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Class Notes

Wabash Man’s Electric Car “Way Ahead of Its Time” CHARLES GEER MCCUTCHEN, Wabash Class of 1893, pioneered the electric car 100 years ago. Having first driven a car in 1903 and after working for American Gear and Manufacturing Company in Indianapolis, McCutchen founded and became president of Standard Electric Car Company of Jackson, MI, in 1911. Standard Electric sold both a closed coupe called the Model M and an open roadster (in photo) called the Runabout. The cars could go 110 miles between charges (that range is better than most electric cars sold today) at speeds up to 30 MPH. Looking back at the history of cars in an article five years ago, the New York Times said that McCutchen’s Standard Electric “would put many of today’s electric car concepts to shame.” Unfortunately, the car did not outsell gasoline automobiles. Standard Electric’s cars sold for $1,850, nearly three times more than Henry Ford’s Model T. With the invention of the electric ignition in 1912, gasoline automobiles no longer needed to be cranked by hand to start, and McCutchen’s company experienced increasing financial difficulties. In November 1914 it wound down its operations after producing fewer than 400 cars, although McCutchen continued to work in the auto industry and held patents on igniters and motor trucks. Shown is the only surviving Standard Electric known, part of the LeMay Family Collection at Marymount in Tacoma, WA.

—Contributed by Art Howe ’83

in AIA Indianapolis for several years. He is principal, chief architect, and chairman of the board of Rowland Design in Indianapolis.

87 B. Allen Schulz reports, “My latest musical composition was premiered in May in NYC. I also organized and am running a fairly large new music festival [Queens New Music Festival] here in the city, which is getting some great press coverage.” Find out more about Allen’s music at his Web site www.allenschulz.net

89 Terry Hamilton was appointed president of St. John Macomb-Oakland Hospitals in Warren and Madison Heights, MI. Terry joined St. John Providence Health in 2007 and has been the interim president of St. John Macomb-Oakland since December. Chris Bojrab was featured in an April 27th article in the Indianapolis Star describing magnetic therapy for treating depression. The article described how

transcranial magentic stimulation (TMS) works to correct a chemical deficit in the brain. Chris has been using the therapy for TMS success fully for two years.

and sought advice from former governors’ counsels, including David. David is a partner and chairman of the Environmental Law Group of Bose McKinney & Evans LLP in Indianapolis.

91 Indiana State Senator Randy Head was

92 Mark Lapierre was named the assistant

recently named “Legislator of the Year” by the Indiana Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) in honor of his support of public safety and tougher criminal sentences in Indiana. Randy, an attorney, was elected to the Indiana State Senate in 2008 and currently resides in Logansport, IN. David Pippen was selected to participate in the Indiana Law Review Symposium, “Reflecting on 40 Years of Merit Selection.” He served as one of four panelists at the April event at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. Marion Superior Court Judge Tim Oakes ’86 moderated the panel discussion, “Should Indiana Merit Selection Be Trumpeted, Tweaked, or Trashed?”

men and women’s tennis coach at Guilford College in Greensboro, NC. Mark is a local veterinarian at the Northeast Veterinary Hospital in Greensboro and is making his college coaching career debut. Mark and his wife, Ellen, have two children, Sophie and Ryan.

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David Waldman is operations director and co-founder of the Triton Brewing Company, which was recently listed among the few children-friendly pub-type venues in Indianapolis for being “smoke-free, familyoriented, and dog-friendly.” Triton makes itself kid-friendly by offering root beer and root beer floats for kids when they visit the brewery with Spring 2012

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Wabash Magazine  

The Journal of Wabash College

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