909-1913 (that is, until he resigned from the O.S.A.). Therefore, it is somewhat puzzling that Beatty’s star did not rise in parallel with the fortunes of the Group, although increasingly he has come to the attention of observant collectors. It is possible that his assertive mien did not easily accommodate itself to the gentler personalities of Harris, MacDonald, Lismer and perhaps even collectors, too. In Winter Landscape, Beatty demonstrates particularly beautiful handling of colour harmonies, and his controlled though vigorous brushwork teases out a timeless georgic energy, remarkable given the season, that makes an otherwise placid prospect - a farm asleep under a blanket of snow intensely alive. The snow is melting; spring is imminent. According to the owner, a note attached to this work when purchased stated that it once hung at Parkwood Estate in the Collection of Colonel Robert Samuel McLaughlin.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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52 CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF STREAM ON NORTH SHORE BELOW QUEBEC oil on canvas signed and dated 1867, titled under the mat diameter 15 ins; 38.1 cms Provenance: Laing Galleries, Toronto Kaspar Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $60,000–80,000

Literature: G. Blair Laing, Memoirs of an Art Dealer, Volume 2, McClelland and Stewart, Toronto, 1982, page 33, colour plate 9 for In the Jardin des Cariboux, Fifty Miles Below Quebec. J. Russell Harper, Krieghoff, Key Porter Books, Toronto, 1999, page 153. Dennis Reid, Krieghoff: Images of Canada, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver/Toronto, 1999, page 145 for Winter Scene in the Laurentians The Laval River, 1867, reproduced in colour. Note: It is widely known that Krieghoff, like many historical artists, returned to specific themes that were either very popular and sold well - among which could be counted his portraits of Indian basket and berry sellers or Indian hunters on snowshoe - or with which he had particularly positive associations. Stream on the North Shore could be included among both categories and is a variant of other works of this subject dating back to circa 1860. Barbeau identifies just six such works - only two of which are circular in shape - with this theme, each with variations in the staffage or composition so typical of Krieghoff. Nonetheless, the fact that there are other closely related versions does not seem to have diminished their appeal and desirability. A very closely related composition from circa 1860 entitled In the Jardin des Cariboux, Fifty Miles Below Quebec was used by Blair Laing to illustrate the chapter on Krieghoff in his two volume memoir. A larger related scene from the same date as this lot forms part of the Thomson Collection, and was earlier owned by Lord Strathcona, the railway magnate who drove the last spike at the Craigellachie. And yet another, Winter Landscape, Laval may now be found in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada. This work shares much in common with all of these works. The narrative is situated on the surface of a frozen river or stream which emerges from a deep Laurentian valley, an isolated spot illuminated by a clear blue Canadian sky under which two groups meet. Sometimes they are there coincidentally to take on water from a hole smashed into the ice, and sometimes, it would seem as though a rendezvous has been pre-arranged in order to catch up on local news.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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53 GEORGE THÉODORE BERTHON, R.C.A. PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG LADY (ALSO KNOWN AS MRS. JOHN BEVERLEY ROBINSON, 1845) oil on canvas signed and dated 1845 23 ins x 17.25 ins; 58.4 cms x 43.8 cms Provenance: G. Blair Laing Limited, Toronto The Loeb Collection, Aylmer, Quebec Private Collection, Montreal $30,000–40,000

Exhibited: The Mr. and Mrs. Jules Loeb Collection, A Travelling Exhibition prepared by Pierre Théberge, Curator of Contemporary Canadian Art, The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1970-71: Sir George Williams University, Montreal, 01 September - 30 September 1970, The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 15 October - 15 November 1970, Winnipeg Art Gallery, 15 January - 15 February 1971, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 01 March - 31 March 1971, Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon, 15 April - 15 May 1971, The Art Gallery of Windsor, 01 June - 30 June 1971, Université de Sherbrooke, 15 July - 15 August 1971, Beaverbrook Art Gallery, Fredericton, 01 September - 30 September 1971 Literature: Pierre Théberge, The Mr. and Mrs. Jules Loeb Collection (catalogue), The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1970-71, unpaginated, cat. no. 4, reproduced. Dennis Reid, A Concise History of Canadian Painting, 3rd Edition, Oxford University Press, Toronto, 2012, page 33, fig. 2.11, for Mrs William Henry Boulton, 1846 (collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario), reproduced in colour. Note: George Berthon was born in the Royal Palace of Vienna and was the son of René Théodore Berthon, court painter to Napoleon I. He emigrated to Canada in 1841 and established himself in Toronto by 1844 executing portraits of Bishops, Mayors and Chief Justices. As portrait painter to the upper echelons of the Canadian Establishment, Berthon’s works figure prominently in major collections such as that of the Art Gallery of Ontario (The Three Robinson Sisters) and Law Society of Upper Canada (Portrait of Sir John Beverley Robinson, Chief Justice of Upper Canada - which is considered to be his masterpiece). In the 1971 exhibition of the Loeb collection organized by Pierre Théberge, the sitter of this work was described as the wife of John Beverley Robinson (1791-1863), Chief Justice of Upper Canada, 1830-1862. However, scholarship on pre-Confederation art is always evolving and countless other works by artists from this period have been misidentified or misattributed in the past. At the time of the 1971 Loeb traveling exhibition, Berthon’s record books from the artist’s family had not yet been made public. With this information now available, the sitter has since been identified as Mrs. James Lukin Robinson, John Beverley Robinson’s daughter-in-law who married James Lukin Robinson (1818-1894) in 1845 – the year this work was executed. Like the portrait in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario of Mrs William Henry Boulton, 1846, with which it shares many affinities – pose, posture, setting, attention to detail, oval format and size – this could also be a wedding portrait. James Lukin Robinson’s bride, Elizabeth Arnold, was daughter to John Arnold. Her husband, John Beverley Robinson’s first son, would become 2nd Baronet in 1863.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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54 FREDERICK ARTHUR VERNER, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. OJIBWAY CAMP AT NORTHWEST ANGLE, LAKE OF THE WOODS oil on canvas signed and dated 1874 14 ins x 28 ins; 35.6 cms x 71.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. Literature: Joan Murray, The Last Buffalo: The Story of Frederick Arthur Verner, Painter of the Canadian West, Pagurian Press, Toronto, 1984, page 53-62. $25,000–30,000

Note: Joan Murray writes that “according to family legend,” Verner’s first contact with the Ojibway people took place in 1862, his second in 1870, his third in 1873 and his fourth around 1890. Of these trips, however, Murray notes there are only two that are actually documented: Verner’s trip in 1873 during which time he made and dated a number of sketches (including Figure 1) which would become crucial to his output, and the circa 1890 trip. Murray notes that during the 1873 trip, which he likely embarked upon following the O.S.A. Spring Exhibition of that year, “Verner drew five very important sketches of Indians from life. They were to become sources to which he would refer again and again. (Figure 1) is the first of this series” and is the sketch on which Lot 54 is directly based. Murray describes the 1873 trip west as “the most important event of (Verner’s) life.” She continues: “Verner devoted 1874 to developing a number of canvases based on the small sketches he had drawn at Lake of the Woods.” Referring to Verner’s submission to the June 1874 O.S.A. Exhibition, Murray notes: “To round out his repertory he showed some unsold paintings from 1873. Ojibway camp, Northern Shore of Lake Huron (1873, National Gallery of Canada) is probably (italics ours) Ojibway Camp of the North West Angle of the Lake of the Woods.” We can now refute this supposition as, indeed, the painting submitted to that exhibition was almost assuredly this lot. The Northwest Angle of Lake of the Woods is the northernmost part of the lake contiguous to the United States and, as such, served as a contentious area in treaties defining the international border of this “fifth” Great Lake. The so-called Treaty #3 was signed by Lt. Governor of Manitoba, Alexander Morrison, on behalf of the crown at the North West Angle around the time of Verner’s 1873 trip. Unlike other treaties involving the First Nations, which often needed to be revised, Treaty #3 shaped the treaties which followed and seems to have created a more enduring peace.

Lake the Woods, 1873, graphite and watercolour on paper, 14.2 x 30 cm. Verner drew five very important sketches of Indians from life. They were to become sources to which he would refer again and again. This sketch is the first of the series. Collection of the National Gallery of Canada.

Figure 1.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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55 CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF INDIAN CAMP oil on canvas 13 ins x 18.75 ins; 33 cms x 47.6 cms Provenance: Senator John Wilson, Ontario Edward Bayley, Toronto, nephew of Senator Wilson (by descent) Miss Geneva Jackson, Kitchener Carroll Fine Arts Limited, Toronto Kaspar Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto Exhibited: Exhibition of Cornelius Krieghoff, The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1934 $40,000–60,000

Literature: Marius Barbeau, Cornelius Krieghoff, Pioneer Painter of North America, Toronto, 1934, page 132, listed. Dennis Reid, “Cornelius Krieghoff: The Development of the Canadian Artist,” in Images of Canada, Dennis Reid, (ed.), Douglas & McIntyre and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1999, pages 44-47, 55, 58, 60, 78-79, 83, and 86. Ramsey Cook, “The Outsider as Insider: Cornelius Krieghoff’s Art of Describing,” in Images of Canada, Dennis Reid, (ed.), Douglas & McIntyre and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1999, pages 145-147, 149, 152, 156, and 163. François-Marc Gagnon, “Perceiving the Other: French Canadian and Indian Iconography in the work of Cornelius Kreighoff,” in Images of Canada, Dennis Reid, (ed.), Douglas & McIntyre and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1999, pages 208-211, 226-229, and 231-232. Note: Arriving in Montreal in 1840 from Amsterdam, by way of the United States, Cornelius Krieghoff became an important cultural figure in Canadian art history. His images have been central to the creation of a collective consciousness about our past. His depictions of rural French Canadian life, First Nations peoples and the grandiose forests have been used to narrate a Canadian timeline, one that romanticizes the hard working and austere lifestyle of the peasant farmer in the path towards progress, Confederation and industrial revolution in Canada. Between 1841 and 1867 Canada evolved from colony to fully fledged country. Krieghoff was instrumental in documenting this rapidly changing climate, insofar as he did not actually record the urbanization and industrialization that was occurring at the time. Instead, he focused primarily on the rural Francophone and Native population that was being slowly eclipsed by English colonization, elevating such themes in the process. Krieghoff’s precise renderings evidence his artistic training in Dutch and German genre painting, yet his choice of subject matter and his conscious decision to portray the human condition within his work largely differentiates Krieghoff from his contemporaries, who concentrated mainly on sacred, historical, and formal portrait subject matter. In Indian Camp we see Krieghoff’s background in German Romanticism, whereby the natural world is pictured as a sublime force, insurmountable and impenetrable by human endeavours. The Indians pictured in the foreground are represented almost as part of the landscape, working and living harmoniously with nature. The two women figures appear lost in conversation, unaware of Krieghoff’s painterly interjection. Krieghoff admired the simplicity of life he associated with Native Americans, viewing his representations as positive affirmations of a primitive life untouched by civilization. According to Marius Barbeau, the work was painted circa 1843-6, and is considered by him to be one of the earliest Krieghoff pictures.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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56 CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF HURON INDIAN TRAPPER ON SNOWSHOES, CA. 1859

Literature: Dennis Reid, Krieghoff: Images of Canada, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1999, page 82.

oil on canvas signed

Note: Small oils such as this lot depicting Indian hunters on snowshoes or Indian moccasin and basket sellers are so readily identifiable as Krieghoff, that they can mistakenly be viewed as commonplace.

11.25 ins x 9.25 ins; 28.6 cms x 23.5 cms Provenance: Walter Klinkhoff Gallery Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Ontario $20,000–30,000

However, while Krieghoff did produce a quantity of such works which appear to be virtually interchangeable, Dennis Reid cautions us that, in fact, such works can and do have “significant variations in the landscape, the clothing, the accoutrements, or direction of movement of the figure.” Reid continues: “Krieghoff’s single figures are stereotypes certainly, but in the portrayal of habitants he not infrequently strives to capture a specific quality of personality rather than a general type.” It is for these seemingly paradoxical qualities - their recognizability and individuality - that these works hold enduring appeal for collectors.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

57 PAUL PEEL, R.C.A. PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN oil on canvas signed and dated 1885 9.75 ins x 8 ins; 19.7 cms x 24.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Victoria Baker, Paul Peel: A Retrospective, 1860-1892 (catalogue), London Regional Art Gallery, London, 1986, pages 40-41, page 41, Fig. 9 for a photograph featuring the artist’s sister, Mildred, reproduced; page 86, cat. no. 37 for Portrait of Isaure Verdier Peel, 1886 (collection of London Public Library & Art Museum, London), reproduced in colour; page 113, cat. no. 22 for Reading the Future (collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery), reproduced; page 119, cat. no. 28 for The Artist’s Wife, 1885 (collection of Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Oshawa), reproduced; and page 127, cat. no. 36 for Portrait of the Artist’s Wife (collection of the National Gallery of Canada), reproduced.

Note: In the summer of 1885, Peel became engaged to Danish-born painter Isaure Verdier. Given the date of this work, it is reasonable to assume the sitter is his fiancée. Victoria Baker writes: “As with other members of his family, Peel gave expression to his close personal relationship with Isaure in his art. Between 1885 and 1886 he executed at least three portraits of her.” While this lot is not one of those three recorded portraits, like his drawing of her of the same year in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Peel is successful in expressing “a more introspective side of (the sitter’s) personality.” While the date would suggest Isaure as the most likely subject, the figure also bears a resemblance to Peel’s younger sister Clara Louise as depicted in Reading the Future (collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery). Still other experts have speculated that the sitter could be Peel’s sister Mildred, who accompanied the artist back to Paris in December 1883. The siblings spent the summers of 1884 and 1885 in Pont-Aven, where Peel subsequently met Verdier. Mildred Peel is identified as the model for several oil studies from this period.

$25,000–30,000

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58 PAUL PEEL, R.C.A. ST. BERNARD

59 LAURA ADELINE MUNTZ LYALL, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. PORTRAIT OF A CHILD

oil on canvas

oil on canvas signed and dated 1907

14.75 ins x 13.25 ins; 35.6 cms x 31.8 cms 16.25 ins x 14.25 ins; 76.2 cms x 101.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. Exhibited: London Western Art Fair, September 1876 Hood’s Art Gallery, London, Ontario, April 1877 Paul Peel: A Boy and a Dog, Museum London, 2009 Literature: Victoria Baker, Paul Peel: A Retrospective, 1860-1892 (catalogue), London Regional Art Gallery, London, 1986, page 13. Note: Paul Peel was a child prodigy. With an enthusiasm bordering on zealousness, his father encouraged him to submit his earliest work for exhibition at regional art fairs. In September 1876, Peel entered this lot into the London Western Fair and won first prize in the amateur class. St. Bernard “went missing” for more than 130 years until it was brought to the attention of Igor Holubizky at Museum London. In 1887 Peel had been accepted to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Holubizky speculates that “a possible scenario is that Peel took the painting with him to Philadelphia, as an example of his work, for academy entrance, and because it was small enough to carry.”

Provenance: Private Collection, United Kingdom Literature: Joan Murray, Laura Muntz Lyall: Impressions of Women and Childhood, McGill-Queen’s University Press, Montreal and Kingston, 2012, pages x, 3-5, 7, 9-10, 15-16, 28, 31-32, and 42. Note: Lyall trained with some of the leading artists at the time, both at home and abroad, becoming familiar with the pre-Raphaelites and Impressionists whilst in London and Paris, respectively. While her paintings portray a romanticized and idealized image of youth, she gives a sense of personality to her sitters through an individualized and intimate approach. In Portrait of a Child from 1907, Lyall has isolated her subject against a dark background, a compositional style characteristic of her work. Staring intently at a subject off canvas, the child’s gaze engrosses the viewer and we are reminded of that childlike sense of wonder that is gradually lost as we age. By 1910, Lyall had moved on to symbolic and allegorical pictures of mother and child, or Madonna and Child, and this painting from 1907 can be seen as an early precursor of that thematic shift within her work. See website for additional information.

See website for additional information. $6,000–8,000 $5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

60 FLORENCE CARLYLE, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. THE STORY oil on canvas signed 29.75 ins x 19 ins; 75.6 cms x 48.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Exhibited: 34th Annual Exhibition of the Royal Canadian Academy of the Arts, Victoria Memorial Museum, Ottawa, 28 November 1912, no. 43 Ontario Society of Artists 41st Annual Open Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture, Art Gallery of Toronto, Toronto, 05 April - 26 April 1913, no. 21 Canadian National Exhibition, Department of Fine Arts, Toronto, 24 August - 09 September 1912, no. 251 $12,000–15,000

Literature: 34th Annual Exhibition of the Royal Canadian Academy of the Arts, Victoria Memorial Museum, Ottawa, 28 November 1912, page 11, cat. no. 43, for The Story, listed. Toronto Mail and Empire, 05 April 1913. Fergus Kyle, “The Ontario Society of Artists,” in The Year Book of Canadian Art 1913, J.M. Dent & Sons, Limited, 1913, London and Toronto, page 182. Ontario Society of Artists 41st Annual Open Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture (catalogue), 1913, page 11, cat. no. 21, for The Story, listed. Florence Carlyle in letter to O.B. Graves, Toronto, 06 December 1922, Artist Files, LRAGHM. Note: Florence Carlyle first exhibited The Story at the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts Annual Exhibition of 1912. The female figure in The Story closely resembles the attentive listener present in a later painting entitled The Guest, Venice, leading one to speculate that the sitter in Carlyle’s 1912 painting is the sitter in the later work, Miss Judith Hastings, Carlyle’s close companion of many years. The Toronto Mail and Empire review of the 1913 exhibition of this work asserted, “Miss Carlyle always conceives splendid effects in color and light.” In a separate review from later on in the exhibition’s run, Fergus Kyle wrote, “...an undoubted advance was made in other subjects. Notable among these are Florence Carlyle’s The Story, a problem in the handling of daylight and candlelight in their play upon a costume of ruddy velvet.” Of both this work and The Threshold, he said, “there was evidence of splendid technique and the atmosphere of human interest which made them pictures, not mere studies.” The work was first purchased in 1922, as indicated in a letter from the artist to her dealer, O.B. Graves, advising him to proceed with the sale: “This is my decision... I will sell The White Flower for $300... and The Story for $175.” See website for additional information.

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61 HOMER RANSFORD WATSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. HOMEWARD BOUND oil on canvas, mounted to board signed 34 ins x 48 ins; 120.7 cms x 85.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: J. Russell Harper, “The Dignity of Labour,” in Painting in Canada: A History, 2nd edition, University of Toronto Press, Toronto and Buffalo, 1977, pages 201208. $10,000–15,000

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Note: Homer Watson’s work characteristically heroizes the industrious pioneer and farmer, who by taming the virgin wilderness and building a prosperous homestead, contributes to the progress and settlement of the nation. Trips to New York and France exposed him to leading American landscape techniques and the Barbizon school, yet Watson’s primary subject matter was his hometown of Doon, now Kitchener, Ontario. Watson was influenced by small pastoral woodcuts that he saw in American art magazines circulating at the time, particularly the dramatic sky effects rendered by the engraving method. Homeward Bound, illustrates this influence as the hazy, atmospheric skyscape has a kind of scratched appearance, similar to an etching. A fine balance exists between the rugged treeline and the farmer herding his cattle in the foreground. The cattle moving steadily across the picture plane mimic the drive of colonial development, while the rough, brown-streaked skyline reminds viewers that this was no easy task. Watson captures the sublime nature of the Canadian landscape while also emphasizing the untenable courage of the pioneering spirit in the face of such wilderness. President of both the Canadian Art Club and the Royal Canadian Academy, Watson reinforced the importance of subject matter and stood on the defensive against the surge of abstraction in early twentieth century art. Watson’s success and his legacy stem from his ability to see and paint the Canadian landscape as Canadian, and not as a facsimile of European or American paintings. While his work both idealizes and romanticizes the years of settlement, his landscape paintings serve as a foundation for the many wilderness iterations to follow in the succeeding decades.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

62 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN, R.C.A. RED FOREST TRIPTYCH oil on canvas, laid down on board signed with monogramme 30 ins x 63 ins; 76.2 cms x 160 cms Provenance: Private Collection, New York Literature: Barry Lord, The History of Painting in Canada: Toward a People’s Art, NC Press, Toronto, 1974, page 114.

Note: In his lifetime, Maurice Cullen had become one of Canada’s most popular painters, exhibiting regularly alongside esteemed contemporaries such as James Wilson Morrice and the Group of Seven. The fame of the latter group sparked greater interest in Cullen’s Quebec landscapes, especially after 1922, but this relationship was symbiotic: as Barry Lord wrote, just a few years earlier, “Cullen’s patriotic decision to return to Canada was not lost on the Group of Seven; nor were his attempts to find the colour, light and texture of paint that suited this land.” While Cullen’s Canadian landscape paintings are well known, less so are his private commissions, which rarely appear on the market. Red Forest Triptych’s bold palette and smoky brushwork departs from the cool colours of Cullen’s scenes of the Laurentians in winter. Highly decorative, Cullen’s residential commissions ranged from small-scale paintings to large murals. Red Forest Triptych is a deeply romantic and atmospheric painting, most likely completed in the studio he established in Montreal on Beaver Hall Square in 1906.

Colin S. MacDonald, A Dictionary of Canadian Artists, 3rd edition, Canadian Paperbacks, Ottawa, 1975, pages 158159. Sylvia Antoniou, Maurice Cullen: 18661934 (catalogue), Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, 1982. $30,000–40,000

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63 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. CANOE LAKE, RAINY DAY oil on board signed and titled on the reverse 12 ins x 15 ins; 30.5 cms x 38.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $20,000–30,000

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Note: While Casson would have been in his late teens when Tom Thomson drowned in Canoe Lake and was still years away from being invited to join the Group of Seven, he had by the time Thomson drowned, met Franklin Carmichael and would have become well acquainted with the Thomson legend. There is an inevitable connection between all members of the Group whether they be part of the original seven or later members, and Thomson. Therefore, Casson’s choice of Canoe Lake, in particular is loaded with associations given that there are over two thousand lakes within Algonquin Park from which to choose and is perhaps a homage of a kind. The decision, to render the landscape on a rainy day suggests further that Thomson, and the loss his passing represented to Canadian art, could not have been far from Casson’s thoughts.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

64 PETER CLAPHAM SHEPPARD, O.S.A., R.C.A. SHORELINE, LOWER ST. LAWRENCE, QUEBEC oil on canvas signed 24 ins x 34 ins; 61 cms x 86.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Colin S. MacDonald, A Dictionary of Canadian Artists, 3rd edition, Canadian Paperbacks, Ottawa, 1975, pages 459461. $25,000–30,000

Note: Born in Toronto in 1882, Peter Clapham Sheppard apprenticed and studied with some of the leading lithographers and artists at the time, and travelled throughout Europe and the United States to further his artistic education. Known primarily for his landscape paintings, Sheppard’s subject matter is highly varied, depicting portraiture, cityscapes, genre painting, and of course landscape with a keen eye for detail. His work is not easily categorized as Sheppard not only painted an array of subjects, but he did so using many different artistic techniques as well (see also Lot 92). Working during a period of rampant industrialization and development, Sheppard would have been exposed to the rapidly evolving aesthetic trends of the time. As such, his work seems to sit in that heady axis of change between one artistic school of thought and another, that is Impressionism and PostImpressionism. Sheppard’s use and precise application of light and shadow hint at the former, while his exploration of colour and line suggests the latter. The painting Shoreline, Lower St. Lawrence, Quebec is demonstrative of this duality. The looseness of the brushwork and the subtleties of light on the rooftops evidences a more Impressionistic influence, while the abstraction of form in both the mountains and shoreline suggests his familiarity with the Post-Impressionist aesthetic. With a career spanning the First and Second World War and the Great Depression, Sheppard’s colourful and recognizable imagery would have resonated deeply with the Canadian public. His stylistic versatility portraying the changing seasons and rugged beauty of both rural and urban centres would have worked to foster a nationalist sentiment, and for this reason Sheppard’s work is essential to the ongoing study and understanding of the Canadian landscape tradition.

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65 ARTHUR LISMER, O.S.A., R.C.A. FOREST INTERIOR oil on board inscribed on the reverse “Class demonstration by Dr. Lismer at Montreal Museum of Fine Arts” 16 ins x 12 ins; 40.6 cms x 30.5 cms Provenance: Gift of the artist Private Collection, Toronto (by descent) Literature: Lewis, interview with author, 7 March 1988, quoted in Angela Nairne Grigor, Arthur Lismer: Visionary art Educator, McGill University Press, Montreal, 2002, page 203. Angela Nairne Grigor, Arthur Lismer: Visionary art Educator, McGill University Press, Montreal, 2002, page 204. $12,000–15,000

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Note: During his time at Art Association of Montreal, now the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Lismer introduced the series “Artists in Action.” As the title suggests, the invited artists were asked to create a work of art in the span of a single session, as audiences - ranging from children and high school students to professional artists and white-collar workers - closely observed them. To sculptor Stanley Lewis, one of the many prominent artists who took part in the project, Lismer’s purpose was to “demystify the idea of creativity... he wanted to show the process of creativity.” Lismer himself participated in the series in November 1963, painting three artworks during the session, including this lot. Captivated by Lismer’s energy, a reporter described the artist as flying towards the painting with a brush and a palette knife, bringing to life “a forest scene in brilliant blues, greens, and yellows.” “Artists in Action,” is a quintessential example of Lismer’s innovative teaching philosophy and views on art and art institutions. To specialist Angela Nairne Grigor, the series reflects the painter’s “ongoing concern to involve the general public in art experiences and a clear reminder to those who might have forgotten that the main purpose of a museum was to educate.” This lot is being sold together with a copy of a letter from the original owner describing its provenance.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

66 LÉON BELLEFLEUR DES RÊVES ET DU HASARD NO. 7 (SÉRIE DE 10) oil on canvas signed and dated ‘88; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse 50 ins x 40 ins; 127 cms x 101.6 cms Provenance: Charles Bronfman’s Claridge Collection, Montreal

Note: “There are so many things that are beyond us, that are behind us in all kinds of pasts, in store for us in futures we know nothing about, and all around us, in every direction.” – Léon Bellefleur Realized between 1987 and 1988, Des rêves et du hasard has been referred to by Bellefleur specialist Guy Robert as the most ambitious of the painter’s career. Painted in the artist’s 78th year, the series, of which this work is a part, is in many ways the culmination of Bellefleur’s long dialogue with chance. Pale droplets of pinks, purples, and whites spin around the painting, making their way to its centre as though drawn in by a vortex. Sold to benefit Historica Canada.

Literature: Guy Robert, Bellefleur: The Fervour of the Quest, Iconia, Montreal, 1988, pages 9, 63, and 142, reproduced in colour. $15,000–18,000

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67 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS ABSTRACT COMPOSITION (LSH 25)

Literature: Bess Harris and R.G.P. Colgrove, (eds.), Lawren Harris, MacMillan of Canada, Toronto, 1960, page 91.

oil on masonite

Andrew Hunter, Lawren Stewart Harris: A Painter’s Progress, Americas Society, New York, 2000, page 53.

24.25 ins x 30 ins; 61.6 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Nova Scotia $20,000–30,000

Note: Lawren Harris exhibited his abstract works for the first time in Canada in 1937 at the third exhibition of the Canadian Group of Painters. His decision to move away from the common ideals of the Group to pursue abstraction may not have been a popular decision at that time but it was, for him, an inevitable one. Harris wrote: “My purpose in attempting to paint abstractions is that there is at once more imaginative scope and a more exacting discipline in nonobjective painting. I have had ideas consistently forming which could not be expressed in representational terms.”

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

68 FREDERICK HORSMAN VARLEY, A.R.C.A. KOOTENAY LAKE, B.C. oil on canvas board signed 15 ins x 12 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $20,000–30,000

Note: Varley first went to British Columbia in 1926 to take up the position of drawing and painting instructor at the Vancouver School of Decorative and Applied Arts. Unsure of the direction his art would take, Varley soon found inspiration in the landscape of British Columbia. Varley was energized by the vast scale of the landscape, the mountains, the ocean and the climate, and embarked on sketching trips, painting the mountains in forms that were almost abstract. Interested in colour symbolism, Varley developed a comprehensive colour theory which he used as a starting point to impart a particular mood to a painting. He favoured a restricted palette of blue-greens and violet (he considered green to be spiritual and pale violet to be aesthetic) which he applied to canvases such as Coast Mountain Forms of circa 1929 (collection of the National Gallery of Canada), constructed almost entirely of blues and violets. Varley remained in B.C. until 1936, and, except for a visit in 1937, did not return until 1957. That year, he made the first of several sketching trips to the Kootenay Lake region in the company of his close companion, Kathleen McKay. Although Varley has used the same palette of blue-green and violet of the earlier B.C. works, he seems less interested in giving expression to the spiritual in nature’s forms and colours than to the effects of light. It has been suggested that Varley is indebted to to J.M.W. Turner in his use of sunlight to illuminate elements in the landscape. Here, the play of light on the water below can be seen through the branches of the foreground trees. The composition harkens back to the iconic landscapes of Georgian Bay where a solitary tree stands silhouetted against the water and sky (Squally Weather, Georgian Bay, 1920, collection of the National Gallery of Canada).

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69 KIM DORLAND SWIMMING IN THE LAKE, 2007 oil, acrylic and spray paint on canvas, unframed signed, titled and dated on the reverse 54 ins x 84 ins; 111.8 cms x 193 cms Provenance: Private Collection, New York Literature: Katerina Atanassova et al., Kim Dorland, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg, 2014, pages 9 and 16.

Note: Kim Dorland emerged on Canada’s art scene shortly after graduating from York University with an M.F.A. in 2003. After 2005, he began the practice for which he is now known: building up his paintings with thick layers of impasto, directly from the paint tube or using knives and improvised implements, until the nodules of paint become so heavy that they sometimes require anchoring to the canvas with screws. Ever since then Dorland has been enjoying international fame as one of Canada’s preeminent mid-career painters. Dorland is a native of Wainwright, Alberta, and his work in the 2000s drew heavily on the youthful memories of his self-proclaimed “white trash” upbringing in the Prairies. Images of teenagers loitering in the woods, as in Wooded Area and Fire Pit of 2006, are quick to condemn the apathy of these youths while the artist’s signature flares of fluorescent colour build an eerie landscape that is not to be trusted. Dorland’s decade-long exploration of wooded scenes once elicited the comment: “I am in awe of nature but I’m also scared to death of it” in an interview.

$25,000–30,000 Swimming in the Lake completes this narrative in a less direct, voyeuristic way than the more confrontational paintings Dorland produced between 2005 and 2010. Employing a wide array of painting techniques, including airbrush and thin, scraping brushstrokes, the canvas is kept to a low profile and the action centred within a proscenium arch of graffiti-like trees. The viewer stands deep in the forest, peering out into the clearing and the action on the lake; an evocative memory, or a cautionary tale. In 2013 Dorland was the first artist to participate in the McMichael Art Collection’s revamped artist-in-residence program, a venture which brought his work to more Canadians than ever before. The resulting canvases were shown alongside those of iconic Canadian painters like Tom Thomson, David Milne, and Frederick Varley in the exhibition You Are Here: Kim Dorland and the Return to Painting. Dorland has shown internationally in Milan, New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. His paintings are in a number of public collections, including that of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Calgary’s Glenbow Museum, and Berlin’s Sander Collection, as well as numerous corporate and private collections.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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70 THOMAS SHERLOCK HODGSON, R.C.A. CHECKERED CAB oil on canvas signed and dated ‘62 80 ins x 60 ins; 203.2 cms x 152.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Exhibited: Art Gallery of Hamilton, 14th Annual Winter Exhibition, February 1963, #42 Literature: Paul Duval, Four Decades: The Canadian Group of Painters and their Contemporaries 1930-1970, Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited, Toronto, 1972, page 145. $20,000–30,000

Note: Tom Hodgson was known as an abstract painter and a champion canoeist who competed for Canada in two summer Olympics in the 1950s. After studying art at Toronto’s Central Technical School and Ontario College of Art (now OCAD University), he worked as a commercial artist (1946-1967) like many of his contemporaries. Having chosen abstraction as his preferred form of artistic expression in the late 1940s, Hodgson became a member of Painters Eleven (1953-1960), a diverse group of abstract painters which included William Ronald, Harold Town and Oscar Cahén. Painters Eleven had no manifesto, but it succeeded in opening the Toronto public’s eyes to new forms of art that went beyond the Group of Seven and Canadian Group of Painters. Hodgson was particularly influenced by the work of Oscar Cahén whose tragic death in 1956 affected him profoundly. The influence of Cahén persists in Checkered Cab in the elongated geometric forms and unusual colour juxtapositions (the flatly painted areas of red and mauve, for example), similar to Cahén’s characteristic combinations of red, pink, violet, blue and black. The tracks left by dripping paint and the rapid free brushwork just left of centre signal the influence of the American Abstract Expressionists known as the action painters; Willem de Kooning, in particular, interested the young Toronto painters. Another influence of the Americans was the large scale of the work. Before Hodgson visited the Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting in 1955, (in which a work of his was included) he was using masonite as a support which limited the size of his paintings. After seeing the huge oil on canvas paintings in Pittsburgh, he abandoned masonite, returned to stretched canvas, and began painting on a much larger scale. Checkered Cab is characteristic of Hodgson’s work of this period. David Burnett has described the surfaces of these pictures as “energetic, accumulative, and gestural” combining paint of varying thicknesses, drawing and sometimes collage. They record the artist’s response to stimuli in his immediate environment—an album cover, a picture in a magazine, or the distinctive checkered branding of a taxi company. There is a temptation to read the knot of gestural brushwork and two strips of peach-stained canvas on the left side of the picture as a female passenger either entering or alighting from the taxi (Hodgson did figure studies and portraits throughout his career), but the image remains tantalizingly ambiguous.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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71 JACK HAMILTON BUSH, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. LOW BLUE acrylic on canvas signed, titled and dated “April 1971” and inscribed “Toronto” on the reverse 78 ins x 30.75 ins; 198.1 cms x 78.7 cms Provenance: Grace Borgenicht Gallery, New York André Emmerich, New York Private Collection, Toronto $90,000–120,000

Literature: Charles W. Millard, “Jack Bush in the 1970s,” in Karen Wilkin, (contributing ed.), Jack Bush, McClelland and Stewart, Hong Kong, 1984, pages 48-59. Marc Mayer, Jack Bush (catalogue), National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 2014, page 28. Note: In contrast to the works of the early 1960s, by the late 60s and early 1970s, Millard observes that “...Bush now began to explore less pristine applications of his grounds... (discovering) that if the thinly rolled paint of the grounds contained a certain amount of unassimilated pigment, the result was a pleasing modulation that produced a yielding, although not atmospheric, foil for the flat shapes on top of them. By 1970 this combination of open ground and carefully described colour areas, which first appeared in 1969, had become prominent in Bush’s work, and from 1971 until his last paintings in December 1976 it was his exclusive format.” Marc Mayer writes: “Arguably the most important innovation his work saw was the appearance of the prepared ground. By rolling and later sponging only partially blended colour onto the canvas, covering it completely, he presented a textured, granite-like surface upon which he deployed colour. In simultaneous consequence, he restored space to the roster of pictorial element in his work, but it is a fictive space, an expression of breadth without depth. Upon this infinitesimally shallow ground he coordinated the calligraphic figures that survive his prolonged adventure in the realm of flatness.” A further characteristic of this period is Bush’s “(p)ulling the grounds away from the edges of the canvas (which) gave them shape and suppressed suggestions of infinite extent.” Typically, as can be seen in this lot, Bush allowed a margin around the central composition to remain which was often “toned down with either a neutral hue” or, as shown here, with “a lighter version of the ground colour.”

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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72 WILLIAM RONALD, R.C.A. BYE BYE BLACKBIRDS acrylic on canvas signed and dated ‘84; also signed, titled and dated “Oct. 9 ‘84” on the reverse 60 ins x 78 ins; 152.4 cms x 198.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: David Burnett and Marilyn Schiff, Contemporary Canadian Art, Hurtig Publishers, Edmonton, 1983, page 57. Iris Nowell, Painters Eleven: The Wild Ones of Canadian Art, Douglas & McIntyre, Toronto, 2010, pages 73-75. $15,000–20,000

Note: One of Canada’s first abstract expressionist painters to earn a reputation in New York’s 1960s art scene, William Ronald became a sensation in Canada, bridging his artistic practice with criticism, broadcasting, and a larger-thanlife persona. When the Guggenheim Museum opened its new modernist home at 1071 5th Avenue in New York, Ronald was the youngest artist represented in its permanent collection. After attracting critical success as a member of the Painters Eleven early in his career Ronald continued to “attack” his canvases, as David Burnett and Marilyn Schiff wrote, “with an impatience which prevented him from settling into a single mode.” His exuberance propelled him toward television and radio broadcasting while also continuing to paint. From 1969-1972 he hosted the CBC radio program As it Happens, and from 1966-1967 a television variety show about the arts called The Umbrella. Then, in the 1970s Ronald returned to painting with a renewed seriousness, producing a large body of new work for inclusion in the 1975 retrospective, Ronald: 25 Years, organized by the Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Oshawa, Ontario. Less than a decade later, Ronald embarked on the bold undertaking of painting a portrait of every Canadian Prime Minister. The sixteen resulting works, painted over a period of seven years, toured Ontario and Quebec in 1984. Bye Bye Blackbirds was painted that same year, an expressive byproduct of a particularly creative streak in Ronald’s later oeuvre. At first appearance, Bye Bye Blackbirds seems monochromatic, but the black silhouettes of its surface hover over a purposefully layered background of colour. Much looser than his “central image” paintings of the 1960s, Bye Bye Blackbirds has much visual semblance with Ronald’s automatic watercolours of the same period, which are still regarded as some of the artist’s finest work. This work will be included in Iris Nowell’s forthcoming monograph on the artist due to be released in Fall 2016.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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73 MARCELLE FERRON, R.C.A. LA ROUSSE (NO. 52) mixed media on canvas 72 ins x 24 ins; 182.9 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist Private Collection, Montreal Literature: Letter by Marcelle Ferron, Paris 1954, quoted in Danielle, Diane and Babalou, “Scattered Memories,” in Marcelle Ferron, Simon Blais, (ed.), Éditions Simon Blais, Montreal, 2008, pages 42-43. Marcelle Ferron, directed by Monique Croullière (1989: Montreal, Quebec: Office national du Film du Canada, 1989), DVD Réal Lussier, Marcelle Ferron, Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Montreal, 2000, www.collectionscanada.gc.ca $20,000–30,000

Note: “I paint a lot, it’s what makes me feel most alive.” – Marcelle Ferron Frequently, works by Automatiste painter Marcelle Ferron are described as forceful, strong, even muscular. Yet Ferron herself would have rejected these descriptors for much of her work, particularly works from this period. In fact, works such as this lot carry a different tone entirely - focusing not on power, but on a kind of enduring luminosity. An avid risk taker, Ferron was an artist forever eager to explore the unexpected. According to family members, “she forced herself to paint in very tall format because it was difficult and represented a challenge” given certain physical limitations. When Ferron returned to painting after spending several years working with glass, art historian Réal Lussier said, “she had not lost her fire.” In La Rousse (No. 52), Ferron creates a maelstrom of black and fiery oranges which emanate from an almost liquid surface. One can wonder if Lussier wasn’t actually looking at La Rousse (No. 52) when he made his statement. While Ferron’s gestural compositions often appear as though they might spill out beyond the confines of the canvas, La Rousse (No. 52) resists an existence beyond its borders. Rather, it is an invitation to enter, a door to open. In a documentary produced by Monique Crouillère in 1989, Ferron is asked how she knows when a painting is finished. Ferron replies that she is not the one who decides when a painting is done. She describes herself as the painting’s slave. Paintings, she contends, know how to defend themselves. Ferron also emphasizes the importance of the relationship between lines and masses. It is this balance which, to her, is the most fragile, and also the most important, aspect of her paintings. A few drops of paint can hold a work together. While creating these tall, vertical compositions, Ferron was inspired by symbolic beings. These so-called “bonnes femmes” served to guide her on her quest to find her identity as a woman and as an artist. Among her many achievements, Ferron was the first woman to receive the Paul Émile Borduas Prize in 1983. Two years later, she was made Chevalier de l’Ordre national du Québec by the Quebec government. In 2000, the same year Marcelle Ferron: une retrospective was presented at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, she was given the title of Grand officier de l’Ordre national du Québec.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

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74 WILLIAM KURELEK, R.C.A. WARNING OF THE ANGEL GABRIEL TO MARY AND JOSEPH mixed media on paper 14.5 ins x 13 ins; 36.8 cms x 33 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario $15,000–20,000

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Note: Matthew 2:13 - Now when they had departed, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream and said, “Rise, take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt, and remain there till I tell you; for Herod is about to search for the child, to destroy him.” At first encounter, this scene might be one of trepidation, even unease. Wooden hoops and blade-wielding mortal spokes cartwheel erratically across a darkened plane. But this grey and inky world is a deliberate tactic on the part of Kurelek to test the viewer and to assess their ability to persevere. The work, therefore, becomes a kind of metaphor of faith. The true focus lay not in the massacre of innocents, but in the prophecy that promised a miraculous escape. As symbolized by the Angel Gabriel, the forerunner to exodus, Kurelek foreshadows deliverance from any pain that will follow the scene. The painting is a parable, the message of which is that we should not dwell on auguries of suffering. Rather, it is, he believes, our call to destiny that must define us.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

75 HAROLD KLUNDER, R.C.A. OF MIND AND MATTER, DAY AND NIGHT oil on canvas, diptych, unframed signed, titled and dated on panel #2, titled and dated on panel #1 Each 48 ins x 36 ins; 121.9 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Michael Gibson Gallery, London Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Harold Klunder, Michael Gibson Gallery, London, Ontario, 2011. James D. Campbell, “Harold Klunder,” (exhibition review), Magenta Magazine, Montreal, 2014. John Marsonet, The Artist Life-Harold Klunder, a Program Documentary Series for Bravo Television, 2013. $20,000–25,000

Note: Born in the Netherlands in 1946, Harold Klunder emigrated to Toronto in 1952. Based in Montreal, Klunder’s colourful impasto and abstract paintings have received critical acclaim in Canada and abroad. Self-portraiture is characteristic of Klunder’s work. With nearly all images beginning as figurative drawings, they morph, extend, transform and distort as the painting takes shape. Sometimes spending up to ten years on any given painting, Klunder’s rigorous and personalized approach equally echoes and allows for the changing nature of personality and the unconscious mind to unfold. His paintings seem to embody a spirit of metamorphosis, with the curvilinear and highly abstract patterns suggestive of the untamed and dissonant thoughts that often occupy and threaten to overwhelm one’s daily existence. Initially influenced by the Dutch tradition of abstract expressionism, Klunder actively carved his own path away from this modernist aesthetic, creating his own individualized style rooted in his adopted Canadian identity. Working with large scale pieces allows Klunder to assert a sense of physicality, which imbues his paintings with a kind of mind-body connection, making them come alive to both artist and viewer alike. Describing his work as “everything is significant and nothing is significant,” Klunder’s use of oil paint, given the postmodern fascination with alternate media such as digital photography, is certainly significant. His piece Of Mind and Matter, Day and Night, painted between 2005 and 2007, is demonstrative of his dedication to oil painting. Klunder takes chances not only in his choice of medium but also in revealing part of his internal self on the canvas. The rich and thickly applied red hues are offset by touches of contrasting blue, black and yellow; this diptych illustrates his differing experience of day and night. During the day, thoughts are seemingly entangled with the world around him, pictured in the jumble of lines and shapes that comprise his representation. At night, a more figurative image is presented, hinting that after dark there is more opportunity for solitary reflection and a return to the self (whatever that may be). The title Of Mind and Matter, suggests that rather than a dominance of one over the other, both entities constitute his being. Recalling that Klunder painted this over a two year period, the heavily applied layers of paint illustrate the vagaries of his experiences throughout this time.

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76 DORIS JEAN MCCARTHY, O.S.A., R.C.A. ROCKS AND LIGHTHOUSE, GEORGIAN BAY oil on panel signed 11.5 ins x 13.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 32.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Whitby, Ontario $4,000–5,000

77 FREDERICK HORSMAN VARLEY, A.R.C.A. THE LONESOME TREE watercolour signed 10.25 ins x 12.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 33 cms Provenance: The Art Emporium, Vancouver Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Peter Varley, Frederick H. Varley, Key Porter Books, Toronto, 1983, page 75. Note: Called westward for a job at the Vancouver School of Decorative and Applied Arts in 1926, Varley found his new surroundings a rich source of inspiration. The glacier lakes, coastal mountains, rugged terrain and assortment of vegetation would feature heavily in a number of his works. The Lonesome Tree makes a simplified statement in which Varley effortlessly harmonizes his graphite lines with select hues of watercolour – greens, blues, the reddish brown of the deeply grooved bark. As Peter Varley affirms, the artist had the ability to “capture the essence of a mood or character with a few lines or coloured washes...” $6,000–8,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

78 CARL CLEMENS MORITZ RUNGIUS STUDY FOR LAKE O’HARA oil on canvas signed 20 ins x 24 ins; 55.9 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Nova Scotia Literature: John Whyte and E.J. Hart, Carl Rungius: Painter of the Western Wilderness, Douglas & McIntyre/The Glenbow-Alberta Institute, Toronto/Calgary, 1985, page 4 and page 129 for Lake O’Hara (collection of the National Gallery of Canada), reproduced in colour. $15,000–18,000

Note: Carl Rungius’s artistic legacy combines a passion for the game animals of North America, the lifestyle of the wild west, and the heart of the Canadian Rockies. Just before the turn of the 20th century, Rungius transitioned from a life of academic training in Germany to a position as a sporting magazine illustrator in the United States. This move to the west inspired Rungius to artistically express his love for animals and nature. A keen draughtsman who could depict animals in fine shaded detail, Rungius would often trek into wild terrain with the aim of both hunting and painting the animals he admired. Here he happily roamed, executing powerful paintings of the North American wilderness. It was a visit to the Canadian Rockies in 1910 that transformed Rungius as a painter. The inspiration he derived from this rugged back country resulted in the development of new techniques, a change in palette and creation of works that reflect the true artistic freedom Rungius felt in this setting. As a result, he began alternating between summers in Banff, Alberta and winters in New York City. Study for Lake O’Hara was executed during Rungius’s two-decade quest for wilderness, reflecting his passion for nature in vibrant brushstrokes and an effervescent creation of colour, light and shadow. Originally, chalk drafting lines could be seen on the canvas surface - the mark of a meticulous draughtsman. Rungius executed this sketch in preparation for the canvas, Lake O’Hara, which is now in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada. Adept at recreating the depth, pattern and detail of the landscape before him, Rungius distinguished his artwork with a sense that “light suffuses the paintings as though nature itself glows in everything.”

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79 DORIS JEAN MCCARTHY, O.S.A., R.C.A. BLUEBERRY ISLAND, GEORGIAN BAY, 1939 oil on panel signed (twice); titled on the reverse 11.5 ins x 13.5 ins; 29.2 cms x 34.3 cms Provenance: Estate of Sophie and Donald McMichael, Toronto $4,000–5,000

80 FRANK HANS JOHNSTON, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. LENGTHENING SHADOWS, LATE AFTERNOON, ONOMAN LAKE NEAR TASHOTA GOLD FIELDS, MAR. 1937 oil on board signed; titled “Lengthening Shadows” on the reverse 10 ins x 12 ins; 25.4 cms x 30.5 cms Provenance: J. Merritt Malloney’s Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario $5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

81 WILLIAM GOODRIDGE ROBERTS, R.C.A RED CLOTH AND GREEN JUG, 1965 oil on masonite signed 19.75 ins x 24 ins; 50.8 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario Literature: James Borcoman, Goodridge Roberts, A Retrospective, The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1969, page 26. Note: In his biographical sketch on Goodridge Roberts, James Borcoman writes that Roberts “has always sought the true relationships of shapes and colours to one another and to the whole structure of the design – the abstract qualities, implicit in the landscape and the whole justification of the still life... Out of the few elements to hand he builds his melodies of colour and form.” This is evidenced in Red Cloth and Green Jug where simple objects are rendered into pliable, rounded shapes in luscious colours. An open book and the imagined fragrances of flowers and citrus draw the viewer into the scene. $8,000–12,000

82 BERTHE DES CLAYES EARLY WINTER oil on canvas signed 16 ins x 20.25 ins; 40.6 cms x 50.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Whitby, Ontario Note: According to a plaque affixed to the stretcher this work was “Presented to L.G. Gillett by the staff, Montreal Branch, on his appointment as Assistant General Manager.” $4,000–5,000

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83 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. GEORGIAN BAY oil on double-sided panel signed; a finished oil sketch also depicting Georgian Bay on the reverse 10.5 ins x 13.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $25,000–35,000

Note: A.Y. Jackson first experienced Georgian Bay as a holiday destination, staying with friends and cousins who owned islands off Penetanguishene during the summers of 1910 and 1911. He initially thought the region was “unpaintable,” consisting of “little islands covered with scrub and pine trees.” It was during the late summer and fall of 1913 that Jackson began to paint seriously at the Bay, especially after meeting Dr. James MacCallum and staying at his cottage in Go Home Bay through the month of October. It was that visit which inspired him to paint the pivotal work, Terre Sauvage, 1913 (collection of the National Gallery of Canada). Georgian Bay was one of the locations that provided Jackson and other members of the Group of Seven with an appropriate landscape through which to realize their vision of Canadian art. It was a northern “wilderness” landscape onto which their notions of cultural nationalism could be projected. Although Jackson would paint in many regions across Canada during his lifetime, summer painting trips to Georgian Bay were part of his annual ritual and he continued painting there for many years. Similarly, he would paint in Quebec in late winter until the snow melted. Jackson’s vantage point for this oil sketch of Georgian Bay was clearly from one of the humpback rocks to which he had rowed in order to look across the water at the rocky islands and shoals of pre-Cambrian rock that typify the region. The high horizon line allowed Jackson to create an alternating rhythm of water and rock. Whereas Jackson’s earlier views of Georgian Bay emphasized the effects of the elements on a wilderness landscape, here it is the character of the rocks and the incidental details of the rock pools and sparse vegetation that attract the eye. The classic motif of windswept pines silhouetted against the sky sits along the horizon. The inclusion of the rowboat introduces a novel human element into the scene.

84 RANDOLPH STANLEY HEWTON, R.C.A. FARM LANDSCAPE WITH ROLLING HILLS oil on canvas 24 ins x 30 ins; 62.2 cms x 77.5 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist Private Collection, Ontario Note: Though known for his portraits of society women, Hewton had a lifelong interest in landscape painting. Hewton embarked on many sketching trips to Baie St. Paul, St. Tite-des-Caps, and Les Éboulements alongside fellow artists Albert Robinson and A.Y. Jackson (whom he had met at the Académie Julian in Paris). $10,000–15,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

(recto)

(verso)

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85 MOLLY LAMB BOBAK, R.C.A. THE PLATFORM oil on masonite signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 16 ins x 12 ins; 52.1 cms x 41.9 cms Provenance: The Waddington Galleries Inc., Montreal Private Collection, U.S.A. Literature: Carolyn Gossage, (ed.), Double Duty: Sketches and Diaries of Molly Lamb Bobak, Canadian War Artist, Dundurn Press, Toronto and Oxford, 1972, pages 16, 17, 49 and 63. Note: Known for her vibrant and dynamic images of crowds and parades, The Platform depicts small clusters of figures who stand waiting to board a train. The gestural brushstrokes imbue the work with energy, a sentiment mirrored by the promise offered by the train. While travelling to Montreal during the war years, Bobak remarked that “train travel is one of the best ways of bringing people of all races, creeds and colour together...” $4,000–5,000

86 JOSEPH FRANCIS PLASKETT, R.C.A. LANDSCAPE WITH THE PATULLO BRIDGE, NEW WESTMINSTER oil on board signed 13 ins x 16 ins; 33 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Vancouver (gift of the artist, late 1930s) Private Collection, United Kingdom (by descent) $3,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

87 BARKER FAIRLEY, R.C.A. PORTRAIT OF PAUL SWEETMAN, 1957 oil on masonite signed 20 ins x 16 ins; 40.6 cms x 50.8 cms Provenance: Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sweetman Private Collection, Brighton, Ontario (by descent) Literature: Barker Fairley and Gary Michael Dault, Barker Fairley Portraits, Methuen, Toronto, 1981, page 96 and page 97, reproduced in colour. Note: Born in 1915, Paul Sweetman was an archaeologist (the first to survey Peterborough’s famous Petroglyphs), a chorister (with a passion for Gilbert and Sullivan), and an alumnus of the University of Toronto, where he would have met and befriended Fairley. Reflecting on this portrait, Barker Fairley wrote, “This study of Paul I have always felt especially proud of without asking myself why. I painted it years ago and have looked at it frequently since, but only now do I begin to see the light. I remember saying suddenly to myself that if a familiar friend of Paul’s were walking up to the picture, he would say that this was Paul long before he was near enough to identify the features, because in a very special way the whole thing is Paul...” $3,000–4,000

88 PETER HAWORTH, O.S.A., R.C.A. LOG HOUSES - QUEBEC oil on canvas signed 21 ins x 26 ins; 53.3 cms x 66 cms Provenance: Libby’s of Toronto, Toronto Private Collection, Ottawa $4,000–6,000

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89 GRAHAM NOBLE NORWELL, O.S.A. UNTITLED - AUTUMN SPLENDOR oil on canvas signed 24 ins x 20 ins; 61 cms x 50.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ottawa $4,000–5,000

90 RITA MOUNT, A.R.C.A. AROUND THE GLACE BAY, N.S. oil on canvas board signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 9 ins x 11 ins; 22.9 cms x 27.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. $3,000–4,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

91 RANDOLPH STANLEY HEWTON, R.C.A. SELF-PORTRAIT oil on panel signed 5.5 ins x 5.25 ins; 12.7 cms x 15.2 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist Private Collection, Ontario $1,200–1,500

92 PETER CLAPHAM SHEPPARD, O.S.A., R.C.A. SEASIDE, C. 1920 oil on board 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist Private Collection, Toronto $3,500–4,000

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93 FREDERICK WILLIAM HUTCHISON, R.C.A THE FARM - AUTUMN oil on canvas signed 25 ins x 30 ins; 63.5 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. $4,000–5,000

94 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN, R.C.A. RIVERSIDE FARM oil on canvas signed and dated ‘96 12.75 ins x 16 ins; 32.4 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Note: Riverside Farm, executed in 1896, is typical of Cullen’s work from this period and is heavily influenced by Impressionism. While this painting does not have the same atmospheric quality of light or looseness of brushstroke that is characteristic of Monet, Riverside Farm exhibits an obvious fascination with the relationship between light, shadow and colour. The hints of red and orange in the trees suggest that autumn is approaching. Cullen captures the farm on the edge of change which, to a still largely agrarian society, would signal the start of the intense preparation necessary for the Canadian winter to come. Cullen Inventory No. 643 $12,000–15,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

95 CHARLES FRASER COMFORT, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. PIRATE ISLAND, GEORGIAN BAY (PAINTED AT WEST WIND ISLAND, 1965) oil on panel signed; inscribed “MacCallum’s island Rocky feature in foreground appears in Lismer’s ‘September Gale’” on the reverse 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Wallack Galleries, Ottawa Zwicker’s Gallery, Nova Scotia Private Collection, Nova Scotia $3,000–5,000

96 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. RANCH LAND, CARIBOO, B.C., 1943 oil on panel signed; also signed, titled and dated “Sept. 1943” on the reverse 10.5 ins x 13.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.3 cms Provenance: Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Naomi Jackson Groves, A.Y.’s Canada: Drawings by A.Y. Jackson, Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited, Toronto, 1986, pages 172 and 174. Note: In A.Y.’s Canada, Naomi Jackson Groves recounts Jackson’s trip to this part of B.C., this “region of fable evocatively misspelled ‘Cariboo’ back in the gold rush days of 1960.” She opines: “We can be sure that the type of paydirt A.Y. struck there in the mid-1940’s contained as many good nuggets as any prospector uncovered - and A.Y.’s have probably afforded more lasting pleasure!” $10,000–15,000

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97 BARKER FAIRLEY, R.C.A. DAFFODILS oil on masonite signed; also signed, titled and dated “ca. ‘69” on the reverse 20.25 ins x 16 ins; 50.8 cms x 45.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Brighton, Ontario $3,000–4,000

98 NORMAND HUDON SALLE D’ATTENTE acrylic on masonite signed, titled and dated ‘93 14 ins x 18 ins; 35.6 cms x 45.7 cms Provenance: Le balcon d’arts inc., Québec Private Collection, Montreal $4,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

99 ARTHUR SHILLING BOY IN PARKA oil on canvas board signed and dated ‘71 24 ins x 20 ins; 61 cms x 50.8 cms Provenance: L. Bruce Pierce Collection, No. 431 Kinsman Robinson Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $4,000–5,000

100 JOE NORRIS SEAGULLS ON ISLAND AND SCHOONER, 1983 enamel on plywood signed 32 ins x 48 ins; 81.3 cms x 121.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Nova Scotia Literature: Bernard Riordon, Joe Norris: Painted Visions of Nova Scotia, Goose Lane Editions, The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, 2000, page 60, reproduced in colour. $4,000–6,000

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101 LIONEL LEMOINE FITZGERALD LANDSCAPE WITH TREES, WINTER oil on canvas, mounted to card 6.75 ins x 7.5 ins; 17.1 cms x 19.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Aurora, Ontario Note: Throughout his life, nature was FitzGerald’s main source of inspiration and study. Trees, specifically, came to be a symbol of growth, life and the interconnectedness of all living things. FitzGerald’s belief in the oneness of nature frequently resulted in comparisons between trees and the human body, especially in regard to their graceful, linear forms. See website for additional information. $7,000–9,000

102 MARCELLA MALTAIS SANS TITRE oil on canvas signed and bears date ‘58 37.275 ins x 27.75 ins; 94.6 cms x 69.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal Note: According to the owner, this work was executed in 1958. $9,000–12,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

103 THOMAS SHERLOCK HODGSON, R.C.A. SPANISH LANDSCAPE WITH OLIVES oil on canvas signed and dated ‘62; also signed on the stretcher 39.75 ins x 56.25 ins; 101 cms x 142.9 cms Provenance: Dorothy Cameron Ltd., Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $12,000–15,000

Note: At the time Painters Eleven was founded in 1953, group member Tom Hodgson was producing cubist-derived, semi-abstract paintings based on prosaic objects like fire hydrants or power shovels, often working from his own photographs. There was no common style among the eleven artists; rather they were united by the desire for change and a respect for individuality. Some members (Oscar Cahén, Hortense Gordon, Harold Town) were more advanced in their grasp of New York Abstract Expressionism than was Hodgson, but after 1955 he was soon painting pure abstracts that attracted attention with their brilliant colour combinations, display of exuberant energy and large size. Visiting his show at the Dorothy Cameron Gallery in the fall of 1962 (20 October 20 – 03 November), writer Elizabeth Kilbourn observed that the “swashbuckler” artist was about more than just speed, agility, and panache and had turned into a “creator” (presumably of genuine works of art). He also became notorious for the wild parties he hosted in his studio known as “The Pit.” Hodgson was not given to theorizing, and the work from this period (1956-1964) represents his response to an immediate experience. The seemingly untamed surface of Spanish Landscape with Olives with its paint drippings and rapid brushwork is given order by means of a framework of black brush drawing which, at times thin and overpainted, appears on the surface in a bravura gesture of juicy black paint. Drawing is an integral part of Hodgson’s work. The painting is built up in layers as one colour or mark evokes an idea which is carried out in more marks across the canvas. Perhaps the title indicates the inspiration for the piece; olive green is used liberally, and might have conjured images of olives (the round and ovoid shapes and rows of small bobbles above centre) and of Spain, a producer of olives (the red and yellow of the Spanish flag appear as small patches in the centre). An undulating strip of blue near the top of the picture suggests a sky, turning the image into a “landscape.”

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104 DENNIS EUGENE NORMAN BURTON WINDOW

Literature: Dennis Burton Retrospective, The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Oshawa, 1997, pages 38 and 39.

oil on masonite signed and dated 1959; also signed (twice), titled, dated 1959 and ‘59 on the reverse

Note: Dennis Burton writes, “Most of my abstractions are related to the city environment in terms of surface, facture and texture.” Burton drew inspiration from the city in unique ways, viewing what most would see as urban blight – broken windows, ruts in the road, graffiti, scratched brickwork and stained cardboard – as artistic entities.

48 ins x 35.5 ins; 91.4 cms x 121.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $12,000–18,000

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“When I sit here and look out of the window, I see unidentifiable forms in the leaf tonal patterns in the trees. I see lines, I see edges, I see abstraction. I don’t see the trees to reproduce them the way they are. I see a pattern of grey-scale changes from black through to white; I see a tonal set-up... The grey-scale tonal effect of parts in shadow, in half-shadow, and the parts that are being hit by brilliant sunlight, create a texture for me – a surface. I see two-dimensionally. Everything is surface...”


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

105 ULYSSE COMTOIS QUATRE ZONES oil on canvas signed, titled and dated 1965 on the reverse 18 ins x 24 ins; 45.7 cms x 73.7 cms Provenance: Art Rental Service, Art Gallery of Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

Note: Associated with les Automatistes, Comtois worked across a variety of media – from paintings, murals, sculpture, draughting and photography. In speaking of the artist’s sculptural works Lawrence Sabbath wrote, “Ulysse Comtois should have his name writ large in the history books of art, for he is one who believes that art need not be sacred, that it can be a source of fun without any loss of respect for artist or object.” This statement also resonates for the artist’s two-dimensional works. Here Comtois’ nonfigurative painting creates modular forms, wherein a painterly quality is still evident – through strips and rectangles. Colour bars over a vivid background form linear juxtapositions that play with the eyes. As if mirroring the bright colours and interlocking forms of his sculptures from the same time, Comtois creates in Quatre Zones a powerful yet playful work, assertive in both its colour and its line.

Literature: Lawrence Sabbath, “Sculptor invites public to ‘play’ with work,” The Gazette, Montreal, 22 August 1981. $10,000–15,000

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106 JOHN HALL, R.C.A. SANDY acrylic on canvas signed and dated ‘89; also signed, titled, dated and inscribed “Mexico” on the reverse 60 ins x 60 ins; 152.4 cms x 152.4 cms Provenance: Wynick/Tuck Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto Note: In Sandy, John Hall takes us through his very own looking glass into a wonderland of forgotten or obsolete objects. Creating a still-life cum portrait, this “archaeologist of urban life” brings unremarkable things into unexpected relationships, allowing them to transcend their triviality. Hall’s kaleidoscope is both bewildering and addictive. $8,000–12,000

107 JOHN MEREDITH, R.C.A. UNTITLED oil on canvas signed and dated ‘58 33 ins x 33.5 ins; 83.8 cms x 85.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: John Meredith: A Retrospective, 1955-1990, with an introduction by Paul Duval, Kaspar Gallery, 1990, unpaginated. Note: In contrast to John Meredith’s later works – with their inky calligraphy – the artist’s 1950s canvases are vigorous and encrusted with rich impasto. Dashes across the canvas – red, blues, yellows – are woven together in intense animation. Paul Duval writes, “It would be difficult to find an artist with a more immediate impulse of expression, short of recklessness... Meredith’s lines and shapes animate his canvases with a surprising and sometimes explosive tension yet, in the end, always achieve a precarious balance.” $8,000–12,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

108 PATRICK AMIOT & BRIGITTE LAURENT FIRE TRUCK kinetic sculpture signed by Amiot and dated ‘91 excluding ladder 39 ins x 42 ins x 17 ins; 99.1 cms x 106.7 cms x 43.2 cms Provenance: Collection of Franklin Silverstone, U.S.A. Note: Now living in California, Patrick Amiot and Brigitte Laurent work collaboratively, turning objects otherwise destined for recycling into what they call “junk-art.” Amiot sculpts and Laurent paints. Amiot believes that found objects have led incredible lives and that as such, their spirits deserve to be glorified. $8,000–12,000

109 THOMAS SHERLOCK HODGSON, R.C.A. UNTITLED (THE CRASH), 1967 oil on canvas signed 58.5 ins x 39 ins; 149.9 cms x 101.6 cms Provenance: Jerrold Morris Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Iris Nowell, Painters Eleven: The Wild Ones of Canadian Art, Douglas & McIntyre, Toronto, 2010, pages 1-11. Note: Experimenting briefly with Pop Art between 1965 and 1972, a thematic shift inspired by the Women’s Liberation Movement, Hodgson’s work created during this period is largely considered his attempt at socio-political engagement. Untitled (The Crash) from 1967 falls into this timeframe. The figurative elements, hard edged and brightly coloured cut out motifs, evidence his interest in Pop Art. The fragmented body suggests a critique of female objectification, a contentious topic of discussion at the time. See website for additional information. $9,000–12,000

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110 FREDERICK JOSEPH ROSS, R.C.A. TRIPTYCH: STILL LIFES WITH RECLINING NUDE mixed media the central panel signed Overall (open) 28.25 ins x 60.5 ins; 71.8 cms x 153.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $5,000–7,000

Note: A native of Saint John, New Brunswick, artist Fred Ross was encouraged by his teacher, Ted Campbell, to experience the world of art and ideas outside of his east coast home. As a result, Ross travelled to Mexico in 1950 and befriended Mexican muralist Diego Rivera. Ross approached Rivera while he was working on a mural at the Palacio Nacional in Mexico City and was invited onto his scaffolding to sketch the artist at work. These sketches are now housed at The National Gallery of Canada. Aided by this hands-on experience and the encouragement of Rivera, Ross was able to affirm his artistic direction and establish himself as a post-war figurative artist. Often using his wife and children as models, Ross’s paintings reflect a timeless humanism, as can be seen in Triptych: Still Lifes with Reclining Nude. A sense of mysticism is also evoked with the artful use of a triptych and the placement of interesting objects around the angelic female figure. The rusting tuba, the potted ferns and folds of drapery draw the eye into a scene of dreamy solitude. The depiction of a single seashell and a carafe on the doors of the triptych, as well as within the central scene of the painting, leave the viewer pondering the artist’s sentiment.

(shown with side panels closed)

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

111 DAVID GERRY PARTRIDGE, R.C.A. UNTITLED nails, copper and mirror height 48 ins; 121.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $3,000–5,000

112 JOHN MEREDITH, R.C.A. SKETCH FOR RAMADAN coloured inks signed and dated ‘66 13.75 ins x 16.75 ins; 34.9 cms x 42.5 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Ian Thom, John Meredith: Drawings, 1957-1980 (catalogue), Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, 1980, unpaginated. Note: Ian Thom asserts that “most of Meredith’s important paintings, and all of his work from 1966 on, relate directly to drawings.” While the painting based on this drawing has not yet been located, the lot, nonetheless, is significant in its own right. Thom notes that Meredith was greatly attracted to the use of coloured inks at this time because they were “brighter and more transparent than watercolours” and “could be used with brush or pen giving Meredith a choice of drawing tool and considerable freedom of expression.” $5,000–7,000

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113 ANTONIO GREDIAGA KIEFF UNTITLED bronze signed with initials height 14.75 ins; 81.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $1,800–2,200

114 TOM HOPKINS THE WATER (...IN PREPARATION...) oil on canvas signed; also signed, titled and dated 2002 on the reverse 46 ins x 44 ins; 116.8 cms x 111.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal Note: In The Water (...In Preparation...), Hopkins creates a narrative of contrast and tension. The backdrop for the scene is a reflective waterscape, limitless in its blues, greens and light. The artist challenges the viewer to shift their perception of the work by placing a blue bowl of water in the foreground. Confronted by this contained space, we now experience the painting through a different lens: Half-full or half-empty, lush or illusory. See website for additional information. $5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

115 JOHN MEREDITH, R.C.A. UNTITLED #1 coloured inks signed and dated ‘67 13.5 ins x 16.5 ins; 34.3 cms x 41.9 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery, Toronto Canadian Fine Arts, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $3,000–4,000

116 JACQUES HURTUBISE NUITS INSONDABLES mixed media on paper signed and dated ‘64 26 ins x 20 ins; 66 cms x 50.8 cms Provenance: Galerie de Siècle, Montreal Sale of Art, The Women’s Committee of the Art Gallery of Toronto Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Sarah Filmore, (ed.), Jacques Hurtubise, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Halifax, 2011, pages 21-128. Note: Dubbed an “enfant terrible of the Quebec art scene,” Jacques Hurtubise has challenged our preconceptions about painting from the outset. In Nuits Insondables, the sharp fragments of jagged and starkly black and white lines create a dramatic contrast. Notorious for flattening the picture plane, Hurtubise subverts, and even denies our sensory expectation. This disjunction between coherence and aesthetic discord can also be understood as his way of making the familiar, unfamiliar. See website for additional information. $5,000–7,000

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117 NORMAND HUDON DIMANCHE MATIN acrylic on masonite signed and titled 12 ins x 24 ins; 30.5 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Le balcon d’arts inc., Québec Private Collection, Montreal Note: Dimanche Matin, painted around 1990, depicts playful children and a quaint Quebec town - a common theme throughout Hudon’s paintings after 1972. These scenes seem to poke fun at certain aspects of Quebec heritage, namely the legacy of Roman Catholicism, while at the same time preserving such heritage in the wake of rampant societal secularization and liberalization. See website for additional information. $6,000–8,000

118 DAVID A. THAUBERGER, R.C.A. CORNER MARKET acrylic on canvas signed (three times), titled and dated “May 2001” and 2001 (twice) on the overflap 42 ins x 53.5 ins; 106.7 cms x 135.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Anne Newlands, Canadian Paintings, Prints and Drawings, Firefly Books, Richmond Hill, 2007, page 316. Note: Thauberger’s work, formally rendered, references folk art with its bright, solid colour and simplification of common surroundings. Thauberger was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan, where he studied under ceramicist David Gilhooly. Anne Newlands observes: “The candour of Saskatchewan folk art further consolidated his appreciation of local subjects rendered with a pristine geometry animated by lively colour and decorative surfaces.” $6,000–8,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

119 MALCOLM RAINS A MIDSUMMER EVENING ON LAKE ONTARIO oil on canvas signed; also signed, titled and dated 1989 on the overlap

Note: Although Malcolm Rains graduated from the Ontario College of Art with a major in sculpture, he is most known for his still life paintings. Rains creates a number of works often based on a theme and focused on a single subject. Employing warm lighting and rich glazing, the resulting canvases evoke a restraint reminiscent of the works by the Old Masters. Pieces of folded paper become statuesque Greek temples; pears on a sideboard are precisely rendered and dramatic. The essences of his subjects are transported into high art.

42 ins x 84 ins; 106.7 cms x 213.4 cms Provenance: Costin & Klintworth, Toronto Private Collection, British Columbia $12,000–15,000

120 LÉON BELLEFLEUR, R.C.A. TRANSMISSION INTERDITE gouache signed; also signed, titled and dated ‘67 on the reverse 21.5 ins x 14 ins; 61 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Québec $3,000–4,000

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121 FRANK HANS JOHNSTON, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. UNTITLED - LANDSCAPE oil on board signed 8.75 ins x 12 ins; 22.2 cms x 30.5 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $5,000–7,000

122 RALPH WALLACE BURTON ST. ELIAS RANGE - YUKON, FROM ALASKA HWY. oil on canvas signed and dated ‘64 23 ins x 31 ins; 59.1 cms x 79.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ottawa Note: Between September 9 and October 30, 1964, Burton travelled to the Yukon with fellow painters Maurice Haycock and A.Y. Jackson. This canvas would have been worked up in his Ottawa studio from a sketch (yet unlocated) executed on this trip. $3,000–4,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

123 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT, P.R.C.A. AUTUMN, SAULT AUX RECOLLETS oil on panel signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 12 ins x 17 ins; 30.5 cms x 43.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. $5,000–7,000

124 JOHN WILLIAM BEATTY, O.S.A., R.C.A. MARKETPLACE, BELGIUM oil on panel 8.5 ins x 10.75 ins; 21.6 cms x 27.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Whitby, Ontario $5,000–7,000

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125 WILLIAM REDVER STARK THE ROAD TO CHUIGNES oil on canvas signed 23 ins x 17.25 ins; 58.4 cms x 43.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Exhibited: Fine Arts Department, Canadian National Exhibition, 1919 $4,000–5,000

126 MANLY EDWARD MACDONALD, R.C.A. HAULING WATER, BAY OF QUINTE oil on canvas signed; titled on the reverse 20 ins x 24 ins; 50.8 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Note: See website for additional information. $6,000–8,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

127 HAL ROSS PERRIGARD, A.R.C.A. SNOWPEAK AVENUE EMERALD LAKE - CANADIAN ROCKIES oil on canvas signed 40 ins x 30 ins; 101.6 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal Exhibited: The Canadian National Exhibition, 1921 Literature: Crystal S. Parsons, Maurice Cullen and His Circle, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 2009. Note: In Snowpeak Avenue, it is hard to ignore the evocative play of light across the canvas. Hal Ross Perrigard’s emphasis on light was likely due to the influence of his instructors at the Art Association of Montreal, Maurice Cullen and William Brymner, who had studied in Paris during the height of Impressionism. Among the many students who attended classes under Cullen and Brymner were Prudence Heward and Anne Savage, who formed the Beaver Hall Group in 1920, alongside A.Y. Jackson and Edwin Holgate. Though the group was short-lived, Perrigard was included in their first official exhibition in January 1921. $6,000–8,000

128 THOMAS WILBERFORCE MITCHELL, O.S.A., R.C.A. PIONEER SERIES: MAPLE SUGAR oil on canvas signed and dated 1930 20 ins x 24 ins; 50.8 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Burlington, Ontario $6,000–8,000

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129 JOHN HERBERT CADDY THE BEACH STRIP, HAMILTON, ONT., 1876 watercolour 9.75 ins x 16.75 ins; 24.8 cms x 42.5 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $1,200–1,500

130 WILLIAM ARMSTRONG NIPIGON, H.B. POST watercolour signed with monogramme and titled 6.75 ins x 9.75 ins; 17.1 cms x 24.8 cms Provenance: Collection of Helen Hope Baynes Rudge, Toronto Collection of Elizabeth Rudge Tucci, Toronto Private Collection, U.S.A. (by descent) Literature: Henry C. Campbell, Early Days on the Great Lakes: The Art of William Armstrong, McClelland and Stewart Limited, Toronto/Montreal, 1971, pages 88-90 for a discussion of Armstrong’s Nipigon works. Note: This lot is sold together with a copy of Henry C. Campbell’s book, Early Days on the Great Lakes: The Art of William Armstrong. $1,500–2,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

131 WASHINGTON F. FRIEND VICTORIA TUBULAR BRIDGE, MONTREAL watercolour, with arched upper corners signed 11 ins x 26 ins; 27.9 cms x 66 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal Literature: J. Russell Harper, Early Painters and Engravers in Canada, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1981, page 122. $6,000–8,000

Note: Washington Friend recorded early views of Canada. Entrepreneurial in spirit, in 1849 Friend began a 5,000 mile journey exploring Canada and the U.S.A., resulting in numerous watercolour sketches to be used in preparation of a large panoramic display of North American scenery. A command showing of the project was given to Queen Victoria at Buckingham Palace. According to Harper, many watercolour paintings, painted as preliminary studies for the project, survive. While this work cannot be counted among them as the subject dates to 1854 or later, it is most certainly consistent with the spirit of those works which documented and lauded the grandeur - both natural and man-made - of the new world. The construction of the tubular bridge crossing the mighty St. Lawrence at Montreal was undertaken between 1854 and 1859, and demonstrated a significant evolution in civil engineering. Harsh climactic conditions (the piers of the bridge would have to be built to withstand ice floes) posed some unique challenges. The construction of Victoria Bridge was, according to Parks Canada, the culmination of a transportation strategy developed by the Montreal business community in competition with their American rivals. The population of Montreal almost doubled during the period of construction of the bridge and the city subsequently became the main industrial and manufacturing centre of Canada, as well as an important hub for rail transportation. The tubular bridge was replaced in 1897 with the bridge that is extant. According to the owner, this work was executed circa 1860.

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132 WALTER JOSEPH PHILLIPS, R.C.A. A PAIR OF WOODCUTS: LITTLE LOG HOUSE, 1926; SNOW BANK woodcuts printed in colours the first signed with initials and dated 1926 in the plate, the second signed with monogramme, both signed in pencil in the lower margin 4 ins x 4.25 ins; 10.2 cms x 10.8 cms; 5 ins x 4.25 ins; 12.7 cms x 10.8 cms $1,200–1,500

133 DAVID BROWN MILNE PAINTING PLACE, 1931 drypoint etching printed in colours etching signed by David B. Milne in pencil in the lower margin drypoint etching sheet size 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms $1,200–1,500

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Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Roger Boulet, The Tranquility and the Turbulence: The Life and Work of Walter J. Philips, Markham, 1981, page 95 for Little Log House, 1926, reproduced in colour. Nancy Green, Kate Rutherford and Toni Tomlinson, Walter J. Phillips, Pomegranate, Portland, Oregon, 2013, page 32 for Little Log House, 1926, reproduced in colour. Nancy Green, Kate Rutherford and Toni Tomlinson, Walter J. Phillips, Pomegranate, Portland, Oregon, 2013, page 71 for Snow Bank, 1923, reproduced in colour. Note: Editions unknown. Little Log House and Snow Bank were reissued in Winter Wood-cuts portfolio, 1936.

Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Note: This work is contained in The Colophon: A Book Collectors’ Quarterly, Part V, Colophon Ltd., New York, 1931.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

134 JOYCE WIELAND, R.C.A. ALEXANDER SAYS EARS CAME BEFORE EYES (HIGHBUSH CRANBERRIES) watercolour signed and dated “1981 August” Sight 5 ins x 5 ins; 31.8 cms x 31.8 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery Ltd., Toronto Mira Godard Gallery, Toronto/Calgary Private Collection, U.S.A. Exhibited: Joyce Wieland, Artist’s with their Work, Forest City Gallery, London, 1982 (organized by Extension Services of the Art Gallery of Ontario) $1,500–2,000

135 WALTER JOSEPH PHILLIPS, R.C.A. WINTER WOODS woodcut printed in colours signed with initials in the plate; also signed in pencil in the lower margin 3.75 ins x 4 ins; 10.2 cms x 10.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Roger Boulet, The Tranquility and the Turbulence: The Life and Work of Walter J. Philips, Markham, 1981, page 96 for Winter Woods, 1926, reproduced in colour. Nancy Green, Kate Rutherford and Toni Tomlinson, Walter J. Phillips, Pomegranate, Portland, Oregon, 2013, page 81 for Winter Woods, 1926, reproduced in colour. $800–1,200

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Index

A Amiot, Patrick & Brigitte Laurent…108 Armstrong, William (1822-1914)…130 B Beatty, John William (1869-1941)…51, 124 Bellefleur, Léon (1910-2007)…25, 66, 120 Berthon, George Théodore (1806-1892)…53 Bobak, Bruno Joseph (1923-2013)…5 Bobak, Molly Lamb (1922-2014)…85 Burton, Dennis Eugene Norman (1933-2013)… 104 Burton, Ralph Wallace (1905-1983)…122 Bush, Jack Hamilton (1909-1977)…71 C Caddy, John Herbert (1801-1883)…129 Carlyle, Florence (1864-1923)…60 Casson, Alfred Joseph (1898-1992)…16, 20, 30, 34, 44, 63 Coburn, Frederick Simpson (1871-1960)…35 Comfort, Charles Fraser (1900-1994)…95 Comtois, Ulysse (1931-1999)…105 Cullen, Maurice Galbraith (1866-1934)…37, 39, 62, 94 D Dallaire, Jean-Philippe (1916-1965)…46 de Grandmaison, Nicholas (1892-1978)…7 des Clayes, Berthe (1877-1968)…82 Dorland, Kim (b.1974)…69 E Etrog, Sorel (1933-2014)…23 F Fairley, Barker (1887-1986)…19, 87, 97 Ferron, Marcelle (1924-2001)…73 FitzGerald, Lionel Lemoine (1890-1956)…32, 101 Fortin, Marc-Aurèle (1888-1970)…9, 21 Friend, Washington F. (c.1820-1886)…131

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H Hall, John (b.1943)…106 Harris, Lawren Stewart (1885-1970)…12, 43, 67 Haworth, Peter (1889-1986)…88 Hewton, Randolph Stanley (1888-1960)…84, 91 Hodgson, Thomas Sherlock (1924-2006)…70, 103, 109 Hopkins, Tom (1944-2011)…114 Hudon, Normand (1929-1997)…8, 98, 117 Hughes, Edward John (1913-2007)…10, 11 Hutchison, Frederick William (1871-1953)…93 Hurtubise, Jacques (b.1939)…116 I Iskowitz, Gershon (1921-1988)…48 J Jackson, Alexander Young (1882-1974)…41, 83, 96 Johnston, Frank Hans (1888-1949)…15, 40, 80, 121 Johnstone, John Young (1887-1930)…13 K Kasyn, John (1926-2008)…28 Kieff, Antonio Grediaga (b.1936)…113 Klunder, Harold (b.1943)…75 Krieghoff, Cornelius (1815-1872)…52, 55, 56 Kurelek, William (1927-1977)…22, 45, 74 L Lewis, Maud (1903-1970)…2, 3 Lismer, Arthur (1885-1969)…65 Little, John Geoffrey Caruthers (b.1928)…6, 18, 26 Lyall, Laura Adeline Muntz (1860-1930)…59 M MacDonald, Manly Edward (1889-1971)…126 Maltais, Marcella (b.1933)…102 McCarthy, Doris Jean (1910-2010)…76, 79 Meredith, John (1933-2000)…107, 112, 115 Milne, David Brown (1882-1953)…31, 133 Mitchell, Thomas Wilberforce (1879-1958)…128 Morris, Kathleen Moir (1893-1986)…42, 50 Mount, Rita (1888-1967)…27, 90

N Norris, Joe (1924-1996)…100 Norwell, Graham Noble (1901-1967)…1, 89 P Partridge, David Gerry (1919-2006)…111 Peel, Paul (1860-1892)…57, 58 Perrigard, Hal Ross (1891-1960)…127 Phillips, Walter Joseph (1884-1963)…132, 135 Pilot, Robert Wakeham (1898-1967)…14, 123 Plaskett, Joseph Francis (1918-2014)…29, 86 R Rains, Malcolm (b.1947)…119 Riopelle, Jean-Paul (1923-2002)…47 Roberts, William Goodridge (1904-1974)…81 Robinson, Albert Henry (1881-1956)…17 Ronald, William (1926-1998)…72 Ross, Frederick Joseph (1927-2014)…110 Rungius, Carl Clemens Moritz (1869-1959)…78 S Sheppard, Peter Clapham (1882-1965)…49, 64, 92 Shilling, Arthur (1941-1986)…99 Stark, William Redver (1885-1953)…125 Surrey, Philip Henry Howard (1910-1990)…4 Suzor-Coté, Marc-Aurèle de Foy (1869-1937)… 36, 38 T Tanabe, Takao (b.1926)…24, 33 Thauberger, David A. (b.1948)…118 V Varley, Frederick Horsman (1881-1969)…68, 77 Verner, Frederick Arthur (1836-1928)…54 W Watson, Homer Ransford (1855-1936)…61 Wieland, Joyce (1930-1998)…134


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

Notes

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William Ronald His Art, His Life Iris Nowell For release fall 2016 Figure I Publishing Inc, Vancouver, BC

Advance notice This highly anticipated art book documents William Ronald’s outstanding art and his remarkable life, as never before revealed.

W il li a m Ro n a ld His Art, His Life

Iris Nowell

224 pages, 8" x 10", hard cover 110 full colour reproductions

William Ronald 5RQDOGDFKLHYHGKLVÃ&#x20AC;UVWVXFFHVVLQZKHQ the Art Gallery of Toronto (now the Art Gallery of Ontario) purchased In Dawn The Heart +HPRYHGWR1HZ<RUNLQDQGEHIRUHKLV Ã&#x20AC;UVWH[KLELWLRQDWWKHUHQRZQHG.RRW]*DOOHU\LQ WKH0XVHXPRI0RGHUQ$UWSXUFKDVHGLQ KLVSt. Paulia,QWKH6RORPRQ5 *XJJHQKHLP0XVHXPSXUFKDVHGEarth Ronaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work is held in more than 30 public JDOOHULHVLQWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVDQG&DQDGDDQG in prestigious private collections.

Iris Nowell Author of Painters Eleven: The Wild Ones of Canadian Art, 2010, now in its 3rd printing. Also Harold Town, VKRUWOLVWHGIRUWKH0HOYD-'Z\HU$ZDUG)RU ([FHOOHQFHLQ$UWDQG$UFKLWHFWXUH%RRNVLQ&DQDGD $QG-R\FH:LHODQG$/LIHLQ$UW1RZHOOKDV also published two books on philanthropy.

In recognition of supporters of this book to date: Benefactor:5RE6DQGUD0D\ Patrons:-RKQ5XGG\5REDQG0LP2·'RZGD'U*RUGRQDQG &DURO6FKDFWHU5RQDOGDQG1DQF\.DOLIHU7KH5REHUW0F/DXJKOLQ Gallery, Oshawa and the Ronald Estate.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

Conditions Of Sale

1. All lots are sold “AS IS”. Any description issued by the auctioneer of an article to be sold is subject to variation to be posted or announced verbally in the auction room prior to the time of sale. While the auctioneer has endeavoured not to mislead in the description issued, and the utmost care is taken to ensure the correct cataloguing of each item, such descriptions are purely statements of opinion and are not intended to constitute a representation to the prospective purchasers and no warranty of the correctness of such description is made. An opportunity for inspection of each article is offered prior to the time of sale. No sale will be set aside on account of lack of correspondence of the article with its description or its reproduction, if any, whether colour or black & white. Some lots are of an age and/or nature which preclude their being in pristine condition and some catalogue descriptions make reference to damage and/or restoration. The lack of such a reference does not imply that a lot is free from defects nor does any reference to certain defects imply the absence of others. Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition. It is the responsibility of prospective purchasers to inspect or have inspected each lot upon which they wish to bid, relying upon their own advisers, and to bid accordingly. 2. Each lot sold is subject to a premium of 18% of the successful bid price of each lot as part of the purchase price. 3. Unless exempted by law, the buyer is required to pay Harmonized Sales Tax on the total purchase price including the buyer’s premium. For international buyers, taxes are not applicable when purchases are shipped out of country. Items shipped out of Ontario, the buyer is required to pay taxes as per the tax status of that province, whether it HST or GST (Goods and Services Tax).

4. The auctioneer reserves the right to withdraw any lot from sale at any time, to divide any lot or to combine any two or more lots at his sole discretion, all without notice. 5. The auctioneer has the right to refuse any bid and to advance the bidding at his absolute discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right not to accept and not to reject any bid. Without limitation, any bid which is not commensurate with the value of the article offered, or which is merely a nominal or fractional advance over the previous bid may not be recognized. 6. Each lot may be subject to an unpublished reserve which may be changed at any time by agreement between the auctioneer and the consignor. The auctioneer may bid, or direct an employee to bid, on behalf of the consignor as agreed between them. In addition, the auctioneer may accept and submit absentee and telephone bids, to be executed by an employee of the auctioneer, pursuant to the instructions of prospective purchasers not in attendance at the sale. 7. The highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer for any lot shall be the buyer and such buyer shall forthwith assume full risk and responsibility for the lot and must comply with such other Conditions of Sale as may be applicable. If any dispute should arise between bidders the auctioneer shall have the absolute discretion to designate the buyer or, at his option, to withdraw any disputed lot from the sale, or to re-offer it at the same or a subsequent sale. The auctioneer’s decision in all cases shall be final. 8. Immediately after the purchase of a lot, the buyer shall pay or undertake to the satisfaction of the auctioneer with respect to payment of the whole or any part of the purchase price requested by the auctioneer, failing which

the auctioneer in his sole discretion may cancel the sale, with or without re-offering the item for sale.

cardholder and therefore cannot be accepted over the telephone. However, fax authorization arrangements can be made.

9. The buyer shall pay for all lots within 48 hours from the date of the sale, after which a late charge of 2% per month on the total invoice may be incurred or the auctioneer, in his sole discretion, may cancel the sale. The buyer shall not become the owner of the lot until paid for in full. Items must be removed within 10 days from the date of sale , after which storage charges may be incurred.

13. In the event of failure to pay for or remove articles within the aforementioned time limit, the auctioneer, without limitation of the rights of the consignor and the auctioneer against the buyer, may resell any of the articles affected, and in such case the original buyer shall be responsible to the auctioneer and the consignor for:

10. Each lot purchased, unless the sale is cancelled as above, shall be held by the auctioneer at his premises or at a public warehouse at the sole risk of the buyer until fully paid for and taken away. 11. Notwithstanding condition no. 1, if the buyer, prior to removal of a lot, makes arrangements satisfactory to the auctioneer for the inspection of such lot by a fully qualified person acceptable to the auctioneer to determine the genuineness or authenticity of the lot, to be carried out promptly following the sale of the lot, and if, but only if, within a period of 14 days following the sale a written opinion of such person is presented to the auctioneer to the effect that the lot is not genuine or authentic, accompanied by a written request by the buyer for rescission of the sale, then the sale of the lot will be rescinded and the sale price refunded to the buyer. 12. Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), and VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000). As Waddington's requires written authorization for all credit card purchases, credit cards must be presented in person by the

(a) any deficiency in price between the re-sale amount and the amount to have been paid by the original buyer; (b) any reasonable charge by the auctioneer for the storage of such articles until payment and removal by the subsequent buyer; and (c) the amount of commission which the auctioneer would have earned had payment been made in full by the original buyer. 14. It is the responsibility of the buyer to make all arrangements for insuring, packing and removing the property purchased and any assistance by the auctioneer or his servants, agents or contractors, in packing or removal shall be rendered as a courtesy and without any liability to them. 15. The auctioneer acts solely as agent for the consignor and makes no representation as to any attribute of, title to, or restriction affecting the articles consigned for sale. Without limitation, the buyer understands that any item bought may be affected by the provisions of the Cultural Property Export Act (Canada). 16. The auctioneer reserves the right to refuse admission to the sale or to refuse to recognize any or all bids from any particular person or persons at any auction.

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Buying at Waddington’s

All lots will be offered and sold subject to the Conditions of Sale which appear in this catalogue as well as any Glossary and posted or oral announcement. By bidding at auction, bidders are bound by those Conditions and Glossary, as amended by any oral announcement or posted notices, which together form the contract of sale between the successful bidder (buyer), Waddington’s™ and the consignor (seller) of the lot. Descriptions or photographs of lots are not warranties and each lot is sold “as is” in accordance with the Conditions of Sale. Condition of Lots All of the items are to be considered, unless otherwise noted in the description, in good condition. The definition of “good” when used in reference to condition, describes an object as having had no major damage or repair but as with the nature of the material, may show minor surface wear, discolouration etc., which indicates the acceptable wear that the piece may acquire with age. If you are particular about minor flaws, you should examine the pieces in person or have our staff answer any questions before bidding. Sizes are approximate. It is the sole responsibility of the bidder to inquire as to the

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condition of a lot before bidding. Condition reports are available upon request by phone, fax, email or in person. You are advised to make any requests well in advance of the sale. Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition. Buyers Premium A premium of 18% of the successful bid price of each lot is paid by the buyer as part of the total purchase price. Invaluable Live! clients will be charged a buyer's premium of 21% of the successful bid price as part of the total purchase price. A charge of 13% HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) is applicable on the hammer price and buyer's premium, except for purchases exported from Canada. In the case where purchases are shipped out of the province of Ontario, the HST or GST is charged based on the tax status of that province.

Bidding To bid in person at the auction, you must register for a bidding number by showing identification acceptable to the Auctioneer upon entering the salesroom. Your number will identify you if you are the successful bidder. You will be responsible for all lots purchased on your bidding number. Banking information may be requested by Waddington’s™. You may submit an Absentee Bid Form if you are unable to attend the sale. Bidding by telephone, in limited circumstances, can be arranged prior to the sale. While we are pleased to offer absentee and telephone bidding as a service to our clients, and take great care in their commission, the Auctioneer will not be responsible for technical difficulties, errors or failure to execute bids. The Auctioneer may also execute bids on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve. The reserve is the confidential minimum price the seller is willing to accept for his or her property, below which it will not be sold.

Payment Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000). As Waddington's requires written authorization for all credit card purchases, credit cards must be presented in person by the cardholder and therefore cannot be accepted over the telephone. However, fax authorization arrangements can be made. ALL PRICES IN CANADIAN FUNDS


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 23 November 2015 at 7 p.m.

Selling at Waddington’s

Shipping: The Auctioneers will not undertake packing or shipping. The purchaser must designate and arrange for the services of an independent shipper and be responsible for all shipping, insurance expenses and any necessary export permits that may apply. The Auctioneers will, upon request, provide names of professional packers and shippers but will not be held responsible for the service or have any liability for providing this information. Reliable pre-auction estimates of shipping costs of lots offered in this sale may be obtained from: Pak Mail 905.470.6874 905.470.6875 416.293.8225 taurus@pakmailmarkham.ca www.pakmailmarkham.ca Envoy 416.299.3367 416.299.9750 ph@envoy.ca www.envoypackandship.com Removal of Purchases Purchases must be paid for within 48 hours of the date of the sale, and removed from premises within 10 days of the date of sale (see Conditions of Sale, conditions 8 to 15). Clients are advised that packing and/or handling of purchased lots by our employees or agents is undertaken solely as a courtesy for the convenience of clients.

Paintings, drawings, prints, furniture, jewellery and all forms of decorative arts and collectibles may be brought to our Toronto office where we can provide you with preliminary auction estimates and consignment procedures. Please visit our website at www.waddingtons.ca for details on our various departments and how to contact the specialists. We also accept mailed and emailed requests for advice on the marketability of objects. A photograph and phone number must accompany a full description of each item. Our specialists regularly travel to major Canadian cities to meet with prospective consignors. For further information, or to arrange an appointment, please contact our Toronto office. Property normally arrives at Waddington’s at least three months before the sale in order to allow our specialists time to research, catalogue, photograph and promote the items. Consignors will receive a contract to sign, setting forth terms and fees for our services.

Notice for our International Clients

Commission Rates Items selling for $7,500 or more 10% Items selling for $2,501 to $7,499 15% Items selling for $2,000 or less 20% *There is a minimum handling charge of $20 per item For items photographed and illustrated in printed catalogues fees are as follows: ¼ page - $150 ½ page - $400 Full page - $800 For items offered in online auctions photography fees are $20 per item. Insurance A 1% insurance charge, based on the hammer price of the property, will be applied to all accounts.

Restrictions exist regarding the import and export of species protected under CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species). This includes but is not limited to items made of or containing bone (whalebone etc.), ivory, tortoise shell, seal skin, rhinoceros horn and any other animal part and is strictly controlled or forbidden by most countries. Please review your country’s laws before bidding on pieces made of or containing these restricted items. It is the sole responsibility of the buyer to inquire about and obtain the proper permits for artwork purchased that may contain restricted materials, if such permit can be obtained. Please contact the department for further assistance. All Narwhal Tusks must have a Marine Harvest Number or a Marine and Mammal Transport number to be sold at Waddington's. For more information please visit: www.cites.org

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Operational StaďŹ&#x20AC;

Specialist Departments

Asian Art Chih-En Chen 416 847 6185 cc@waddingtons.ca Simone Ludlow Asian Art Administrator 416 847 6195 scl@waddingtons.ca

Jewellery, Watches & Numismatics Don P. McLean 416 847 6170 dpm@waddingtons.ca Lynda Macpherson Jewellery Administrator 416 847 6190 lm@waddingtons.ca

Canadian Fine Art

Monthly Fine Art

Linda Rodeck lr@waddingtons.ca

Doug Payne 416 847 6180 dp@waddingtons.ca

Erin Rutherford Fine Art Administrator 416 504 5100 er@waddingtons.ca Anna Holmes Condition Reports 416 847 6176 canadianart@waddingtons.ca Contemporary Art Stephen Ranger 416 847 6194 skr@waddingtons.ca Kristin Vance Fine Art Administrator 416 504 9100 ext 6178 kv@waddingtons.ca International Art Susan Robertson 416 847 6179 sr@waddingtons.ca Nadine Di Monte Assistant 416 847 6182 npd@waddingtons.ca Inuit Art Christa Ouimet 416 847 6184 co@waddingtons.ca Nadine Di Monte Assistant 416 847 6182 npd@waddingtons.ca

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Decorative Arts Bill Kime Silver, Glass & Ceramics 416 847 6189 bk@waddingtons.ca Sean Quinn Sculpture, Decorations, Clocks & Lighting 416 847 6187 sq@waddingtons.ca Andrew Brandt Rugs & Carpets 416 504 9100 ext 6200 ab@waddingtons.ca Fine Wine & Spirits Ryan Corrigan 416.504.9100 x6255 rtc@waddingtons.ca

President Duncan McLean 416 847 6183 adm@waddingtons.ca

Building Manager Steve Sheppard 416 847 6186 ss@waddingtons.ca

Vice President Business Development Stephen Ranger 416 847 6194 skr@waddingtons.ca

Client Services Andrew Brandt 416 504 9100 ext 6200 ab@waddingtons.ca

Vice President Fine Art Linda Rodeck 416 847 6176 lr@waddingtons.ca General Manager Duane Smith 416 847 6172 das@waddingtons.ca Creative & Technical Manager Jamie Long 416 847 6188 jl@waddingtons.ca Otto Lam Assistant ol@waddingtons.ca Accounts Manager Karen Sander 416 847 6173 ks@waddingtons.ca Elda Pappada 416 504 9100 x6213 ep@waddingtons.ca Corporate Receptionist Kate Godin 416 504 9100 kg@waddingtons.ca Appraisal Co-ordinator Ellie Muir 416 847 6196 em@waddingtons.ca Communications Tess McLean 416 504 9100 tm@waddingtons.ca

Waddingtons.ca/Collingwood P. O. Box 554, Collingwood ON L9Y 4B2 Valerie Brown 705 445 8811 vb@waddingtons.ca


Canadian Fine Art Waddingtons.ca

275 King Street East, Second Floor Toronto Ontario Canada M5A 1K2

Telephone: 416.504.5100 Fax: 416.504.6971 Toll Free: 1.877.504.5700

Profile for waddingtons

Canadian Fine Art Auction | Nov. 23, 2015  

Canadian Fine Art Auction | Nov. 23, 2015