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Inuit Art Auction TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2018


Inuit Art Auction TUESDAY, MAY 29, 2018 AT 1:00 PM

AUCTION HELD AT

INUIT ART SPECIALIST

FRONT COVER

Waddington’s

Christa Ouimet co@waddingtons.ca

Lot 81

275 King Street East, 2nd Floor Toronto, Ontario M5A 1K2

416-847-6184

INSIDE FRONT COVER

Lot 75 ON VIEW

ABSENTEE AND PHONE BIDDING

Friday, May 25, 2018 from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm

416-504-9100 fax: 416-504-0033

Saturday, May 26, 2018 from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm Sunday, May 27, 2018 from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday, May 28, 2018 from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm

FRONTIS PIECE

Lot 87

bids@waddingtons.ca INSIDE BACK COVER

Lot 5 ONLINE BIDDING

www.invaluable.com

BACK COVER

Lot 81

Select lots may be viewed otherwise by appointment. ALL LOTS CAN BE VIEWED ONLINE AT

inuitart.waddingtons.ca

This auction is subject to the Conditions of Sale printed in the back of this catalogue.

This catalogue and its contents © 2018 Waddington McLean and Company Ltd. All rights reserved.

Photography and design by Waddington’s 


TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

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4

Inuit Art Auction

LOT 104


This season we begin celebrating our 40th year of Inuit Art auctions. The commercial landscape has certainly changed over the years, but what has remained constant is the passion and devotion of collectors to the art and culture of the Inuit. We know many of you share this anniversary with us as you have been attending our auctions for just as long or almost as long, and you have been integral in keeping the enthusiasm for Inuit art alive over the last 40 years. With that in mind we are happy to present to you another exceptional selection for our spring Inuit Art auction.  We are thrilled to be the temporary caretakers of a major work by the incomparable Karoo Ashevak. Having first handled this work in 1989 for the original collector, this sculpture has resided in a prominent Toronto collection for almost 30 years. It is a privilege having two incredible textile works by Jessie Oonark hanging in our offices this season. These are fresh to the market and loaded with the shamanic and cultural imagery that we have come to love and seek out in Oonark’s work. I invite you to visit us, even if only to take in these museum quality creations. In addition, we have an interesting selection of drawings from Cape Dorset and Baker Lake on offer as well as a lovely group of small scale sculptures. Finally, we present to you The Vanderpoel Collection of Art. Sadly, it is presented in remembrance of Tom Vanderpoel, a naturalist and conservationist who developed a passion for Inuit Art. Many of you will remember Tom fondly as we do from our previews and auctions which he attended.  Tom started to develop an interest in Inuit art in the 1960’s when his father would bring back Inuit wildlife sculptures from his business trips to Toronto. Later Tom began attending Waddington’s auctions with many of his family members. As his knowledge of the Inuit culture and artists continued to expand, Tom added many new pieces to his collection including abstract and spiritual sculptures, textiles and prints. A gallery was added at the family home in Barrington, Illinois, and Tom enjoyed giving tours to visiting friends and family sharing his enthusiasm and understanding of what the artists were communicating. During the last decade Tom developed some wonderful friendships as a result of his love of Inuit art. Highlights from the Vanderpoel collection appear in both sessions of our spring Inuit Art auction (live and online) and are marked with an asterisk. TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

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LOT 57


1 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT RABBIT EATING SEAWEED II etching and aquatint, 1999, 35/50, framed, sight 18 x 25 in — 45.7 x 63.5 cm This work is based on Kenojuak’s original design for the 1959 stencil of the same name. There is great significance to this work as the original print marked the beginning of Kenojuak’s career as one of Canada’s most celebrated artists.

$1,500—2,500

2 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT OWL IN BLUE lithograph, 1991, 24/50, unframed 28 x 38 in — 71.1 x 96.5 cm Although Kenojuak focused on a limited range of subject, her treatment of the subject was what set her apart from other Inuit artists using the same subjects. Kenojuak was not focused on narration, her intent was to create beautiful images that would please the viewer. Form was of paramount importance and without the constraints of representation she was able to create some of the most iconic images in Canadian art.

$1,000—1,500

3 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT TRANSFERENCE stonecut, 1994, 28/50, unframed 19.5 x 24.5 in — 49.5 x 62.2 cm Kenojuak’s use of symmetry and repetition helps to create an engaging image. Featuring the iconic raven, she suggests a kind of communication between it and the human being. The work has a spiritual, almost meditative quality about it.

$1,000—1,500

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4 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT TAPESTRY OF OWLS lithograph, 2002, 2/50, framed 26 x 20 in — 66 x 50.8 cm

literature: Spirit Wrestler. “Tapestry of Owls (2013), limited edition blanket”. Accessed March 20, 2018. Commissioned by Spirit Wrestler Gallery, Vancouver, B.C., as part of Kenojuak’s 2002 solo exhibition hosted by the Spirit Wrestler Gallery. “The drawing that became the Tapestry of Owls print was originally created as one of the potential candidates for her first Pendleton blanket.”

$1,000—1,500

5 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT OWLS TREASURE lithograph, 2002, 20/50, framed 26 x 20 in — 66 x 50.8 cm Commissioned by Spirit Wrestler Gallery, 2002, Vancouver, B.C.

$1,000—1,500

6 PARR (1893-1969), ᐸ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT SEAL HUNTER stonecut, 1968, no inscription, unframed 24.5 x 17.25 in — 62.2 x 43.8 cm

provenance:

In 1975, the consigner traveled to Cape Dorset with the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada) to assess the stability of the paper being used by the artists. It was during this time that he acquired a number of graphic works, this being one of them.

$1,500—2,500

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Inuit Art Auction


7 NAPATCHIE POOTOOGOOK (1938-2002), ᓇᐸᓯ ᐳᑐᒍ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT BIRD SPIRITS stonecut, 1960, 22/50, framed, sight 17 x 20.5 in — 43.2 x 52.1 cm Napatchie connects the animal with the spirit world in this somewhat enigmatic work. There is a sense of joy and transcendence to this image, in part because of its unstructured composition. Reminiscent in theme and style to Tudlik’s 1959 masterpiece Bird Dream Forewarning Blizzard, Bird Spirits was printed in a similar technique. Colours can vary in both prints.

$1,500—2,000

8 NAPATCHIE POOTOOGOOK (1938-2002), ᓇᐸᓯ ᐳᑐᒍ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT MAN WITH BEASTS stencil, 1963, 38/50, framed, sight 21.75 x 24.75 in — 55.2 x 62.9 cm

literature:

Ernst Roch, Arts of the Eskimo: Prints, 1974, page 72. Sometimes misattributed to her mother Pitseolak, this print by Napatchie is filled with a “swirl of animals and monsters...” “...whereas the man.. is but a minor element.”

$1,500—2,500

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

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9 PARR (1893-1969), ᐸ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT THE WALRUS HUNT stonecut, 1963, 47/50, framed, sight 13 x 22.75 in — 33 x 57.8 cm Parr’s work is distinguished by his direct and rugged designs. Encouraged to draw by Terry Ryan in 1960, Parr could no longer sustain himself as a hunter due to age and poor health. In drawing, he and his wife Eleeshushe found not just a means of expression but also a way to support themselves.

$1,000—1,500

10 KIAKSHUK (1886-1966), ᑭᐊᓱ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT IGLOO AND DOG TEAM stonecut, 1961, 5/50, framed, sight 11.5 x 22 in — 29.2 x 55.9 cm Known as a great storyteller, his work was inspired by the life he lived depicting hunting, camp scenes and elements of shamanism that he once experienced. For an example of his original designs in graphite, see lot 39 in this catalogue.

$600—900

11 SHEELAKY (1902-1985), ᓯᓚᑭ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT SEA SPIRIT stonecut, 1968, 16/50, unframed 8 x 12 in — 20.3 x 30.5 cm Sibling of graphic artists Tikituk, Niviaksiak and Angotigalu Teevee, Sheelaky only produced two prints in her career. Sea Spirit was created in 1968 but released in 1999.

$600—900

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Inuit Art Auction


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13

NARWHAL TUSK, ARCTIC BAY / IKPIARJUK

NARWHAL TUSK, PANGNIRTUNG / PANNIRTUQ

ivory, accompanied with Government of Canada Marine Mammal Tag height 67 in — 170.2 cm

$3,000—5,000

ivory, accompanied with Government of Canada Marine Mammal Tag height 73 in — 185.4 cm

$3,000—5,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

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Tupilaks are a Greenlandic Inuit souvenir which originated in the tradition of fabricating a monster from various objects to either protect an individual or to destroy an enemy. The Inuit began to carve them out of sperm whale teeth during early contact with Europeans.

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UNIDENTIFIED, GREENLAND

UNIDENTIFIED, GREENLAND

TWO TUPILAKS ivory, c. 1960s 5.75 x 1.75 x 2.75 in — 14.6 x 4.4 x 7 cm; 5 x 1.5 x 2 in — 12.7 x 3.8 x 5.1 cm

TWO TUPILAKS ivory, c. 1980s 5.5 x 1.5 x 2.75 in — 14 x 3.8 x 7 cm; 5.5 x 1.5 x 2 in — 14 x 3.8 x 5.1 cm

$700—1,000

$600—900

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Inuit Art Auction

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17

UNIDENTIFIED, GREENLAND

UNIDENTIFIED, GREENLAND

TWO TUPILAKS ivory, c. 1980s 5 x 1.5 x 1.5 in — 12.7 x 3.8 x 3.8 cm; 5 x 1.25 x 1.75 in — 12.7 x 3.2 x 4.4 cm

TWO TUPILAKS ivory, stone, c. 1960s - 1990s 4.5 x 1.25 x 1.75 in — 11.4 x 3.2 x 4.4 cm; 4 x 1.25 x 1.5 in — 10.2 x 3.2 x 3.8 cm

$500—700

$500—700

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TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

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SMALL WONDERS a collection of small scale sculptures

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Inuit Art Auction


s m a l l wo n ders

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ABRAHAM ETUNGAT, R.C.A. (1911-1999), ᐊᐃᐊᔭᑲ ᐃᑐᒐ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT

LATCHOLASSIE AKESUK (1919-2000), ᓚᓴᓚᓯ ᐊᑲᓴ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT

BIRD WITH SPREAD WINGS stone, signed in syllabics 3.75 x 8 x 2 in — 9.5 x 20.3 x 5.1 cm

SEA CREATURE stone, c. 1975 3.25 x 7.25 x 2 in — 8.3 x 18.4 x 5.1 cm

See lot 62 for a spectacular large scale version of this subject by Etungat. This miniature work has perfect balance and presence.

Latcholassie’s ambiguous creature bears flippers and a startled human-like face. Son of artist Tudlik, many of Latcholassie’s best works were carved in large scale however it is in this smaller work that his gift for subtle, quirky creatures is demonstrated.

$600—900

$600—900

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

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20

22

23

21

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ELIZABETH NUTARALUK AULATJUT (1914-1998), ᐃᓕᓴᐸ ᓄᑕᕋᓗ, ESKIMO POINT / ARVIAT

LUCY TASSEOR TUTSWEETOK (1934-2012), ᓗᓯ ᑕᓯᐅ ᑎᓯᑕ, ESKIMO POINT / ARVIAT

JOHN PANGNARK (1920-1980), ᔭᓐ ᐸᓇ, ESKIMO POINT / ARVIAT

JOHN KAVIK (1897-1993), ᔭᓐ ᑲᕕ, RANKIN INLET / KANGIQLINIQ

WOMAN WITH BRAIDED HAIR stone, signed in syllabics 4.75 x 3 x 1.75 in — 12.1 x 7.6 x 4.4 cm

FAMILY stone, signed in syllabics 2.75 x 2.5 x 3.25 in — 7 x 6.4 x 8.3 cm

Displaying the classic aesthetic of Arviat, Nutaraluk’s small seated woman’s most defining feature is her long plaited hair. With a decidedly strong profile, the woman’s face dominates the truncated body of the work. It is artistic decisions like this that elevate a simple figure to that of a small wonder.

$300—500 16

Inuit Art Auction

This palm sized sculpture by Lucy Tasseor has well defined heads emerging from a mountain-like formation of bodies. Every Tasseor has its own individual strengths. When rotating the work in your hand, each angle reveals a new “front” of the sculpture.

$300—500

FIGURE stone 2.5 x 1.5 x 2.25 in — 6.4 x 3.8 x 5.7 cm So much about finding the perfect miniature Pangnark is about the feeling it evokes. This work balances the delicate with the tactile. Arviat artists were adept at carving in this scale as many of them started out with shards of hard stone to work with. Pangnark’s carvings have since become synonymous with elegance and restraint.

$600—900

FIGURE stone, c. 1990 3.25 x 1.5 x 1.5 in — 8.3 x 3.8 x 3.8 cm This work could be a study for the massive Kavik sculpture that we featured in our fall 2017 Inuit Art auction (lot 77). Kavik’s brutish forms lend themselves well to both extremes in scale.

$400—600


s m a l l wo n ders

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26

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27

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ADA EYETOAQ (1934), ᐊᑕ ᐃᔨᑐᐊ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ

BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-2017), ᐸᓇᐸᓯ ᐊᓇᓴᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ

MOTHER COMFORTING CHILD stone, signed in syllabics 3.25 x 3 x 2 in — 8.3 x 7.6 x 5.1 cm

EXCITED MAN stone 3.5 x 3.25 x 1.5 in — 8.9 x 8.3 x 3.8 cm

Excelling at the miniature sculpture, Ada’s dark stone carvings are the definition of a small wonder. Her works are subtle renditions of often tender moments. For more works by this artist, view Waddington’s May 31, 2018 online auction.

Barnabus was an important influence on the community of carvers in Baker Lake and one of the eldest from the original group in this region. This is one of a number of Barnabus works in this auction and it will add an element of joy to your small wonders cabinet.

$300—500

25 MIRIAM MAREALIK QIYUK (1933), ᒪᕆᐊᒪ ᑭᔪ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ FAMILY stone, signed in Roman 4 x 3.25 x 2 in — 10.2 x 8.3 x 5.1 cm The importance of family in the north is obvious in the countless number of depictions from Inuit artists, however the community of Qamani’tuaq (Baker Lake) arguably has provided us with some of the best examples.

$700—1,000

$400—600

27* BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-2017), ᐸᓇᐸᓯ ᐊᓇᓴᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ SEATED WOMAN stone, signed in syllabics 3.5 x 3.5 x 3.25 in — 8.9 x 8.9 x 8.3 cm Known for his powerful and commanding musk ox sculptures, Barnabus could also create in his way somewhat delicate simplistic pieces. Here, he has rendered a beautifully proportioned Inuit woman in a seated position.

$400—600

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

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28

29

28

29

UNIDENTIFIED

UNIDENTIFIED

HUNTER stone, inset white stone, c. 1950 5 x 2.5 x 2 in — 12.7 x 6.4 x 5.1 cm

HUNTER DRAGGING A SEAL stone, ivory, wood, c. 1950 4 x 10 x 2.5 in — 10.2 x 25.4 x 6.4 cm

White stone, ivory and bone used as inlay in stone carvings are indicative of Nunavik in the 1950s.

$600—900

$400—600

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Inuit Art Auction


s m a l l wo n ders

30

31

30

31

DAVIDIALUK ALASUA AMITTU (1910-1976), ᑎᕕᑎᐊᓗ, POVUNGNITUK / PUVIRNITUQ

THOMASSIE KUDLUK (1910-1989), ᑐᒪᓯ ᑲᓚ, PAYNE BAY / BELLIN / KANGIRSUK

OWL CAUGHT A LOON stone, signed in Roman 4 x 6 x 3 in — 10.2 x 15.2 x 7.6 cm

MAN AND DOG stone, signed in syllabics 4.5 x 1 x 4.5 in — 25.4 x 17.8 x 7.6 cm

Davidialuk produced some of the most remarkable works of contemporary Inuit sculpture over his lifetime. He had an innate understanding of legends and cultural imagery and portrayed these often in his work.

Kudluk is known for his crudely carved and sometimes painted or shoe polished stone sculptures adorned with a narrative inscribed into it. His commercial success can be attributed to his completely unique style.

$700—1,000

$400—600

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

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33

32

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33

JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), ᔪᑕ ᐅᓗᓚ, GJOA HAVEN / UQSUQTUUQ

INUK CHARLIE (1956), ᐃᓄ ᓴᓕ, SPENCE BAY

INUKSUK MAN stone, antler, signed in syllabics, c. 1990 5 x 4.5 x 1.75 in — 12.7 x 11.4 x 4.4 cm

PERCHED FALCON stone, signed in syllabics, c. 1994 4.5 x 7.5 x 2.75 in — 11.4 x 19.1 x 5.7 cm

An Inuksuk traditionally used as a stone marker in the North has become a symbol of welcoming. Judas has brought his version to life with his characteristic expressive face instilling it with warmth.

Inuk Charlie is the son of artists Charlie Ugyuk and Peeteegootee. His mother designed the original Spence Bay packing dolls. Inuk learned to carve at a young age and later in life when he became a working artist, he focused on animals as his preferred subject. See lot 74 for Charlie Ugyuk’s falcons in bone.

$700—1,000

$400—600

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Inuit Art Auction


s m a l l wo n ders

35

34

36

34

35

36

HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), ᐃᕙᓗᐊᔪ, FROBISHER BAY / IQALUIT

HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), ᐃᕙᓗᐊᔪ, FROBISHER BAY / IQALUIT

PAUTA SAILA, R.C.A. (1916-2009), ᐸᐊ ᓯᓚ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT

ARCTIC FOX stone, signed in Roman and syllabics 2.5 x 5 x 1.5 in — 6.4 x 12.7 x 3.8 cm

POLAR BEAR stone 2 x 4.5 x 1.15 in — 5.1 x 11.4 x 2.9 cm

DANCING BEAR stone, signed in syllabics 5.25 x 2.5 x 1.25 in — 13.3 x 6.4 x 3.2 cm

Looking at this exquisite depiction of an Arctic Fox, it isn’t any wonder why Henry’s popularity has been so consistent over the years. Observation of nature was critical for survival in the early years for Henry and that skill clearly contributed to his art.

Henry mastered the subject of the life-like lumbering polar bear. This miniature version is as accomplished as his standard sized works.

A shrunken version of Pauta’s typical dancing bear. Balanced on one foot, his bears possess human attributes.

$600—900

$1,000—1,500

$700—1,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

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37

38

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38

ENNUTSIAK (1896-1967), ᐃᓄᓯᐊ, FROBISHER BAY / IQALUIT

JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), ᔪᑕ ᐅᓗᓚ, GJOA HAVEN / UQSUQTUUQ

BOY READING BIBLE stone, c. 1965 3 x 2 x 1.75 in — 7.6 x 5.1 x 4.4 cm

MUSK OX AND MAN stone, musk ox horn, signed in syllabics, c. 1991 2.5 x 4 x 1.25 in — 6.4 x 10.2 x 3.2 cm

This is a tiny sculpture, even for Ennutsiak, whose carvings were always on the small side. Fine detail is not necessary here, the positioning of the body of the child and the proximity of the book to his face are enough to imply the subject.

Judas Ullulaq began his career carving ivory and antler miniatures. He imbues his animals as sentient and emotionally functioning beings rather than just as prey. In this lot, both the man and the musk ox look as if they have both been startled by something.

$300—500

$700—1,000

Inuit Art Auction


The following selection of works on paper are an intriguing and visually diverse cross section of artwork primarily from first generation artists. Drawing became one of the most significant outcomes of the art projects undertaken by James and Alma Houston in 1950s Cape Dorset. Here was an easily accessibly art form, with no physical barriers, and as drawing on paper was not an existing cultural activity for people in the North at the time, all participants started on equal ground. Terry Ryan noted, “there were at least an equal number of women drawing, perhaps even more than men.” Graphite was used almost exclusively in Cape Dorset for these drawings, until “late 1965/early 1966, when the Co-operative supplied coloured pencils…”. Occasionally, some locally found crayons or ink were incorporated into the graphite drawings. The subject matter in these early drawings, Ryan noted, allowed the opportunity to show aspects of the artist’s world: whether illustrating parts of their daily life, such as the hunt, or details of a camp; or recreating the stories relayed by their elders. Others took a blank slate, and seemed to just start drawing, as Kenojuak often did: “It’s like looking at the clouds…the original drawing might well lead to another, perhaps quite different image”. Inspired by the success of Cape Dorset’s graphic programs, other Arctic communities modelled similar programs on it. Baker Lake also became successful in marketing drawing and printmaking to southern buyers. Jessie Oonark, like Kenojuak, was not merely an illustrator of stories but created confident and impactful images from her imagination. Yet some of the most successful of Inuit graphic artists came from communities with no formal printmaking program. John Kavik of Rankin Inlet was given paper and drawing utensils by Stanley Zazelenchuk, a local teacher, resulting in his dense and energetic images. For more important drawings from this collection see Waddington’s online Inuit art auction, running May 26 to May 31, 2018.

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

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39 KIAKSHUK (1886-1966), ᑭᐊᓱ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT MEN AT WORK graphite drawing, c. 1960, unframed 16.5 x 21 in — 41.9 x 53.3 cm

literature:

Marion E. Jackson & Judith M. Nasby, Contemporary Inuit Drawings, Macdonald Stewart Art Centre, Guelph, 1987, page 48. “Already in his 70s when he began drawing in connection with the fledgling Cape Dorset printmaking project... Kiakshuk’s carefully rendered graphite pencil drawings yield a great deal of information about the traditional Inuit experience, and his style of presenting isolated but energetic figures bears a resemblance to earlier incised ivory works.” An unusual subject and composition for artists of this time period. Kiakshuk could very well have witnessed this scene of what appears to be southerners unloading a ship. The men carry everything from ladders to planks to anchors.

$600—900

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41

KIAWAK ASHOONA O.C., R.C.A. (1933-2014), ᑭᐊᓱ ᐃᓱᓇ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT

KAKA ASHOONA (1928-1996), ᑲᑲ ᐊᓴᓇ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT

SPIRITS ON THE LAND graphite drawing, c. 1965, unframed 18 x 24 in — 45.7 x 61 cm

SPIRITS AND HUNTER graphite drawing, artist name inscribed and dated 6/2/62, unframed 18 x 24 in — 45.7 x 61 cm

$600—900

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Inuit Art Auction

$600—900


42 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT COMING HOME graphite drawing, c. 1960, unframed 19 x 25 in — 48.3 x 63.5 cm

literature:

Marion E. Jackson & Judith M. Nasby, Contemporary Inuit Drawings, Macdonald Stewart Art Centre, Guelph, 1987, page 63. “One of the first to respond to James Houston’s call for drawings to supply images for the new print-making experiments in Cape Dorset, Kenojuak has drawn steadily for more than a quarter century. Her early graphite pencil works remain among her strongest.” The clothing designs are particularly detailed and accomplished in this drawing. There is something in the composition of this image that conveys a feeling that we can all relate to. Although no facial expressions or overt commentary is made here, the subtle gesture of spread arms and upturned hands indicate the joy of this simple act of coming home. Even the dog is happy.

$5,000—7,000

43 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT SEDNA AND BIRD felt tip and coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics, framed 20 x 25.75 in — 50.8 x 65.4 cm

literature:

Jean Blodgett, Kenojuak, 1985, page 51 - 52. This drawing illustrates Kenojuak’s precision in drawing. “Pencils and felt pens seem best suited to her manner of working. ...Although Kenojuak’s drawings are characterized by her strict control of line, she does not adhere rigidly to one technique or style.”

$3,000—5,000

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44 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT ARCTIC BIRD graphite drawing, 1959-1965, framed, sight 7.75 x 12.75 in — 19.7 x 32.4 cm

provenance:

Collection of M.F. Feheley, Toronto, Private Collection, Toronto

literature:

The Discreet Collector, Feheley Fine Arts, exhibition catalogue, June 2002, unpaginated. ‘In the drawings we glimpse the spark - the original idea that can identify a great, or soon-to-be-great artist. “Drawing is the essence of art.” Budd [Feheley] asserts’.

$700—1,000

45 QAUNAQ MIKKIGAK (1932), ᑲᓂ ᒥᑭᒐ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT DANCING ANIMAL SPIRITS graphite drawing, artist name inscribed and dated 8/10/60, unframed 19 x 26 in — 48.3 x 66 cm

$600—900

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Inuit Art Auction


46 JANET KIGUSIUQ (1926-2005), ᔭᓇ ᑭᒍᓯᐊ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ LEGEND coloured pencil and pastel drawing, signed in syllabics with disc number, unframed 22 x 30 in — 55.9 x 76.2 cm

$400—600

47 RUTH ANNAQTUUSI TULURIALIK (1934), ᕈᑐ ᐊᓇᑐᓯ ᑐᓗᐃᐊ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ OLD LADY coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics, framed 22.25 x 29.5 in — 56.5 x 74.9 cm Annaqtuusi was fascinated by the stories of shamans she heard as a child. Her drawings are exuberant and colourful and tend to fill the entire paper. This female shaman surrounded by helper spirits is the subject of many of her drawings. For a reproduction of this image see, Ruth Tulurialik and David Pelly, Qikaaluktut: Images of Inuit Life, Toronto: Oxford University Press, 1986, page 27.

$1,000—1,500

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

27


48 LUKE ANGUHADLUQ (1895-1982), ᓗᐅᒃ ᐊᒐᓴᓗ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ PURSUING CARIBOU BY KAYAK coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics with disc number, c. 1972, framed 20.75 x 29.5 in — 52.7 x 74.9 cm Anguhadluq did not abide by any rules of perspective or paper orientation. In this drawing he has created a colourful hunting scene from both an aerial and forward facing viewpoint. Turning the paper as he worked, Anguhadluq placed his syllabic signature and disc number likely where he completed his drawing or where there was space. For related works see, Cynthia Waye Cook, From the Centre, The Drawings of Luke Anguhadluq, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1993, page 88.

$3,000—5,000

28

Inuit Art Auction


49 LUKE ANGUHADLUQ (1895-1982), ᓗᐅᒃ ᐊᒐᓴᓗ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ WOMAN coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics with disc number, 1972 26 x 20 in — 66 x 50.8 cm

literature:

Cynthia Waye Cook, From the Centre, The Drawings of Luke Anguhadluq, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1993, page 40. Anguhadluq was introduced to drawing by Gabriel Gely in the 1960s. He made drawings and later prints for about a twenty year period. This work, representative of the start of his ‘mature period’ (1970-1982) shows certain modifications in his designs. According to Cynthia Waye Cook, he added “decorative embellishments to the clothing and faces of his figures” They gained pigmented faces, eyelashes, and parka fringes. These elements tended to disappear after 1973. For related works see, Cynthia Waye Cook, From the Centre, The Drawings of Luke Anguhadluq, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1993, pages 70 - 71.

$1,500—2,500

50 LUKE ANGUHADLUQ (1895-1982), ᓗᐅᒃ ᐊᒐᓴᓗ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ TWO FIGURES coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics, c. 1970, unframed 24 x 19 in — 61 x 48.3 cm

literature:

Helga Goetz, The Art of Baker Lake, from The People Within, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1976, unpaginated. “Individual figures show minimal differentiation, with large heads, staring eyes, vestigial arms, little motion; yet they interact strongly, and with compelling eyes the occasional outward-facing, icon-like figure demands the participation of the viewer.”

$1,000—1,500

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

29


51 JOHN KAVIK (1897-1993), ᔭᓐ ᑲᕕ, RANKIN INLET / KANGIQLINIQ FIGURES AND FISH coloured pencil drawing, c. 1980 12 x 17.75 in — 30.5 x 45.1 cm

$1,500—2,500

30

Inuit Art Auction


52 JOHN KAVIK (1897-1993), ᔭᓐ ᑲᕕ, RANKIN INLET / KANGIQLINIQ STANDING FIGURE stone, signed in syllabics 19 x 10 x 6 in — 48.3 x 25.4 x 15.2 cm

$10,000—15,000

Considerable in size and intensity, this work by John Kavik speaks to the stark and resilient course of his repertoire. Working with very durable stone and modest tools, Kavik’s carving method reveals to us the perseverance and dedication to make such a sculpture. Kavik chose the human figure as the prevailing theme in his art. Standing Figure is an excellent example of this. After moving to Kangiqliniq (in Rankin Inlet) to work in the mines, Kavik chose the human figure as the prevailing theme in his art, as he so expertly renders a quite stoicism of his people. Standing Figure is an excellent example of this rendering.

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

31


53 MIRIAM MAREALIK QIYUK (1933), ᒪᕆᐊᒪ ᑭᔪ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ FAMILY GROUP stone, signed in Roman, c. 1978 8 x 15 x 8 in — 20.3 x 38.1 x 20.3 cm Miriam is the daughter of trailblazing graphic and textile artist Jessie Oonark. Miriam used the dark basalt stone common to Qamani’tuaq (Baker Lake). Her sculptures are often carved in flat low relief and depict families or clusters of people or loons. There is an innate sense of familial love in this subtle and yet straight forward work. True to the characteristics of artwork from Baker Lake - the stone is carved only so much as to convey the nature of the sculpture. Qiyuk needs no more detail than what she has provided to create this elegant portrait of a supportive family.

$2,000—3,000 32

Inuit Art Auction


54* MATHEW AQIGAAQ (1940-2010), ᒪᑐ ᐊᑭᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ MOTHER AND CHILDREN stone, signed in syllabics, c. 1980 10.5 x 9.5 x 6 in — 26.7 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm One of Aqigaaq’s most refined and accomplished works, this precious scene of a family stands out because of its proportionality, relatability and the pleasant faces he has endowed his figures with.

$2,500—3,500

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

33


55* BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-2017), ᐸᓇᐸᓯ ᐊᓇᓴᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ MUSK OX stone, signed syllabics, 2011 9 x 16 x 6 in — 22.9 x 40.6 x 15.2 cm Working with incredibly hard stone which others might have found an obstacle, Barnabus utilizes the material and creates timeless, monumental beasts while at the same time seemingly soft and solemn. A Barnabus musk ox, equivalent to a Pauta bear, has been a highly collectable item for decades.

$3,000—5,000 34

Inuit Art Auction


56 BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-2017), ᐸᓇᐸᓯ ᐊᓇᓴᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ MUSK OX stone, signed in syllabics, c. 1980 4 x 2 x 7 in — 10.2 x 5.1 x 17.8 cm

provenance:

Gallery One, Toronto, 1984 Private Collection, WI

$600—900

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

35


57 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), ᐃᕙᓗᐊᔪ, FROBISHER BAY / IQALUIT ARCTIC HARE stone, signed in Roman, c. 1985 11 x 12 x 6 in — 27.9 x 30.5 x 15.2 cm Henry, the master of the Lumbering Polar Bear, has carved this Arctic Hare with the utmost sensitivity. The artist’s powers of observation as well as technical skill are an essential aspect of his artwork. The animals he carved were a precise depiction of what he studied when out on the land.

$3,000—5,000

36

Inuit Art Auction


58 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), ᐃᕙᓗᐊᔪ, FROBISHER BAY / IQALUIT LUMBERING POLAR BEAR stone, signed in Roman and syllabics, c. 1980 6 x 13.5 x 4.5 in — 15.2 x 34.3 x 11.4 cm A predominantly self-taught artist, it is remarkable how meticulous and life-like his portrayal of animals are, something that only a great hunter could express. A true expert at handling stone, Lumbering Polar Bear is another excellent example of Evaluardjuk’s precision and dexterity as an artist.

$3,000—5,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

37


59 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), ᐃᕙᓗᐊᔪ, FROBISHER BAY / IQALUIT POLAR BEAR AND SEAL stone, c. 1970 10 x 4 x 5.5 in — 25.4 x 10.2 x 14 cm

$2,500—3,500

38

Inuit Art Auction


60 PAUTA SAILA, R.C.A. (1916-2009), ᐸᐅᑕ ᓴᐃᓚ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT STRUTTING POLAR BEAR stone, signed in Roman and syllabics, c. 1970 10 x 8.25 x 5 in — 25.4 x 21 x 12.7 cm

provenance:

Gallery One, Toronto, 1984 Private Collection, WI Pauta was one of the first Inuk artists to develop a distinctive, personally unique style. A Pauta bear among a shelf of polar bear sculptures is instantly recognized. Although he worked on a wide variety of subjects, his dancing bears are particularly significant to him because polar bears are important shamanistic creatures, embodied spirit helpers of Inuit culture.

$6,000—9,000 TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

39


61 ABRAHAM ETUNGAT, R.C.A. (1911-1999), ᐊᐃᐊᔭᑲ ᐃᑐᒐ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT COMPOSITION stone, signed in syllabics 23 x 25 x 5 in — 58.4 x 63.5 x 12.7 cm

$6,000—9,000

40

Inuit Art Auction

A spectacular compositional work by the artist famous for his grand birds with raised wings. Etungat has been described as an independent soul and a perfectionist in regard to his sculpting. He started out working in small scale gradually building up to larger works and incorporating humans and other animals. These have become some of his most powerful creations.


62 ABRAHAM ETUNGAT, R.C.A. (1911-1999), ᐊᐃᐊᔭᑲ ᐃᑐᒐ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT BIRD OF SPRING stone, signed in syllabics 20 x 18 x 5 in — 50.8 x 45.7 x 12.7 cm

$5,000—7,000

It is impossible not to experience Etungat’s Bird of Spring without an overwhelming sense of optimism. As one of his most well known images, this lot emits a profound sense of life and energy, parallel to the shifting of the Arctic’s longest season from winter to spring. Etungat’s original 5 inch soapstone carving of Bird of Spring was reproduced in a 7 foot tall bronze for the Devonian Foundation. The bronze is now displayed in public areas in cities across Canada, including Halifax, Calgary, Vancouver and Toronto.

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

41


63 AQJANGAJUK SHAA R.C.A. (1937), ᐊᔭᒐᔪ ᓴᐊ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT WOMAN CARRYING A SEAL AND HER CHILD stone, c. 1970 16.22 x 10 x 7 in — 41.2 x 25.4 x 17.8 cm

$2,500—3,500

42

Inuit Art Auction


64 OSUITOK IPEELEE, R.C.A. (1923-2005), ᐅᓱᐃᑐ ᐃᐱᓕ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT SEDNA SWIMMING WITH HER YOUNG stone, signed in syllabics and Roman, c. 1970 16.5 x 8 x 10 in — 41.9 x 20.3 x 25.4 cm

literature:

Alma Houston, Inuit Art: An Anthology, Winnipeg, MB, 1988, page 46.

Jean Blodgett notes, “The sea goddess, Taleeyayo, the mythological creature with mermaid-like body who was believed to control the animals that people hunted, is a popular subject for Inuit carvers. Osuitok has done a number of representations of the sea goddess...” This particular work much like the work cited below from the Klamer Collection, possesses an elegance and fluidity unmatched by any other carver. For a related work see, The Klamer Family Collection of Inuit Art, Waddington’s auction catalogue, Spring 2005, lot 121.

$6,000—9,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

43


65* OSUITOK IPEELEE, R.C.A. (1923-2005), ᐅᓱᐃᑐ ᐃᐱᓕ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT MAN WITH HIS DOG stone, signed in syllabics, c. 1970s 22.5 x 14 x 5 in — 57.2 x 35.6 x 12.7 cm

literature:

Alma Houston, Inuit Art: An Anthology, Winnipeg, MB, 1988, page 46. “In his carvings Osuitok claims he is just representing Inuit people, not specific individuals, even though the completed image may seem to resemble a particular person. ...many of Osuitok’s sculptures show the people and animals he knows from his day-to-day life...”

$5,000—7,000

44

Inuit Art Auction


66* KANANGINAK POOTOOGOOK, R.C.A. (1935-2010), ᑲᓇᒋᓇ ᐳᑐᒍᑭ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT BASHFUL WALRUS stone, signed in syllabics 13 x 12 x 8 in — 33 x 30.5 x 20.3 cm

provenance:

Waddington’s, November 2008, lot 241, Toronto, Tom Vanderpoel Collection, Barrington, IL The motivation behind this charming caricature of a walrus is unknown, however Kananginak has captured the playfulness perfectly. Not necessarily known for his overt humour, Kananginak can exact any rendition of an animal whether through pen or chisel.

$3,000—5,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

45


67* KAKA ASHOONA (1928-1996), ᑲᑲ ᐊᓴᓇ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT HAWK stone 16.5 x 5 x 10 in — 41.9 x 12.7 x 25.4 cm

$4,000—6,000

46

Inuit Art Auction


68 LATCHOLASSIE AKESUK (1919-2000), ᓚᓴᓚᓯ ᐊᑲᓱᒃ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT OWL stone, c. 1970 18 x 10 x 7 in — 45.7 x 25.4 x 17.8 cm

provenance:

Calgary Galleries Ltd., Calgary, 1973 The Estate of Katerina Haka-Ikse, Toronto

$4,000—6,000 Hulking, unusual bird-like creatures are the most admired and collected of Latcholassie’s works. Different from other artists’ naturalist or elegant renditions of birds, Latcholassie’s stark and minimalist style echoes that of his father Tudlik’s carvings. Using limited markings and scarce definition, his birds look lively with character and animation. In this way he demonstrates an ardent ability to achieve abstract expressiveness within a limited range or work. TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

47


69* JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), ᔪᑕ ᐅᓗᓚ, GJOA HAVEN / UQSUQTUUQ DANCING SHAMAN stone, antler 14 x 9.75 x 6 in — 35.6 x 24.8 x 15.2 cm Staying true to the region’s artistic traditions of blending comedy and the grotesque, Ullulaq expertly handles stone and bone. Like his brothers, Charlie Ugyuk and Nelson Takkiruq, his work offers a level of creativity and individuality. He influenced the next generation of artists in the region. Dancing Shaman is indicative of Ullulaq’s ability to render light-heartedness and joy in his work, manifested by his comedic approach to his artwork and life.

$6,000—9,000

48

Inuit Art Auction


70 JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), ᔪᑕ ᐅᓗᓚ, GJOA HAVEN / UQSUQTUUQ DANCING MUSK OX stone, antler, signed in syllabics 8.25 x 5.5 x 4.75 in — 21 x 14 x 12.1 cm

$2,500—3,500

71 JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), ᔪᑕ ᐅᓗᓚ, GJOA HAVEN / UQSUQTUUQ INUKSUK MAN stone, antler, signed in syllabics, c. 1990 8 x 7 x 4 in — 20.3 x 17.8 x 10.2 cm A classic work by Ullulaq, with the inlaid eyes, face tattoos, and teeth. Ullulaq himself was known to have a contagious smile, it is no wonder he often depicted his sculpture with a matching, infectious grin.

$2,500—3,500

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

49


72 JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), ᔪᑕ ᐅᓗᓚ, GJOA HAVEN / UQSUQTUUQ MAN TORMENTED BY INSECT (BUG IN EAR) stone, antler, signed in syllabics, c. 1990 8.5 x 9 x 2 in — 21.6 x 22.9 x 5.1 cm

$2,000—3,000

73 JUDAS ULLULAQ (1937-1999), ᔪᑕ ᐅᓗᓚ, GJOA HAVEN / UQSUQTUUQ DRUMMER stone, composite, signed in syllabics, c.1990 7.5 x 8.25 x 3 in — 19.1 x 21 x 7.6 cm

$1,000—1,500

50

Inuit Art Auction


74 CHARLIE UGYUK (1931-1999), ᓴᓕ ᐅᔭ, SPENCE BAY / TALOYOAK TWO FALCONS bone, stone, antler, signed in syllabics, 1991 13.25 x 5 x 9 in — 33.7 x 12.7 x 22.9 cm; 12 x 5 x 10 in — 30.5 x 12.7 x 25.4 cm

$4,000—6,000

Described as “the strongest spiritual carver in the central arctic” Charlie Ugyuk or “Big Charlie” as he was known, could alternate between high realism and intensely imaginative subject matter. Charlie loved birds (as did his nephew Karoo) and his fascination lay with falcons specifically, a subject matter he visited repeatedly throughout his career with his work’s characteristic intensity demonstrated through inset eyes, rigid claws with sharpened talons and meticulously detailed feathers on powerful wings. Charlie was the first of the Netsilingmiut to carve professionally and he was an inspiration to not just Judas Ullulaq and Karoo Ashevak but for many carvers in the region. Inuk Charlie, see lot 32, has spoken of his father’s perfectionism and drive and he challenged his son to be the best at his craft.

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

51


75 KAROO ASHEVAK (1940-1974), ᑲᕈ ᐊᓴᕙ, SPENCE BAY / TALOYOAK SHAMAN WITH OPPOSING FACES bone, stone, ivory, c. 1973 15 x 10 x 7 in — 40.6 x 25.4 x 19.1 cm

provenance:

Waddington’s, May 30, 1989, lot 616.

literature:

See endnotes

$30,000—40,000

52

Inuit Art Auction


By the time Karoo Ashevak was emerging as an artist, Inuit art had seen many variations and fluctuations, but a narrative of traditional ways of life, modes of survival, mythology, shamanism and arctic animals remained a common theme. Born in 1940 in the Kitikmeot region of what is now Nunavut and raised in the Taloyoak community, one of the last areas to experience the dramatic change of the new government policies, Karoo Ashevak lived a nomadic, traditional lifestyle as a hunter until 1968, at which time he and his family settled in Taloyoak. Introduced to arts and sculpture through the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada initiative, he quickly became known and sought out for his unique and unexpected sculptures and by 1972 he had a solo show at the prestigious National Museum of the American Indian in New York City. Ashevak’s principal medium was whalebone, though he used caribou antler, soapstone and ivory as well, and his expressive and playful sculptures of Inuit spirits defied the trend set by his contemporaries towards naturalism. His whimsical, grotesque, and amorphous figures challenged the Southern Canadian stereotype and expectation of what Inuit art was “supposed to look like”, and Ashevak is largely considered a creative catalyst for artistic change within his own community. Known for his treatment of bone that contrasts large refined and un-embellished expanses with sections of intricate detail, Shaman with Opposing Faces, with its torso like shape atop two small legs, is a keen example of this characteristic style. The smooth surface of the figure highlights not only the facial features and wide open mouth with intricately carved teeth, but also hints at the temporality of the scene, as if the shaman’s frenzied vision or dream has stepped into the visible world only for a brief moment. As highly respected leaders within the Inuit community, shamans are thought to bridge the divide between the earthly and spiritual world, and the two sides of this sculpture cleverly represent this duality. Ashevak’s bulbous, imaginative and distorted figures lend themselves well to shamanistic representation, and through these whimsical sculptures he makes powerful emotions and traditional stories come alive for the viewer. With the onset of Christianity in Inuit communities, the shaman and other long held beliefs were challenged and often criticized, but through a dynamic artistic practice and industry, the Inuit have transformed and altogether adapted to such outside influences; and Ashevak’s sculptures stand at the forefront of this simultaneous resistance and incorporation. After bursting onto the contemporary art scene, Ashevak’s promising career was cut tragically short when he and his family died in a house fire in 1974. He has left behind only about 250 works representing Inuit life and culture through a vibrant, expressive and playful aesthetic unique to the artist. TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

53


76 JESSIE OONARK, O.C., R.C.A. (1906-1985), ᔪᓯ ᐃᓇ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ TWO ROOMS INSIDE THE IGLU linocut and stencil, 1982, 18/35, unframed 22 x 30 in — 55.9 x 76.2 cm In Two Rooms Inside The Iglu Oonark beautifully illustrates the mundane every day activities that might take place inside the snow house.

$700—1,000

77 JESSIE OONARK, O.C., R.C.A. (1906-1985), ᔪᓯ ᐃᓇ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ MAGIC CIRCLE stonecut and stencil, 1971, 2/27, framed, sight 19 x 29 in — 48.3 x 73.7 cm For a reproduction of this print and the textile based on the same design see, Jessie Oonark, A Retrospective, Jean Blodgett and Marie Bouchard, Winnipeg Art Gallery, 1986/1987, page 118-119.

$700—1,000

54

Inuit Art Auction


78

79

JESSIE OONARK, O.C., R.C.A. (1906-1985), ᔪᓯ ᐃᓇ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ

JESSIE OONARK, O.C., R.C.A. (1906-1985), ᔪᓯ ᐃᓇ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ

A SHAMAN’S HELPING SPIRITS stonecut and stencil, 1971, 11/40, framed 36 x 24.5 in — 91.4 x 62.2 cm

RACING KAYAKS stonecut and stencil, 1986, A/P, framed 25 x 37 in — 63.5 x 94 cm

literature:

As with many works on paper from Qamani’tuaq (Baker Lake), the orientation can be decided by the viewer.

Robert Enright, The Art of Jessie Oonark, Ceremonies of Innocence, Inuit Art Quarterly, Winter 1987, page 3. A central theme in Oonark’s artwork, shamanism was part of her heritage. Her grandfather and father were said to be shamans. “While her art is predisposed towards brightness, she was by no means unaware of the darker dimensions of the Inuit experience and Inuit imagination. She had a respectable shamanic pedigree, after all, and her grandmother warned her that ‘images could come to life in the dark of the night.’ Clearly, Oonark herself took special care to breathe life into the forms of a good number of those nocturnal images.”

$2,500—3,500

$3,000—5,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

55


Few bodies of work can compare to that of graphic and textile artist Jessie Oonark. She worked steadily for a twenty year period, designing creative and direct, multifarious tapestries. She used complex shapes and forms which seem to morph before your very eyes, and employed bold colouring and traditional yet modern looking motifs. Oonark’s impressive large-scale wall hangings are considered to be her “more formal statements”, evidenced by the two outstanding works, lots 80 and 81. In lot 80 she used dividing lines to keep order and organize her space - a technique she utilized in some of her early drawings. Oonark’s sense of style and flare is unmistakable here, in the patterns of red, white and black adorned by the central mustard yellow head of a female caribou shaman. A traditional women’s garment, located just below the shaman figure appears to be a good fit for the above shaman – are these figures waiting to adorn the shaman with a new amautiq? Oonark’s work is layered, and communicates much about her cultural and spiritual life. In both of these pieces she has included decorative embellishments for the purpose of enhancing the visual image while portraying images from her world. A consummate seamstress, Oonark did not use patterns, “with her visual sense and many years of experience in sewing traditional clothes…Oonark was able to cut and duplicate any kind of shape freehand”. As seen in lot 81, the figures on the komatik are cut from one piece of cloth and then detailed with embroidery. The rest is comprised of strong individually cut out figures and composite animals, with a bright yellow life-giving creature as the focal point. This work is less structured yet is well balanced and lively. These two textiles are almost companion pieces: their contrasting compositions both illustrate particular strengths of Oonark’s oeuvre. Jack Butler stated of Oonark’s graphic authority, it was as if “she was absolutely certain of everything she was doing…”. Just as with both examples presented here, “what shines through is a tremendous human being with a great command of the artistic language given to her by her culture, and developed by herself.” Her legacy continues through her children who are accomplished artists in their own right. Of these, William Noah, Janet Kigusiuq and Miriam Qiyuk are represented in this catalogue.

56

Inuit Art Auction


80 JESSIE OONARK, O.C., R.C.A. (1906-1985), ᔪᓯ ᐃᓇ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ UNTITLED stroud, thread, embroidery floss, signed in syllabics, c. 1970 48 x 60 in — 121.9 x 152.4 cm

provenance:

The York Downs Golf and Country Club Collection of Art, Unionville, ON For the Club’s relocation from Bathurst Street to its current location in Unionville, all new artwork was acquired. The relocation process took place between 1968 and 1971 and the wall hangings were acquired during that time.  When the Clubhouse opened in 1971, the new art collection including paintings by top Canadian artists was put on display. This work along with lot 81 and 85 was displayed in the dining room from opening day until about 1990.

$25,000—30,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

57


81 JESSIE OONARK, O.C., R.C.A. (1906-1985), ᔪᓯ ᐃᓇ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ UNTITLED stroud, thread, embroidery floss, signed in syllabics, c. 1970 47 x 59 in — 119.4 x 149.9 cm

provenance:

The York Downs Golf and Country Club Collection of Art, Unionville, ON For the Club’s relocation from Bathurst Street to its current location in Unionville, all new artwork was acquired. The relocation process took place between 1968 and 1971 and the wall hangings were acquired during that time.  When the Clubhouse opened in 1971, the new art collection including paintings by top Canadian artists was put on display. This work along with lot 80 and 85 was displayed in the dining room from opening day until about 1990.

$20,000—25,000

58

Inuit Art Auction


82 JESSIE OONARK, O.C., R.C.A. (1906-1985), ᔪᓯ ᐃᓇ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ UNTITLED coloured pencil drawing, signed in syllabics, c. 1970, framed 15 x 22 in — 38.1 x 55.9 cm A prime example of the artist’s ability to translate common objects into symbols. Here the ulu (women’s knife) as well as hood shapes are exaggerated, the traditional hair sticks are elongated to become an integral design element, intertwining with symbolic female figures. The intensity of the colours that she has chosen along with her signature symmetry complete this powerful image. There are striking compositional and thematic similarities between this drawing and the famous 1974 stonecut and stencil Big Woman (lot 83).

$1,500—2,500

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

59


83 JESSIE OONARK, O.C., R.C.A. (1906-1985), ᔪᓯ ᐃᓇ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ BIG WOMAN stonecut and stencil, 1974, 30/50, framed, sight 23.75 x 33.5 in — 60.3 x 85.1 cm

literature:

Winnipeg Art Gallery. “Collections”. Accessed April 5, 2018. http://wag.ca/art/collections/inuitart/display,collection/61317 This work was the cover image for the Sanavik Cooperative Baker Lake Print Catalogue, 1974. “...In this print the Inuit amautiq, or mother’s parka, assumes the force of a feminine symbol. Traditional facial tattoos and the crescentshaped woman’s knife, or ulu, projecting from each side of the woman’s head are also cultural attributes associated with Inuit women.”

$4,000—6,000

84 JESSIE OONARK, O.C., R.C.A. (1906-1985), ᔪᓯ ᐃᓇ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ PLAYING WITH MY GRANDCHILDREN stonecut and stencil, 1981, 15/40, unframed 22 x 29.5 in — 55.9 x 74.9 cm

literature:

Inuit Art Foundation. “Flashback: Jessie Oonark”, Accessed April 5, 2018.http://iaq. inuitartfoundation.org/30-3-flashback-jessieoonark/ ‘“Her only indulgence seems to have been her grandchildren. Fred Ford, who manned the counter at the tuck shop attached to his Qamani’tuaq gallery, recalls her coming in for candy, always with a flock of children in attendance. (Some were her relations, others were hangers-on.) “They followed her around everywhere,” he remembers.’

$2,500—3,500 60

Inuit Art Auction


85 IRENE AVAALAAQIAQ TIKTAALAAQ (1941-), ᐃᕆᓐ ᐊᕙᓚᑭᐊ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ UNTITLED stroud, felt, thread, embroidery floss, c. 1970 47.5 x 65 in — 120.7 x 165.1 cm

provenance:

The York Downs Golf and Country Club Collection of Art, Unionville, ON

$3,000—4,000

This green, yellow, black and red textile is decorated with supernatural figures. The border is adorned with animal and human faces and Inuktut syllabics which translate in English to Qamani’tuaq (Baker Lake) along the top and the artist’s name, Avaalaaqiaq along the bottom. This work on cloth by Avaalaaqiaq is from an early period in her career and exhibits her unique visual narratives. She has layered one panel of fabric over another to create a frame around the body of the work. Her later textiles would utilize appliqued borders shaped into profiles of faces. There is a sense of playfulness conveyed by these composite figures. For the Club’s relocation from Bathurst Street to its current location in Unionville, all new artwork was acquired. The relocation process took place between 1968 and 1971 and the wall hangings were acquired during that time.  When the Clubhouse opened in 1971, the new art collection including paintings by top Canadian artists was put on display. This work along with lot 80 & 81 was displayed in the dining room from opening day until about 1990.

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

61


86 WILLIAM NOAH (1943), ᕕᓕᐊᒪ ᓄᐊ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ WOLF MAN stonecut, 1970, 22/40, framed 26.25 x 20.25 in — 66.7 x 51.4 cm

$4,000—6,000

62

Inuit Art Auction

William Noah is the son of Jessie Oonark. This image appears on the front cover of Jean Blodgett, Eskimo Narrative, The Winnipeg Art Gallery, 1979, exhibition catalogue. This image was also used as the cover for the Baker Lake annual graphics catalogue for the 1971 release.


87 UNIDENTIFIED MAN HOLDING A SMALL PERSON stone, c. 1950 16.75 x 7 x 5 in — 42.5 x 17.8 x 12.7 cm

$4,000—6,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

63


88 ABRAHAM APAKARK ANGHIK (1951), ᐊᐃᐊᔭᑲ ᐊᐸᑲ ᐊᒋ, SALT SPRING ISLAND RAVEN, WOMAN AND CHILD stone, signed in Roman, dated 1997 12 x 18 x 8 in — 30.5 x 45.7 x 20.3 cm Anghik retained his interest in Alaskan mythology learned during his years living there. Part of the Alaskan Raven creation myth, this work beautifully entwines the Raven with the first woman and first man. The beings seem to flow into each other creating one unified form.

$5,000—7,000

64

Inuit Art Auction


89 NICK SIKKUARK (1943-2013), ᓂᑲ ᓯᑲᐊ, PELLY BAY / ARVILIQJUAQ HUNTER WITH LOLLED TONGUE bone, fur, sinew 28 x 21 x 14 in — 71.1 x 53.3 x 35.6 cm

literature:

Robert Kardosh, The Art of Nick Sikkuark, Marion Scott Gallery, exh. cat., 2003, page 5-11

$3,000—5,000

Nick Sikkuark was one of the creators in the Kitikmeot region that shaped the image of Northern art, having produced some of the most imaginative and original sculptures to come out of the arctic. After the phenomenal success of larger bone sculptures like Karoo Ashevak’s, Sikkuark was inspired to create his own works in whalebone, on a more aspiring scale and working with a variety of materials. Although he deeply admired and was inspired by artists such as Karoo, Ugyuk and Ullulaq, he was never an imitator. Sikkuark’s work differs immensely from the typical characteristics of the region. His approach is on the whole more natural and representational rather than abstract, while still bearing the tradition of humour and the grotesque. Though he rejects the prevailing techniques of the region, his effects are nonetheless equally commanding, leaving us with an image that is incredibly intense, chillingly realistic and utterly mesmerizing TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

65


90 AQJANGAJUK SHAA R.C.A. (1937), ᐊᔭᒐᔪ ᓴᐊ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT DANCING WALRUS stone, 1985 11.5 x 9 x 6 in — 29.2 x 22.9 x 15.2 cm

provenance:

Images of the North, San Francisco, 1986 Private Collection, WI

$1,000—1,500

91 AQJANGAJUK SHAA R.C.A. (1937), ᐊᔭᒐᔪ ᓴᐊ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT DANCING SEAL stone, signed in syllabics, 1985 9 x 8 x 3 in — 22.9 x 20.3 x 7.6 cm

provenance:

Elca London Gallery, Montreal, 1986 Private Collection, WI

$600—900

66

Inuit Art Auction


92 KAKA ASHOONA (1928-1996), ᑲᑲ ᐊᓴᓇ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT RUNNING BIRD stone, signed in Roman, 1975 13 x 8 x 18 in — 33 x 20.3 x 45.7 cm

$3,000—5,000

93 KAKA ASHOONA (1928-1996), ᑲᑲ ᐊᓴᓇ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT SQUATTING MAN stone, signed in Roman and syllabics, c. 1965 8.5 x 9 x 4.5 in — 21.6 x 22.9 x 11.4 cm

$1,500—2,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

67


94 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT FALCON stone, c. 1980 14.5 x 5 x 8 in — 36.8 x 12.7 x 20.3 cm

$2,000—3,000

95* KIAWAK ASHOONA O.C., R.C.A. (1933-2014), ᑭᐊᓱ ᐃᓱᓇ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT BIRD CREATURE WITH HOODED FIGURE stone, signed in Roman 11 x 7 x 9 in — 27.9 x 17.8 x 22.9 cm

$700—1,000

68

Inuit Art Auction


96* KIAWAK ASHOONA O.C., R.C.A. (1933-2014), ᑭᐊᓱ ᐃᓱᓇ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT FALCON stone, signed in syllabics 11 x 8.25 x 3 in — 27.9 x 21 x 7.6 cm

$700—1,000

97 KIAWAK ASHOONA O.C., R.C.A. (1933-2014), ᑭᐊᓱ ᐃᓱᓇ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT SEDNA stone, signed in Roman 9 x 12.5 x 2 in — 22.9 x 31.8 x 5.1 cm

$700—1,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

69


98* LATCHOLASSIE AKESUK (1919-2000), ᓚᓴᓚᓯ ᐊᑲᓴ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT BIRD CREATURE stone, c 1970 9 x 10 x 8 in — 22.9 x 25.4 x 20.3 cm A comedic rendering of Latcholassie’s classic bird, the raised wings of the bird are very anthropomorphic in feeling, almost mischievous, as though he is ready to pounce on an unsuspecting passer-by.

$1,500—2,500

99 LATCHOLASSIE AKESUK (1919-2000), ᓚᓴᓚᓯ ᐊᑲᓴ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT SEA CREATURE stone, c. 1975 4.25 x 10 x 2 in — 10.8 x 25.4 x 5.1 cm

$1,500—2,000

70

Inuit Art Auction


100* LUKTA QIATSUK (1928-2004), ᓗᑕ ᑭᐊᓱᑲ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT GOOSE stone, c. 1976 13 x 21 x 9.5 in — 33 x 27.9 x 22.9 cm

$2,500—3,500

101 LUKTA QIATSUK (1928-2004), ᓗᑕ ᑭᐊᓱᑲ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT BIRD stone, c. 1980 10 x 3 x 12 in — 25.4 x 7.6 x 30.5 cm

provenance:

Gallery One, Toronto, 1984 Private Collection, WI

$800—1,200

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

71


102 NIVIAXIE (1909-1959), ᓂᕕᐊᓯ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT CHAR FISHERMAN sealskin stencil, 1959, 7/50, unframed 13 x 20 in — 33 x 50.8 cm

$4,000—6,000

103 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT BIRDS OVER THE SUN sealskin stencil, 1960, 6/50, unframed 13.25 x 20 in — 33.7 x 50.8 cm

$3,000—5,000

72

Inuit Art Auction


104 PUDLO PUDLAT (1916-1992), ᐳᓗ ᐳᓚ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT ANIMAL WHALERS II stonecut, 1961, 19/40, framed 20 x 19 in — 50.8 x 48.3 cm

$3,000—4,000

105 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT OWL SPIRIT stonecut, 1969, 37/50, framed, sight 21 x 31 in — 53.3 x 78.7 cm

$2,500—3,500

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

73


106 KENOJUAK ASHEVAK, C.C., R.C.A. (1927-2013), ᑭᓄᔭᐊ ᐊᓯᕗ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT AUDACIOUS OWL stonecut and stencil, 1993, 67/100, unframed 24 x 29 in — 61 x 73.7 cm

provenance:

Private Collection, WI

$2,500—3,500

107 SHEOJUK ETIDLOOIE (1929-1999), ᓯᐅᔪ ᐃᑎᐃᑎᓚᐃ, CAPE DORSET SWIMMING BEAR lithograph, 1995, 14/50, unframed 22.5 x 30 in — 57.2 x 76.2 cm

$1,000—1,500

74

Inuit Art Auction


108 OSUITOK IPEELEE, R.C.A. (1923-2005), ᐅᓱᐃᑐ ᐃᐱᓕ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT OWL stone, signed in syllabics 17 x 16 x 5 in — 43.2 x 40.6 x 12.7 cm

$4,000—6,000

109* OSUITOK IPEELEE, R.C.A. (1923-2005), ᐅᓱᐃᑐ ᐃᐱᓕ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT PLAYFUL SEAL stone, signed in syllabics, c. 1965 15 x 14 x 11 in — 38.1 x 35.6 x 27.9 cm

$3,000—5,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

75


110 OSUITOK IPEELEE, R.C.A. (1923-2005), ᐅᓱᐃᑐ ᐃᐱᓕ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT WALRUS OWL TRANSFORMATION stone, signed in syllabics 21 x 7 x 8 in — 53.3 x 17.8 x 20.3 cm

$3,000—5,000

111 PAULASSIE POOTOOGOOK, R.C.A. (1927-2006), ᐸᓗᓯ ᐳᑐᒍ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT MAN HOLDING HIS DOG stone, signed in Roman, c. 1968 11.5 x 7 x 4 in — 29.2 x 17.8 x 10.2 cm

provenance:

Feheley Fine Arts, Toronto, 1988 Private Collection, WI In the gorgeous green stone beloved by collectors, this composition of a kneeling man holding his dog was carved by Pootoogook’s eldest son, Paulassie. A photograph of this work appeared in Inuit Art, Traditional Expressions of the Canadian Arctic by M.F. (Budd) Feheley in Art Impressions magazine.

$1,500—2,500

76

Inuit Art Auction


112 POSSIBLY: JOHNNIEBO ASHEVAK (1923-1972), ᔭᓂᕗ ᐊᓴᕙ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT KNEELING BOY stone, signed in syllabics 16 x 10 x 6 in — 40.6 x 25.4 x 15.2 cm

$1,000—1,500

113 QAVAROAK TUNNILLIE (1928-1993), ᑲᕙᕋᒃ ᑐᓂᓕ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT DOGS DEFENDING THEIR PACK stone, signed in syllabics 23 x 17 x 8 in — 58.4 x 43.2 x 20.3 cm

$3,000—5,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

77


114* SAKIASSIE RAGEE (1924), ᓴᑭᐊᓯ ᕋᒋ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT SEDNA CREATURE stone 6 x 13 x 5.5 in — 15.2 x 33 x 14 cm

$700—1,000

115 SHEOKJUK OQUTAQ (1920-1982), ᓱᐅᔪ ᐅᑯᑕ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT NARWHAL stone, ivory, signed in syllabics, 1969 5 x 2.5 x 13 in — 12.7 x 6.4 x 33 cm

provenance:

Feheley Fine Arts, Toronto, 1996 Private Collection, WI

$1,000—1,500

78

Inuit Art Auction


116 SHEOKJUK OQUTAQ (1920-1982), ᓱᐅᔪ ᐅᑯᑕ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT POLAR BEAR stone, signed in syllabics, c. 1979 8 x 6 x 16 in — 20.3 x 15.2 x 40.6 cm

provenance:

Feheley Fine Arts, Toronto, 1987 Private Collection, WI

$1,000—1,500

117* SHORTY KILLIKTEE (1949-1993), ᓱᑎ ᑭᓕᑎ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT HAWK WITH FEATHER stone 24.5 x 6 x 12 in — 62.2 x 15.2 x 30.5 cm

provenance:

Waddington’s, November 6, 2006, lot 342, Toronto

$4,000—6,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

79


118* SHORTY KILLIKTEE (1949-1993), ᓱᑎ ᑭᓕᑎ, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT FEEDING CARIBOU stone, antler, signed in syllabics, c. 1991 19.5 x 3.75 x 10.75 in — 49.5 x 9.5 x 27.3 cm

$3,000—5,000

119 UNIDENTIFIED, CAPE DORSET / KINNGAIT POLAR BEAR ATTACKING WALRUS stone, ivory, c. 1965 16 x 22 x 14 in — 40.6 x 55.9 x 35.6 cm

$1,000—1,500

80

Inuit Art Auction


120 JOHN ALLUKPIK (1935), ᔭᓐ ᐃᓗᐱ, COPPERMINE / KUGLUKTUK HUNTER STRUGGLING WITH POLAR BEAR stone, antler, signed in Roman, c. 1965 5 x 4 x 8 in — 12.7 x 10.2 x 20.3 cm

$600—900

121 LUCY TASSEOR TUTSWEETOK (1934-2012), ᓗᓯ ᑕᓯᐅ ᑎᓯᑕ, ESKIMO POINT / ARVIAT FAMILY stone, signed in syllabics 6 x 4.5 x 2.25 in — 15.2 x 11.4 x 5.7 cm

$600—900

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

81


122 JOHN PANGNARK (1920-1980), ᔭᓐ ᐸᓇ, ESKIMO POINT / ARVIAT FIGURE stone 4 x 4 x 4.5 in — 10.2 x 10.2 x 11.4 cm

$700—1,000

123 JOHN PANGNARK (1920-1980), ᔭᓐ ᐸᓇ, ESKIMO POINT / ARVIAT FIGURE stone, signed in syllabics 4.75 x 1.75 x 5.5 in — 12.1 x 4.4 x 14 cm

$700—1,000

82

Inuit Art Auction


124 MARC ALIKASWA (1928-2008), ᒪᐊᒃ ᐃᓕᑲᓴ, ESKIMO POINT / ARVIAT HUNTER ATTACKING A POLAR BEAR stone, antler 6 x 16 x 5 in — 15.2 x 40.6 x 12.7 cm

$1,000—1,500

125 GEORGE ARLUK (1949), ᐊᓗ, ESKIMO POINT / ARVIAT SHAMAN TRANSFORMATION stone, antler, signed in Roman 14 x 13 x 4 in — 35.6 x 33 x 10.2 cm

literature:

For a closely related work, see Amway Environmental Foundation Collection, Masters of the Arctic, Art in the Service of the Earth exh. cat., 1989, page 63

$1,000—1,500

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

83


126 EVA TALOOKI ALIKTILUK (1927-1995), ᐃᕙ ᑕᓗᑭ, ESKIMO POINT / ARVIAT COMMUNITY stone, beads, thread, signed in Roman, c. 1975 6 x 5 x 4 in — 15.2 x 12.7 x 10.2 cm

provenance:

Gallery Phillip, Toronto, 1987 Private Collection, WI Talooki’s technique of adding colourful beadwork into her stone carvings set her apart from her contemporaries. The beading adds visual contrast to the hard, grey Arviat stone and context to her minimalist figures. With a beaded web-like covering, the many protruding heads seem to be intertwined in it, emphasizing the strength and interconnectedness of this community or family.

$500—700

127 JACOPOSEE OOPAKAK (1948), ᔭᐊᑲᐅᓯ ᐅᐸᑲᐊᒃ, FROBISHER BAY / IQALUIT OWL ROOKERY bone, ivory, signed in Roman 6.75 x 11 x 4 in — 17.1 x 27.9 x 10.2 cm

$600—900

84

Inuit Art Auction


128 HENRY EVALUARDJUK (1923-2007), ᐃᕙᓗᐊᔪ, FROBISHER BAY / IQALUIT PERCHED FALCON stone, signed in Roman and syllabics, c. 1987 13 x 13 x 5 in — 33 x 33 x 12.7 cm

$1,500—2,500

129* SEEPEE IPEELIE (1940-2000), ᓯᐱ ᐃᐱᓕ, FROBISHER BAY / IQALUIT MUSK OX stone, antler, signed in syllabics 9 x 15 x 6 in — 22.9 x 38.1 x 15.2 cm

$2,000—3,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

85


130 JOSEPH SHUQSLAK (1958), ᔪᓱᐱ ᓱᓴ, GJOA HAVEN / UQSUQTUUQ MAN WITH WOODEN LEG stone, ivory, signed in syllabics, c. 1980 11 x 9 x 6 in — 27.9 x 22.9 x 15.2 cm

$700—1,000

131 UNIDENTIFIED, PORT HARRISON / INUKJUAK HUNTER WITH HEAVY PACK stone, c. 1955 11 x 7.5 x 5 in — 27.9 x 19.1 x 12.7 cm

$700—1,000

86

Inuit Art Auction


132 ISA AQIATTUSUK SMILER (1921-1986), ᐊᐃᓴ ᐊᑭᐊᑐᓱ ᓯᒪᐃᓚ, PORT HARRISON / INUKJUAK MOTHER NURSING HER CHILD stone, signed in syllabics with disc number inscribed, c. 1968 8 x 7 x 7 in — 20.3 x 17.8 x 17.8 cm Both of Isa Smiler’s parents died from an illness that was spread from a supply ship when he was just nine years old. This carving is that of a mother nursing her child, suggestive to that past experience and mirroring his longing and deep value of family, something that is very much central to Inuit culture.

$2,500—3,500

133 ATTR: AKEEAKTASHUK (1898-1954), ᐊᑭᐊᑐᓱ, PORT HARRISON / INUKJUAK HUNTER PULLING A LINE stone, c. 1952 4.25 x 6 x 3 in — 10.8 x 15.2 x 7.6 cm For related works see Early Masters, Inuit Sculpture 1949-1955, Darlene Coward Wight, The Winnipeg Art Gallery, 2006, page 28 - 37.

$2,000—3,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

87


134* ABRAHAM POV (1927-1994), ᐊᐃᐊᔭᑲ ᑕᓕᕈᓂᓕ ᐱᐅᕕ, PORT HARRISON / INUKJUAK MOTHER WITH HER CHILDREN stone 18 x 8 x 8 in — 45.7 x 20.3 x 20.3 cm

$1,500—2,000

135 SNOW GOGGLES, POSSIBLY ALASKAN bone 1.25 x 6 x .75 in — 3.2 x 15.2 x 1.9 cm

$3,000—5,000

88

Inuit Art Auction


136 MATEE ATANGAK TIKTAK (1916), ᒪᑎ ᐊᑕᒐ ᑎᑕ, RANKIN INLET / KANGIQLINIQ FAMILY GROUP stone 7.5 x 7 x 3.5 in — 19.1 x 17.8 x 8.9 cm Matee Atangak was married to John Tiktak and the influence on each other’s carving is evident when comparing their works. In this thoughtful piece, the child seems to be enjoying himself behind the backs of the more serious looking adults.

$1,000—1,500

137 UNIDENTIFIED, ARCTIC QUEBEC / NUNAVIK HUNTER WRESTLING A BEAR stone, ivory, c. 1960 5.75 x 14 x 12 in — 14.6 x 35.6 x 30.5 cm

$1,500—2,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

89


138 POSSIBLY: PADLI UTTUUJAQ ILISITUK (1931), ᐸᓕ ᐅᑐᔭ ᐃᓕᓯᑕᑲ, SUGLUK / SALLUIT WOMAN SCRAPING A SKIN WITH HER ULU stone, signed indistinctly in Roman, c. 1970 6.5 x 6.25 x 3.5 in — 16.5 x 15.9 x 8.9 cm

$800—1,200

139* MARK ILISITUK (1902), ᒪᑲ ᐃᓕᓯᑕᑲ, SUGLUK / SALLUIT HUNTERS DRAGGING A WALRUS AND SEAL stone, disc number inscribed 9 x 17 x 7 in — 22.9 x 43.2 x 17.8 cm

$1,000—1,500

90

Inuit Art Auction


140 UNIDENTIFIED HUNTER FILLING SEAL BLADDER bone 18 x 26 x 9 in — 45.7 x 66 x 22.9 cm

$1,500—2,000

141 ELISAPIE TAQAQ SAVIAKJUK (1914), ᐃᓕᓴᐱ ᑕᑲ ᓴᕕᐊᔪ, SUGLUK / SALLUIT WOMAN stone, disc number inscribed, c. 1955 8.25 x 3.5 x 3.75 in — 21 x 8.9 x 9.5 cm

$700—1,000

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

91


142* TUNA IQULIQ (1935), ᑐᓇ ᐃᑯᓕ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ SEATED WOMAN stone, c. 1970 10 x 11 x 9 in — 25.4 x 27.9 x 22.9 cm

literature:

Helga Goetz, The Art of Baker Lake, from The People Within, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, 1976, unpaginated “Tuna Iquliq celebrates the individual in his moving and powerful sculptures. His people reach outward from the stone mass, demanding the emotional participation of the viewer.”

$1,000—1,500

143 TUNA IQULIQ (1935), ᑐᓇ ᐃᑯᓕ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ FAMILY stone, signed in syllabics 9.5 x 6 x 4 in — 24.1 x 15.2 x 10.2 cm

$600—900

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Inuit Art Auction


144* MATHEW AQIGAAQ (1940-2010), ᒪᑐ ᐊᑭᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ MOTHER AND CHILD stone, signed in syllabics 11 x 7 x 6 in — 27.9 x 17.8 x 15.2 cm

$1,500—2,500

145 BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-2017), ᐸᓇᐸᓯ ᐊᓇᓴᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ WINGED SHAMAN stone 8 x 9.5 x 2.5 in — 20.3 x 24.1 x 6.4 cm

$800—1,200

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

93


146* BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-2017), ᐸᓇᐸᓯ ᐊᓇᓴᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ MOTHER AND CHILD stone, signed in syllabics 7 x 4.5 x 3.5 in — 17.8 x 11.4 x 8.9 cm

$700—1,000

147 BARNABUS ARNASUNGAAQ (1924-2017), ᐸᓇᐸᓯ ᐊᓇᓴᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ DREAMS OF MUSK OX stone 10.25 x 3.5 x 5.5 in — 26 x 8.9 x 14 cm

$1,000—1,500

94

Inuit Art Auction


148* THOMAS SIVURAQ (1941), ᑕᒪᓯ ᓯᕗᒐ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ MAN KNEELING stone, signed in syllabics 14 x 11 x 7 in — 35.6 x 27.9 x 17.8 cm

$1,000—1,500

149* BASIL APTANIK (1952-), ᐸᓯ ᑕᑕᓂ, BAKER LAKE / QAMANI’TUAQ POLAR BEAR ATTACKING A MAN AND MUSK OX stone, signed in syllabics 19 x 12 x 12 in — 48.3 x 30.5 x 30.5 cm

$1,000—1,500

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

95


Artist Index A Akeeaktashuk (1898-1954) E9-713……133 Alikaswa, Marc (1928-2008) E1-121……124 Aliktiluk, Eva Talooki (1927-1995) E1-175……126 Allukpik, John (b.1935) W2-398……120 Akesuk, Latcholassie (1919-2000) E7-1055)……19, 68, 98, 99 Amittu, Davidialuk Alasua (1910-1976) E9-824……30 Anghik, Abraham Apakark (b.1951) W3-1205……88 Anguhadluq, Luke (1895-1982) E2-294……48, 49, 50 Aptanik, Basil (b.1952) E2-503……149 Aqigaaq, Mathew (1940-2010) E2-350……54, 144 Arluk, George (b.1949) E3-1049……125 Arnasungaaw, Barnabus (1924-2017) E2-213……26, 27, 55, 56, 145, 146, 147 Ashevak, Johnniebo (1923-1972) E7-1034……112 Ashevak, Karoo (1940-1974) E4-196…75 Ashevak, Kenojuak (1927-2013) E7-1035……1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 42, 43, 44. 94, 103, 105, 106 Ashoona, Kaka (1928-1996) E7-1101……41, 67, 92, 93 Ashoona, Kiawak (1933-2014) E7-1103……40, 95, 96, 97 C Charlie, Inuk (b.1956) E4-735……33 E Ennutsiak (1896-1967) E7-603……37 Etidlooie, Sheojuk (1929-1999) E7-941……107 Etungat, Abraham (1911-1999) E7-809……18, 61, 62 Evaluardjuk, Henry (1923-2007) E5-846……34, 35, 57, 58, 59, 128 Eyetoaq, Ada (b.1934)…E2-352……24 I Ilisituk, Mark (1902-D) E9-1211……139 Ilisituk, Padli Uttuujaq (b.1931) E9-1212……138 Ipeelee, Osuitok (1923-2005) E7-1154……64, 65, 108, 109, 110 Ipeelie, Seepee (1940-2000) E7-511……129 Iquliq, Tuna (b.1935) E2-167……142, 143

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K Kavik, John (1897-1993) E2-290…23, 51, 52 Kiakshuk (1886-1966) E7-105……10, 39 Kigusiuq, Janet (1926-2005) E2-71……46 Killiktee, Shorty (1949-1993) E7-308……117, 118 Kudluk, Thomassie (1910-1989) E8-873……31 M Mikkigak, Qaunaq (b.1932) E7-1014……45 N Niviaxie (1909-1959) E7-107……102 Noah, William (b.1943) E2-391……86 Nutaraluk, Elizabeth (1914-1998) E1-445……20 O Oonark, Jessie (1906, 1985) E2-384……76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84 Oqutaq, Sheokjuk (1920-1982) E7-919……115, 116 Oopakak, Jacoposee (b.1948) E6-539……127 P Pangnark, John (1920-1980) E1-104……22, 122, 123 Parr (1893-1969) E7-1022……6, 9 Pootoogook, Kananginak (1935-2010) E7-1168……66 Pootoogook, Napatchie (1938-2002) E7-1104……7, 8 Pootoogook, Paulassie (1927-2006) E7-1176……111 Pov, Abraham (1927-1994) E9-884……134 Pudlat, Pudlo (1916-1992) E7-899……104

S Saila, Pauta (1916-2009) E7-990……36, 60 Saviakjuk, Elisapie Taqaq (1914-D) E9-1139……141 Shaa, Aqjangajuk (b.1937) E7-1065……63, 90, 91 Sheelaky (1902-1985) E7-1088……11 Shuqslak, Joseph (b.1958) E4-810……130 Sikkuark, Sick (1943-2013) W1-209……89 Sivuraq, Thomas (b.1941) E2-236……148 Smiler, Isa Aqiattusuk (1921-1986) E9-706……132 T Tiktaalaaq, Irene Avaalaaqiaq (b.1941) E2-423……85 Tiktak, Matee Atangak (1916—D) E1-267……136 Tularialik, Ruth Annaqtuusi (b.1934) E2-16……47 Tunnillie, Qavaroak (1928-1993) E7-929……113 Tutsweetok, Lucy Tasseor (1934-2012) E1-135…21, 121 U Ullulaq, Judas (1937-1999) E4-342……32, 38, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73 Ugyuk, Charlie (1931-1999) E4-341…74

Q Qiatsuk, Lukta (1928-2004) E7-1060……100, 101 Qiyuk, Miram Marealik (b.1933) E2-387……25, 53 R Ragee, Sakiasse (1924-2003) E7-1195……114

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

97


Inuit Art Online Auction MAY 26 - 31, 2018

JOHN LONG SR. LIDDED BASKET WITH WHALE TAIL KNOP 4 ins — 10.2 cms

JESSIE OONARK INUK WITH BIRDS 19.75 x 25.75 ins — 50.2 x 65.4 cms

MARK TUNGILIK, FAMILY COMPOSITION 2.5 ins — 6.4 cms

ARNAQU ASHEVAK, TOWN RAVENS 28 x 22 ins — 71.1 x 55.9 cms

ESTIMATE: $600—900

ESTIMATE: $300—500

ESTIMATE: $1,000—2,000

ESTIMATE: $400—600


MARION TUU’LUUQ, CARIBOU HUNTING IN THE SUMMERTIME 20 x 27.5 ins — 50.8 x 69.9 cms

GEORGE ARLUK, SPIRITS 8.25 ins — 21 cms

PUDLO PUDLAT, UNTITLED 18 x 24 ins — 45.7 x 61 cms

JOSEPH SHUQSLAK, BEAR SHAMAN 11.75 ins — 29.8 cms

ESTIMATE: $300—500

ESTIMATE: $600—900

CAIN IRQQARQSAQ, OWL 12.5 ins — 31.8 cms ESTIMATE: $900—1,200

ESTIMATE: $400—600

ESTIMATE: $600—900

BILL NASOGALUAK, POLAR BEAR 9 ins — 22.9 cms ESTIMATE: $500—700


Endnotes DRAWING ESSAY Jackson, Marion E. & Nasby, Judith M. Contemporary Inuit Drawings, McDonald Stewart Art Centre, Guelph, 1987 Blodgett, Jean. In Cape Dorset We Do It This Way, Three Decades of Inuit Printmaking, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, exhibition catalogue, 1992 Blodgett, Jean & Gustavison, Susan. “Strange Scenes, Early Cape Dorset Drawings”, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, 1993 LOT 80 & 81 JESSIE OONARK Blodgett, Jean and Bouchard, Marie. Jessie Oonark, A Retrospective, Winnipeg Art Gallery, 1986/1987. Inuit Art Foundation. “Flashback: Jessie Oonark”, Accessed April 5, 2018. http://iaq.inuitartfoundation. org/30-3-flashback-jessie-oonark/ Bouchard, Marie. Waddington’s, Inuit Art auction catalogue, November 2002, “Seams of Cultural Affirmation”, unpaginated. LOT 75: KAROO ASHEVAK Inuit Art Foundation. “Karoo Ashevak”. Accessed 4 April, 2018. https://iad.inuitartfoundation.org/artist/ Karoo-Ashevak/bio-citations Laugrand, Frederick B and Jarich G Oosten. Inuit Christianity and Shamanism: Transitions and Transformations in the Twentieth Century. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2010. Summary. Lutz, Maija. Hunters, Carvers and Collectors: The Chauncy C. Nash Collection of Inuit Art. Cambridge: Peabody Museum Press, Harvard University, 2012. Pg. 51 Gallpen, Britt. “From the Editor”. In Inuit Art Quarterly, Spring 2018: Bone. Toronto: Inuit Art Foundation, 2018. Winnipeg Art Gallery. “Karoo Ashevak”. Accessed 4 April 2018. http://wag.ca/art/collections/inuit-art/ display,collection/61098 The Canadian Encyclopedia. “Karoo Ashevak”. Historica Canada. Accessed 4 April 2018. http://www. thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/karoo-ashevak/ Katilvik.com. “Karoo Ashevak biography”. Waddington’s Art Auctioneers and Appraisers. Accessed 5 April 2018. http://www.katilvik.com/content/bio/view.php?bid=664&criteria=community&q=Spence%20Bay The Canadian Encyclopedia. “Inuit”. Historica Canada. Accessed 4 April, 2018. http://www. thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/inuit/

100 Inuit Art Auction


Conditions of Sale 1. All lots are sold “AS IS”. Any description issued by the auctioneer of an article to be sold is subject to variation to be posted or announced verbally in the auction room prior to the time of sale. While the auctioneer has endeavoured not to mislead in the description issued, and the utmost care is taken to ensure the correct cataloguing of each item, such descriptions are purely statements of opinion and are not intended to constitute a representation to the prospective purchasers and no warranty of the correctness of such description is made. An opportunity for inspection of each article is offered prior to the time of sale. No sale will be set aside on account of lack of correspondence of the article with its description or its reproduction, if any, whether colour or black & white. Some lots are of an age and/ or nature which preclude their being in pristine condition and some catalogue descriptions make reference to damage and/or restoration. The lack of such a reference does not imply that a lot is free from defects nor does any reference to certain defects imply the absence of others. Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition. It is the responsibility of prospective purchasers to inspect or have inspected each lot upon which they wish to bid, relying upon their own advisers, and to bid accordingly. 2. Each lot sold is subject to a 20% buyers premium as part of the purchase price.

Canadian Art Auction Invaluable Live! clients will be charged a buyer’s premium of 25% of the successful bid price of each lot. Concrete Contemporary Art Auction ARTSY clients will be charged a buyer’s premium of 25% of the successful bid price of each lot. 3. Unless exempted by law, the buyer is required to pay Harmonized Sales Tax on the total purchase price including the buyer’s premium. For international buyers, taxes are not applicable when purchases are shipped out of country. Items shipped out of Ontario, the buyer is required to pay taxes as per the tax status of that province, whether it HST or GST (Goods and Services Tax). 4. The auctioneer reserves the right to withdraw any lot from sale at any time, to divide any lot or to combine any two or more lots at his sole discretion, all without notice. 5. The auctioneer has the right to refuse any bid and to advance the bidding at his absolute discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right not to accept and not to reject any bid. Without limitation, any bid which is not commensurate with the value of the article offered, or which is merely a nominal or fractional advance over the previous bid may not be recognized. 6. Each lot may be subject to an unpublished reserve which may be changed at any time by agreement between the auctioneer and the consignor. The auctioneer may bid, or direct an employee to bid, on behalf of the consignor as agreed between them. In addition, the auctioneer may accept and submit absentee and telephone bids, to be executed by an employee of the auctioneer, pursuant to the instructions of prospective purchasers not in attendance at the sale. 7. The highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer for any lot shall be the buyer and such buyer shall forthwith assume full risk and responsibility for the lot and must comply with such other Conditions of Sale as may be applicable. If any dispute should arise between bidders the auctioneer shall have the absolute discretion to designate the buyer or, at his option, to withdraw any disputed lot from the sale,

or to re-offer it at the same or a subsequent sale. The auctioneer’s decision in all cases shall be final. 8. Immediately after the purchase of a lot, the buyer shall pay or undertake to the satisfaction of the auctioneer with respect to payment of the whole or any part of the purchase price requested by the auctioneer, failing which the auctioneer in his sole discretion may cancel the sale, with or without re-offering the item for sale. 9. The buyer shall pay for all lots within 48 hours from the date of the sale, after which a late charge of 2% per month on the total invoice may be incurred or the auctioneer, in his sole discretion, may cancel the sale. The buyer shall not become the owner of the lot until paid for in full. Items must be removed within 10 days from the date of sale, after which storage charges may be incurred. 10. Each lot purchased, unless the sale is cancelled as above, shall be held by the auctioneer at his premises or at a public warehouse at the sole risk of the buyer until fully paid for and taken away. 11. Notwithstanding condition no. 1, if the buyer, prior to removal of a lot, makes arrangements satisfactory to the auctioneer for the inspection of such lot by a fully qualified person acceptable to the auctioneer to determine the genuineness or authenticity of the lot, to be carried out promptly following the sale of the lot, and if, but only if, within a period of 14 days following the sale a written opinion of such person is presented to the auctioneer to the effect that the lot is not genuine or authentic, accompanied by a written request by the buyer for rescission of the sale, then the sale of the lot will be rescinded and the sale price refunded to the buyer. 12. Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), and VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000). 13. In the event of failure to pay for or remove articles within the aforementioned time limit, the auctioneer, without limitation of the rights of the consignor and the auctioneer against the buyer, may resell any of the articles affected, and in such case the original buyer shall be responsible to the auctioneer and the consignor for: (a) any deficiency in price between the re-sale amount and the amount to have been paid by the original buyer; (b) any reasonable charge by the auctioneer for the storage of such articles until payment and removal by the subsequent buyer; and (c) the amount of commission which the auctioneer would have earned had payment been made in full by the original buyer. 14. It is the responsibility of the buyer to make all arrangements for insuring, packing and removing the property purchased and any assistance by the auctioneer or his servants, agents or contractors, in packing or removal shall be rendered as a courtesy and without any liability to them. 15. The auctioneer acts solely as agent for the consignor and makes no representation as to any attribute of, title to, or restriction affecting the articles consigned for sale. Without limitation, the buyer understands that any item bought may be affected by the provisions of the Cultural Property Export Act (Canada). 16. The auctioneer reserves the right to refuse admission to the sale or to refuse to recognize any or all bids from any particular person or persons at any auction. TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018

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Buying at Waddington's

All lots will be offered and sold subject to the Conditions of Sale which appear in this catalogue as well as any Glossary and posted or oral announcement. By bidding at auction, bidders are bound by those Conditions and Glossary, as amended by any oral announcement or posted notices, which together form the contract of sale between the successful bidder (buyer), Waddington’s™ and the consignor (seller) of the lot. Descriptions or photographs of lots are not warranties and each lot is sold “as is” in accordance with the Conditions of Sale. condition of lots All of the items are to be considered, unless otherwise noted in the description, in good condition. The definition of “good” when used in reference to condition, describes an object as having had no major damage or repair but as with the nature of the material, may show minor surface wear, discolouration etc., which indicates the acceptable wear that the piece may acquire with age. If you are particular about minor flaws, you should examine the pieces in person or have our staff answer any questions before bidding. Sizes are approximate. It is the sole responsibility of the bidder to inquire as to the condition of a lot before bidding. Condition reports are available upon request by phone, fax, email or in person. You are advised to make any requests well in advance of the sale. Frames on artwork are not included as part of purchase or condition. buyers premium A premium of 20% of the successful bid price of each lot. Canadian Art Auction Invaluable Live! clients will be charged a buyer’s premium of 25% of the successful bid price of each lot. Concrete Contemporary Art Auction ARTSY clients will be charged a buyer’s premium of 25% of the successful bid price of each lot. A charge of 13% HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) is applicable on the hammer price and buyer’s premium, except for purchases exported from Canada. In the case where purchases are shipped out of the province of Ontario, the HST or GST is charged based on the tax status of that province. payment Payment for purchases must be by cash, INTERAC direct debit (Cdn clients in person only), certified cheque (U.S. & Overseas not applicable), travelers cheque, bank draft, electronic transfer (fee applies), VISA or Mastercard (up to $25,000).

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Inuit Art Auction

ALL PRICES IN CANADIAN FUNDS bidding To bid in person at the auction, you must register for a bidding number by showing identification acceptable to the Auctioneer upon entering the salesroom. Your number will identify you if you are the successful bidder. You will be responsible for all lots purchased on your bidding number. Banking information may be requested by Waddington’s™. You may submit an Absentee Bid Form if you are unable to attend the sale. Bidding by telephone, in limited circumstances, can be arranged prior to the sale. While we are pleased to offer absentee and telephone bidding as a service to our clients, and take great care in their commission, the Auctioneer will not be responsible for technical difficulties, errors or failure to execute bids. The Auctioneer may also execute bids on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve. The reserve is the confidential minimum price the seller is willing to accept for his or her property, below which it will not be sold. shipping The Auctioneers will not undertake packing or shipping. The purchaser must designate and arrange for the services of an independent shipper and be responsible for all shipping, insurance expenses and any necessary export permits that may apply. The Auctioneers will, upon request, provide names of professional packers and shippers but will not be held responsible for the service or have any liability for providing this information. Reliable pre-auction estimates of shipping costs of lots offered in this sale may be obtained from: PakShip 905.470.6874 / 905.470.6875 / 416.293.8225 taurus@pakship.ca www.pakship.ca Envoy 416.299.3367, 416.299.9750 ph@envoy.ca www.envoypackandship.com Fero Transport 514.453.1462, 514.543.7585 www.ferotransport.ca removal of purchases Purchases must be paid for within 48 hours of the date of the sale, and removed from premises within 10 days of the date of sale (see Conditions of Sale, conditions 8 to 15). Clients are advised that packing and/or handling of purchased lots by our employees or agents is undertaken solely as a courtesy for the convenience of clients.


Selling at Waddington’s waddington’s commission rates Items selling for $7,501 or more 10% Items selling for $2,501 to $7,500 15% Items selling for $251 to $2,500 20% Items selling for $250 or less 25% *There is a minimum handling charge of $20 per item canadian art department commission rates Items selling for $7,500 or more 10% Items selling for $2,501 to $7,499 15% Items selling for $2,500 or less 20% *There is a minimum handling charge of $20 per item

insurance A 1% insurance charge, based on the hammer price of the property, will be applied to all accounts. cites Restrictions exist regarding the import and export of species protected under CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species). This includes but is not limited to items made of or containing bone (whalebone etc.), ivory, tortoise shell, seal skin, rhinoceros horn and any other animal part and is strictly controlled or forbidden by most countries. Please review your country’s laws before bidding on pieces made of or containing these restricted items. It is the sole responsibility of the buyer to inquire about and obtain the proper permits for artwork purchased that may contain restricted materials, if such permit can be obtained. Please contact the department for further assistance. All Narwhal Tusks must have a Marine Harvest Number or a Marine and Mammal Transport number to be sold at Waddington’s. For more information please visit: www.cites.org

Paintings, drawings, prints, furniture, jewellery and all forms of decorative arts and collectibles may be brought to our Toronto office where we can provide you with preliminary auction estimates and consignment procedures. Please visit our website at www.waddingtons.ca for details on our various departments and how to contact the specialists. We also accept mailed and emailed requests for advice on the marketability of objects. A photograph and phone number must accompany a full description of each item. Our specialists regularly travel to major Canadian cities to meet with prospective consignors. For further information, or to arrange an appointment, please contact our Toronto office. Property normally arrives at Waddington’s at least three months before the sale in order to allow our specialists time to research, catalogue, photograph and promote the items. Consignors will receive a contract to sign, setting forth terms and fees for our services.

TUESDAY, MAY 29,

2018 103


Specialist Departments ASIAN ART

CONTEMPORARY ART

Austin Yuen

Stephen Ranger

416-847-6195

416-847-6194

ay@waddingtons.ca

skr@waddingtons.ca

Chih-En Chen Department Consultant cc@waddingtons.ca

FINE WINE & SPIRITS

Amelia Zhu

416-847-6194

416-847-6185

asianart@waddingtons.ca

Stephen Ranger

FINE PRINTS & PHOTOGRAPHY Kristin Vance Consignment Coordinator 416-847-6178 kv@waddingtons.ca

INUIT ART

skr@waddingtons.ca

Christa Ouimet

Joann Maplesden

co@waddingtons.ca

416-847-6184

416-847-6182

CANADIAN FINE ART

jmm@waddingtons.ca

Linda G. Rodeck canadianart@waddingtons.ca

Devin Hatfield

Anna Holmes Fine Art Administrator 416-504-5100

canadianart@waddingtons.ca Rochelle Konn Consignment Coordinator

416-847-6181

dh@waddingtons.ca

JEWELLERY, WATCHES & NUMISMATICS Don P. McLean 416-847-6170

dpm@waddingtons.ca INTERNATIONAL ART Susan Robertson 416-847-6179

sr@waddingtons.ca

416-847-6191

DECORATIVE ARTS Bill Kime Silver, Glass and Ceramics 416-847-6189

bk@waddingtons.ca Sean Quinn Sculpture, Decorations, Clocks & Lighting 416-847-6187

sq@waddingtons.ca Andrew Brandt Rugs & Carpets 416-847-6168

ab@waddingtons.ca Hayley Dawson Decorative Arts Administrator 416-504-9100 ext. 6220

“OFF THE WALL” FINE ART

hd@waddingtons.ca

Doug Payne 416-847-6180

dp@waddingtons.ca

rk@waddingtons.ca

Operational Staff PRESIDENT Duncan McLean 416-847-6183

adm@waddingtons.ca VICE PRESIDENT

DESIGN & PRODUCTION MANAGER

ONLINE AUCTION SUPPORT & ACCOUNTS

Julia Deo

Elda Pappada

416-847-6188

416-847-6177

jcd@waddingtons.ca

APPRAISALS & CONSIGNMENTS MANAGER Ellie Muir 416-847-6196

COMMUNICATIONS

em@waddingtons.ca

Tess McLean

CLIENT SERVICES

TECHNICAL SERVICES

Stephen Ranger skr@waddingtons.ca

Otto Lam ol@waddingtons.ca

VICE PRESIDENT OF FINE ART

Solomon Alaluf sa@waddingtons.ca

COLLINGWOOD

bbp@waddingtons.ca

Linda G. Rodeck canadianart@waddingtons.ca

PHOTOGRAPHER

Valerie Brown

Andrew Brandt

705-445-8811

416-847-6168

vb@waddingtons.ca

ab@waddingtons.ca

GENERAL MANAGER

416-847-6192

P.O. BOX 554 Collingwood ON L9Y 4B2

Alec Kerr

VANCOUVER

Nicole Schembre

Jacqui Dixon

ns@waddingtons.ca

416-847-6194

416-847-6171

tm@waddingtons.ca

Brittany Boyd-Pyman 416-847-6175

Duane Smith 416-847-6172

das@waddingtons.ca

John Macdonald jm@waddingtons.ca ACCOUNTS Karen Sander 416-847-6173

ks@waddingtons.ca

778-837-4588 jd@waddingtons.ca

416-847-6166

ak@waddingtons.ca 416-504-9100


Inuit Art Auction  
Inuit Art Auction