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On View Friday 22 May 2015 from 12:00 Noon to 5:00 pm Saturday 23 May 2015 from 12:00 Noon to 5:00 pm Sunday 24 May 2015 from 12:00 Noon to 5:00 pm Monday 25 May 2015 from 10:00 am to 12 Noon Select lots may be viewed otherwise by appointment. Preview and Auction to be held at Waddington’s 275 King Street East, 2nd Floor Toronto Ontario Canada M5A 1K2 This auction is subject to the Conditions of Sale printed in the back of this catalogue. All lots in the auction may be viewed online at CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

Waddingtons.ca

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Canadian Fine Art Auction Monday 25 May 2015 at 7:00 pm


Front Cover Lot 67 YVES GAUCHER GREEN, YELLOW/RED, 1ÈRE VERSION Inside Front Cover Lot 37 JOHN WILLIAM BEATTY, O.S.A., R.C.A. BROOKS FALLS, MAGNETAWAN RIVER Title Page Lot 68 JOHN MEREDITH VOYAGE Inside Back Cover Lot 20 ARTHUR LISMER, O.S.A., R.C.A. KILLICKS (STONE ANCHORS, N.S.) Back Cover Lot 39 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. PONT ROYAL, PARIS

All lots in the auction may be viewed

online at CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca This catalogue and its contents © 2015 Waddington McLean & Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Photography by Waddington’s

Specialist Linda Rodeck 416 847 6176 lr@waddingtons.ca Fine Art Administrator Erin Rutherford 416 504 5100 er@waddingtons.ca Corporate Receptionist Kate Godin 416 504 9100 kg@waddingtons.ca Accounts Manager Karen Sander 416 847 6173 ks@waddingtons.ca Absentee and Phone Bidding 416 504 0033 (Fax) bids@waddingtons.ca Online Bidding www.invaluable.com Communications Tess McLean 416 504 9100 tm@waddingtons.ca


I have worked in the auction business off and on for close to twenty-five years, and I have always viewed it as a great privilege. The job can seem routine: the call for consignments is followed by client visits (with, it must be said, a degree of travel often involving gravel roads and locations unmapped on my GPS); consignments come in and are catalogued, researched, shot, and published; the sale marketed, exhibited and finally conducted. Then we start all over again. And we adhere to a rather strict schedule: auction season occurs each Spring and Fall. Traditionally the sales take place in the third week of May and November, and the routine is quite firmly established. Nonetheless, the job can be unpredictable. It is impossible to know what surprises will pepper the day and that has always been a huge part of the fun. In my work world, each day is inevitably a little better than the last as the sale builds to completion – lot by lot, consignment by consignment. That sense of potential and the unpredictability of it all is what make the industry so exciting. I’ve always liked the people I work with. I have been lucky in this way and keep in touch with colleagues from previous positions I have held. My luck here seems to have held firm this year. The team I have worked with to assemble our major Spring Sale of Canadian Art have dedicated themselves to myriad responsibilities that go into producing the catalogue sale. Our staff have delivered, without complaint, despite the considerable demands that are placed on them particularly at two crucial times in the auction process: press deadline and sale day. It is here that I must acknowledge by name, Erin Rutherford and Eileen Reilly. They have made each day here a little easier through their professional conduct. Both women carried a heavy load this season but made it look as light as air. They have grit and fortitude and they have been invaluable to me. Additionally, I admire the collectors. They are often quirky and peculiar, but I like that. They tell fascinating stories about their pictures, their path to collecting, and even about themselves in what sometimes feels like a moment of confession. In my experience, they have been unfailingly generous with their hospitality, their knowledge and their time. They have an unbridled passion for Canadian Art and I am indebted to them for sharing their personal experiences with me. And so another sale is offered to you for your competition on May 25th. You will find within the pages of this catalogue many of the sorts of works you have come to expect from us: works by the Group of Seven, Painters 11 and other major schools. But we have also tried to offer you works by artists who appear more rarely on the secondary market and whose work we hugely admire, such as Harold Klunder, Yves Gaucher, John Meredith, Lemoine FitzGerald, Frances Loring and Joyce Wieland. We hope you enjoy reading through the catalogue, and viewing our sale live in a few weeks’ time, as much as we enjoyed putting it together for you. We extend our thanks to Christine Boyanoski and David Silcox for their contribution to the writing of this catalogue. — Linda Rodeck Senior Specialist, Canadian Art Vice President, Fine Art


Waddington’s

Leadership Team

Waddington’s is Canada’s most diverse and significant provider of fine art auction and appraisal services. Based on a rich legacy in the industry, Waddington’s actively seeks to redefine our business to ensure we remain fresh and reactive to what our clients are seeking. Through our appraisal, auction, private sale and downsizing expertise, we are pleased to provide a complete range of services.

Waddington’s leadership team brings together three of the industry’s best. The combination of their experience, knowledge of market trends and client networks builds on Waddington’s 160 year legacy of growth and dominance.

Waddington’s is Canada’s original auction house, with a history of conducting auctions since 1850. We are also an international auction house, providing access to world markets. Waddington’s is an innovative leader. We enjoy pushing the limits, exploring new territory and creating new partnerships. From the marathon auction of Maple Leaf Gardens, our partnership with the LCBO to auction fine wine, to the launch of Concrete Contemporary and our new Pop-Up Gallery series, we are driven to find what’s new, what’s exciting, and what you want to buy or sell.

Waddington’s by Department Asian Art Canadian Fine Art Contemporary Art Auctions and Projects Decorative Arts International Art Inuit Art Jewellery, Watches & Numismatics “Off the Wall” Art Philanthropy and Community

Duncan McLean, President, is Waddington’s corporate leader, responsible for strategic development and innovation realization. Under his direction Waddington’s strives to not only continuously evolve to meet the needs of our clients and address the demands of the market, but to push the boundaries, with integrity, creativity and passion. Mr. McLean has been involved in the auction industry for over 35 years, as art specialist, appraiser, auctioneer and corporate leader. His knowledge base spans the diversity of Waddington’s offerings, with internationally-recognized expertise in Inuit Art. As Vice President Business Development, Stephen Ranger is focused on identifying new markets, new clients and new ways to do business. For example, Mr. Ranger launched Waddington’s Contemporary Art venture, Concrete Contemporary, to reach an exciting new sector of art enthusiasts and artists. Under Mr. Ranger’s guidance, new partnerships are also being created resulting in edgy new offerings like our Pop-Up Gallery series debuting in 2013. Mr. Ranger brings over 25 years of diverse experience as an auctioneer, appraiser and consultant in the art and fine wine auction industry with specific expertise in Canadian Fine Art. Linda Rodeck, Vice President Fine Art, is one of Canada’s most trusted and respected Canadian Art specialists. Her impressive career of 25+ years includes leadership roles in the country’s most distinguished auction houses. Ms. Rodeck’s keen understanding of the market and her extensive network are invaluable in her role of sourcing the best works and providing the best service to our clients. As Vice President of Waddington’s Fine Art, Ms. Rodeck plays a critical role in developing new business leveraging her success in the Canadian art market.


Canadian Fine Art

Concrete Contemporary Auctions and Projects

Waddington’s has been a major force in the Canadian art sector for over five decades, beginning with our first auction of Canadian Fine Art held at the Queen Elizabeth Building at the CNE in 1967. Since that historic event, Waddington’s has offered some of the most important Canadian works, set record prices, and has been an integral part of driving the Canadian art market.

Waddington’s launched its newest division, Concrete Contemporary Auctions and Projects in March 2012 with a vision and mandate to create a secondary market for contemporary Canadian art.

Linda Rodeck Senior Specialist, Canadian Art Vice President, Fine Art

An exciting initiative is the introduction of our Pop-Up Gallery series. These shortduration single artist exhibitions offer works by some of Canada’s most accomplished and influential working artists. As well, the groundbreaking Concrete Contemporary Acquisition Fund assists museums and public galleries in the acquisition of works by artists included in the auction.

Concrete Contemporary Auctions merges the worlds of traditional auction and the retail gallery, where our relationships with artists, art dealers, curators and collectors result in exciting new sources of contemporary works. The auctions are tightly focused on Canadian contemporary art since 1980 with an emphasis on midand late-career artists with exhibition history in the private and public sphere.

Led by one of Canada’s most plugged-in arts experts, Stephen Ranger, we are committed to exploring new ways to connect, expand and support the contemporary art community.

Stephen Ranger Senior Specialist, Contemporary Art


Asian Art

Jewellery, Watches and Numismatics

Waddington’s Asian Art department is Canada’s leader in serving the demands of the rapidly growing Asian market supported by our recognized and credible expertise. Our ability to achieve exceptional prices for works is based on our international reputation and network with the community.

Waddington's has conducted auctions of Fine Jewellery and Numismatics for close to three decades. Highly respected expertise and in-depth knowledge of both domestic and international markets are the anchors of the ongoing success and popularity of our auctions.

Specializing in jade, paintings, porcelain, religious works of art, textiles, woodblock and export wares, we present works from China, Japan, Korea, South East Asia, South Asia, Himalaya and others.

Our auctions are composed of a wide spectrum of contemporary and period jewellery featuring examples by some of the most desired names in jewellery including Tiffany, Cartier, Fabergé, Jensen, Yurman and Van Cleef & Arpels. Also featured in our auctions are fine wrist and pocket watches, designer fashion jewellery and all forms of numismatics including coins, tokens, banknotes and ancients.

Anthony Wu Specialist, Asian Art

Donald McLean Senior Specialist, Jewellery, Watches and Numismatics


Decorative Arts

International Art

Decorative Arts at Waddington’s encompasses a broad and diverse variety of objects and the department's client database is one of our largest.  From ancient to modern, delicate to deadly, Waddington’s Decorative Arts department redefines the term, bringing much more than traditional silverware and porcelain figurines to market, and with remarkable success.

Waddington’s International Art department presents auctions of fine art from around the world, offering original works from art centres across North America and Europe while continuing to expand our scope to bring our collectors works from Asia, South Asia, Russia and South America. A major element of Waddington’s legacy, our International art auctions draw on Canada’s cultural diversity. The combination of our expertise and our expansive global network ensures the highest standards of authentication and research.

Waddington’s reputation for developing new markets is well represented by our Decorative Arts department, as is our ability to present large collections – notable recent sales have included Contemporary Studio Glass, Scientific Instruments and Militaria.

Rare and important paintings, sculptures, prints and photographs are offered in our live and online auctions, attracting buyers worldwide.

The department regularly offers auctions which include bronzes, items of Canadian historical interest, ceramics, devotional works of art, glass, lighting, militaria, mirrors, objets de vertu, porcelain, silver, scientific instruments, travel and exploration maps. Susan Robertson Senior Specialist, International Art

Sean Quinn Specialist, Decorative Arts

Bill Kime Senior Specialist, Decorative Arts


Inuit Art

“Off the Wall” Art

Waddington’s is internationally recognized as one of the leading authorities in marketing Inuit Art. No other auction house has been as intrinsically linked to the development of a market for this art form. Inuit Art is a proud part of our DNA. From our first landmark auction in 1978 of the William Eccles Collection, Waddington’s has offered thousands of works, set record prices, and expanded the market well beyond Canada’s borders.

Our “Off The Wall” Art online auctions are a unique opportunity to showcase accessible art. Drawing from our International Art, Canadian Art and Inuit Art divisions, “Off The Wall” Art auctions feature paintings, prints and sculpture.

Our legacy of successful Inuit Art auctions, our ability to achieve continually increasing values and our creation of an international market have been key factors in validating Inuit art as a whole and establishing it as an integral part of the Canadian Art scene.

These monthly, online auctions are always an eclectic selection of affordable works – a great way to learn, enjoy art and start building a collection. Working closely with our other divisions, this auction has developed its own diverse and extensive network of clients.

Doug Payne Specialist, Fine Art

Duncan McLean Senior Specialist, Inuit Art

Christa Ouimet Specialist, Inuit Art


Philanthropy and Community

Waddington's is committed to working within the community by contributing our time and expertise to charity fundraising events and appraisal clinics. We are honoured to work with countless museums, galleries, art organizations and fund raising events and contribute our time to over 20 events each year raising over $2,000,000 annually for the community. In addition, the Concrete Contemporary Acquisition Fund each year funds 50% of the purchase price for a work of contemporary Canadian art for a public institution. Organizations we support include: Aids Committee of Toronto, SNAP Best Buddies Birdlife International Canadian Opera Company Canadian Film Centre Calgary Contemporary Casey House, Art with Heart Casey House, Snowball CAMH Unmasked Covenant House Design Hope The Furniture Bank Integra Foundation Lake Ontario Waterkeepers OCAD University Metro Toronto Zoo

Montreal Children’s Hospital Music and Beyond, Ottawa Nyota School, Kenya Princess Margaret Hospital Robert McLaughlin Gallery Second Harvest, Toronto Taste Serve Canada St. Mary’s General Hospital, Kitchener St. Michael’s Hospital, ARTGEMS The STOP Foodbank Toronto Symphony Orchestra The Varley Gallery Windsor Art Gallery Warchild Canada York University Fisher Fund


Canadian Fine Art Lots 1–184


CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

1 CHARLES FRASER COMFORT, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. THE PEEP-HOLE TREE, GEORGIAN BAY oil on canvas signed 20 ins x 26 ins; 50.8 cms x 66 cms $7,000–9,000

Provenance: Wallack Galleries, Ottawa Private Collection, Montreal Literature: Margaret Gray, Margaret Rand and Lois Steen, Charles Comfort, Agincourt, Ontario, 1976, page 69 and page 45 for a closely related sketch entitled Peep Hole Tree. Note: “Naples yellow, yellow ochre, raw sienna, raw umber, burnt umber... both Alizarin crimson and either vermilion or scarlet vermilion, two blues, cobalt and cerulean... then viridian. That would be how I’d set my palette...” Comfort’s landscapes are characterized as much by their bold and balanced graphic qualities, as they are by their underlying sensuousness. The artist pares down the work to the barest of forms: straight lines juxtapose warm curves; rocks, trees and clouds ooze with rich colours. His landscapes shine brightest when situated in Haliburton and the Maritimes, but especially in Georgian Bay. As Gray, Rand and Steen write, “Time and again we are made aware of Comfort’s superb sense of colour, harmony and tone - there is unerring beauty, even a voluptuous quality to his best landscapes, especially in the flesh tones of the Georgian Bay rocks.”

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

2 ALAN CASWELL COLLIER, O.S.A., R.C.A. PATTERN OF A HARVEST LAND oil on canvas signed 20 ins x 30 ins; 50.8 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $3,000–4,000

3 HENRI LEOPOLD MASSON PETITE VALLÉE, GASPÉSIE, 1978 oil on canvas signed; dated on the reverse 22 ins x 28 ins; 66 cms x 56.5 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $3,000–5,000

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4 ETHEL SEATH INTERIOR watercolour signed 14.5 ins x 13.5 ins; 36.8 cms x 34.3 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist By descent through the family Private Collection, Ontario Exhibited: Ethel Seath (1879-1963) Retrospective Exhibition, September 1987, Galerie Walter Klinkhoff, Montreal, no.42. $4,000–5,000

5 PELEG FRANKLIN BROWNELL, O.S.A., R.C.A. BONAVENTURE ISLAND, OLD FISHING COMPANY HOUSES oil on canvas signed 14 ins x 21 ins; 35.6 cms x 53.3 cms Provenance: James Wilson & Co. Fine Art Dealers, Ottawa Private Collection, Ontario Note: Though Peleg Franklin Brownell found his favourite sketching grounds close to his home in Ottawa, he also explored and created works set in the areas of the Lower St. Lawrence, the Little Saguenay River and the Gaspé Peninsula. Brownell’s works exhibit great technical ability. His landscapes, which arise out of vigourously applied brushstrokes, are thoughtfully composed. Southeast of the village of Percé, off of the southern coast of Québec, Bonaventure Island was one of the early seasonal fishing ports of New France. What is truly picturesque about this work is not the land nor the old fishing company houses that give it its title, but rather the pensive and invigorating sea of sapphire blue. $3,500–4,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

6 DORIS JEAN MCCARTHY, O.S.A., R.C.A. GRAND MANAN REMEMBERED, 2001 watercolour and oil pastel signed Sight 13.5 ins x 21 ins; 34.3 cms x 53.3 cms Provenance: Wynick/Tuck Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $2,500–3,000

7 ROBERT FRANCIS MICHAEL MCINNIS BRIDGE SERIES, RED, 1985 oil on canvas signed and dated 1985; also signed, titled and dated “1-9-3-85” on the reverse 24 ins x 30 ins; 61 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Wallack Galleries, Ottawa Charles Bronfman’s Claridge Collection, Montreal Note: Sold to benefit Historica Canada. $2,500–3,000

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8 JOSEPH JEAN ALBERT PALARDY LA DÉCHARGE, JUILLET ‘37 oil on illustration board titled and dated on the reverse and inscribed “Jori Smith” and “Jean did this” 3.5 ins x 4.24 ins; 8.9 cms x 10.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, British Columbia $700–900

9 PETER CLAPHAM SHEPPARD, O.S.A., R.C.A. DRY DOCK oil on masonite signed 10.5 ins x 11.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 29.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario (a wedding gift from the artist) Private Collection $2,000–3,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

10 ERIC RIORDON, A.R.C.A. NEW YEAR’S EVE, MT. ST. SAUVEUR oil on canvas signed 20 ins x 24 ins; 50.8 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto Note: According to the present owner, this work was executed in 1939. $3,000–5,000

11 BERTHE DES CLAYES HAULING LOGS IN WINTER oil on panel signed 10.5 ins x 13.75 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $2,500–3,000

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12 CARL FELLMAN SCHAEFER, R.C.A. LATE AFTERNOON, AUTUMN CALEDON, 1935 watercolour titled, dated “October 24, 1935” and inscribed “To Graham MacInnis from Carl, March 21, 1937” in pencil on the reverse 15.5 ins x 22 ins; 39.4 cms x 55.9 cms Provenance: Collection of Graham MacInnis, s.l. The Framing Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $3,000–4,000

13 DOROTHY KNOWLES, R.C.A. FLAX FIELD IN LATE AFTERNOON oil on canvas signed, titled, dated ‘85 and also inscribed “July 16. 85” and “OC-28-85” on the reverse 24 ins x 40 ins; 61 cms x 101.6 cms Provenance: Waddington & Shiell Galleries Ltd., Toronto Private Collection, Montreal $3,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

14 JACK HAMILTON BUSH, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. STILL-LIFE, 1950 watercolour signed; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse 10.25 ins x 14.5 ins; 26 cms x 36.8 cms Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist By descent to the present owner Private Collection, Lake of Bays $3,000–5,000

15 MARC-AURÈLE FORTIN, A.R.C.A. LA CUEILLETTE watercolour, laid down on card signed 18.5 ins x 24 ins; 47 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Charles Bronfman’s Claridge Collection, Montreal Literature: Interview MAF-RB 1968/5, quoted in Michèle Grandbois (ed.), Marc-Aurèle Fortin: The Experience of Colour, Les Éditions de l’Homme, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, 2011, page 102. Note: Marc-Aurèle Fortin started to work with watercolour in the early 1920s. By virtue of the immediacy of the medium, his work changed drastically, setting the stage for dazzling landscapes that bordered the limits of reality. Describing his use of watercolour, Fortin said: “when you master it, it’s like a morphine addiction. It’s a tremendous mania.” La Cueillette, vivid and luminous, is an exquisite display of the painter’s whimsical palette. Sold to benefit Historica Canada. $8,000–12,000

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16 CHRISTOPHER PRATT, R.C.A. THE GYPSY ON THE NARROWS watercolour signed and dated ‘56

Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, St. John’s, Newfoundland (by descent) Literature: Christopher Pratt, Personal Reflections on a Life in Art, Key Porter Books, Toronto, 1995, page 14.

18 ins x 22.25 ins; 45.7 cms x 56.5 cms $8,000–12,000

Note: “During the winter of 1956 I did several watercolours that were concerned with the look and feel of St. John’s, romantic subjects that yielded easily to techniques I had learned from reproductions of paintings in American magazines...” Created before Pratt’s shift to hyper-realism, this painterly work is rooted in a regional geography. Unlike his later works, which aim for the sublime, it is the personalization of this watercolour – the non-fictional infusion of time and place – which makes the impact. That Pratt has called the east coast home for all of his life makes him an authentic narrator of its vistas. The Narrows is the only entrance to the St. John’s Harbour, a passage between the Southside and Signal hills. The story of the work’s acquisition from the artist by the original owner is playful and intriguing. Upon leaving the artist’s studio, the gentleman caught a glimpse of a work depicting The Narrows. He jested with the artist, stating that if Pratt would only paint his boat, The Gypsy, into the scene, he could consider it sold. The artist accepted the challenge, and this work is the result of that exchange.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

17 WILLIAM HENRY CLAPP, A.R.C.A. THE ARTIST AND HIS MODEL oil on panel with an authentication from Laky Gallery, Carmel on the reverse 10.5 ins x 13.75 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.9 cms $7,000–9,000

Literature: A.K. Prakash, Impressionism in Canada: A Journey of Rediscovery, Arnoldsche Art Publishers, Stuttgart, Germany, 2014, page 527. Note: “A Modernist, William Henry Clapp is one of the monarchs of Canadian Impressionism. Indifferent as an artist to the emotional elements implicit in everyday experience, he extolled landscapes and the human figure – specifically the nude. In painting these works, he observed the phenomena of light on the generative forces of the organic world. The body is only a detail, an iconography, subordinate to the pattern in which light and shade govern vision. Immersed in golden quietude, Clapp’s art is all the more credible because of its objective truth – an art of passive reverie that has inspired all Impressionists since Renoir who are preoccupied with light and colour to the exclusion of human issues.” A signature of his works, Clapp’s setting is diaphanous and diffused. Mauves and violets blend with rosy white to form his model’s supple flesh. The eye is attracted by the sensuous application of colour, a hazy softness that tempts and beguiles us. The artist gazes back at the viewer, catching us in our intrigue of this Andromeda, against a backdrop of deep yellow.

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18 NORMAND HUDON RUE PRINCIPALE oil on masonite signed, titled and dated ‘89 10 ins x 12 ins; 25.4 cms x 30.5 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $3,000–5,000

19 HORTENSE CROMPTON MATTICE GORDON, R.C.A. TIME, BOUND IN SPACE oil on canvas signed and dated ‘57; also signed and titled on the reverse 24 ins x 22 ins; 61 cms x 55.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Exhibited: 88th Annual Exhibition, Ontario Society of Artists, March 1960. Literature: Iris Nowell, Painters Eleven: The Wild Ones of Canadian Art, Douglas & McIntyre, Toronto, 2010, page 263 for a similar work entitled Orange and Yellows Bound in Space, 1952. Ian Vorres, “Work of Gordons seen part of city tradition,” Hamilton Spectator, May 11, 1957. Note: “...Hortense Gordon embraced the rule that art is an endless search and experiment. Her life work thus is a gradual scintillating flight towards abstraction.” Drawing inspiration from the rawness and splendour of Cubism, Gordon creates a juxtaposition of shapes, colour and energy. Time, Bound in Space is an impulsive burst; the calibres, spindles and ruby jewels of a watch sprung from its case. Gears and pivots, resemble planetary orbs, non-objective and boundless despite the work’s title. $6,000–8,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

20 ARTHUR LISMER, O.S.A., R.C.A. KILLICKS (STONE ANCHORS, N.S.) oil on panel signed and dated ‘54; also signed (twice), titled and dated 1954 and ‘54 on the reverse 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Laing Galleries, Toronto Private Collection, U.S.A. Literature: Dennis Reid, Canadian Jungle: The Later Work of Arthur Lismer, The Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1985. $20,000–30,000

Note: In 1940, at the age of fifty-four, Arthur Lismer moved to Montreal to take up the position of educational supervisor at the Art Association of Montreal, which commenced in January 1941. He also began teaching fine arts and aesthetics at McGill University on a sessional basis that Fall. This change of location was to have a noticeable effect on his art, for in Montreal, Lismer was able to observe how Modernism was developing in Quebec through the work of the Contemporary Arts Society and the Automatistes around Paul-Émile Borduas. Also, beginning in 1945, Lismer began to make sketching trips to Cape Breton Island (in addition to Georgian Bay and later, Vancouver Island) up until 1954. Killicks was one of several small pictures that resulted from that final trip. The paintings that Lismer made in Ingonish and Neil’s Harbour on the east coast of Cape Breton differ significantly from his earlier, better-known work at Georgian Bay. In this picture, the focus of the tightly knit composition is the dock litter that he encountered —barrels, buoys, killicks (stone anchors), etc. The maritime landscape appears only in the upper left corner through a window. Lismer was drawn to the well-worn, hand-made objects as subject matter because they had “the same feeling of weather as pine trees,” as well as “a human quality.” They also symbolized the fishermen’s resourcefulness in crafting objects which they could use to make a living from the ocean. The influence of contemporary Montreal painters can be seen in Lismer’s selective use of thickly applied paint (here, confined to the netting, rope and patch of sea) in which the artist has drawn with the end of his brush to create details descriptive of water, netting, fish scales, etc. The close-up focus has an abstracting effect; it forces us to appreciate the abstract interplay of shapes and colours—blues and greys, punctuated by touches of brown and amber, and a red rope for contrast. Lismer never abandoned the subject in favour of pure abstraction, but a work such as Killicks clearly demonstrates that he had an affinity for it.

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21 MARC-AURÈLE FORTIN, A.R.C.A. PAYSAGE LAURENTIEN watercolour on board signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 22 ins x 27.75 ins; 55.9 cms x 70.5 cms Provenance: Galerie Lamoureux Ritzenhoff, Montreal $7,000–9,000

22 JOE NORRIS FOUR SCHOONERS AT ANCHOR oil on canvas signed 24 ins x 36 ins; 61 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Nova Scotia Literature: Chris Huntington, “My Life with Joe Norris,” in Bernard Riordon, Joe Norris: Painted Visions of Nova Scotia, Goose Lane Editions, The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, 2000, page 89. Note: The charming paintings of Joe Norris are synonymous with the Nova Scotian experience. Norris records the daily life and seasonal changes of a small fishing village – its inhabitants and animals, schooners and houses – all in the vivid technicolour of his small paint pots. As Chris Huntington writes, “Joe Norris is firstly an artist; secondly a folk artist. His work is bold, almost shockingly vibrant; it is cheerful, and as with most self-taught artists who are removed from the mainstream of society and its influences, it defines its own aesthetic. Above all, Norris’ work is GOOD ART! We are less interested here in the quaint folk artist than we are in the strong painter who reveals a part of his special world.” $3,000–4,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

23 LIONEL LEMOINE FITZGERALD GRAIN SILOS, SASKATCHEWAN oil on canvas, laid down on board signed 12 ins x 11 ins; 30.5 cms x 27.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, New York Literature: Ferdinand Eckhardt, L.L. FitzGerald (18901956) A Memorial Exhibition, The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1958, n.p.

Note: Born in Winnipeg in 1890, FitzGerald was the only member of the Group of Seven to call western Canada home. Despite numerous travels within Canada, Mexico and the United States, the artist remained rooted in Manitoba for all of his life. FitzGerald’s first one-man exhibition was held at the Winnipeg Art Gallery in 1921, where he presented a series of prairie landscapes. “He was particularly attracted to the Prairie landscape. Its minimal topography suited his pared-down aesthetic.” In this painting, FitzGerald softly renders the warmth of a summer’s day. Through the hazy mood of the prairie light, the scene is dreamlike and ethereal. The artist dollops the strong blue sky with a delicate meringue of clouds. The hearty grain silos and trees that dot the Saskatchewan landscape are transformed into soft layers of mint, pink and ochre tulle. As FitzGerald once remarked, “the prairie has many aspects, but intense light and the feeling of great space are dominating characteristics.”

Robert Enright, “Docile nudes, orgasmic trees,” The Globe and Mail, Saturday, March 12, 2005. $8,000–12,000

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24 FLORENCE CARLYLE, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. UNTITLED - PEELING POTATOES oil on panel, laid down on masonite signed 12.25 ins x 9.75 ins; 31.1 cms x 24.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Kingston Literature: Evelyn de Rostaing McMann, The Royal Canadian Academy of Arts: Exhibitions and Members, 1880-1979, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1981, page 62, cat.no.31 for Peeling Potatoes listed. Susan Butlin, The Practice of Her Profession, Florence Carlyle: Canadian Painter in the Age of Impressionism, McGill-Queen’s University Press, Kingston & Montreal, 2009, page xviii. Note: Like many women of her era, Carlyle painted what she knew best, the so-called “spaces of femininity” where women engaged in quotidian household tasks or partook in social events. However, unlike many women painters of her day, Carlyle was not a hobby painter but an accomplished professional artist and in 1897 was elected to the Royal Canadian Academy as an Associate Member. $7,000–9,000

25 C.I. GIBBONS ORIOLE, AILEEN AND ZELMA coloured pencil drawing signed and dated 1900 19.5 ins x 32.25 ins; 49.5 cms x 81.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Note: In 1861 the Prince of Wales was asked by members of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club (R.C.Y.C.) if he would donate a cup to commemorate his visit to Toronto the previous year. He agreed and so began the annual Prince of Wales Cup Race on Lake Ontario. During the 1880s the Aileen and Oriole - owned by the Gooderham family - were both frequent winners of the Cup. According to RCYC records, “During the season of 1893, the Zelma started in every race for which she was eligible and finished with an unbroken record of first places, nothwithstanding that in many cases she had to compete with boats of double her own tonnage...” $3,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

26 NICHOLAS DE GRANDMAISON PAPOOSE IN PIGTAILS

Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario

pastel signed

Literature: Hugh A. Dempsey, History in Their Blood, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver/Toronto, 1982, page 16.

11 ins x 8.75 ins; 27.9 cms x 22.2 cms $15,000–20,000

Note: De Grandmaison did not often title his portraits of women and children, preferring to label them generically as “Squaw” or “Papoose.” Belatedly, he realized the historical significance of recording the names of all his subjects, as he did for the Indian Chiefs he drew. Nonetheless, his portraits of children such as this lot were far from being stock types and were said to be so faithful to their subjects that, according to Dempsey, a relative might exclaim: “Ki-ai-yowww” or “it’s just like him (or her).”

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27 ROBERT REGINALD WHALE, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. PORTRAIT OF ELLEN WHALE (THE ARTIST’S DAUGHTER) oil on canvas, laid down on board 27 ins x 21 ins; 68.6 cms x 53.3 cms Provenance: Collection of the artist (by descent to the present owner) Literature: J. Russell Harper, Painting in Canada: A History, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1969, page 334. Anne Newlands, Canadian Art From Its Beginnings to 2000, Firefly Books Ltd., Toronto, 2000, page 334. Note: A native of Cornwall, Robert Reginald Whale’s greatest influence was Sir Joshua Reynolds whose pictures he studied on trips up to London prior to emigrating to Canada. Whale became one of Southern Ontario’s earliest professional artists. Together with his brother and sons, the Whale family of painters exhibited widely, winning enough prizes and awards to cause friction among other professional painters of the day. While it was for his panoramic views that Whale is best-remembered, this quiet portrait of a young girl - his daughter - clasping a posy, is equally unforgettable. Whale married Ellen Heard Whale and together they had six children including the subject of this painting, Ellen Whale (Catton) who was born in 1836. $3,000–5,000

28 FREDERICK ARTHUR VERNER, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. INDIANS PADDLING AT SUNSET watercolour on card signed and dated 1902 10 ins x 20 ins; 25.4 cms x 50.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Joan Murray, The Last of the Buffalo: The Story of Frederick Arthur Verner, Painter of the Canadian West, Pagurian Press, Toronto, 1984, pages 68 and 115. Note: Murray writes: “Verner first studied Indians from life in Peterborough, Ontario. Indians paddling in a canoe eventually became a favourite subject.” Examples date from the late 1860s to first decade of the next century. Despite little variation from picture to picture, the demand for such works continued. Murray continues: “The art-buying public loved Verner’s Indian subjects partly because he painted an era which even by the 1890s no longer existed.” Instead collectors, then as today, appreciated the poetry of the subject and his romantic handling of it. $6,000–8,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

29 CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF THE INDIAN BASKET SELLER

Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario

oil on canvas, laid down on board signed

Literature: J. Russell Harper, Krieghoff, Key Porter Books, Toronto, 1999, page 126, Fig. 116 for a very similar work entitled The Indian Woman Basket Seller, reproduced in colour.

11 ins x 9 ins; 27.9 cms x 21.6 cms $12,000–15,000

Note: Harper writes: “During his years in Quebec City Krieghoff continued to paint Indians. Increasingly he viewed them romantically and at the same time he shrunk them into landscapes... Nevertheless, he continued (also) to paint small canvases of single Indian figures. Women in black hats wander up hills laden with great festoons of baskets (fig.116) or carry cradle boards as they pick their way through craggy mounds of ice cakes crossing the St. Lawrence in front of the city. They are reminiscent of the women in Montreal streets, but are infinitely more appealing as a result of increased details and unsurpassed craftsmanship.”

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30 FRANCES NORMA LORING CHARLES LAZENBY Painted plaster, set on a stone base Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Exhibited: A Loan Exhibition of Portraits, Art Gallery of Toronto, Toronto, October 1927, #361 for Portrait of Charles Lazenby. Canadian Sculpture, Art Gallery of Toronto, Toronto, 1928, #105 for Charles Lazenby. Note: Charles Lazenby graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in psychology and philosophy in 1907. He studied Jungian psychoanalysis in Zurich and was an active and colourful member of the Canadian Theosophical Society, of which Lawren Harris was also a member. By all accounts Lazenby was a very gifted orator, and a tireless crusader for freedom of thought and speech. Accordingly, he held somewhat controversial ideas about sex, gender identity and reincarnation. $3,000–5,000

31 HORACE CHAMPAGNE SNOW PATCHES & SPRING FLOWERS, LAKE O’HARA, YOHO NAT. PK., B.C. colour pastel signed 40 ins x 30 ins; 101.6 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Note: This work was executed in October 1989. $5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

32 LOUIS MUHLSTOCK, R.C.A. WINTER AFTERNOON oil on canvas 33 ins x 30 ins; 83.8 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist Note: Muhlstock was foremost among a coterie of Jewish artists who gave Montreal a lively and informed art scene starting in the 1930s and continuing into the 1960s. Along with Ernst Neumann, Rita Briansky, Sam Borenstein, and others, Muhlstock brought fresh ideas and original expression to urban Montreal. His work was acquired for the National Gallery, the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the Montreal Museum of Fine Art. Muhlstock and his friends collected European and Quebec painters like Miro and Dallaire. Muhlstock’s work made its Toronto debut at the Picture Loan Society, where Borduas and Riopelle also first showed in Toronto. David Silcox asserts: “To my mind, these two cityscapes are where Muhlstock’s strength lies.” $4,000–5,000

33 LOUIS MUHLSTOCK, R.C.A. MONTREAL STREET SCENE oil on canvas

32 ins x 26 ins; 81.3 cms x 66 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist $3,000–5,000

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34 MANLY EDWARD MACDONALD, R.C.A. A PAIR OF LANDSCAPES: NEAR BELLEVILLE; COUNTRY ROAD, AUTUMN oils on board both signed Each 10.5 ins x 13.75 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $3,500–4,500

35 BERTHE DES CLAYES HORSE AND SLEIGH ON WINTER ROAD oil on canvas signed 16 ins x 20.25 ins; 40.6 cms x 51.4 cms Provenance: Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto $4,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

36 JOHN WILLIAM BEATTY, O.S.A., R.C.A. WOODLAND INTERIOR oil on panel signed 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $6,000–8,000

37 JOHN WILLIAM BEATTY, O.S.A., R.C.A. BROOKS FALLS, MAGNETAWAN RIVER oil on panel signed; titled on the reverse 10.5 ins x 13.75 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.9 cms Provenance: John Egerton Lovering, Toronto (acquired directly from the artist) Private Collection, Toronto (by descent) Note: The Magnetawan River flows from Algonquin Park to Georgian Bay and was once used to transport logs downstream to the sawmills. The river gets its name from the Ojibway word for “swiftly flowing water.” Beatty excelled at painting water and Brooks Falls provides strong proof of this talent. This sketch closely relates to a major canvas in the collection of the Toronto District School Board and currently in the care of the Art Gallery of Ontario entitled Brooks Falls, Parry Sound, 1932. The Falls are about 70 kilometres north of Bracebridge. $6,000–8,000

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38 ALBERT HENRY ROBINSON, R.C.A. SKATING AFTER SCHOOL oil on panel signed 11.25 ins x 13 ins; 26.7 cms x 33 cms $20,000–30,000

Provenance: Dominion Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Jennifer C. Watson, Albert H. Robinson: The Mature Years, KitchenerWaterloo Art Gallery, Kitchener-Waterloo, 1982, pages 14-18. Note: Best known as a painter of winter, Robinson’s reputation lies in his distinction as a gifted colourist. While often associated with the Group of Seven, Robinson never became a member. Nonetheless, writes Watson: “He surely contributed to the development of Canadian painting and the formation of a national style.” Like the Group, Robinson sketched directly from nature and considered this a critical source of inspiration. Using Winsor Newton oils on birch bark panel, without priming or varnish, Robinson worked rapidly, by some estimates producing a finished sketch in under three hours. Skating After School is not dated nor have we suggested a date. In her 1982 catalogue, Watson alludes to the fact that first-hand documentation for the artist is scarce. However, most of Robinson’s best work was done prior to 1933. It was then that he suffered a heart attack, “with ensuing complications and painted little thereafter.”

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

39 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. PONT ROYAL, PARIS oil on panel signed; inscribed “Pont Royal” on the reverse 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Caleb Arnold Slade (purchased directly from the artist in France) Estate of C.A. Slade Bradford Trust Private Collection, U.S.A. $25,000–30,000

Literature: A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited, Toronto/Vancouver, 1958, pages 18-24. Note: In his lifetime, Jackson would travel to France many times, but in 1911 he did so in the company of fellow-painter Albert Henry Robinson and together they spent spent approximately four months in and around St. Malo. When Robinson left to return home, Jackson stayed and in the spring of 1912 went to Paris and produced a number of urban scenes such as this one. However, Jackson notes, “few people liked what I brought home from Europe. The French Impressionist influence in it was regarded as extreme modernism.” In fact at that time, it was the Dutch school that was viewed by Canadian collectors, as a good investment. Jackson continues: “While we in Canada were cautiously buying sound and sane art, so called, the Americans were acquiring the work of the modern French school to such an extent that today there are probably as many great examples of it in the U.S. as there are in France.” It is interesting to note that this work has been consigned to us by an American collector.

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40 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY MACDONALD, O.S.A., R.C.A. THORNHILL oil on board signed with initials; also signed, titled and dated /30 on the reverse 4.25 ins x 5.25 ins; 10.8 cms x 13.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. $12,000–15,000

41 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY MACDONALD, O.S.A., R.C.A. HUMBER RIVER oil on board signed 5.75 ins x 7 ins; 14.6 cms x 17.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. $12,000–15,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

42 WILLIAM KURELEK, R.C.A. HIS OLD MAN’S PIPE mixed media on masonite signed with initials and dated ‘73; titled on the reverse 23 ins x 14 ins; 59.1 cms x 35.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto

Literature: Ramsay Cook and Avrom Issacs, Kurelek Country: The Art of William Kurelek, Key Porter Books Limited, Toronto, page 11. Note: “Kurelek’s vision of childhood is powerful and alive...” Cloaked in the shadows of a plank-board building, a young boy sits in secrecy. He has opted out of his daily chores and has stolen away with his father’s pipe. The embers of the pipe glow a hot red – a colour which is mirrored in the distant barn. The building seems to stand watch – the constancy of farm operations and the authority of his father ever present, waiting for the boy’s return. Forgetting for a brief moment the fear of reprimand, the boy defies authority and basks in the daring delight.

$40,000–60,000

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43 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. WEATHER CHANGE, 1967 oil on masonite signed 20 ins x 24 ins; 50.8 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $40,000–60,000

Note: A. J. Casson joined the Group of Seven in 1926 at the invitation of Franklin Carmichael with whom he had apprenticed as a commercial artist beginning in 1919. The youngest of the Group, he became an important resource for their history in the 1970s. Although Casson exhibited with the Group of Seven and the Canadian Group of Painters, co-founded the Canadian Society of Painters in Watercolour with Carmichael in 1926, and was an active member of the major art societies of the day, he did not become a full-time artist until his retirement as Vice-President and Art Director of the commercial art firm Sampson-Matthews in 1957. The senior members of the Group had an important and lasting influence on Casson’s work. This is most evident in his paintings of the 1920s and 1930s. Carmichael had helped him with his painting on the sketching trips they took together in northern Ontario, and Harris had advised him to flatten and simplify his forms. In an effort to find a distinct voice within the Group, Casson specialized in watercolours and turned to villages and houses in rural Ontario for his subject matter. He wanted his work to have a human dimension that was lacking in the unpopulated wilderness landscapes of his colleagues. Another tactic, in the later 1940s through the 1950s, was to accentuate the design elements and heighten the patterning in his work. This body of work may be seen to represent Casson’s response to abstraction which was becoming an increasingly important form of artistic expression in Toronto at that time. Weather Change of 1967 is a slightly later painting, less extreme in its geometricizing of nature that characterized Casson’s work of the previous decade. The subject of an impending storm in a northern landscape is typical of the Group of Seven. However, the accentuated patterning of the rocks mirrored in the still waters close to the shoreline achieves a level of abstraction that is Casson’s own. Also characteristic is his concern with the effect of light on form; he has captured a moment in which a shaft of light passes across the face of the rocks, illuminating the left half, while the right portion remains in shadow.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

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44 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. GITSEGUKLA oil on panel signed; titled and inscribed “See Plate 72, A.Y.’s Canada” on the reverse 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms

Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. Literature: Naomi Jackson Groves, A.Y.’s Canada: Drawings by A.Y. Jackson, Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited, Toronto/Vancouver, 1969, page 153, plate 72 for Mount Gitsegyukla on the Upper Skeena River, B.C., October 1926, reproduced. Marcia Crosby, “T’emlax’a: An Ada’Ox” in The Group of Seven in Western Canada, Key Porter Books, Toronto, 2002, page 99.

$25,000–30,000 Note: Jackson was painting in Skeena Crossing, B.C. (Gitsegukla) in 1926 as part of a project developed by anthropologist Marius Barbeau who invited artists to record symbols of native culture – villages and their totems poles – which were rapidly disappearing. Jackson produced a number of oil sketches and paintings on this theme of the tragic decline of a once proud people. And while many such works include totem poles, villages and their inhabitants in keeping with Barbeau’s agenda, this work does not. Instead, Jackson here elects to focus exclusively on a landscape devoid of any reference to human geography. Perhaps his choice to do so was influenced by the fact that he did not view the totems as authentic Indian art. Crosby quotes Jackson in his biography thus: “The poles were not ancient in origin, having been made possible only when the white man’s tools became available to the Indians.” Referring to the closely related drawing, reproduced in her book and referred to on the verso of this lot, Jackson Groves describes “the grandiose theme of clear-cut peak behind wide-rolling middle ground with a hint of the village in the foreground left.” In this oil sketch, the hint referred to by Jackson Groves, is noticeably absent, the artist choosing conspicuously to emphasize the untamed character of the terrain.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

45 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. ROCKS, 1914 oil on panel signed; also signed, titled and dated “Sept. 1914” on the reverse 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms $20,000–25,000

Provenance: Private Collection, Waterloo Literature: A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited, Toronto/Vancouver, 1958, pages 37-38. Note: In the fall of 1914, Jackson and Tom Thomson were painting together in Algonquin Park. Jackson writes: “That autumn was wonderful with sunny days and frosty nights and after the mountains (Jackson had been painting in the Rocky Mountains prior to this) the intimate landscape appealed to me. We camped first below Tea Lake Dam... Then we moved on to Smoke and afterwards Ragged Lake... We worked on little 8 1/2 x 10 1/2- inch birch bark panels; travelling by canoe and living in a tent made it impossible to work on larger sizes.” As the weather turned colder and the autumn colours began to fade, Jackson returned to Toronto. The war, which everyone had optimistically predicted would be a short one, continued and soon after returning to the city, Jackson travelled to Montreal to enlist.

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46 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. THE FARMHOUSE, 1978 oil on board signed; also signed, titled and dated “Sept. 1978” on the reverse 12 ins x 15 ins; 30.5 cms x 38.1 cms $18,000–22,000

Provenance: Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario Note: In this later work, Casson returned to his favourite theme of the rural Ontario scene. He once said that his was an “Ontario quest.” As in Lot 64 from 1946, the man-made structures in this painting are literally surrounded by nature. The white house is thrown into relief by a backdrop of dark trees and distant hills, and Casson has typically balanced the composition with the patterned cloud formations in the upper half of the picture. In contrast to the earlier work, however, the trees and ground cover have been rendered in a more painterly manner, rather than through the use of clearly outlined forms. The Farmhouse was painted in 1978, the year in which Casson became an Officer of the Order of Canada and a retrospective of his work was organized by the Art Gallery of Windsor. Both occasions recognized his outstanding talent and contribution to Canadian culture.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

47 FRANK HANS JOHNSTON, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. THE BLUE EYES OF SPRING oil on masonite signed

Note: “To-day, (Youth) meets you unexpectedly on the hill-side; and was there ever a face in this world so celestialized by smile! All the features are framed of light. Black eyes are beads – blue eyes are diamonds. Gaze, then, into the blue eyes of Spring, and you feel that in the untroubled lustre, there is something more sublime than in the heights of the cloudless heavens, or in the depths of the waveless seas. More sublime, because essentially spiritual.”

22 ins x 28 ins; 55.9 cms x 71.1 cms II. Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Christopher North, “Winter Rhapsody,” in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, No. CLXXIV, Volume XXVIII, December 1830, page 863. “From the Neuer Fruhling,” Selections from the Poetical Works of Heinrich Heine, MacMillan and Co., London, 1878, page 88. $18,000–22,000

Bluest eyes of spring peep out From the grasses tall: Ah sweet violets – I choose Them the first of all. Plucking them, I think of things More than I can tell; But my every though, aloud Sings the nightingale. And her song, that tells my thoughts, Loudly echoing flows; So my tender secret now All the forest knows. Franz Johnston was renowned for his ability to capture the effects of light, particularly those present on snowy, cloudless days. This lot is an ample indication of his skill. Johnston’s scene is tranquil and soft, cloaked in its downy mantle of snow. A warm, mellow light trickles through the tree branches and dances upon the river’s water. The viewer is both welcomed to a moment of serenity - the intake of crisp air coupled with the rosy haze of a late Winter’s morning - and left breathless by the splendour of the ‘blue eyes of Spring’, glistening gem-like in azure and turquoise.

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48 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY MACDONALD, O.S.A., R.C.A. ROCKY SHORE, STURGEON BAY (NEAR POINTE-AU-BARIL, GEORGIAN BAY), SEPT. 1931 oil on panel signed, titled and dated on the reverse 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Walter Klinkhoff Gallery Inc., Montreal Private Collection $75,000–100,000

Literature: E.R. Hunter, J.E.H. MacDonald: A Biography & Catalogue of his Work, The Ryerson Press, Toronto, 1940, page 37. Bruce Whiteman, J.E.H. MacDonald, Quarry Press, Kingston, 1995, pages 66 and 79. Note: J.E.H. MacDonald was never a prolific painter and by the end of the 1920s his professional responsibilities at the Ontario College of Art (O.C.A.) restricted his output further. He remarked in a letter to the O.C.A. Council of “teaching & its associated troubles” and there is no doubt that he was frustrated by the fact that his job left him little opportunity to paint. While MacDonald continued to participate in major Group of Seven shows throughout this busy time, according to E.R. Hunter, MacDonald was exhibiting old canvases because the demands that had been placed on his time precluded him from producing new work – which makes a painting like this lot, dating from this period, exceedingly rare. Furthermore, MacDonald’s health, which was never robust, worsened toward the end of the 1920s. In 1931, on his doctor’s advice, he travelled to Barbados for rest. However, following his return to Canada, he still felt compelled to travel once more to a place that had been almost sacred to him – a place to which he had taken many trips with his son from the early nineteen-teens to the end of his life: Georgian Bay. Situated among the 30,000 Islands of Georgian Bay just south of his beloved Algoma, Sturgeon Bay offered to MacDonald an expressive setting of rocky shorelines and wind-swept pines. The works considered to be among MacDonald’s greatest outside of his Algoma period were the mountain subjects, which the artist executed during the last few years of his life – including Snow Fall, Lake Oesa. MacDonald’s early biographer, E.R. Hunter calls it “an irony of fate” that in these last pictures MacDonald “returned to the simple search for truth and entered the threshold of a other period of promise.” It is interesting to consider that, in this work, MacDonald chose not to paint the low horizon line featured in some of his best Georgian Bay scenes. Perhaps significantly, he focused on building up a mountain-like form in the left foreground, lending a sense of majesty to the composition.

J.E.H. MacDonald Sketching, Sturgeon Bay

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

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49 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. SNOWY LANDSCAPE oil on board signed 9.5 ins x 11.5 ins; 24.1 cms x 29.2 cms Provenance: Gift of C.A.G. Matthews Private Collection, Toronto (by descent) $20,000–30,000

36

Note: Casson preferred to paint winter scenes because he was drawn to the strong patterning of the stripped-down landscape. In summer, this same view would likely have presented an undifferentiated field of green, whereas winter permitted the artist to separate the gently rolling, snow-covered hills into fore, middle and backgrounds using sinuous bands of trees. Casson has knitted together the different elements in the lower half of the picture by using a restricted palette of brown, mauve and blue, then balanced the composition with the large expanse of almost empty sky above. The unobtrusive barn and snake fence are the only evidence of a human presence. The label affixed to the back of the panel indicates that it was a gift from C.A.G. (“Chuck”) Matthews, (1890-1990) President of the commercial art firm, Sampson-Matthews where Casson worked. Matthews often gave artwork by his artist friends as gifts. The inscription, which offers the couple good wishes for hopes as high “as the hills around,” complements the subject of the painting.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

50 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT, P.R.C.A. SNOWY LANDSCAPE oil on canvas signed

Note: Pilot’s recurring palette of indigo, rose madder, mars brown and yellow ochre transforms a snowy landscape into a foreshadowing of Spring. The billowing riverbanks and the frosted water appear golden. The cold recedes, the ice melts away, heralding that, on this day, in this scene, Pilot provides a brief repose from the cold.

21 ins x 28 ins; 55.9 cms x 71.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $20,000–30,000

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51 CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF ICE HARVEST oil on canvas signed 11.5 ins x 15.75 ins; 29.2 cms x 40 cms

Provenance: Watson Art Galleries, Montreal Mrs. J.H. Magor, Montreal Private Collection Literature: J. Russell Harper, Krieghoff, Key Porter Books, Toronto, 1999, page 38, and page 39, plate 34 for a very closely related work entitled Ice Harvest in the collection of the Musée du Québec, dating to ca. 1847-50.

$60,000–80,000 Dennis Reid with essays by Ramsay Cook and François-Marc Gagnon, Krieghoff: Images of Canada, Douglas & McIntyre, Toronto/Vancouver, 1999, page 157, page 37 for a related lithograph with watercolour of Ice Cutting, c. 1849 (Collection of Peter Winkworth, London), reproduced in colour and page 159, Figure 22 for the related oil Carting Ice, c. 1850 (The Thomson Collection), reproduced. Note: In a 1939 letter to Mrs. J.H. Magor, art dealer William Watson writes of this lot: “This is a perfect example of the master’s art, and has one of his finest skies. The scene as you know is near home, as it was painted near Krieghoff’s own house at Longueuil, and shows the St. Lawrence reaching to Montreal.” While not always entirely successful in capturing in paint the nature of the breed of horse used in the early days of Quebec habitant life, Krieghoff’s depiction of these shaggy equines as rendered in paintings such as Ice Harvest received a very warm critical reception. Harper writes: “No paintings give a better idea of the little canadien horse developed by the habitants than do Krieghoff’s pictures of ice-cutting.” Ramsay Cook continues: “Sleighs and horses together reveal Krieghoff’s perception of class and ethnic differences in mid-century Canada. The horse that he obviously enjoyed painting was a distinctive breed known as the canadien. A rather small horse with powerful legs and shoulders, broad hooves, and heavy mane and tail, this animal descended from the Norman and Breton horses introduced into New France in the Seventeenth Century.”

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

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52 JEAN ALBERT MCEWEN, R.C.A. SUITE DES PAYS VASTES oil on canvas signed, titled, and dated ‘72 on the reverse 20 ins x 20 ins; 50.8 cms x 50.8 cms $25,000–35,000

40

Provenance: Galerie Simon Blais, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Simon Blais and Roald Nasgaard, Rétrospective Jean McEwen, Éditions Simon Blais, Montréal, 2004, page 26 for a closely related work entitled Suites des pays vastes, 1972. Note: Born in Montreal in 1923, Jean McEwen is most recognized for his colourfield and heavily texturized works. Exploring both the sensory effects of colour and its relationship to structure, McEwen shaped his surfaces into richly layered formations. He applied masses of paint to his surfaces directly by hand, teasing out and building up topographical impastos with a palette knife. Various pigments are worked directly into the varnish, creating a shimmer or translucence. The resulting effect is one of grandeur and luminosity. Suite des Pays Vastes (as with other, similarly titled works) appears before the viewer like a crystallized formation. Like a celestial body of silver and gold, McEwen’s canvas captures a moment of metallic exuberance.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

53 STANLEY MOREL COSGROVE, R.C.A. STILL-LIFE WITH JOURNAL DES ARTS oil on board signed and dated ‘46 23 ins x 32 ins; 58.4 cms x 81.3 cms $30,000–35,000

Provenance: Laing Galleries, Toronto Dominion Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal Note: In Still-Life with Journal des Arts, Cosgrove purposely deconstructs the unified image, intertwining his work with the still lifes of Paul Cézanne and George Braque. A grouping of fruit emerges from a bundle of green cloth and paper. Cosgrove’s is a world of simultaneous perspective: a geometric collage in paint where the fruit is flat and yet lush, earthly delights compliment the events of the art world, and folds and layers blossom into a riot of colour.

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54 MAURICE GALBRAITH CULLEN, R.C.A. MOONLIT LANDSCAPE oil on canvas, laid down on board monogramme 9.75 ins x 66.5 ins; 73.7 cms x 167.6 cms $40,000–60,000

Provenance: Private Collection, Winnipeg Exhibited: On long-term loan to the Winnipeg Art Gallery, Winnipeg, n.d. Literature: Hugues de Jouvancourt, Maurice Cullen, Éditions la Frégate, Montréal, 1978, pages 1 6-1 7. Crystal S. Parsons, Maurice Cullen and His Circle, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 009, page 9. Note: Under the light of the low-horizon moon, Cullen paints a scene of quiet brilliance. As Crystal S. Parsons writes, “Cullen’s Canadian landscapes differed from those of his artistic predecessors. They were not allegorical or historical records but, like the French Impressionists, Cullen strove to paint what he saw in front of him with truth to particular aspects of nature, especially the ephemeral effects of light.” The subdued palette of this work softly captures the contours and bends of the birches and rocks, the cresting of the distant shoreline. In a subtle play of tone and a cast of delicate blue, the work becomes powdery and iridescent, as if a silk veil were draped across the canvas. The beauty of this work lies in its stillness and its delicate emotionality. Hugues de Jouvancourt summarizes Cullen’s abilities perfectly in stating that, “Through his strong feeling for things, Cullen could perceive the invisible strength of life hidden in woods, streams, mountains and valleys. His great search was to try and express his emotion in relation to nature to the best of his ability, and this he magnificently succeeded in doing.”


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

56 ALEXANDER COLVILLE, R.C.A. FOREST AND BEACH

Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, Nova Scotia (by descent to the present owner)

oil on masonite signed and dated ‘46

Exhibited: Annual Exhibition, Nova Scotia Society of Artists, n.d.

15 ins x 20 ins; 38.1 cms x 50.8 cms

Note: Alex Colville was one of Canada’s best known realist painters. After graduating from Mount Allison University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1942, he enlisted in the army and later served as an official war artist from 1944 to 1946. The experience of war and having witnessed human destruction on such a massive scale affected him profoundly.

$15,000–25,000

The few paintings that Colville produced soon after his return to civilian life and his move to Sackville, New Brunswick to teach at Mount Allison, suggest that he was trying to make sense of his war experience as he set about painting his immediate surroundings. Forest and Beach is an early example of Colville’s imbuing his subject with questions about human existence. This is more than simply a landscape featuring an uprooted tree and rocks on one of New Brunswick’s many beaches. Painted the same year as his canvases for the Canadian War Records, Forest and Beach appears to be a metaphor for the frailty and brevity of human life.

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57 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. OPEONGO RIVER, 1950 oil on board signed; also signed, dated and titled on the reverse 12 ins x 15 ins; 30.5 cms x 38.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $20,000–30,000

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Note: Casson painted this interesting work at a time when his larger canvases were demonstrating pronounced abstract qualities in the extreme reduction and superimposition of forms, and the breaking up of light into fractured planes. Opeongo River has not undergone this transforming process, but it nonetheless indicates a strong abstracting tendency. The wedge shape of burnt land in the foreground is a flopped mirror image of the distant golden land mass that cuts across the picture plane from the left, balancing the composition. The two halves of the picture are connected by the tall piece of burnt timber on the right. Some of these charred remains are reflected in the pool of still water in the foreground, while others resemble human figures. Regardless of whether Casson attached any symbolic meaning to Opeongo River, it is a fine example of the synthesis of theme and form, and of the haunting stillness that characterizes Casson’s work. This picture must have been a family favourite, and was included in the 1988 exhibition, Casson’s Cassons.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

58 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY MACDONALD, O.S.A., R.C.A. PETITE RIVIÈRE, NOVA SCOTIA, 1922 oil on board signed “J. MacD”; also signed and titled in pencil on the reverse “Petite Rivière, N.S.“ 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Collection of A.C. Kenny, Toronto Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Green, s.l. Private Collection, Ontario Exhibited: J.E.H. MacDonald in Nova Scotia with Lewis and Edith Smith, Dalhousie Art Gallery, Halifax, 1990, cat.no.27.

Literature: Nancy E. Robertson, “Introduction,” J.E.H. MacDonald, R.C.A. 1873-1932, Art Gallery of Toronto, Toronto, 1965, pages 11-12. Gemey Kelly and Scott Robson, J.E.H. MacDonald. Lewis Smith, Edith Smith, Nova Scotia, Dalhousie Art Gallery, Halifax, 1990, page 37, cat.no.27 reproduced. Note: Petite Rivière, Nova Scotia evidences a discipline initiated by MacDonald at this time and developed further with visits to Lake O’Hara in the mid-1920s. Both locales presented MacDonald with new artistic challenges which required a simplification of his brushwork relative to the Algoma sketches which had come before. Nancy Robertson notes the artist’s more subdued approach and writes: “In keeping with the simplicity of his subject and the subdued grey-blue of the sky and sea, he (MacDonald) restrained his handling.” She continues: “The simplicity of nature’s design without the distractions of brilliant colour and lively brush-work was revealed.” MacDonald was in Petite Rivière in July 1922.

$15,000–20,000

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59 ARTHUR LISMER, O.S.A., R.C.A. THREE PINES, GEORGIAN BAY, 1929 oil on board signed and dated ‘29; also signed, titled and inscribed “from A. Lismer To Sydney Key” on the reverse 13 ins x 16 ins; 33 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Collection of Sydney Key (Curator, Art Gallery of Toronto) Private Collection, Toronto (by descent) $30,000–40,000

Note: Of the many artists who painted at Georgian Bay in the nineteen-teens and twenties, including Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven, it was Arthur Lismer who would continue to paint there long after the others had shifted their focus elsewhere. The early impressionistic oil sketches that he first made at Go Home Bay in 1913 evolved into the bold image of a solitary pine tree withstanding the elements which we know as A September Gale, Georgian Bay of 1921 (National Gallery of Canada). It has become one of the iconic works of the Group of Seven. Former National Gallery curator Charles Hill has commented that it was surely a tribute to Tom Thomson’s The West Wind and The Jack Pine of 1916-7, the first canvases to feature the motif of the single tree. Lismer’s The Three Pines is a continuation of this, his favourite theme, but with some variations that hint at a new direction in his work. It was painted at McGregor Bay, located north of Manitoulin Island in Georgian Bay, which he visited with his family during the summer of 1929. In this sketch, Lismer has shifted his focus downward from the group of trees to the lichencovered rocks in the foreground which now occupy the lower half of the picture. As a result, the trees are pushed up, reducing the amount of open sky, and the water is merely suggested by a small patch of turquoise located midway up the right-hand side of the panel. This new interest in foreground detail would be developed in later works such as Pine Wrack of 1933 (National Gallery of Canada) until they became the very subject of the painting. Canadian Jungle, 1947 (The McMichael Canadian Art Collection), for example, is a close-up examination of the rich ground covering that he had sketched at Georgian Bay the previous summer. The inscription on the back of the panel indicates that it was a personal gift from the artist to Sydney J. Key (1918-1956), the young curator at the Art Gallery of Toronto who organized the Lismer Retrospective in 1950.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

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60 EDWIN HEADLEY HOLGATE, R.C.A. SUMMER NEAR MORIN HEIGHTS oil on board signed 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Galerie Walter Klinkhoff, Montreal Literature: Rosalind Pepall, “An Art of Vigour and Restraint,” in Edwin Holgate, Brian Foss and Rosalind Pepall (curators), The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Montreal, 2005, page 24. Note: “In 1946, feeling a need to seek refuge from the city, Holgate and his wife left Montreal to settle in Morin Heights, sixtyfive kilometres northwest. Holgate, who loved the outdoors, had been drawn to the Laurentians early in his career... (I)n Morin Heights, a small village amid lakes and hills, he and Frances found a welcoming community there. From his house, Holgate had a ready subject for the landscapes he continued to paint.” Holgate’s scene is cool and inviting, a composition of greens, browns and greys under a butter-whipped sky. The distant hills, hinted at by a daub of indigo, add depth to the earthy landscape and seem to allude to Holgate’s familiarity and love of the terrain. Holgate lived in Morin Heights until 1973 when, for health reasons, he moved back to Montreal. This work was painted circa 1950 according to the gallery label on the reverse. $12,000–15,000

61 EDWIN HEADLEY HOLGATE, R.C.A. TREESCAPE oil on panel signed with initials; also signed and dated “Oct. 1963” 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Walter Klinkhoff Gallery, Montreal Note: In Treescape the lines of trunks and ferns are simple and restrained – like those of his woodblocks. Holgate creates a cool, and serene forest scene through carefully applied colour and a focus on the geometry of his forms. $15,000–20,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

62 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. ALGOMA LAKE, AUGUST 1955

Literature: Dennis Reid, Alberta Rhythm: The Later Work of A.Y. Jackson, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1982, page 96.

oil on panel signed; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse

Note: In 1955, after many years its resident, Jackson vacated the Studio Building in Toronto and settled in a new live-in studio in Manotick near Ottawa. However, he continued to revisit his favourite stomping grounds and in July of that year sketched in Georgian Bay. August would ďŹ nd him on the east shore of Lake Superior and in September near Sault Ste. Marie.

10.5 ins x 13.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $20,000–30,000

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63 PAUL PEEL, R.C.A. THE RETURN OF THE FLOCK

Exhibited: Fourth Annual Exhibition, Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, Toronto, 1883, no. 31 for Return of the Flock.

oil on canvas signed and dated 1883

Royal Canadian Academy: Exhibit of Canadian Art, Festival of the Empire, Crystal Palace, London, 1910.

36 ins x 46.75 ins; 91.4 cms x 118.7 cms

Paintings of Deceased Canadian Artists Fourth Annual Exhibition, The Art Museum of Toronto, Toronto, January 1911, No. 191.

Provenance: Collection of R.Y. Ellis The T. Eaton Co. Limited, Toronto Collection of Geo. Booth, Toronto (acquired 1923) Collection of Evelyn L. Hay, Toronto (by descent) Private Collection, Ontario (by descent) $80,000–120,000

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Literature: Evelyn de Rostaing McMann, The Royal Canadian Academy of Arts: Exhibitions and Members, 1880-1979, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1981, page 321. Note: Though still in his early twenties, by 1883 Peel had studied with Eakins in Philadelphia, with Gérôme in France, had been elected to the R.C.A. as an Associate Member (1882), and had exhibited in the Paris Salon, a major accomplishment for such a young man. April and May of that year was spent in Pont-Aven, as he had the previous summer, although the artist returned to Canada in July and remained there for the rest of that year.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

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64 ALFRED JOSEPH CASSON, O.S.A., P.R.C.A. MARCH - VANDORF, 1946 oil on canvas, laid down on board signed; also signed, titled and dated on reverse 9.5 ins x 11.25 ins; 24.1 cms x 28.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $20,000–30,000

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Note: Casson chose Ontario villages as the subject for his paintings in the 1930s, as a way of distinguishing himself from other members of the Group of Seven. In a conversation with curator Joan Murray in 1977, he voiced the opinion that his particular contribution to Canadian art was in the rural villages and houses that he had depicted before they disappeared. Vandorf is a hamlet in the present-day Town of Whitchurch-Stouville. Casson has chosen to paint the countryside in early Spring; he preferred to paint the autumn and winter seasons, perhaps because the patterns of nature were displayed in Autumn and the basic forms of the landscape were exposed in Winter, both of which appealed to his design sensibility. Here, the forms are organized in a balanced composition and the palette has been restricted to blue, mauve, grey and golden brown. The sketches that Casson executed during the 1940s and 1950s, while carefully composed, are free from the abstracting tendencies of his larger paintings of the same period.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

65 ALEXANDER YOUNG JACKSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. GEORGIAN BAY oil on divided panel signed 10.5 ins x 13.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.3 cms Provenance: Mrs. Arthur Matthewman, Picton, Ontario Private Collection, Quebec City, Quebec $15,000–20,000

Literature: A.Y. Jackson, A Painter’s Country: The Autobiography of A.Y. Jackson, Clarke, Irwin & Company Limited, Toronto/Vancouver, 1958, page 74 and the colour plate opposite page 161 for a closely related work entitled Islands, Georgian Bay 1954, reproduced in colour. Note: Jackson travelled to Georgian Bay to paint its many islands for decades and he never tired of it as a subject. Part of the appeal later in life when he travelled there were the sharp memories such visits would conjure of camping trips taken with painting friends long gone and greatly missed including J.E.H. MacDonald and Tom Thomson. Looking back, Jackson recounts: “Go Home Bay and the outer islands are filled for me with happy memories of good friends and of efforts, more or less successful, that I made to portray its varying moods.” Canoeing was among his favorite pastimes and he had, over the years, become very adept at it. Jackson remarked: “Half the fun of camping is to find a good campsite, and the smooth rocks of Georgian Bay were ideal.” One cannot help but imagine Jackson seated on his camp stool, sketch box at his side and brush in hand trying to capture yet again those elusive and “varying moods” of Georgian Bay.

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66 KAZUO NAKAMURA SUSPENDED LANDSCAPE oil on canvas signed and dated ‘69; also signed, dated 1969 and inscribed “Toronto” on the stretcher 43 ins x 45 ins; 109.2 cms x 114.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $30,000–40,000

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Literature: Kazuo Nakamura, quoted in Dorothy Cameron, Sculpture ’67, unpaginated. Note: “The contribution of the artist is to extend visual knowledge as a way of understanding our universe. I, as an artist, am never wholly isolated from anyone else, from the labourer or the scientist. We are all, each in his own way, making a new society, or a part of that society. On the other hand, since some perception and foresight beyond the norm is a necessary attribute of the functioning artist, I must admit to a certain sense of unavoidable ‘apartness.’” Viewing mathematics as a key to form and design, Nakamura formulated artwork that was both alluring and precisely ordered. Atop a backdrop of indigo, the artist places bands of white, mimicking foolscap. His lines are clean, intersecting only with a circular porthole, a window to a landscape. Mirroring the small, diagonal brushstrokes of Cézanne, Nakamura creates a terrain of greens and blues. His restricted palette excites both the eye and the mind, like Euclidean geometry played out in a bloom of algae.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

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67 YVES GAUCHER GREEN, YELLOW/RED, 1ÈRE VERSION acrylic on canvas, unframed signed, titled and dated ‘76 on the reverse 48 ins x 60 ins; 121.9 cms x 152.4 cms Provenance: Marlborough-Godard, Toronto/Montreal Private Collection, Toronto

Literature: Diana Nemiroff, “Geometric Abstraction after 1950,” in Anne Whitelaw, Brian Foss, and Sandra Paikowsky (eds.), The Visual Arts in Canada: The Twentieth Century, Oxford University Press, Don Mills, Ontario, page 217. Roald Nasgaard, Yves Gaucher, A Fifteen Year Perspective/1968-1973/Une Perspective de Quinze Ans, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1979, pages 109-111, and page 115, Fig. 17 for Vert-Jaune-Rouge, 1970, 9 feet 6 ins x 16 feet (Collection of the artist), reproduced. Note: Gaucher and Molinari are often considered together as their paintings appear to have much in common at first glance. However, unlike Molinari, Gaucher’s paintings must be viewed as one single object as opposed to a sequence of visual experiences.

$20,000–30,000 Molinari’s stripe paintings are meant to be considered sequentially, to be read from one side to another, each field of colour in relation to the one adjacent. Accordingly, the orientation of stripes arranged horizontally in this work, as opposed to vertically as in so many of Molinari’s paintings, is not whimsy, but compels the viewer to consider the work holistically. Prior to 1970, Gaucher worked from drawings which allowed him to scale up his ideas more easily. However, after 1970, Nasgaard writes: “When structure and colour became inextricably linked, drawings were at best an initial step in exploring ideas. There was no predicting how a particular balance of yellow, red and grey at drawing size would work blown up to 9 x 15 feet.” With respect to his practice, Gaucher will do a number of works using similar colours and even similar ratios, but of different sizes. Nasgaard continues: “Gaucher may start at the largest size but his common working procedure is to work up to the final size. Often several sizes in the same series will be worked on simultaneously.” At least one other version of this lot exists: a larger version measuring just over 9 x 15 feet. Nasgaard quotes Gaucher explaining his painting process: “The physicality of working on a big painting, and the scale, is very different from a smaller one. I like to bounce between the big and small, on the same premise basically, just to reassess where the problem is. Sometimes you get carried away with a very large painting and you try to convince yourself that it is working. But as soon as you bring the problem back to the small one you sense that there is something wrong which you have to settle in the small one before going back to the big one, or vice-versa. To work on more than one painting refreshes my head and forces me to keep it open in more than one direction.” In Green, Yellow and Red, Gaucher provides the viewer with what Diana Nemiroff describes as a “contemplative perceptual experience.”

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

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68 JOHN MEREDITH VOYAGE oil on canvas signed, titled and dated “70-71” on the reverse, and signed, titled and dated “Jan/71” and “/71” on the stretcher 72 ins x 48 ins; 127 cms x 182.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $20,000–30,000

Literature: Art Gallery of Ontario: Selected Works, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1990, page 338. Roald Nasgaard, Abstract Painting in Canada, Douglas & McIntyre Ltd., Vancouver, 2007, page 243. Note: A superb colourist, it is easy to overlook what is perhaps considered Meredith’s great, even greatest, talent: his expressive rendering of line. Using a technique that would stimulate his compositions and become a kind of signature of his best work, Meredith smudged the wet ink of his drawings, and later the wet painted lines of his canvases, electrifying the lines and dramatically energizing his composition. The result was the successful transfer of energy from the drawing onto the canvas. Meredith, thereby, creating a kind of painted drawing. By the mid-1960s, Meredith was using his ink drawings to produce finished work. We are indebted to a private collector in Toronto who generously has lent us, for exhibition purposes only, Meredith’s drawing for Voyage. Nasgaard writes that by the 1970s Meredith’s drawing “is nervous, agitated, and overlaid on free-floating bursts of brilliant colour. The edges are more extravagantly feathered and appear more spontaneous than ever, entirely belying Meredith’s actual working technique. He first worked out painting as a coloured drawing, and then transferred the drawing to canvas, the enlargement accomplished by covering the drawing with transparent graph paper and then proceeding to paint in the matching squared off canvas. He enlarged the sketches without making changes, replicating carefully the dragged and smudged lines and the nuanced modulations of his coloured inks.”

Drawing for Voyage, not included as part of this lot.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

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69 HORTENSE CROMPTON MATTICE GORDON, R.C.A. ABANDONED oil on canvas signed 30 ins x 40 ins; 76.2 cms x 101.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $14,000–18,000

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Literature: Iris Nowell, Painters Eleven: The Wild Ones of Canadian Art, Douglas & McIntyre, Toronto, 2010, page xxxvi, Preface. Note: Gordon’s swaths of darkened colours rest atop a dusty, golden landscape. These forms – with their hints of turquoise and red – form blossoming cacti and oil rigs, the bones of oxen, an oasis in the imagination, and under the heat of the sun. Here, Gordon captures the sentiment that Iris Nowell expresses: Abstract art is “infinitely more than mere shapes and colours... (It) is an amalgam of energy, power and rhythm, the components that fire this art’s ineffable energy.” Abandoned in an uninhabited landscape, the artist conveys a distinct sense of fortitude and freedom.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

70 RITA LETENDRE, R.C.A. TALISMAN oil on canvas signed and dated /61 40 ins x 30 ins; 101.6 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: The Women’s Committee of the Art Gallery of Toronto, Sale of Canadian Art Private Collection, Toronto $25,000–30,000

Literature: Roald Nasgaard, Abstract Painting in Canada, Douglas & McIntyre Ltd., Vancouver, 2007, page 180. Note: Evoking magic and mysticism, Letendre’s canvas is an amulet of red, green, and gold. Images crafted of wide strokes of jagged paint, such as this lot, developed into one of her signature styles. As Nasgaard explains: “A more distinct look emerged in the early 1960s, when scale grew and the concatenation of the gestural marks expanded into great thick flame-like bursts of explosive colour. A sense of turbulent drama was intensified by brighter colours pushing, as if seeking liberation, against masses of black...” Often created by the person for whose use it is intended, the talisman has an intimate connection to its bearer. It contains magical properties, which protect she who wields it from harm, bringing about good fortune. In fierceness and in passion, Talisman is imprinted with Letendre.

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71 PAUL-ÉMILE BORDUAS, R.C.A. GROUPEMENT TRIANGULAIRE (1954) watercolour signed and dated ‘54; titled on the reverse 17.75 ins x 23.5 ins; 45.1 cms x 59.7 cms Provenance: Galerie Dresdnere, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto $12,000–18,000

Literature: François-Marc Gagnon, Paul-Émile Borduas: biographie critique et analyse de l’oeuvre, Fides, Montreal, 1978, pages 355, 356 and 406. Note: Realized a year after the beginning of his exile in the United States, Groupement Triangulaire is a prime example of the impact of American painting on Borduas’ work. While in New York, feeling the need to experiment, Borduas decided to focus on watercolour. For Borduas specialist François-Marc Gagnon, “Groupement triangulaire évoque une sorte de paysage abstrait. Les plans s’y succèdent dans l’espace et le «groupement triangulaire» que le peintre a voulu y voir s’impose beaucoup moins à l’oeil que cette impression de récession en profondeur. Aussi bien c’est une aquarelle qui se rattache aux compositions à l’huile de la période. Le registre ocre pâle et brun de celles-ci a été remplacé par un vert transparent et des noirs, signifiant le passage de l’hiver au printemps.” In the summer of 1955, Max Stern visited Borduas’ studio in Paris and acquired thirteen works, including this lot.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

74 JACQUES GODEFROY DE TONNANCOUR, A.R.C.A. PAYSAGE, 1959 oil on masonite signed and dated ‘59 24 ins x 32 ins; 61 cms x 81.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $10,000–15,000

Literature: Jacques de Tonnancour in Elizabeth Kilbourn, Great Canadian Painting: A Century of Art, McClelland and Stewart Limited, 1966, page 45. Note: For Jacques de Tonnancour, 1955 signaled a genre shift from the abstract to the landscape. His primary focus was on the terrain of northern Quebec, which held a certain power in his eyes. “The magnetic and engulfing charm and power of the north can in no time dissolve a man and lose him in a sea of silence and desolation. In many parts of Canada that is what we are up against, that enormous silence. This is the shape of Quebec.” Through loose gestures, swift strokes of paint and thin washes, de Tonnancour conveys the pensanteur or weight of the land. Under an effortless sky, tangles of branches and currents of energy twist about in greens and sienna. In de Tonnancour’s painting, one relinquishes the notion of controlled landscape and surrenders oneself to the dangers of the wilderness.

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75 JOHN MEREDITH BLACK NIGHT, 1959 oil on canvas 36 ins x 48 ins; 91.4 cms x 121.9 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery Ltd., Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $10,000–15,000

Note: John Meredith (Smith) was the younger brother of William Ronald (Smith) of Painters Eleven fame, but in contrast to Ronald, he was an introvert who stayed on the margins of the Toronto art community, and his work evolved at a slow and steady pace. Despite this tendency towards reclusiveness, Meredith shared an interest in Abstract Expressionism with the other young abstract painters of his generation (he began to show at the Isaacs Gallery in 1961), along with a quality that critic Barry Hale has termed “expressionist lyricism”—evidence of the artist’s hand over the surface of the painting, and total engagement with the artwork. Meredith developed his own distinctive style within the so-called “Toronto Look.”

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Meredith studied at the Ontario College of Art from 1950-1953 and had his first one-man show at the Gallery of Contemporary Art in 1958. A second show followed in March 1959 which consisted of paintings with vertical stripes that varied in colour, width and paint texture. Marie Fleming characterized these early works as alluding to human or vegetal forms and as having “a strong sense of a standing, growing force” in the catalogue of her 1974 Meredith exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Dark Night is characteristic of Meredith’s work between 1958 and 1962. The work is structured by a series of vertical lines, all of which deviate slightly from the perpendicular and extend across the entire width of the canvas. Its horizontal orientation compels us to read the work from left to right, towards the whitish stripe two-thirds of the way across which catches the eye. Otherwise, the palette is sombre—blue, black, red and ochre, mixed directly on the canvas. The vertical lines have been drawn with the brush, the field punctuated by more spontanous applications of ochre, which gives the canvas an overall texture. The work has been informed by Borduas and the Automatistes in spirit and by American Abstract Expressionist Barnett Newman in its exploration of the vertical. As the title suggests, Black Night is full of mystery. What do the vertical lines represent? Trees, a line of figures in profile, or figures lurking in a forest? It demonstrates the creative approach that Meredith explained in the catalogue of his 1974 exhibition: to give material form to his conscious and unconscious reactions to the world, to colour and form and to develop new ideas through experimentation.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

76 HAROLD KLUNDER THE GEOMETRY OF PAIN (SELF PORTRAIT I), 1989 oil on canvas, unframed signed and dated ‘89; also signed, titled and dated 1987-89 on the reverse, and inscribed on the left overflap “G. of P., S.P. 87-89” 78 ins x 78 ins; 198.1 cms x 198.1 cms Provenance: The Sable-Castelli Gallery Limited, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto

Note: Born in The Netherlands in 1943, Harold Klunder immigrated to Canada with his parents in 1952. He studied art at Central Technical School in Toronto under Doris McCarthy, Charles Goldhammer and Virginia Luz. Klunder developed a diverse practice, working across a range of media including painting, photography, printmaking and performance. When assessing the pervading influences on Klunder’s artwork, scholars often allude to other artists of Dutch heritage such as Willem de Kooning and Karel Appel. Yet Klunder himself defies rigid comparisons. He paints according to feeling: creating charged surfaces intuitively and freely – removing himself from the formal aspects of painting. Through Klunder’s process, texture amasses in abundance. The sculptural forms created by his thick impastos carry as much life as the subject matter of the works themselves. Heavy paint pulsates with a buoyancy of colour. These are not works resulting from a quick slather; these are works that accumulate momentously, like geological formations.

$12,000–18,000 Klunder’s paintings give a taste of the surreal despite being rooted firmly in real life. They are bohemian, musical and abstract, chunky. In recent years, Klunder has increasingly explored self-portraiture of which this lot, The Geometry of Pain (Self Portrait I), 1989, is an example. Paralleling the process of personal development – which happens slowly, cumulatively, and over many years – Klunder works on a single painting for years at a time. The canvases gestate, forming over a duration as vivid and living, weighty with the human experience.

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77 LÉON BELLEFLEUR ÉMERGENCE oil on canvas signed and dated ‘77; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse 46 ins x 35 ins; 116.8 cms x 88.9 cms Provenance: Thielsen Gallery, London Galerie Walter Klinkhoff, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto $12,000–15,000

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Literature: Guy Robert, Bellefleur, Iconia, Montreal, 1988, page 9. Note: “Yes, the most important thing is not what we see, but what we imagine.” Léon Bellefleur In the 1970s, Bellefleur’s work started to be more lyrical than that of the previous decade. Conveyed in a dance of pigments, texture, and movement, paintings like Émergence render the painter’s desire to capture an impulse of inspiration and protect it from the inevitable transience of time.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

78 WILLIAM KURELEK, R.C.A. MYSTIC PRAIRIE THEME, 1976 mixed media on masonite signed with initials and dated ’76; titled on the reverse 16 ins x 19 ins; 40 cms x 47.6 cms Provenance: Isaacs Gallery Ltd., Toronto Private Collection, Burlington, Ontario

Exhibited: Regina Collects, Norman Mackenzie Art Gallery, Regina, cat.no.56. Literature: Ramsay Cook and Avrom Issacs, Kurelek Country: The Art of William Kurelek, Key Porter Books Limited, Toronto, page 22. Note: Kurelek had a number of mythical experiences throughout his life, directly linked to his conversion to Catholicism in 1957. Kurelek attempted to contextualize the gospel, through which, he believed he had come to a convincing understanding of the meaning of life, in contemporary terms within his artwork. “(T)hat which crucifies Christ over and over can just as easily happen on a summer day on a Manitoba farm as anywhere else.”

$25,000–30,000 A farmer sits humbled before an icon which is powerful to him. The scene is still and beautiful, linking the mundane with the sacred.

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79 LOUIS-PHILIPPE HÉBERT, R.C.A. COEUR QUI CHANTE bronze signed, titled, dated 1912 and stamped with the foundry mark “R. Hohwiller/Fondeur/Paris” on the base height 19 ins; 48.3 cms Provenance: Patrick Martin Wickham, Quebec (purchased directly from the artist) Private Collection, Ontario (by descent) $10,000–15,000

Exhibited: Louis-Philippe Hébert, 1850-1917, Sculpteur National, Musée du Québec, 7 juin – 3 septembre, 2001 and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 12 octobre, 2001 - 6 janvier, 2002, 2001, cat.no.110. Literature: Daniel Drouin, et alia, Louis-Philippe Hébert, Musée du Québec et Musée des Beaux-Arts de Montréal, 2001, pages 242-257 for “Iconographie Indienne de Hébert,” page 254, and page 307, fig. 110 for this lot, reproduced in colour. Note: Hébert was interested both in the depiction of Indian life pre-contact with Europeans as well as of those who interacted with European culture through, for example, trade. It is also interesting to note the contrast in his depiction of male and female subjects. Drouin notes: “Si l’homme est souvent representé en chasseur ou en guerrier à l’affut, la femme emprunte les traits d’une séductrice ou d’une abandonnée, comme...Coeur qui Chante.” Insurance Executive Patrick Martin Wickham was an early patron of LouisPhilippe Hébert. He also served as Mayor of St. Lambert, Quebec for several terms at the turn of the century. A cordial relationship arose between Louis-Philippe Hébert and Wickham over the years, and the details of their business transactions were meticulously recorded by the artist and by the Wickham family. Wickham approached the artist with a special request that Hébert make small replicas of a number of works which graced the National Assembly Buildings in Quebec City, a request embraced by the artist. At least seven small statues were created, including Coeur qui Chante, with three to six copies of each, all cast at the renowned R. Hohwiller Foundry in Paris.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

80 JOYCE WIELAND, R.C.A. L’ASSASSINAT DE MARAT PAR CHARLOTTE CORDAY, 1987 oil on canvas 53 ins x 39 ins; 134.6 cms x 99.1 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery Ltd., Toronto Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Jane Lind, Joyce Wieland: Artist on Fire, James Lorimer & Company, Ltd., Toronto, 2001, page 17. $15,000–18,000

Note: It was on the eve of the fourth anniversary of the sacking of the Bastille, 13 July 1793, that the noblewoman Charlotte Corday, knocked on Jean-Paul Marat’s door. Claiming knowledge of an escaped group of Girondins, Corday was permitted entry and recited her list of 18 offenders. In truth, Corday was a Girondin sympathizer, a member of an impoverished aristocratic family seeking to avenge the ‘wrongdoings’ of the Revolution. After Marat had finished writing down the names, he assured the lady that the ‘heads’ of the guilty would ‘fall within a fortnight.’ With her true allegiance called to task, Corday produced a kitchen knife from her corset, and slayed the politician. She would later testify during her four-day trial that she had ‘killed one man to save 100,000.’ The works of Joyce Wieland are frequently lauded as emblems of patriotism and feminism. “From the beginning of her career, Joyce did not try to paint like a man, even at a time when mainly men’s work was considered authentic art. Working from the wellspring of who she was, a woman and a feminist...meant accepting an inescapable identity that modified her position in art; as a woman she was marginal even though she was the country’s leading (woman) artist by the late sixties.” In this work, Wieland re-infuses the scene, immortalized previously in a work by Jacques-Louis David, with the female voice. The viewer is compelled by the artist to reinvestigate the narrative, the moment captured, and the true hero. As Wieland inscribed: MODERÉE: To “moderate” the story, to make less extreme, the average, the commonplace. This work was executed in 1987, the year in which Wieland became the first living Canadian-woman artist to be given a career-long retrospective at the Art Gallery of Ontario (16 April–28 June 1987).

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81 WILLIAM RONALD, R.C.A. NANTUCKET oil on canvas signed and dated ‘71; also signed, titled, dated ‘70 and inscribed “11/25/70” and “Toronto” on the reverse 78 ins x 60 ins; 198.1 cms x 152.4 cms $15,000–20,000

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Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

82 JACK LEONARD SHADBOLT, R.C.A. UNTITLED - ABSTRACT COMPOSITION oil on canvas signed 43 ins x 36 ins; 109.2 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto

Literature: Roald Nasgaard, Abstract Painting in Canada, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver/Toronto, 2007, page 134. Note: In 1956, Shadbolt travelled to the south of France. Nasgaard writes: “the painting that resulted was unanticipatedly hedonistic, townscapes and harbour scenes, built up into block-like mosaic patterns of energetic touches of luminous sensuous leaf colours, (with) painterly patches aligned on the lattice of a Cubist grid, often articulated with a horizon line.” Describing paintings from this period, Nasgaard references “the thick paint, smeared and splattered“ and “the wonderfully felt passages in which facture and representation interlock.”

$15,000–20,000

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83 GREGORY RICHARD CURNOE CONFESSORS, DECEMBER 1963 painted construction, oil and stamped ink on plywood titled on the reverse overall 18.25 ins x 13.75 ins; 46.4 cms x 34.9 cms Provenance: The Members’ Gallery, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo Private Collection, Toronto $7,000–9,000

84 JACQUES GODEFROY DE TONNANCOUR, A.R.C.A. LE MILLE PATTES, 1964 mixed media on canvas, laid down on board signed, titled and dated on the reverse 12 ins x 12 ins; 30.5 cms x 30.5 cms Provenance: Galerie Agnès Lefort, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Gilles Hénault, “Tonnancour,” in André Paradis, 16 Peintres Du Québec Dans Leur Milieu, La Vie Des Arts, Québec, 1978, page 147. $3,000–5,000

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Note: In Confessors, December 1963 Curnoe issues subtle proclamations through a bold Pop Art conduit. The work is, in essence, a time capsule. Text stamped out on a horizon of canary yellow integrates into and structures the piece. The words personalize icons of current events and re-enact snippets of private conversations and introspections: BILL SAYS “STOP NOW” JACK SAYS “RESPECT DISTANCE” CHARLIE SAYS “IT’S A MISTAKE” OLGA THINKS IT’S NICE GREG SAYS “TOO MUCH” MOM SAYS “AGAIN”? BOBBY HULL LOSES A TOOTH – The Golden Jet’s goal total hitting 43 in the 1963-64 season. OSWALD DIES – Jack Ruby avenges a President. JACKIE SAYS WEDNESDAY LOUISE SAID YES KAREN LEFT DAD SAID “YOU HAVE NO FUTURE” Legible only upon closer inspection, the lines are choppy and potent, both powerful and riveting in their intimacy.

Note: «Alors, un danger s’instaure. Il faut montrer de nouveau que l’art n’est pas la nature; que l’espirit de géométrie est bien propre de l’homme. (Pourtant, cette formulation est ambiguë, car partout la nature sème à profusion ses théorèmes de coquillages, ses symétries d’insectes, son cubisme de cristaux.) Tonnancour en tiendra compte, car sa pente naturelle l’entraîne à privilégier la forme; il composera donc ses tableaux en y inscrivant sur un fond grumeleux, sa trace personelle, je veux dire ses propres géométries, ses écritures.» Le Mille Pattes is an arid landscape: granulated textures, sandy pixels, a plane of earthen blocks of colour. De Tonnancour modernizes nature’s forms – his paint acting as a new kind of primordial mud. Suspended in this figurative clay are allusions to shells and lichen, and the abstracted form of a centipede frozen in a dance across the surface.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

85 JACK HAMILTON BUSH, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. ON AN ORANGE GROUND oil on canvas signed and dated ‘58 15 ins x 20 ins; 38.1 cms x 50.8 cms Provenance: The Park Gallery, Toronto By descent to the present owner Private Collection, Lake of Bays, Ontario Literature: Marc Mayer and Sarah Stanners, Jack Bush, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 2014, page 20. Note: In the mid-fifties, Bush struggled to find a more authentic voice for himself and experimented with various approaches to painting, none of which proved uniformly satisfactory until 1957 when he was visited by Clement Greenberg, the New York critic. To Marc Mayer, Greenberg was perhaps the most useful friend that an ambitious artist like Bush could wish for. Shortly after this seminal meeting, Bush embarked on a path that would lead him to produce some of his best works to date. This lot, which dates to 1958, represents a pivotal moment in Bush's creative arc. $7,000–9,000

86 DENNIS EUGENE NORMAN BURTON GLIMPSE oil on masonite signed and dated ‘58; also signed, titled, and dated “May 1958” and ‘58 on the reverse 26 ins x 30 ins; 66 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $5,000–7,000

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87 DANIEL PRICE ERICHSEN BROWN YOUNG DANCERS coloured pencil drawing signed and dated 1981 sight 22.5 ins x 21.5 ins; 57.2 cms x 54.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $10,000–15,000 Note:

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In one of Daniel Price Erichsen Brown’s best-known works, two young dancers step into their slippers in preparation for class. Brown’s highly realistic rendering is beautiful both in its symmetry and in the technical ability it conveys. Through their shadows on the wall behind, Brown seems to suggest the latent talent within each of the girls.


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

88 WALTER JOSEPH PHILLIPS, R.C.A. DEER ON THE HILLSIDE watercolour signed and dated ’52; an unfinished pencil sketch of a dock scene on the reverse

Literature: Roger Boulet, The Tranquility and the Turbulence: The Life and Work of Walter J. Phillips, M.B. Loates Publishing, Markham, Ontario, 1981, pages 195 and 207 for the related watercolours Mount Rundle with Deer, 1953 and Rainbow Falls, circa 1938, reproduced in colour. Nancy E. Green, Kate Rutherford and Toni Tomlinson, Walter J. Phillips, Pomegranate, Portland, Oregon, 2103 for an earlier colour woodcut of this subject entitled Deer on Hillside, 1948, page 95, reproduced in colour.

16.5 ins x 17.75 ins; 41.9 cms x 45.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, St. Catharines, Ontario $10,000–15,000

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89 CHRISTOPHER PRATT, R.C.A. LAKE ONTARIO, 1976 serigraph, printed in colours signed, titled, dated “Aug.76” and numbered 26/35 in pencil in the lower margin 20 ins x 20 ins; 50.8 cms x 50.8 cms Provenance: Mira Godard Gallery, Toronto/Montreal Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Jay Scott and Christopher Pratt, The Prints of Christopher Pratt, 1958-1991, Catalogue Raisonné, Breakwater Books, St. John’s, Nfld., 1991, page 65 for Lake Ontario, reproduced in colour. David P. Silcox and Merike Weiler, Christopher Pratt, Prentice-Hall Canada Inc., Scarborough, 1982, page 137 for Lake Ontario, reproduced in colour. Note: Pratt writes: “On those passages down the Lake and through the St. Lawrence Seaway to the Gulf, we encountered ‘Lakers’ everywhere. Sometimes, where the channel narrowed or at the entrance to a lock, they were close encounters; there, big black ships loomed over us, and we felt very fragile... Usually they were much farther off, plodding east and west relentlessly; from Trois Rivières to Thunder Bay, they symbolize the river and the lakes.” $2,500–3,000

90 CHRISTOPHER PRATT, R.C.A. FISH STAMP serigraph signed, titled, dated “Nov. 1968” and inscribed “engraver’s proof” Sight 20.25 ins x 27 ins; 51.4 cms x 68.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, New Brunswick Literature: Jay Scott and Christopher Pratt, The Prints of Christopher Pratt, 1958-1991, Catalogue Raisonné, Breakwater Books, St. John’s, Nfld., 1991, page 46 for The Stamp (2 Cent Cod Fish), “engraver’s proof,” 1968, reproduced and pages 46-49 for the artist’s more extended comments of the Stamp works. David P. Silcox and Merike Weiler, Christopher Pratt, Prentice-Hall Canada Inc., Scarborough, 1982, page 29. Note: Silcox writes: “Between 1968 and 1974, Pratt completed six silkscreen prints based on nineteenth century Newfoundland stamps...In his eyes these stamps were beautiful objects, well designed, and part of a proud pre-Confederation heritage which he wished to salute.” Pratt writes: “I made the ‘Stamp’ prints as souvenirs of Newfoundland: not Newfoundland as an island, its fauna and geography, but as a social, political and economic entity that has passed out of time. These early postage stamps constitute evidence of that Newfoundland.” $2,000–3,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

91 ALEXANDER COLVILLE, R.C.A. SUNRISE, 1970 serigraph, printed in colours signed, dated 1970 and numbered 62/70

Literature: Michael Bell, Colville, Being Seen: the serigraphs, Carleton University Art Gallery, Ottawa, 1994, page 40, cat.no.12 for Sunrise, (Collection of Graham Colville), reproduced.

13.75 ins x 25.75 ins; 30.5 cms x 61 cms

David Burnett, Colville – Prints/Estampes, Department of External Affairs, Arts Promotion Division, Ottawa, 1985, page 10, for Sunrise/Lever du soleil, 1970, reproduced.

Provenance: Marlborough Godard Gallery, Toronto/Montreal

Helen J. Dow, The Art of Alex Colville, McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, Toronto, 1972, page 87, and page 195, plate 99 for Sunrise, reproduced in colour.

$8,000–12,000

Note: Dow writes that for Colville “the highest art, like marriage, required concentrated effort.” She continues: “At least one of his works appear to deal with this analogy, though indirectly, by again examining the nature of love. This is his picture, Sunrise, a serigraph which he executed in 1970... The print portrays a woman silhouetted in purplish tones against the glowing rays of a coral sun as she glides mysteriously past a dark embankment in the graceful embrace of a canoe. In a consideration of the nature of art, however, it is the dramatic juxtaposition of the woman with the rising sun which is especially significant. For just as the sun rises uninvited in the sense that it appears without human control, so love, as the reverse of art, happens suddenly and without conscious effort. To Colville, the mystery of love is a sheer gift while, conversely, marriage in itself is an art, that is to say something premeditated and intentionally planned. For him, all art must be the product of a similarly rational activity.”

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92 LAWREN STEWART HARRIS JACK RESTING BY A TREE oil on canvas 13.25 ins x 11.25 ins; 33.7 cms x 28.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Niagara-on-the-Lake Literature: “The Coupler Presents-Jack T. Hulme,” The Coupler (The Official Magazine for the employees and pensioners of the Toronto Transit Commission), No. 7, Vol. 11, November 1936. Note: John Thompson Hulme, or Jack, as everyone called him, was born in Toronto in October 1898. Leaving the city behind for the farming life, Jack moved with his family to Aurora (Oak Ridges) while still a boy. “The district surrounding his parent’s farm was a favourite haunt for artists and (Jack) was able to pick up considerable pocket money by merely posing for them in the shade of some tree or with a fishing rod at the edge of a stream.” One such artist, a young friend of the family, was Lawren Stewart Harris. Painted on the family property, Harris is believed to have paid Jack 25 cents to sit for this portrait. See our website for additional information about this lot. $5,000–7,000

Jack Hulme as a young man (left) with friend.

93 MARCELLA MALTAIS FENÊTRES DE QUÉBEC oil on board signed and dated ‘54 21 ins x 17.75 ins; 54 cms x 45.1 cms Provenance: Lavalin Collection, Quebec Private Collection, Toronto $3,000–4,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

94 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT, P.R.C.A. ST. MARGARETS, P.Q. oil on panel signed, titled and dated 1945 on the reverse 8 ins x 10.5 ins; 20.3 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Dominion Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto Note: Robert Wakeham Pilot set up studio in the space that had once belonged to his stepfather, Maurice Cullen. It was from this Studio Building on Ste. Famille Street in Montreal (which was, anecdotally, owned by Alfred Laliberté) that Pilot made his first sketching trips into the Laurentians, Baie St. Paul country, Quebec and the Maritimes. This painting was executed in 1945, most likely on one of the sketching trips, which resumed following Pilot’s return to Canada from his service in World War II. Pilot’s depiction of St. Margarets is pleasant and delicate: A snowy scene in which we can almost hear the gurgling water and feel the warmth of the cabin’s hearth. $6,000–8,000

95 ANGUS TRUDEAU HARRISON, OWEN SOUND, ONTARIO, 1982 mixed media on illustration board signed with initials and titled 30 ins x 40 ins; 76.2 cms x 101.6 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery Ltd., Toronto Charles Bronfman’s Claridge Collection, Montreal Note: Steamboats are a recurring theme in the work of Anishinaabe artist Angus Trudeau. Working as a sailor and a cook on the Great Lakes commercial ships, paintings such as this lot can be seen as a recollection of the artist’s journey aboard these great steamers. Sold to benefit Historica Canada. $3,500–5,000

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96 HAROLD BARLING TOWN, R.C.A. TOY HORSE (A PAIR) acrylic on paper signed and dated “Oct. -12 - 77” and “Dec. -5 -77” respectively Each 22.5 ins x 28.25 ins; 57.2 cms x 71.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. $5,000–6,000

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Literature: Iris Nowell, Harold Town, Figure 1 Publishing Inc., Vancouver, 2014, pages 139-143 for a discussion about the Toy Horse series. Note: The Toy Horse series began in 1976 and was inspired by a small tin toy horse which Town had received as a gift. According to Nowell, this object “figured beyond all others in his output of drawings.” While Town is reputed to have produced many hundreds of variations on this theme – with sculptural horses, mechanical horses, static horses, prancing horses, black and white horses and colourful ones – the result seems to have had an enormous impact on the buying public who were in awe of the variations that Town produced on this theme. Nowell notes that for the 1984 Toy Horse exhibition at Laing Galleries, 127 pictures were installed, the praise non-stop and sales robust. She writes: “Collectors who had difficulty deciding between two works bought both.”


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

97 WALTER HAWLEY YARWOOD UNTITLED welded metal, mounted to a wooden base 29 ins x 9 ins; 73.7 cms x 22.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Note: Yarwood’s sculpture resembles lava rock having cooled and hardened after a volcanic eruption. Forming a spontaneous totem, the metal spikes, twists, and ripples. Yarwood makes effective use of juxtaposition by anchoring the frontispiece to a wooden support. This lot is exemplary of the innovation brought to welded structures by the artist. $4,000–5,000

98 JACK LEONARD SHADBOLT, R.C.A. UNTITLED - ABSTRACTION mixed media on paper signed and dated ‘49 22.5 ins x 29 ins; 57.2 cms x 73.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Alberta Literature: Patricia Ainslie, Jack Shadbolt: Correspondences, Glenbow Museum, Calgary, 1991, page 14, page 18, cat.no.44 and page 31 cat.no.46 for related works from this period, reproduced. Note: Ainslie asserts that in the late 1940s Picasso “remained the single most influential force on American painters.” In September 1948, Shadbolt arrived in New York and enrolled at the Art Students League. Shadbolt was in New York until August 1949 when he returned to British Columbia. This work dates from 1949, a time during which Shadbolt, according to Ainslie, “worked increasingly intuitively, remembering forms in a strange disjunctive way” in keeping with surrealist ideas. $4,000–6,000

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99 WILLIAM PEREHUDOFF, R.C.A. AC-86-8, 1986 acrylic on canvas signed and titled on the reverse 13 ins x 24 ins; 33 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Waddington & Shiell Ltd., Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $3,000–4,000

100 MARIAN MILDRED DALE SCOTT UNTITLED acrylic on canvas 23.5 ins x 35.5 ins; 59.7 cms x 90.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Esther Trépanier, Mildred Dale Scott: Pioneer of Modern Art, Musée du Québec, Québec, 2000, pages 228-230. Note: Dating from the mid- to late- 1960s, this lot exemplifies Scott’s continuous effort to refresh her practice. According to Trépanier, during this period one of Scott’s main goals was “to explore authentically modernist composition and structure.” Trépanier writes: “this new phase was undoubtedly a reflection of the growing attention being paid to plasticiens issues within the Montreal art milieu.” Using an irregular grid to structure her compositions, Scott employed bright colours “to embrace a new form of geometric abstraction, neither rigidly hard-edge nor dependent on the visual effects of op art.” These fluid grid compositions were subdivided into triangular shapes and occasionally “a broader white area at the centre of the network of lines create(d) an almost floral effect,” as can be seen in this lot. $2,000–2,500

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

101 RONALD LANGLEY BLOORE UNTITLED, 1979 oil on masonite signed on the reverse, and titled and dated on the stretcher 36 ins x 48 ins; 91.4 cms x 121.9 cms Provenance: Moore Gallery Ltd., Hamilton Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Terrence Heath, Ronald L. Bloore: Not Without Design, Mackenzie Art Gallery, Regina, 1983, page 42. Denise Leclerc, The Crisis of Abstraction in Canada: The 1950s, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1992, page 89. Note: Though he first explored the style in 1958, Ronald Bloore began painting exclusively in white monochrome in 1960. Scraping paint onto his masonite supports like mortar on brick, Bloore creates compositions of lines and layers. The impact of his works lay in the richness of tonality created by his impasto. Cited as the “white on white painter,” the artist first gained national recognition when he participated in an exhibition of “The Regina Five” organized by the National Gallery in 1961. $9,000–12,000

102 LÉON BELLEFLEUR SANS TITRE oil on board signed and dated 1951 4.75 ins x 6.5 ins; 12.1 cms x 16.5 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $3,000–5,000

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103 GORDON RAYNER FLYING OUT acrylic on canvas signed on the reverse, also signed, titled and dated 1980 on the overflap, and signed, titled and dated “Nov. 1980” on the stretcher 59.5 ins x 71.75 ins; 151.1 cms x 182.2 cms Provenance: Isaacs Gallery Ltd., Toronto The Collection of Rothmans, Benson & Hedges Inc. Private Collection $7,000–9,000

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Literature: David Burnett and Marilyn Schiff, Contemporary Canadian Art, Hurtig Publishers Ltd., Edmonton, 1983, pages 91-92, and page 91, Fig. 79, reproduced in colour. Note: Since childhood, Rayner had summered on Georgian Bay, near Magnetawan. Burnett writes: “His response to this northern landscape, touched by his interest and experience in the East (Rayner had travelled to Turkey, Iran and India on a Canada Council grant), had led to his finest pictures, from River Window (1965) (Art Gallery of Windsor) to Flying Out (1980), characterized by brilliance of colour and breadth of gesture.”


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

104 WILLIAM GOODRIDGE ROBERTS, R.C.A SEATED NUDE oil on canvas signed 43.25 ins x 27.75 ins; 70.5 cms x 109.9 cms Provenance: Collection of Joan C. Roberts, the artist’s wife Private Collection, New York Literature: James Borcoman, Goodridge Roberts, A Retrospective, The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1969, page 19. Note: “Humans are reserved for the figure paintings and, like Cézanne, Roberts expects his models to sit as still as apples on a plate. All he asks of them is that they be beautiful human beings – he would never paint anyone he considers physically unattractive – and that they hold the pose.” Using rapid and loose brushstrokes, Roberts builds his female subject out of ochre and raw umbers, as if breathing life into clay. The earth tones of her body and the onyx of her hair are punctuated by the verdant green and sharp white cloth on which she sits. This lot was a birthday present to the artist’s wife, Joan C. Roberts, in 1953. $5,000–7,000

105 TOM HOPKINS THE WATER (...IN ADVANCE OF...) oil on canvas signed; also signed, titled and dated 2002 on the reverse 43.75 ins x 46 ins; 111.1 cms x 116.8 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal Literature: Tom Hopkins: New Paintings, Galerie de Bellefeuille, Montreal, 1997, page 4, the artist in conversation with Guido Molinari. Note: “For me, tension is the basis for all life. Certainly tension between two or three colours in a painting is what makes the painting vibrant, all contrasts – warm/cool, broad areas against detail, organic against mechanical. And of course, in many of my paintings I am interested in the wild versus the tame, water in nature against water imprisoned ‘civilized’ in a bowl or container.” In The Water (...In Advance of...), Hopkins creates a narrative of contrast and tension. The backdrop for the scene is a reflective waterscape, limitless in its blues, greens and light. The artist challenges the viewer to shift their perception of the work by placing a red bowl of water in the foreground. Confronted by this contained space, we now experience the painting through a different lens: Half-full or half-empty, lush or illusory. $5,000–7,000

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106 HAROLD BARLING TOWN, R.C.A. UNTITLED collage signed and dated 1959 13 ins x 13 ins; 33 cms x 33 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Exhibited: Harold Town: 1944-1975, December 16, 1975 January 15, 1976, organized by the Art Gallery of Windsor and exhibited in Toronto. $3,000–5,000

107 RONALD YORK WILSON, O.S.A., R.C.A. OUT OF YOUR MIND mixed media on card signed and dated ‘80; inscribed “Especially painted for the Arts & Letters skit in 1980 ‘Out of Your Mind’” on the reverse 44 ins x 63.5 ins; 111.8 cms x 161.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Lela WiIson, York Wilson: His Life and Work, 19071984, Carleton University Press, Ottawa, 1997, page 244 for a reference to the review “Out of Your Mind”. Note: Members of the Arts and Letters Club, like York Wilson, wrote and performed annual theatrical reviews from the 1930s onward, almost without interruption. This work was created as part of an annual review performed at the Club in 1980. This graffiti inspired composition, possibly used as part of the set for a skit, incorporates fantastical figures and puns which play on names of Toronto streets, public figures, club members and current events. $5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

108 MARCELLE FERRON, R.C.A. SANS TITRE oil on canvas signed on the reverse 7 ins x 9 ins; 17.8 cms x 22.9 cms Provenance: Galerie Lamoureux Ritzenhoff, Montreal Note: Sans titre is a powerful dialogue between colour, shade, and light. Ferron’s bold brushstrokes unfold into a vigorous composition, as though a sun-soaked horizon meets the stormy, dark waters of dusk. The sky splits in swaths of taupe and gold, as darkened waves crest in copper red and deep violet. $7,000–9,000

109 DAVID BOLDUC SIGHT READING, 1979 acrylic on canvas signed, titled and dated on the reverse 64 ins x 64 ins; 162.6 cms x 162.6 cms Provenance: Circle Arts International, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $4,000–5,000

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110 RITA LETENDRE, R.C.A. SANS TITRE casein on paper signed and dated ‘62 9.25 ins x 12 ins; 23.5 cms x 30.5 cms Provenance: Collection Camille Hébert, Québec Galerie Simon Blais, Montreal Private Collection, Montreal Literature: Hedwidge Asselin and Simon Blais, Rita Letendre: Les éléments/The Elements, Montréal, Éditions Simon Blais, 2001, page 12. Note: In this untitled work, Letendre churns out a waterfall of vibrant blue and molten gold. All is engulfed in movement, a tempest contained by the page, as the paint dashes and surges across the surface. The painting is lyrical and free; “...the work of art appears not as a depiction of the world, but rather an energetic machine built by the painter to interact in a renewed, freer relationship with the world.” $6,000–8,000

111 DONALD JARVIS BLUE FIGURE II, 1962 oil on canvas signed; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse 50 ins x 36 ins; 127 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Note: Blue Figure II is one in a series of “core” pictures that Jarvis executed in the early 1960s. Here, he aimed to integrate the figure and background in an overall painterly style that owes much to Abstract Expressionism. Jarvis was one of several abstract painters working on the west coast of Canada at mid-century (Jack Shadbolt, Gordon Smith, Takao Tanabe). A student of B.C. Binning and Jack Shadbolt at the Vancouver School of Art (now the Emily Carr University of Art and Design) between 1941 and 1948, Jarvis continued his studies under the Abstract Expressionist painter Hans Hofmann in New York from 1948 to 1950. Hofmann’s theory of “push and pull”—the dynamic interplay between colour, shape and placement on a flat surface that creates competing forces to produce depth—may well have been behind this work. A dark central form appears to hover before the picture plane, cut loose from the space behind it. $4,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

112 JOSEPH FRANCIS PLASKETT, R.C.A. THE MANTELPIECE WITH FIGURES oil on masonite signed and dated ‘59 15.75 ins x 49.5 ins; 40 cms x 125.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $4,000–6,000

113 TOM HOPKINS MANGO oil on canvas signed and dated ‘89 16.75 ins x 54.5 ins; 41.9 cms x 137.2 cms Provenance: The Drabinsky Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $4,000–6,000

Literature: Joseph Plaskett, 1998, from Joseph Plaskett: Still Life in Interior Space, Bau-Xi Gallery, Toronto, 1999, unpaginated. Note: “The painter must choose subjects that are not flat, that offer endless complexities of depth and dynamic movement...” When Plaskett arrived for a second time in Paris in 1957, he found the inspiration that he had been seeking in its grandeur and its charm. He decided to settle in the city permanently, first renting a room and then eventually purchasing a house in one of the oldest quarters of Paris, the Marais. The painter filled his home with a profusion of flowers, fruits and books gathered from flea markets and the nearby market stands at Les Halles. Objects from this magical array became his subjects, captured on canvas or paper in a poetic use of colour like intimate windows into the domestic. In this work, we even catch a glimpse of the artist within the mirror, a fixture at home in rich pigment. Plaskett’s still lifes delight in their setting: sensuous and tactile they are filled with enchantment and light.

Literature: Tom Hopkins: New Paintings, Galerie de Bellefeuille, Montreal, 1997, page 6, the artist in conversation with Guido Molinari. Note: “My thinking is that a single feature is more of an icon. In other words, it can’t exist on its own; it needs a dialogue with the viewer to interact, to be projected upon. It’s not like a picture of people talking. We are invisible to the people in the painting. With the icon, it’s always interactive.” Tom Hopkin’s unconventional still-life, with its solitary and tropical subject, beckons the viewer to interpret and explore. The experience of the painting, Hopkins stresses, depends on one’s experiences in life. The mango is wholly personal: soft or unripened, vibrant or two-toned, illuminated or in shadow, the subject or an intruder, stale or sweet and succulent.

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114 RONALD ALBERT MARTIN UNTITLED NO. 15 oil on canvas signed and inscribed “Paris ‘66” on the reverse 39.5 ins x 31.75 ins; 100.3 cms x 80.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. $4,000–5,000

115 ROBERT HEDRICK UNTITLED ABSTRACT, 1961 oil on canvas signed and dated ‘61; also signed and dated on the reverse 50 ins x 36 ins; 127 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Canadian Fine Art Gallery, Toronto Note: Robert Hedrick belonged to the second generation of Toronto abstract artists who showed at the Isaacs Gallery in the 1960s. In a 1961 article on Hedrick for Canadian Art magazine, critic Robert Fulford described the artist’s practice as “discipline in action” because he typically tackled one artistic problem at a time through a number of works until he had solved it. Untitled Abstract is one of several canvases from this period in which the artist was concerned with making forms move in space. Masses of earthy colours and black float across the surface forming patterns suggested by a primary wash, creating an overall effect characteristic of Abstract Expressionism. The painting process is visible in that the thinned-down paint has been allowed to drip into adjacent areas, (note the orange mass in the upper right corner) which gives the work a look of spontaneity and “chance.” Hedrick has nonetheless given careful consideration to the interplay of space, colour and rhythm so that the element of chance has been held in check by his adherence to a set of formal standards, as Fulford observed. Hedrick believed that his sculpture, first exhibited in 1961, shared an underlying naturalism with his painting of the period. $5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

116 JOHN GRAHAM COUGHTRY UNTITLED oil on canvas signed and dated ‘58 on the reverse 46 ins x 36 ins; 116.8 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Interview with Brydon Smith in 1966, quoted in Bale Hale, Graham Coughtry Retrospective, The Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Oshawa, 1976, page 11. Note: Nineteen fifty-eight was a momentous year for Graham Coughtry. With a preference for the abstract stirring the air, he showed at both the Carnegie International and at the Guggenheim International (at which the Canadian group of paintings won an honourable mention). It was also in this year, with the creation of a work entitled Dark Room, that Barry Hale noted a distinct shift in the manner of Coughtry’s painting, which he attributed to the influence of Willem de Kooning. Coughtry explains: “I broke into a more dashing kind of paint handling, all of a sudden, where I found I could put down one great big stroke and actually let it stay there.” The space of this untitled work is generalized and entirely abstract. While Coughtry’s vibrant palette and large swaths and trickles of paint are present, his signature ‘figure’ is not yet articulated. $8,000–10,000

117 PAUL FOURNIER, R.C.A. KARNAC oil on canvas signed and dated “Spring ‘78” on the reverse and titled on the stretcher 70 ins x 47 ins; 177.8 cms x 119.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, New Brunswick $3,000–4,000

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118 REG HOLMES ONE FOLDED SPACE, 1966 acrylic on shaped canvas, unframed signed, dated and inscribed “no. 8” on the overflap overall 30.5 ins x 54.75 ins; 77.5 cms x 139.1 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Montreal $2,500–3,000

119 HAROLD BARLING TOWN, R.C.A. SPACE BITS Single Autographic Print signed, dated 57 and numbered 1-1 in pencil in the margin; also signed, titled and dated 57 on the reverse 23.25 ins x 18.75 ins; 59.1 cms x 47.6 cms Provenance: Mazelow Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $1,500–2,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

120 CLAUDE TOUSIGNANT, R.C.A. DIPTYCH - MONOCHROME JAUNE AND MONOCHROME FONCÉ, 1995 acrylic on card signed, titled and dated on the reverse Sight 15.5 ins x 19.5 ins; 39.4 cms x 49.5 cms Provenance: Projex-MTL Galerie, Montreal Literature: Briony Fer, On Abstract Art, Yale University Press, New Haven, 1997, page 154. Note: Tousignant urges his viewer to make direct contact with the sensation of colour – its taste, texture and temperament. Squares of uniform colour sing with intensity, confirming Briony Fer’s oberservation that the monochrome has “remained one of abstract painting’s most resilient and repeated strategies.” The diptych is pure sensation. $2,000–2,500

121 DENNIS EUGENE NORMAN BURTON UNTITLED - HORIZON watercolour and ink signed and dated “11.8.’59” 22 ins x 16.75 ins; 55.9 cms x 42.5 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $1,000–1,500

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122 TED BIELER SIX COLUMNS

text note

bronze, set on a wooden base signed, titled, dated 1964 and numbered 1/1 on the base

ing

height including base 15 ins; 38.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. $1,200–1,500

123 JOAN WILLSHER-MARTEL TREES XIV oil on canvas signed with initials and dated ‘08; also signed, titled and dated 1977 on the reverse 66 ins x 64 ins; 167.6 cms x 162.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Literature: Joan Murray, Cosmic Consciousness: the Paintings of Joan Willsher-Martel, 1950-2000, Gallery Gevik, 2000, page 5. Note: “Willsher-Martel’s work is not so much the result of reasoning as an instinctual feeling for the place in which she grew up... What we see is mystical intuition: she is an heir to the Romantic tradition, and her work is part of a larger quest for the spirit.” Born in Victoria in 1925, Joan Willsher-Martel moved to Toronto in 1952 with a view to become an abstract artist. Willsher-Martel developed her own artistic style inspired by the Painters Eleven and Emily Carr, infused with Pointillism and Impressionism. Her works are romantic and meticulous, resembling four-colour process inks in a Gaussian blur. Often depicting the trees and landscapes of British Columbia, Willsher-Martel’s mature works are an otherworldly homage to her birthplace. It is not uncommon for artists to re-consider aspects of their work, as is the case with this painting, which was originally executed in 1977 and re-visited by the artist in 2008. $4,000–5,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

124 JOHN IVOR SMITH HEAD cast stone, set on black laminate base height including base 59 ins; 149.9 cms height excluding base 11.5 ins; 29.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. Literature: Colin S. MacDonald, A Dictionary of Canadian Artists, Volume Eight, Part One, Canadian Paperbacks Publishing Ltd., Ottawa, 2006, page 651. Note: John Ivor Smith studied under Jacques de Tonnancour and Arthur Lismer. According to Colin MacDonald, the influence of Italian sculptors Marino Marini and Manzu, to which Smith would have been exposed during travels to Italy, are evident in his work with its simplified figures and flowing lines. $2,500–3,000 (detail)

125 JACK BEDER SHELL FORM (SCULPTURE 14), 1964 limestone, set on a stone base height including base 16 ins; 40.6 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist By descent to the present owner Private Collection, St. Catharines, Ontario $1,200–1,500

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126 THOMAS SHERLOCK HODGSON UNTITLED - PURPLE & GOLD oil on canvas signed 22 ins x 21.25 ins; 55.9 cms x 54 cms Provenance: Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Canadian Fine Arts, Toronto $1,500–2,000

127 FRITZ BRANDTNER GEORGIAN BAY, 1946 ink and crayon on paper signed and titled 17 ins x 22 ins; 43.2 cms x 55.9 cms Provenance: Kastel Gallery, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto $1,500–2,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

128 JACK HARMAN YOUNG MAN bronze, set on a wooden base signed height excluding base 42 ins; 119.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Note: According to the present owner, this work was executed circa 1961. $900–1,200

129 JOHN GRAHAM COUGHTRY RECLINING NUDE lithograph, printed in colours signed, dated ‘79 and numbered 28/40 38 ins x 29 ins; 96.5 cms x 73.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, New Brunswick $1,200–1,500

130 DON JARVIS UNTITLED - ABSTRACT COMPOSITION watercolour and ink signed and dated ‘79 28.75 ins x 22.5 ins; 73 cms x 57.2 cms $800–1,200

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131 JACK REPPEN, O.S.A. UNTITLED oil on masonite signed and dated ‘62 24 ins x 36 ins; 61 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $1,500–2,000

132 PIERRE GENDRON PAYLANDE À CARMEN AMAYA NO.2 acrylic on canvas signed and dated ‘92; also signed (twice), titled, dated 1992 on the reverse and signed on the stretcher 40 ins x 30 ins; 101.6 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Art Dialogue Gallery, Toronto Art Rental and Sales Gallery, Museum London, London, Ontario Private Collection, Toronto $2,500–3,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

133 DENIS JUNEAU BLACK, BLUE, RED RECTANGLES gouache signed and dated “83” Sight 14.25 ins x 26 ins; 66 cms x 36.2 cms $800–1,200

134 WILLIAM RONALD, R.C.A. UNTITLED acrylic on paper signed 24.5 ins x 36 ins; 62.2 cms x 91.4 cms Provenance: Canadian Fine Arts, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $1,500–2,000

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135 JOYCE WIELAND, R.C.A. SHE SPEAKS IN BLUE, RED & YELLOW, 1980 coloured pencils signed, dated ‘80 and inscribed “Blue, Red, Yellow” in pencil 10.75 ins x 13 ins; 27.3 cms x 33 cms Provenance: The Isaacs Gallery Ltd., Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $1,000–1,500

136 JACK BEDER TALL GREY FORM (SCULPTURE 122), 1975 stone, set on a stone base

xt te

height including base 18.25 ins; 46.4 cms Provenance: Estate of the artist By descent to the present owner Private Collection, St. Catharines, Ontario $1,200–1,500

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

137 JOHN RICHARD FOX VIEW FROM THE STUDIO WINDOW oil on canvas signed 33 ins x 39 ins; 83.8 cms x 99.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $2,000–3,000

138 MICHAEL SNOW PIANO lithograph signed, dated ‘73 and numbered 37/100 24 ins x 24 ins; 61 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Private Collection, New Brunswick $1,200–1,500

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139 FRANK HANS JOHNSTON, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. THE GATE oil on masonite signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 20 ins x 16 ins; 50.8 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Note: According to the owner, this work was purchased from an exhibition at the Arts and Letters Club, Toronto. $7,000–9,000

140 JOHN GEOFFREY CARUTHERS LITTLE, R.C.A. RUE CHAMPS DE MARS, MONTREAL, ‘65 oil on canvas board signed; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse 8 ins x 10 ins; 20.3 cms x 25.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Note: This lot expresses Little’s affection for Montreal’s snowy winters. With thick and brisk brushstrokes, the painter perfectly renders the busy, slushy, and slippery streets of the city. His subdued colour palette creates an atmosphere where the air is so heavy and the sky so low, that foreground and background appear as if leaning on one another. $5,000–7,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

141 DAVID LLOYD BLACKWOOD, O.S.A., R.C.A. JANUARY VISIT HOME etching, printed in colours signed, titled, dated 1975 and numbered 25/50 in pencil in the lower margin 19.75 ins x 31.5 ins; 50.2 cms x 80 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal Literature: William Gough, The Art of David Blackwood, McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, Toronto/Montreal, 1988, Plate 1 for January Visit Home, reproduced in colour. Wiliam Gough, David Blackwood, Master Printmaker, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver/Montreal, 2011, pages 2829 for January Visit Home, reproduced in colour. $4,000–5,000

142 DANIEL PRICE ERICHSEN BROWN ON THE FENCE, 1963 egg tempera on board signed and dated /63 18 ins x 26 ins; 45.7 cms x 66 cms Provenance: Canadian Industries Limited (CIL), North York Exhibited: D.P. Brown: Twenty Years, Art Gallery of Hamilton, Ontario, 1985. Note: Brown enrolled at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick in 1958. It was there that he was introduced to the process of egg tempera painting – following in the footsteps of the likes of Tom Forrestall, who attended the school from 1954 to 1958. Working on a board prepared with gesso, Brown skillfully crafts scenes in High-Realism. The theme of this lot is one which the artist returns to frequently: that of the inhabited landscape. A young boy perches atop a split-rail fence, surveying the vista ahead. There is an intensity of feeling that leaves the viewer curious to know what has piqued his interest. In a letter from Pearl Vaughan, Administrator of the CIL Art Program, to the artist dated November 24th, 1987, Vaughan describes this work as, “a valued part of the CIL traveling collection for over 24 years. It has been displayed in over 200 exhibitions across Canada and in some U.S. centres.” $6,000–8,000

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143 CLARENCE ALPHONSE GAGNON, R.C.A. MONT ST. MICHEL etching signed and titled in pencil in the lower margin 9 ins x 11 ins; 22.9 cms x 27.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Alberta Literature: Rosemarie L. Tovell, A New Class of Art: the Artist’s Print in Canadian Art 1877-1920, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1996, page 81, and page 21, Plate V, cat.no.43 for Mont St. Michel, reproduced. Hélène Sicotte and Michel Grandbois with Rosemarie L. Tovell, Clarence Gagnon, 1881-1942: Dreaming the Landscape, Musée du Québec, 2006, page 286 and cat.no.34, page 383 for Mont St. Michel, reproduced. $2,500–3,000 Note: Tovell writes: “In 1907 a transformation occurred in Gagnon’s etching that can be attributed to a rare privileged experience with Rembrandt’s etching.” Between 1906 and 1907, Gagnon had the opportunity to assist with pulling a set of restrikes from the great Dutch master’s own plates. As a result, Tovell asserts that works such as Mont St. Michel show “a new sensitivity to the expressive qualities of a densely drawn etched line, a rich painterly method of inking, and a moodiness or emotional quality now truly felt and not just observed.” Executed circa 1907, Gagnon described Mont St. Michel as his best print. Only twenty-one signed impressions of this title have been identified to date. Copies may be found in major public collections including the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the National Gallery of Canada and the Art Gallery of Ontario. Gagnon also made a similar painting of this subject.

144 CLARENCE ALPHONSE GAGNON, R.C.A. CANAL SAN PIETRO, VENICE etching signed and titled in pencil in the lower margin Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario Literature: Rosemarie L. Tovell, A New Class of Art: the Artist’s Print in Canadian Art 1877-1920, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1996, page 80, and page 79, Fig. 68 for Canal San Pietro, Venice, reproduced. $1,800–2,200 Note: Gagnon’s Venetian etchings date to 1905. Tovell writes: “Gagnon’s Venetian prints evince a stylistic transition from cleanly drawn renderings of fully sunlit views to tonally nuanced subjects, showing a growing interest in capturing the transitory light and shadows peculiar to that city’s topography,” a change Tovell asserts is clearly evident in Canal San Pietro, Venice among others.

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

145 JAMES EDWARD HERVEY MACDONALD, O.S.A., R.C.A. A WORD TO US ALL, SOLD TOGETHER WITH A COPY OF A WORD TO US ALL BY J.E.H. MACDONALD, A LIMITED EDITION KEEPSAKE PRINTED ON THE OCCASION OF THE PUBLICATION OF J.E.H. MACDONALD: DESIGNER BY THE ARCHIVES OF CANADA AND TO MARK THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DEATH OF WILLIAM MORRIS IN 1896, SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR AND NUMBERED 299/500

Literature: Robert Stacey, J.E.H. MacDonald, A Word to Us All, Carleton University Press, Ottawa, 1996, page 5. Robert Stacey, J.E.H. MacDonald: Designer, An Anthology of Graphic Design, Illustration and Lettering, Carleton University Press, Ottawa, 1996, front and back fly leaf for this lot, reproduced. Note: According to Thoreau MacDonald (the artist’s son), J.E.H. MacDonald produced this work as a sample when he thought of working at the Roycroft Shops in East Aurora, New York, circa 1900. Stacey remarks that A Word to Us All reveals a little known fact about one of Canada’s most renowned landscape painters: “His deep attachment to the written word and to the world of organic ornament.” Stacey continues by noting that this work is “the first important statement by (the artist), not only as a graphic designer, lettering artist and illuminator, but as budding poet.”

ink and gouache three works (one double-sided), each inscribed by Thoreau MacDonald Each 10.75 ins x 8 ins; 27.3 cms x 20.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $3,000–4,000

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146 RENÉ RICHARD SEA SHORE, BAIE ST. PAUL oil on panel signed; titled on the reverse 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $2,000–3,000

147 MANLY EDWARD MACDONALD, R.C.A. BACK OF SUGAR BUSH oil on canvas, laid down on board signed 12 ins x 16.25 ins; 30.5 cms x 41.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $1,800–2,200

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

148 MARCEL FECTEAU COUNTRY ROAD oil on masonite signed; with an unfinished drawing on the reverse 10 ins x 14 ins; 25.4 cms x 35.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $800–1,200

(verso)

149 MANLY EDWARD MACDONALD, R.C.A. ROAD TO THE GLENORA FERRY oil on canvas board signed; with unfinished pencil sketches of landscapes on the reverse 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Picton Note: Title provided by the owner. $1,500–2,000

(verso)

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150 HERBERT SIDNEY PALMER, O.S.A., R.C.A. A PAIR OF LANDSCAPES: MAPLE AND PINE; LINGERING LEAVES oils on panel both signed; both also signed and titled on reverse Each 8.5 ins x 10.5 ins; 21.6 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $2,000–2,500

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

151 LAWRENCE ARTHUR COLLEY PANTON, O.S.A., R.C.A. OLD PARRY SOUND oil on panel signed; also signed, titled and inscribed “n.f.s” on the reverse 9 ins x 11.5 ins; 22.9 cms x 29.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto Exhibited: Department of Graphic Art, Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, 1933. $1,500–1,800

152 ARMAND TATOSSIAN, R.C.A. ST. AGATHE oil on canvas signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 24 ins x 30 ins; 61 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $2,500–3,000

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153 FREDERIC MARLETT BELL-SMITH, O.S.A., R.C.A. NEAR WATERLOO BRIDGE watercolour, laid down on card signed; titled on the backing 9.75 ins x 6.75 ins; 24.8 cms x 17.1 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $1,500–2,500

154 FREDERIC MARLETT BELL-SMITH, O.S.A., R.C.A. LONDON STREET SCENE WITH OMNIBUS watercolour, laid down on card signed and indistinctly dated 9.25 ins x 5.75 ins; 23.5 cms x 14.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $1,200–1,800

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

155 JOHN A. HAMMOND, R.C.A. VENICE, ST. MARIA DELLA SALUTE oil on panel signed and dated 1887; also signed with initials, titled and dated on the reverse 5.5 ins x 8.25 ins; 14 cms x 21 cms $1,000–1,500

156 GEORGE LORNE HOLLAND BOUCHARD, R.C.A. MEURLING REFUGE MONTREAL oil on canvas board signed 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, St. Catharines, Ontario Exhibited: The 69th Annual Exhibition of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 19 November–12 December 1948, no. 17. $1,000–1,500

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157 JOHN WILLIAM BEATTY, O.S.A., R.C.A. UNTITLED - HARVEST TIME oil on panel signed 10.5 ins x 13.75 ins; 26.7 cms x 34.9 cms Provenance: Mayberry Fine Art, Winnipeg/Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $3,000–4,000

158 ANDRÉ CHARLES BIÉLER, O.S.A., R.C.A. CAP ROUGE AU PRINTEMPS oil on panel signed 9.75 ins x 13 ins; 24.8 cms x 33 cms Provenance: Galerie Martin, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto Exhibited: Manoir Richelieu Art Exhibition, La Malbaie, Québec, n.d. $3,500–4,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

159 MANLY EDWARD MACDONALD, R.C.A. HOUSE ON THE NAPANEE RIVER oil on canvas signed 28 ins x 36 ins; 50.8 cms x 61 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Picton $5,000–7,000

160 FRANK HANS JOHNSTON, O.S.A., A.R.C.A. INDIAN SUMMER oil on masonite signed 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $5,000–7,000

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161 BERTHE DES CLAYES FARM, EASTERN TOWNSHIPS oil on canvas, laid down on board signed 7.25 ins x 8.5 ins; 20.3 cms x 22.9 cms Provenance: Walter Klinkhoff Gallery Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Ontario Note: This work is titled House at Knowlton, Quebec on a nameplate attached to the frame. $1,200–1,500

162 DANIEL FOWLER, O.S.A., R.C.A. RURAL LANDSCAPE WITH WAYFARERS AND HORSE watercolour, laid down on illustration board signed and dated 1880 on a one inch strip attached to the lower edge 22 ins x 28 ins; 50.8 cms x 68.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $2,500–3,500

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

163 THOMAS HILTON GARSIDE, A.R.C.A. RIVIÈRE EN HIVER pastel signed 8 ins x 10 ins; 20.3 cms x 25.4 cms Provenance: Galerie Valentin, Montreal Private Collection, Toronto Note: Executed circa 1945. $1,800–2,200

164 ROBERT WAKEHAM PILOT, P.R.C.A. AT THE WHARF pastel signed and indistinctly dated ‘4(?) 9.5 ins x 13 ins; 24.1 cms x 33 cms Provenance: Canadian Fine Arts, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $2,000–3,000

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165 JOHN WILLIAM BEATTY, O.S.A., R.C.A. AUTUMN HILLSIDE oil on canvas board signed and dated ‘12 9.5 ins x 6.25 ins; 24.1 cms x 15.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $2,000–3,000

166 HERBERT SIDNEY PALMER, O.S.A., R.C.A. ON THE HUMBER RIVER oil on panel signed; also signed, titled and dated ”Sept. 1916” on the reverse 10.25 ins x 13 ins; 26 cms x 33 cms Provenance: Canadian Fine Arts, Toronto Private Collection, Ontario $1,800–2,200

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

167 ALLEN SAPP, R.C.A. PLAYING HOCKEY acrylic on canvas, unframed signed 24 ins x 30 ins; 61 cms x 76.2 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $2,000–3,000

168 THOMAS KEITH ROBERTS, O.S.A., R.C.A DELTA oil on masonite signed; also signed and titled on the reverse 19.75 ins x 26 ins; 50.8 cms x 66 cms Provenance: Wallack Galleries, Ottawa Private Collection, Ontario $1,500–2,000

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169 ROBERT STEWART HYNDMAN LIGHTHOUSE oil on panel signed 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $400–500

170 ERIC RIORDON, A.R.C.A. MARCH AFTERNOON: LAURENTIANS oil on canvas signed 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Watson Art Galleries, Toronto Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Ontario $1,500–2,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

171 ERIC RIORDON, A.R.C.A. ON THE BEACH oil on canvas, laid down on board signed 8.25 ins x 10.5 ins; 21 cms x 26.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $1,000–1,500

172 HENRI LEOPOLD MASSON FISHING VILLAGE watercolour and ink signed and dated ‘62 16.75 ins x 23 ins; 42.5 cms x 58.4 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $1,000–1,500

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173 WILLIAM EDWARD DE GARTHE MORNING LIGHT AT PEGGY’S COVE, NOVA SCOTIA oil on canvas board signed; also signed, titled and dated “July 21/57” on the reverse 20 ins x 16 ins; 50.8 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $1,000–1,500

174 MARJORIE (JORI) ELIZABETH THURSTON SMITH FOUR NUDES IN A LANDSCAPE watercolour and gouache signed and dated ‘45 11.75 ins x 18 ins; 29.8 cms x 45.7 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $800–1,200

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

175 GASTON REBRY PARC DE LA MAURICIE, QUÉBEC oil on canvas signed; also signed, titled and dated 1991 on the reverse 16 ins x 10 ins; 25.4 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Kaspar Gallery, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $1,200–1,500

176 RONALD WILLIAM BOLT, P.R.C.A. THREE SEA PICTURES: NIGHT acrylic on canvas signed and dated /74; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse 26 ins x 32 ins; 66 cms x 81.3 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $1,500–2,000

125


CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

177 DAVID BROWN MILNE PAINTING PLACE; BLUE SKY, PALGRAVE (CANCELLED) drypoint etching, printed in two colours signed in the print (recto); with an incomplete, cancelled print on the reverse 8.75 ins x 6.75 ins; 22.2 cms x 17.1 cms Provenance: Harold Stacey, Ontario (acquired directly from the artist) Private Collection, Ontario Note: This lot is sold together with a framed handwritten inscription dating to 1941 from Milne to Stacey, which references this lot, describing it as “slightly imperfect copy.” $1,000–1,500

(verso)

178 WILLIAM GOODRIDGE ROBERTS, R.C.A POINTE AU PERSIL, 1952 watercolour signed 15 ins x 22 ins; 38.1 cms x 55.9 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto $1,200–1,500

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

179 PAUL VANIER BEAULIEU, R.C.A. NATURE MORTE AUX FRUITS watercolour on illustration board signed and dated ‘58 19.5 ins x 25 ins; 49.5 cms x 63.5 cms Provenance: Private Collection, Montreal $1,000–1,500

180 ARTO YUZBASIYAN WEST END IN WINTER, 1997 oil on panel signed 8 ins x 10 ins; 20.3 cms x 25.4 cms Provenance: Roberts Gallery Limited, Toronto Private Collection, Toronto $800–1,200

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CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

181 DANIEL PRICE ERICHSEN BROWN STANDING MALE NUDE

182 MARC-AURÈLE DE FOY SUZORCOTÉ, O.S.A., R.C.A. CAVALIER, 1923

pencil and tempera signed

charcoal and coloured chalk signed and dated 1923

Sight 24.75 ins x 13 ins; 62.9 cms x 33 cms

17 ins x 10 ins; 43.2 cms x 25.4 cms

Provenance: Private Collection, Toronto

Provenance: Private Collection, Ontario $2,000–3,000

$2,000–3,000

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Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

183 BRUCE LE DAIN, R.C.A. BURSTALL LAKE, KANANASKIS, ALBERTA oil on canvas board signed; also signed, titled and dated “Sept. 1988.” 12 ins x 16 ins; 30.5 cms x 40.6 cms Provenance: Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Ontario $700–900

184 WILLIAM KURELEK, R.C.A. THE HOUND OF HEAVEN lithograph signed, titled and numbered 81/100 in pencil in the margin 25.75 ins x 19.75 ins; 65.4 cms x 50.2 cms $700–900

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CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

Index

B

Cullen, Maurice Galbraith (1866-1934)…

Harris, Lawren Stewart (1885-1970)…92

Beatty, John William (1869-1941)…36, 37,

54

Hébert, Louis-Philippe (1850-1917)…79

157, 165

Curnoe, Gregory Richard (1936-1992)…83

Hedrick, Robert Burns (b. 1930)…115

Beaulieu, Paul Vanier (1910-1996)…179

Hodgson, Thomas Sherlock (1924-2006)…

Beder, Jack (1909-1987)…125, 136

D

126

Bellefleur, Léon (1910-2007)…72, 77, 102

De Garthe, William Edward (1907-1983)…

Holgate, Edwin Headley (1892-1977)…60,

Bell-Smith, Frederic Marlett (1846-1923)…

173

61

153, 154

De Grandmaison, Nicholas (1892-1978)…

Holmes, Reg (b. 1934)…118

Bieler, Ted (b. 1938)…122

26

Hopkins, Tom (1944-2011)…105, 113

Biéler, André Charles (1896-1989)…158

De Tonnancour, Jacques Godefroy (1917-

Hudon, Normand (1929-1997)…18

Blackwood, David Lloyd (b. 1941)…141

2005)…74, 84

Hyndman, Robert Stewart (1915-2009)…

Bloore, Ronald Langley (1925-2009)…101

Des Clayes, Berthe (1877-1968)…11, 35,

169

Bolduc, David (1945-2010)…109

161

Bolt, Ronald William (b. 1938)…176

J

Borduas, Paul-Émile (1905-1960)…71

F

Jackson, Alexander Young (1882-1974)…

Bouchard, George Lorne Holland (1913-

Fecteau, Marcel (b. 1927)…148

39, 44, 45, 62, 65

1978)…156

Ferron, Marcelle (1924-2001)…108

Jarvis, Donald (1923-2001)…111, 130

Brandtner, Fritz (1896-1969)…127

FitzGerald, Lionel Lemoine (1890-1956)…

Johnston, Frank Hans (1888-1949)…47,

Brown, Daniel Price Erichsen (b. 1939)…

23

139, 160

87, 142, 181

Fortin, Marc-Aurèle (1888-1970)…15, 21

Juneau, Denis (1925-2014)…133

Brownell, Peleg Franklin (1857-1946)…5

Fournier, Paul (b. 1939)…117

Burton, Dennis Eugene Norman (1933-

Fowler, Daniel (1810-1894)…162

K

2013)…86, 121

Fox, John Richard (1927-2008)…137

Klunder, Harold (b. 1943)…76

Bush, Jack Hamilton (1909-1977)…14, 85

Knowles, Dorothy (b. 1927)…13 G

Krieghoff, Cornelius (1815-1872)…29, 51

C

Gagnon, Clarence Alphonse (1881-1942)…

Kurelek, William (1927-1977)…42, 73, 78,

Carlyle, Florence (1864-1923)…24

143, 144

184

Casson, Alfred Joseph (1898-1992)…43,

Garside, Thomas Hilton (1906-1980)…163

46, 49, 57, 64

Gaucher, Yves (1934-2000)…67

L

Champagne, Horace (b. 1937)…31

Gendron, Pierre (b. 1934)…132

Le Dain, Bruce (1928-2000)…183

Clapp, William Henry (1879-1954)…17

Gibbons, C.I. (act. 1885-1905)…25

Letendre, Rita (b. 1928)…70, 110

Collier, Alan Caswell (1911-1990)…2

Gordon, Hortense Mattice (1889-1961)…

Little, John Geoffrey Caruthers (b. 1928)…

Colville, Alexander (1920-2013)…56, 91

19, 69

140

Comfort, Charles Fraser (1900-1994)…1

Lismer, Arthur (1885-1969)…20, 59

Cosgrove, Stanley Morel (1911-2002)…53

H

Coughtry, John Graham (1931-1999)…116,

Hammond, John A. (1843-1939)…155

129

Harman, Jack (1927-2001)…128

130

Loring, Frances Norma (1887-1968)…30


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

M

R

V

MacDonald, James Edward Hervey (1873-

Rayner, Gordon (1935-2010)…103

Verner, Frederick Arthur (1836-1928)…28

1932)…40, 41, 48, 58, 145

Rebry, Gaston (b. 1933)…175

MacDonald, Manly Edward (1889-1971)…

Reppen, Jack (1933-1964)…131

W

34, 147, 149, 159

Richard, René (1895-1982)…146

Whale, Robert Reginald (1805-1887)…27

Maltais, Marcella (b. 1933)…93

Riordon, Eric (1906-1948)…10, 170, 171

Wieland, Joyce (1931-1998)…80, 135

Martin, Ronald Albert (b. 1943)…114

Roberts, Thomas Keith (1909-1998)…168

Willsher-Martel, Joan (b. 1925)…123

Masson, Henri Leopold (1907-1996)…3,

Roberts, William Goodridge (1904-1974)…

Wilson, Ronald York (1907-1984)…107

172

104, 178

McCarthy, Doris Jean (1910-2010)…6

Robinson, Albert Henry (1881-1956)…38

Y

McEwen, Jean Albert (1923-1999)…52

Ronald William (1926-1998)…81, 134

Yarwood, Walter Hawley (1917-1966)…97

McInnis, Robert Francis Michael (b.

Yuzbasiyan, Arto (b. 1948)…180

1942)…7

S

Meredith, John (1933-2000)…68, 75

Sapp, Allen (b. 1929)...167

Milne, David Brown (1882-1953)…177

Schaefer, Carl Fellman (1903-1995)…12

Muhlstock, Louis (1904-2001)…32, 33

Scott, Marion Mildred Dale (1906-1993)… 100

N

Seath, Ethel (1879-1963)…4

Nakamura, Kazuo (1926-2002)…66

Shadbolt, Jack Leonard (1909-1998)…82,

Norris, Joe (1924-1996)…22

98 Sheppard, Peter Clapham (1882-1965)…9,

P

55

Palardy, Joseph Jean Albert (1905-1991)…

Smith, John Ivor (b. 1927)…124

8

Smith, Marjorie (Jori) Elizabeth Thurston

Palmer, Herbert Sidney (1881-1970)…150,

(1907-2005)…174

166

Snow, Michael (b. 1929)…138

Panton, Lawrence Arthur Colley (1894-

Suzor-Coté, Marc-Aurèle de Foy (1869-

1954)…151

1937)…182

Peel, Paul (1860-1892)…63 Perehudoff, William (1918-2013)…99

T

Phillips, Walter Joseph (1884-1963)…88

Tatossian, Armand (1951-2012)…152

Pilot, Robert Wakeham (1898-1967)…50,

Tousignant, Claude (b. 1932)…120

94, 164

Town, Harold Barling (1924-1990)…96,

Plaskett, Joseph Francis (1918-2014)…112

106, 119

Pratt, Christopher (b. 1935)…16, 89, 90

Trudeau, Angus (1907-1984)…95

131


CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

Conditions Of Sale

1. All lots are sold “AS IS”. Any description issued by the auctioneer of an article to be sold is subject to variation to be posted or announced verbally in the auction room prior to the time of sale. While the auctioneer has endeavoured not to mislead in the description issued, and the utmost care is taken to ensure the correct cataloguing of each item, such descriptions are purely statements of opinion and are not intended to constitute a representation to the prospective purchasers and no warranty of the correctness of such description is made. An opportunity for inspection of each article is offered prior to the time of sale. No sale will be set aside on account of lack of correspondence of the article with its description or its reproduction, if any, whether colour or black & white. Some lots are of an age and/or nature which preclude their being in pristine condition and some catalogue descriptions make reference to damage and/or restoration. The lack of such a reference does not imply that a lot is free from defects nor does any reference to certain defects imply the absence of others. Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition. It is the responsibility of prospective purchasers to inspect or have inspected each lot upon which they wish to bid, relying upon their own advisers, and to bid accordingly. 2. Each lot sold is subject to a premium of 18% of the successful bid price of each lot as part of the purchase price. 3. Unless exempted by law, the buyer is required to pay Harmonized Sales Tax on the total purchase price including the buyer’s premium. For international buyers, taxes are not applicable when purchases are shipped out of country. Items shipped out of Ontario, the buyer is required to pay taxes as per the tax status of that province, whether it HST or GST (Goods and Services Tax).

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4. The auctioneer reserves the right to withdraw any lot from sale at any time, to divide any lot or to combine any two or more lots at his sole discretion, all without notice. 5. The auctioneer has the right to refuse any bid and to advance the bidding at his absolute discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right not to accept and not to reject any bid. Without limitation, any bid which is not commensurate with the value of the article offered, or which is merely a nominal or fractional advance over the previous bid may not be recognized. 6. Each lot may be subject to an unpublished reserve which may be changed at any time by agreement between the auctioneer and the consignor. The auctioneer may bid, or direct an employee to bid, on behalf of the consignor as agreed between them. In addition, the auctioneer may accept and submit absentee and telephone bids, to be executed by an employee of the auctioneer, pursuant to the instructions of prospective purchasers not in attendance at the sale. 7. The highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer for any lot shall be the buyer and such buyer shall forthwith assume full risk and responsibility for the lot and must comply with such other Conditions of Sale as may be applicable. If any dispute should arise between bidders the auctioneer shall have the absolute discretion to designate the buyer or, at his option, to withdraw any disputed lot from the sale, or to re-offer it at the same or a subsequent sale. The auctioneer’s decision in all cases shall be final. 8. Immediately after the purchase of a lot, the buyer shall pay or undertake to the satisfaction of the auctioneer with respect to payment of the whole or any part of the purchase price requested by the auctioneer, failing which

the auctioneer in his sole discretion may cancel the sale, with or without re-offering the item for sale.

cardholder and therefore cannot be accepted over the telephone. However, fax authorization arrangements can be made.

9. The buyer shall pay for all lots within 48 hours from the date of the sale, after which a late charge of 2% per month on the total invoice may be incurred or the auctioneer, in his sole discretion, may cancel the sale. The buyer shall not become the owner of the lot until paid for in full. Items must be removed within 10 days from the date of sale , after which storage charges may be incurred.

13. In the event of failure to pay for or remove articles within the aforementioned time limit, the auctioneer, without limitation of the rights of the consignor and the auctioneer against the buyer, may resell any of the articles affected, and in such case the original buyer shall be responsible to the auctioneer and the consignor for:

10. Each lot purchased, unless the sale is cancelled as above, shall be held by the auctioneer at his premises or at a public warehouse at the sole risk of the buyer until fully paid for and taken away. 11. Notwithstanding condition no. 1, if the buyer, prior to removal of a lot, makes arrangements satisfactory to the auctioneer for the inspection of such lot by a fully qualified person acceptable to the auctioneer to determine the genuineness or authenticity of the lot, to be carried out promptly following the sale of the lot, and if, but only if, within a period of 14 days following the sale a written opinion of such person is presented to the auctioneer to the effect that the lot is not genuine or authentic, accompanied by a written request by the buyer for rescission of the sale, then the sale of the lot will be rescinded and the sale price refunded to the buyer. 12. Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), and VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000). As Waddington's requires written authorization for all credit card purchases, credit cards must be presented in person by the

(a) any deficiency in price between the re-sale amount and the amount to have been paid by the original buyer; (b) any reasonable charge by the auctioneer for the storage of such articles until payment and removal by the subsequent buyer; and (c) the amount of commission which the auctioneer would have earned had payment been made in full by the original buyer. 14. It is the responsibility of the buyer to make all arrangements for insuring, packing and removing the property purchased and any assistance by the auctioneer or his servants, agents or contractors, in packing or removal shall be rendered as a courtesy and without any liability to them. 15. The auctioneer acts solely as agent for the consignor and makes no representation as to any attribute of, title to, or restriction affecting the articles consigned for sale. Without limitation, the buyer understands that any item bought may be affected by the provisions of the Cultural Property Export Act (Canada). 16. The auctioneer reserves the right to refuse admission to the sale or to refuse to recognize any or all bids from any particular person or persons at any auction.


CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

Buying at Waddington’s

All lots will be offered and sold subject to the Conditions of Sale which appear in this catalogue as well as any Glossary and posted or oral announcement. By bidding at auction, bidders are bound by those Conditions and Glossary, as amended by any oral announcement or posted notices, which together form the contract of sale between the successful bidder (buyer), Waddington’s™ and the consignor (seller) of the lot. Descriptions or photographs of lots are not warranties and each lot is sold “as is” in accordance with the Conditions of Sale. Condition of Lots All of the items are to be considered, unless otherwise noted in the description, in good condition. The definition of “good” when used in reference to condition, describes an object as having had no major damage or repair but as with the nature of the material, may show minor surface wear, discolouration etc., which indicates the acceptable wear that the piece may acquire with age. If you are particular about minor flaws, you should examine the pieces in person or have our staff answer any questions before bidding. Sizes are approximate. It is the sole responsibility of the bidder to

136

inquire as to the condition of a lot before bidding. Condition reports are available upon request by phone, fax, email or in person. You are advised to make any requests well in advance of the sale. Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition. Buyers Premium A premium of 18% of the successful bid price of each lot is paid by the buyer as part of the total purchase price. Invaluable Live! clients will be charged a buyer's premium of 21% of the successful bid price as part of the total purchase price. A charge of 13% HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) is applicable on the hammer price and buyer's premium, except for purchases exported from Canada. In the case where purchases are shipped out of the province of Ontario, the HST or GST is charged based on the tax status of that province.

Bidding To bid in person at the auction, you must register for a bidding number by showing identification acceptable to the Auctioneer upon entering the salesroom. Your number will identify you if you are the successful bidder. You will be responsible for all lots purchased on your bidding number. Banking information may be requested by Waddington’s™. You may submit an Absentee Bid Form if you are unable to attend the sale. Bidding by telephone, in limited circumstances, can be arranged prior to the sale. While we are pleased to offer absentee and telephone bidding as a service to our clients, and take great care in their commission, the Auctioneer will not be responsible for technical difficulties, errors or failure to execute bids. The Auctioneer may also execute bids on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve. The reserve is the confidential minimum price the seller is willing to accept for his or her property, below which it will not be sold.

Payment Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000). As Waddington's requires written authorization for all credit card purchases, credit cards must be presented in person by the cardholder and therefore cannot be accepted over the telephone. However, fax authorization arrangements can be made. ALL PRICES IN CANADIAN FUNDS


Canadian Fine Art Auction - Monday 25 May 2015 at 7 p.m.

Selling at Waddington’s

Shipping: The Auctioneers will not undertake packing or shipping. The purchaser must designate and arrange for the services of an independent shipper and be responsible for all shipping, insurance expenses and any necessary export permits that may apply. The Auctioneers will, upon request, provide names of professional packers and shippers but will not be held responsible for the service or have any liability for providing this information. Reliable pre-auction estimates of shipping costs of lots offered in this sale may be obtained from: Pak Mail 905.470.6874 905.470.6875 416.293.8225 taurus@pakmailmarkham.ca www.pakmailmarkham.ca Envoy 416.299.3367 416.299.9750 ph@envoy.ca www.envoypackandship.com Removal of Purchases Purchases must be paid for within 48 hours of the date of the sale, and removed from premises within 10 days of the date of sale (see Conditions of Sale, conditions 8 to 15). Clients are advised that packing and/or handling of purchased lots by our employees or agents is undertaken solely as a courtesy for the convenience of clients.

Paintings, drawings, prints, furniture, jewellery and all forms of decorative arts and collectibles may be brought to our Toronto office where we can provide you with preliminary auction estimates and consignment procedures. Please visit our website at www.waddingtons.ca for details on our various departments and how to contact the specialists. We also accept mailed and emailed requests for advice on the marketability of objects. A photograph and phone number must accompany a full description of each item. Our specialists regularly travel to major Canadian cities to meet with prospective consignors. For further information, or to arrange an appointment, please contact our Toronto office. Property normally arrives at Waddington’s at least three months before the sale in order to allow our specialists time to research, catalogue, photograph and promote the items. Consignors will receive a contract to sign, setting forth terms and fees for our services.

Notice for our International Clients

Commission Rates Items selling for $7,500 or more 10% Items selling for $2,501 to $7,499 15% Items selling for $2,000 or less 20% *There is a minimum handling charge of $20 per item For items photographed and illustrated in printed catalogues fees are as follows: ¼ page - $150 ½ page - $400 Full page - $800 For items offered in online auctions photography fees are $20 per item. Insurance A 1% insurance charge, based on the hammer price of the property, will be applied to all accounts.

Restrictions exist regarding the export of species protected under CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species). The export and importation of items made of or containing whalebone, ivory, tortoise shell, seal skin, rhinoceros horn and other animal parts is strictly controlled or forbidden by most countries. Please review your country’s laws before shipping or purchasing pieces made of or containing these restricted items. Obtaining the appropriate permits is the responsibility of the client. All Narwhal Tusks must have a Marine Harvest Number or a Marine and Mammal Transport number to be sold at Waddington's. For more information please visit: www.cites.org

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CanadianArt.Waddingtons.ca

Operational Sta

Specialist Departments

Asian Art Anthony Wu 416 847 6185 aw@waddingtons.ca Yvonne Li 416 847 6195 yl@waddingtons.ca

Jewellery, Watches & Numismatics Don P. McLean 416 847 6170 dpm@waddingtons.ca Lynda Macpherson Jewellery Administrator 416 847 6190 lm@waddingtons.ca

Canadian Fine Art Monthly Fine Art Linda Rodeck 416 847 6176 lr@waddingtons.ca Erin Rutherford Fine Art Administrator 416 504 5100 er@waddingtons.ca Contemporary Art Stephen Ranger 416 847 6194 skr@waddingtons.ca Kristin Vance Fine Art Administrator 416 504 9100 ext 6178 kv@waddingtons.ca International Art Susan Robertson 416 847 6179 sr@waddingtons.ca Nadine Di Monte Assistant 416 847 6182 npd@waddingtons.ca Inuit Art Christa Ouimet 416 847 6184 co@waddingtons.ca Nadine Di Monte Assistant 416 847 6182 npd@waddingtons.ca

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Doug Payne 416 847 6180 dp@waddingtons.ca Decorative Arts Bill Kime Silver, Glass & Ceramics 416 847 6189 bk@waddingtons.ca Sean Quinn Sculpture, Decorations, Clocks & Lighting 416 847 6187 sq@waddingtons.ca Ellie Muir Decorative Arts Assistant 416 847 6196 em@waddingtons.ca

President Duncan McLean 416 847 6183 adm@waddingtons.ca

Building Manager Steve Sheppard 416 847 6186 ss@waddingtons.ca

Vice President Business Development Stephen Ranger 416 847 6194 skr@waddingtons.ca

Client Services Andrew Brandt 416 504 9100 ext 6200 ab@waddingtons.ca

Vice President Fine Art Linda Rodeck 416 847 6176 lr@waddingtons.ca General Manager Duane Smith 416 847 6172 das@waddingtons.ca Creative & Technical Manager Jamie Long 416 847 6188 jl@waddingtons.ca Queeny Xu Assistant qx@waddingtons.ca Accounts Manager Karen Sander 416 847 6173 ks@waddingtons.ca Elda Pappada 416 504 9100 x6213 ep@waddingtons.ca Corporate Receptionist Kate Godin 416 504 9100 kg@waddingtons.ca Ali Nasir 416 847 6181 an@waddingtons.ca Appraisal Co-ordinator Ellie Muir 416 847 6196 em@waddingtons.ca Communications Tess McLean 416 504 9100 tm@waddingtons.ca

Waddingtons.ca/Collingwood P. O. Box 554, Collingwood ON L9Y 4B2 Valerie Brown 705 445 8811 vb@waddingtons.ca


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Canadian Fine Art Auction | May 25, 2015  

Canadian Fine Art Auction | May 25, 2015