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Victor Valley College

RamPage March 20, 2009 · Vol. 27, No. 2

Fame isn’t all just free beer and late mornings. There’s some whiskey in there that’s free, too. ~ Keith Buckley

‘Justice’ People Heart of Program Story and Photo By Bill Buttler Editor-In-Chief While job availability in many fields has slowed and increased technological and economic factors narrow the entrance into others, Victor Valley College’s Administration of Justice program offers students preparation for a variety of careers that are not only satisfying and in high demand, but those jobs survive economic turbulence. Stressed in the program are physical training, selfdefense, discipline, as well as classroom study. Some of the instrumental drivers of the VVC program spoke recently about its success and promise. Department Chair Ron Fields expressed pride in the training and is pleased to have support of VVC President Dr. Robert Silverman. “During tough economic times, jobs in the areas for which we prepare students are not going to disappear. Our students get a wellrounded experience to ready them for a wide range justice system careers,” Fields said. Associate Professor of Administration of Justice Michael Visser is a retired assistant police chief, who has served 34 years as a peace officer. With his California

State Teacher Credential, he also has a Master of Public Education Degree, a Bachelors Degree in Sociology and Associate Degree in Administrative Justice. Visser has a sixth-degree black belt in Shorin Ryu Karate and has served in many capacities of law enforcement, including SWAT command. He is a graduate of FBI National Academy and FBI Southwest Command College. Visser wants the community to know about the many jobs available to those who complete the VVC program. “Law enforcement, crime scene investigation (CSI), probation, forensics, communications and corrections careers are just a few that can start here at our own community college. Many of these jobs can be had at federal, state, county and city levels,” said Visser. Assistant Warden of Programs Felicia Carter works at Desert View Modified Community Corrections Facility in the high desert. “The program at VVC will open doors to a world of opportunities,” said Carter. She is a graduate of the VVC Administration of Justice program and has earned a Bachelors Degree in Corrections. Carter is pursuing a masters degree and is working on a violence

prevention program for the corrections system. “I particularly love the rehabilitation aspect of my job. Helping make changes for the better in lives is very rewarding.” Her belief that ‘students come first’ is a cornerstone of her love of teaching and mentoring. “I have gift of identifying potential in students. I have a 19-yr old sergeant who already displays excellent leadership skills,” she said. Desert View Modified Community Corrections Facility Warden Charles McBurney maintains a strong affiliation with the college’s program. With 29 years working in corrections, McBurney is a committed,

active administrator, who frequently visits classes and speaks to the students. “These people are potential recruits, importantly involved with keeping the community safe, so I hold them to high standards. I learn quite a bit from the cadets, too,” said McBurney. He points to a former warden of high desert corrections, who is now a member of the VVC board of trustees, Angela Valles, as a good friend and proponent of the AJ program at the college. Information about classes that comprise the Administration of Justice Program can be found in the VVC schedule of classes.

Warden Charles McBurney (on right) reviews administration of justice students.


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O’Hearn Applauds College Innovations Story By Kathleen Allen Managing/Online Editor/Board Secretary Dr. Christopher O’Hearn is the deputy superintendent of instruction and came to VVC from Mount San Antonio College in Walnut. He really likes the change, enjoys the offerings of the slower pace in the Victor Valley community and the challenges faced by everyone in the high desert. The things O’Hearn does not deal with on campus are buildings, grounds and money. Anything that deals with student instruction is under his control. When asked what accreditation means to the student in layman terms, O’Hearn said, “The credit received for the classes taken at VVC means something. Without accredi-

tation students would not be able to transfer the credits from VVC and the credits taken here would not help them get any degree.” Next to O’Hearn’s office is the former location of the switchboard and mailroom. He said he is pleased that area is now being staged to house a transfer center. Recruiters will meet with students in that area, and there will be a counselor available to give information and help students with transfer decisions. Positioning across from the career center places the transfer center in a strategic location for students interested in researching their future possibilities. O’Hearn is impressed with the enormous experience of all the recently hired personnel and feels they see and appreciate the leadership and vision of Silverman.

“President Silverman has an interest in a one-stop center for student services as most institutions are doing,” said O’Hearn. The primary reason is the pragmatic need to better serve students, and as these

dents and fewer jobs being offered. That means more students are looking for retraining in emerging fields and staying until completion of those studies,” said O’Hearn. “Winter intersession was

“I feel fantastic things are happening with this institution,” said O’Hearn. services are housed in one place, the current locations can become classrooms. VVC is discussing introduction of instruction in emerging technologies of our geographic interests, including air, rail and green technology. “The college needs to offer a significant means of growth for the community due to the influx of new stu-

down by 50 percent of the sections offered and was specifically designed that way to keep the current funding under the cap. This allows providing services without state reimbursement. The winter and summer sessions have to balance out the course offerings for payment from the state,” said O’Hearn.

Planetarium Shows Out of this World Story By Kathleen Allen Managing /Online Editor, Board Secretary The Victor Valley College Planetarium opened in 1996 and is a non-profit entity supported by the VVC Foundation. The planetarium depends on volunteers and financial donors to continue making the shows available to the high desert community. Daytime programs are available for groups or classes. Reservations can be arranged by calling Director Dave Meyer at extension 2324. Doors open for seating at

6:30 p.m. for all shows, which start Fridays at 7 p.m. sharp. Doors remain shut until the show ends for safety and liability reasons, so latecomers will not be admitted. The planetarium seating capacity is 50, and reservations are accepted for family groups of at least six. Prices range from two to four dollars. Three shows remain during spring semester. • April 3, a 33-minute program follows the progress of the Magellan radar-mapping mission to Venus. • April 17, a 33-minute program focused on problems with the Hubble Space

lege, and VVC has a great Telescope. planetarium. I’m always May 1, a 40-minute learning something new. The program concerns the more answers I get, the more fascination humans have questions I want to ask,” said always had with Mars, Javier Franco. narrated by Patrick For more information call Stewart. (760) 245-4271 extension There are enthralling im2324. ages included in each program, and opportunities to view the night sky by telescope exist following each production, weather permitting. VVC student Javier Franco is stoked about the planetarium. “I’m currently taking Astronomy, and I’ll have to say that it is my Student Javier Franco loves astronomy. favorite class. This is Photo by Bill Buttler. my first year in col•


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Extended Opportunity Program and Services Assists VVC Students Story and Photos By Bill Buttler Editor-In-Chief Prospective students who think personal obstacles make it impossible or difficult to attend college have a team of dedicated people in their corner ready to help. They can provide tools to remove roadblocks and smooth the path to learning. They are the Extended Opportunity Program and Services (E.O.P.S.), and they are right here on campus.

credential. E.O.P.S. offers priority registration, individual counseling and academic assistance, peer assist and advising, book vouchers, tutorial services and scholarships. With EOPS, students learn balance According to E.O.P.S. Specialist Ms Audrey Williams, E.O.P.S. opens doors for non -traditional college students to earn their college credential. E.O.P.S. offers priority registration, individualized counseling and academic assistance, peer assistance

and referrals. Help is available to locate community services, such as family services and women’s special services. For information concerning E.O.P.S. Student worker Lameka Kendle, staff member Audrey at VVC, con- Williams, student worker Jessica Vera, and staff member tact Ms Aud- LaDonna Huggins are ready to assist people in EOPS. rey Williams, E.O.P.S. Specialist at (760) 245-4271, ext. 2438

VVC: Health Classes, No Clinic Story By Kathleen Allen Managing/Online Editor/Board Secretary

fied. The cost of liability and insurance were the major reasons for not trying to do it again, but the idea remains in the talking stages. This is an administration and governing board decision. If there is a health concern on campus, the recommendation is to call 911 or go to the hospital. Basically attending school at VVC is a ‘come at your own risk’ decision for students.

Patricia Luther is an RN and the dean of Health Sciences and Public Safety. “VVC did have a health clinic where the police department is now located, funded by Dr. Prem Reddy. Physicians Assistants were on duty, but it wasn’t utilized enough by Dean Patricia Luther Photos by Bill Buttler students to be “There cost-effective and closed, I is always an RN on campus. believe, in the late 1990’s,” We can stop bleeding, take she said. blood pressure and advise The former Vice President students on what to do. It is of VVC did some checking best to call campus police on restoring a health departfirst. We are teaching student ment for students, but deternurses here, but their training mined the cost wasn’t justiis to prepare them for work-

ing in a hospital, not a clinical setting. We do not have any of the equipment needed to care for injuries, such as x-ray machines,” Luther said. Luther has been at VVC VVC EMTs practice on “Anatomical Annie” 19 years. She came from Imperial Valley pation by students. In 2008 College which is a very the nursing department resmall college. They did have ceived an award from San a clinic that dealt with light Bernardino and Riverside health concerns such as birth Counties for their outcontrol medicines, std’s and standing performance as a headaches. “It would be donor group. great if we could have a It has been brought to the health center here. Very attention of the nursing degood,” said Luther. She is partment that more of the not an ‘active’ advocate for faculty would use those serhealth care facilities at VVC. vices if they were not closed As a leadership project, the during normal lunch hours. senior nursing students hanThat is under discussion, and dle the blood mobile and maybe it will be different health screenings that are when offered again, probably done on campus. These proin October. jects require a lot of partici-


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Parking Only Perceived as Problem to build a multi-level parking structure have ever been considered, Hylton says no. “Multi-level parking structures are extremely expenWhile parking space sive to build, and they take availability is reaching critiup too much space. It would cal mass on upper campus, not be cost effective. The parking on lower campus is school wouldn’t generate still readily available. While enough parking-related revethe upper campus parking nue to justify building such a situation might stem from the structure,” said Hylton. recent spike in Victor Valley Regarding citations for College enrollment, Chris parking violations, VVC Hylton, director of maintePolice Chief Jon D. Schorle nance and operations, says says he has not overseen an that the issue increase in the also lies with number of p a r k i n g citations given spaces not out, but inbeing where stead has purpeople want posefully them to be. "backed off in “There’s light of stuplenty of dents' probparking on Lot 20 by the elevator has ample space. lems (with campus,” said parking)," as Schorle said in Hylton. Hylton says the a March 18, 2009 interview. parking lots on the lower "You have to find a balance campus are often only onebetween hard-line enforcethird full. ment and the acknowledgWhen asked if any plans ment that there are other issues contributing to the prob-

Story and Photos By Evan Spears Features/Photo Editor

Lot 16 next to the portables is virtually empty. lem," said Schorle. While parking in the dirt areas adjacent to the paved parking lots is frowned upon in his department, Schorle says that if a parking placard is clearly displayed in a vehicle on those lots the infraction will be overseen. "A simple solution for alleviating parking issues is educating the public. There is ample parking on lower campus, and with the nearby elevator, it's not a longer

walk from there to anywhere else on campus. Also, I'm a big fan of carpooling and ridesharing." Christopher O'Hearn, Deputy Superintendent of Instruction, is also concerned about the parking and flow of traffic. "Parking is atrocious and with the unidentifiable flow of traffic, it's a wonder we don't have accidents every day," said O'Hearn.

Writing Contest Deadline Fast Approaching Story by Aaron Bañuelos Sports/Video Editor Once again, it’s time for the Victor Valley College writing contest. Submissions must be in by Friday, March 27. Categories include poems, essays, personal narratives, short stories, shortshorts or artwork submitted to compete for cash prizes. Three grand prizes will be given winners in each of the writing categories, and two additional prizes will reward those judged best in the artwork category.

It is easy to enter, and eligible entrants must be current students of VVC. All written entries must be typed, double-spaced, with the exception of poetry, and in 12-point font. Students can submit up to five entries. Entrants are not to place their names on the actual work submitted. Each submission must have a cover sheet indicating category of entry, title of work submitted, applicant’s name, address, student ID number and telephone number to be eligible for judging. As with any contest, entrants should not contact

judges, and judging won’t begin until close of the contest. Winners will be announced, and winning entries will be published in a magazine. No literary entries will be returned, and art work will be held until May 15. The magazine may be purchased at the book store for fifty cents. Entries can be emailed to adellt@vvc.edu or by hand at Tim Adell’s office in the Advanced Technology Center, building 21, room 140. Tim Adell can answer questions at 245-4271, extension 2691.

WHAT’S THE MATTER? VENT!! TELL US!! AIR YOUR COMPLAINTS! MUST BE VVC AFFILIATED INDICATE AGE AND GENDER

vvcramitout@yahoo.com


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Victor Valley College

March 20, 2009

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Button Batteries Can Be Very Dangerous Story By Kathleen Allen Managing/Online Editor/Board Secretary CBS News reported that there were more than 4,000 emergency calls last year due to button batteries. The cover story was about a toddler who almost died because she swallowed a button battery out of a remote control unit. The battery compartments open too easily and toddlers can get the batteries out. These batteries are about the size of a nickel. Children think they’re candy and put them in their mouths. This little girl had to have

emergency surgery and is still going through treatments. The battery lodged in her throat, began corroding, and did enough damage to the esophagus that the little girl will have to have several more surgeries. Thankfully, she is still alive. When batteries get wet they corrode and release electrical charges. When placed in a glass of water, a battery begins corroding within three hours. When the natural body fluids are secreted, they contain acids not present in water. One can check remote controls, children's toys and anything else that uses button batteries. If the battery is small enough to swallow but large enough to get stuck in the

throat, try to secure the battery compartment with a screw or key. If it is impossible to secure, keeping it out of a child’s reach may be the way to prevent a tragic mishap from occurring.

VISIT MySpace.com/vvcrampage


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Victor Valley College

March 20, 2009

The Apple Valley Kennel Club hosted a dog show on the lower campus March 7 and 8. People came from all over to attend, and the lower campus was filled with tents and recreational vehicles. Although all first place winners were champion dogs (Ch), the show had non-champion dogs take second and third place in the Toy Group and fourth place in the Non-Sporting Group. Best-In-Show went to (Ch) Coventry Vanity Fair (Carly) and according to Wyndstar Kennels website, this Pembroke Welsh Corgi has 41 "Best In Show" titles under her coat. Listed by group, breed and name - first place winners for this show were: •

Sporting Group: Weimaraner, Ch Smokycity Silhouette Dbl Ur Pleasure

Hound Group, Saluki, Ch Srinagar Glory Halelujah Ladyhawk

Working Group, Bullmastiff, Ch Escalades All Tricked Out

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Terrier Group, Fox Terrier - Wir Maximo

Toy Group, Chihuahua - Long, C ing With The Stars

Non-Sporting Group, Dalmatian Angel Sabrina

VVC Campus Gone To T Dogs


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Victor Valley College

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e, Ch Kathrich

Ch Jocal Danc-

, Ch Xanadu’s

s The

Story and Photos by Tony and Taylor Resendez Guest Contributors


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WORD SEARCH PUZZLE

ALSTROEMERIA AMARYLLIS ANTHURIUM ASTER BABY'S BREATH BELL FLOWER BIRD OF PARADISE BOUVARDIA CALLA CARNATION CHRYSANTHEMUM CLEMATIS CORNFLOWER DAFFODIL

DAISY DELPHINIUM FORGET-ME-NOT FOXGLOVE FREESIA FUCHSIA GERANIUM GERBERA GINGER GLADIOLUS GOLDEN ROD HEATHER HOLLYHOCKS HYACINTH HYDRANGEA IRIS

LAVENDER LILAC LILY LISIANTHUS MARIGOLD ORCHID PANSY PEONY PETUNIA ROSE SNAPDRAGON STATICE STOCK SUNFLOWER TULIP VIOLET

Find and circle all of the flowers that are hidden in the grid. The remaining letters spell a secret message - a quotation from Romeo and Juliet.


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Victor Valley College

March 20, 2009

SUDOKU 2 4 3 8 6 5 8

7 4

4

1 7

5 2

1 3

8 6 7

5 4 9 2 1 Courtesy of KrazyDad.com

YAHOO’S TOP TEN MOVIES

Billboard’s Top Ten SINGLES

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Taken

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Underworld: Rise of the Lycans

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Tyler Perry’s Madea Goes To Jail

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Uninvited

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Pink Panther 2

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Race To Witch Mountain

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Confessions Of A

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Flo Rida—Right Round

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Taylor Swift—Fearless

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T.I.—Dead and Gone

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Lamb of God—Wrath

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Lady GaGa—Poker Face

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Soulja Boy Tell ‘Em—Kiss Me Thru The Phone

Jonas Brothers—Music From The 3D Concert Experience

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The All-American Rejects— Gives You Hell

A.R. Rahman—Slumdog Millionaire

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Nickelback—Dark Horse

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Kanye West—Heartless

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7.

Lady GaGa—Just Dance

Beyoncé—I Am … Sasha Fierce

8.

Eminem, Dr. Dre and 50 Cent—Crack A Bottle

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Lady GaGa—The Fame

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The Fray—The Fray

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Jamie Foxx—Intuition

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Shopaholic 10. Fired Up!

ALBUMS

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Taylor Swift—Love Story

10. Kelly Clarkson—My Life Would Suck Without You

10. Kanye West—808’s & Heartbreak

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Victor Valley College

March 20, 2009

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Ex-Raider Supports Children’s Miracle Network In 1972, Branch was was such a big time Cowboy drafted in the fourth round fan why he was dressed in all and 98th player to be seblack and grey. Branch said, lected overall. When asked “Even your shoes are white about his favorite memory in and black.” A charity event benefiting his career, “The happiest “I live and die with the Children’s Miracle Network moment was being Raiders,” said Branch when held at the Victordrafted by the Raidasked who his favorite team ville Wal-Mart was ers, knowing that I was now that he was retired. boosted by the preswas going to be a “John was a players coach. ence of super bowl pro playing for the He only had three rules. Be winning receiver NFL,” said Branch. on time for work, pay attenCliff Branch. Branch had a very tion at practice, and go like Branch signed successful 15-year never before on Sundays,” autographs and had career from then on, said Branch when rememberpictures taken with going on to be alling his time working for fans to raise money pro four times and Coach John Madden. He for children’s hospiall pro-bowl four added, “Time working with tals across the natimes. Branch and Al Davis was great too betion, something that the Raiders won cause he is an innovator and Branch has been Branch signing autograph for a fan while fans wife took a picture. three super bowls in his legacy should speak for doing since his reeight years starting itself.” tirement in 1988. in 1977. history that all top-threeThe controversial Davis Branch was All-American Most of Branch’s successranked teams came from the has won Coach of the year at the University of Colorado ful career same conference. awards and and was All-Conference. His was due to according to an amazing Branch is quarterback well loved - to-receiver by all forchemistry mer players. he and Jim There is Plunkett nothing displayed Branch reon Sundays. grets in his Branch was wearing his Superbowl ring. T h i s 15-year pro amazing career and being nominated duo tied an NFL record that to the Hall of Fame since can never be broken by hav1992 for 17 years straight. ing a 99 yard pass play in a He enjoys his time with 1983 game vs. the Redskins. fans and it gives him joy Branch was joking around being able to help raise with one fan who asked him money for the Children’s if he had any Dallas CowMiracle Network. boys memorabilia to sign and answered by asking him if he

Story and Photos by Aaron Bañuelos Sports/Video Editor

school ranked third in the nation in 1971. That year Nebraska was ranked first and Oklahoma was ranked second. This was the only time in


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March 20, 2009

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Cartoon By Evan Spears Features/Photo Editor

RAMPAGE STAFF Editor-in-Chief: Bill Buttler Managing Editor/Online Editor/Board Secretary: Kathleen Allen Sports Editor/Video Editor: Aaron Bañuelos Features Editor/Photo Editor: Evan Spears Adviser/Instructor: Judith Pfeffer Administration/Faculty/Staff Mentors: Patty Golder, Bev Huiner, Scott Mulligan, Deanna Murphy, Christopher O’Hearn, Robert Sewell, Shirley Snell-Gonzalez, Robert Silverman, P.J. Teel, Paul Williams Printing: Victor Valley College Campus Print Shop

CONTACT INFORMATION VVC RamPage, 18422 Bear Valley Road, Victorville, CA 92392 Phone: (760) 245-4271 Extension 2773 • Fax: (760) 241-5723 Email: VVCRamPage@hotmail.com or email Judith Pfeffer via GroupWise

Website: http://www.vvc.edu/offices/rampage http://www.myspace.com/VVCRampage

GENERAL INFORMATION The RamPage is a newspaper published as an educational exercise and First Amendment Public Forum by students at Victor Valley College in Victorville, Calif. Issues come out approximately twice a month in the two full-length semesters, generally each February, March, April, May, September, October, November and December, for a total of 14 issues each calendar year. The views expressed by the RamPage are not necessarily those of VVC, its board of trustees, its administration, its faculty, its staff, its Associated Student Body Council or its students. The RamPage welcomes press releases, story ideas, letters to the editor, guest articles and guest editorials. Submit proposed items to the on-campus mailbox of RamPage Adviser Judith Pfeffer — clearly marked as being submitted for publication. Or, email them to VVCRamPage@hotmail.com or mail information to RamPage, Victor Valley College, 18422 Bear Valley Road, Victorville, CA 92395 or leave a message at 760-245-4271 extension 2773. ADVERTISING The RamPage generally accepts as advertising only 8 1/2 - by -11-inch flyers as inserts. The cost is $100, which covers insertion/distribution of 1,500 copies. The cost and responsibility of designing, reproducing and delivering the 1,500 flyers to the RamPage is borne by the advertiser. To discuss display advertising options or to purchase any form of advertisement, call Assistant Director of Auxiliary Services Deanna Murphy at 760-245-4271 extension 2707. Acceptance of any advertisement in the RamPage does not constitute endorsement by the paper, college, district, board, council or student body.

The RamPage reserves the right to reject any material — advertising or editorial — that it deems to be not in keeping with the standards of the paper.


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Victor Valley College

March 20, 2009

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VVC RamPage Vol. 27 Issue 2  

Vol. 27 Issue 2

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