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#885 / OCT 04 – OCT 10, 2012 VUEWEEKLY.COM

FILM: EIFF!

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LISTINGS: EVENTS /10 FILM /15 ARTS /20 MUSIC /40 CLASSIFIEDS: GENERAL /43 ADULT /44 ISSUE: 885 OCT 4 – OCT 10, 2012

FRONT /8

FILM /12 ARTS /17 DISH /21 MUSIC /40

Fall Style

Give thanks for the season's most wicked-fresh looks.

26 9 17 33

"Let's be honest here: children always get killed in air strikes." "It's not about being perfect, it's not about hiding anything. It's about showing everything." "I played air guitar to Ten when I was 11 years old, and now Eddie Vedder's on stage, playing with me."

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UP FRONT 7


UP FRONT VUEPOINT

REBECCA MEDEL

// REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Charges waylaid If a person has committed numerous crimes, serving time for one of the crimes should not cover all other offences they have committed. But this seems to be the way the case concerning Canadian pedophile Christopher Paul Neil is being handled now that he is back on Canadian soil. Neil was arrested in Thailand in October 2007 for sexually abusing a 13-year-old boy and his nine-year-old brother after a swirled image of his face in over 200 photos posted on the Internet of him sexually abusing boys was deciphered by German computer experts, sending Interpol on a manhunt. Neil fled his job teaching English in South Korea for Thailand where he was arrested, charged and kept in a Thai prison for five years. When Neil entered the Vancouver airport on September 28, he was again arrested as RCMP considered him a risk to the public. His court hearing on October 1 to determine the conditions of his return to Canada was postponed for two days, but an RCMP spokesman had said previously they had no plans to reccomend Neil be charged on counts of sextourism because he had already served a fiveyear sentence in Thailand for the same thing. However, Neil is accused of at least 12 counts of sexually abusing boys in both Cambodia and Vietnam in addition to the Thai charges he did prison time for. There is a warrant for his arrest in Cambodia. T.M. Hoy, an American who spent five

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years in a Thai prison before being transferred to an American prison, writes in his blog that "a US State Department study found that every year spent in a Thai prison is equivalent (in damage done to body and mind) to five years in a standard US prison," but that he also found the Thai prison far less violent than American prison as it's not so centred on domination and control. Hoy spent time in prison for failing to report a murder and his insights are interesting in pointing out some of the differences in prison structure in different cultures. But regardless if Thai prison is a little tougher on the body and mind than western lockups, it should not be a factor in Neil's release in Canada. He didn't even complete his full sentence in Thailand, which was supposed to be three years (originally six but cut in half because he pleaded guilty) with an additional six years for molesting the second boy, plus a fine of $1780. Not completing a full prison sentence is a pretty standard procedure in Canada too, but this man destroyed the lives of young boys and men and exploited them even further by posting images of the abuse online for anyone to see. He has not been charged for the crimes he committed in Cambodia and Vietnam and no amount of time in a Thai prison should nullify those acts. V

Alberta's beef recall of meat manufactured at the XL Food plant in Brooks on the dates of August 24, 27, 28, 29 and September 5, 2012 has many questioning the government's meat safety priorities and the possibility that the industry may be regulating itself, but the Conservatives counter that they have brought in 170 regulators specifically for the meat industry since 2006. Official Opposition Critic for Public Works and Government Services, Linda Duncan, said, "With lives, jobs and a critical agriculture sector at risk, this government needs to step up to the plate and get serious about

an inspection regime that prevents such devastating impacts." The first recall of meat in Canada was on September 16—days after the US stopped importing from XL Foods in Brooks—and over a week later the licence of XL was suspended. Of the 10 cases of reported E. coli in Alberta, the four in Edmonton have been linked to meat from XL and a class-action lawsuit has been filed. XL slaughters almost a third of Canada's beef— up to 5000 cattle daily—and the beef is sold across the country.

FOREIGN INVESTMENT WOES Canada's policies on the environment and energy could lose some weight if a bilateral investment treaty between Canada and China goes through. The Canada-China Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement (FIPA) was made public on September 26 and the Council of Canadians is calling on MPs to reject it. "Canadians need a chance to review the risks in this treaty before it's ratified by Parliament," says Maude Barlow, national chairperson of the Council of Canadians. "This should not be a rush job, especially as Canada considers opening up its energy sector

ABORTION DEBATE CONTINUES Even though the motion to re-open the debate about when human life begins (M-312) was defeated 203-91 on September 26 in the House of Commons, Conservative MP Stephen Woodworth—who put forth the private members bill—says he will continue to put pressure on the goverment to take another look at abortion laws. Subsection 223(1) of the Criminal Code of Canada states that a child becomes a human being only when he /she has emerged from his/her mother. Wood-

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REBECCA MEDEL

// REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

to Chinese investment." In essence, Barlow says, allowing foreign investors to buy up Canadian energy firms gives these firms the power "to sue the federal government when delays or environmental protection measures interfere with profits." This could mean hundreds of millions of dollars in payouts, as Canada is number six in the lineup of countries most sued in investor versus state disputes and owes, or has paid more than $200 million for NAFTA lawsuits over the years, according to the Council of Canadians.

worth now plans a cross country speaking tour. Eighty-seven Conservative MPs voted in favour of M-312 and four Liberals. Ten of 13 Saskatchewan MP's voted in favour as well as 19 of 27 Alberta MPs. Status of Women Minister Rona Ambrose's vote for M-312 caused public outcry and there is a petition circulating for her to step down from her position.


NEWS // MENTAL ILLNESS

No plain white tees here Nervosa Clothing puts a new twist on mental illness

H

ow much power does a T-shirt wield? Nervosa Clothing designer Elizabeth Colette hopes it's enough to change perceptions about mental illness. Colette, who has lived with her own mental illness from a young age, decided to combine her design experience with a message she believes in: that mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of. She's created a line of T-shirts for men and women with slogans and graphics depicting some of these illnesses in an interesting way as both a conversation starter and because she loves bold, graphic fashion. "I wanted to be an advocate, but I wasn't sure if I wanted to come out about my own illness. I wasn't sure if I was going to be a personal advocate. I thought I would end up doing it more through the label, but then I ended up sharing more about myself," she explains. And sharing more about herself on Nervosa's website (nervosaclothing. com) might just have been the golden ticket people needed to feel a connection to this line. One year in—Nervosa officially launched last November— the T-shirts are selling in two Edmonton shops (Redemption; Mars and Venus), Toronto, Arizona and online. Colette says she wants people to be

Mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of. Elizabeth Colette models a shirt she desgined. // Digital Cool

educated and to make the idea of being mentally ill commonplace and not such an uncomfortable topic. "It'd be nice if people didn't use terms like psycho or schizo or 'I like my house clean, therefore I have OCD,'" she says, referring to the way we often throw these terms around. "For people who don't know a term for an illness, or if you don't understand it and you haven't experienced it first-hand, don't talk about it. The effects of it are huge. People commit suicide over those things." When mental illnesses are made fun of, Colette says those who live with them feel more stigmatized and ashamed to come forward. She struggled with this herself and wants her T-shirts to be a starting point for breaking the ice on this issue. "I felt like I had this secret and I couldn't tell anyone because they were going to judge me. And it's a part of me. I should be able to talk about it. Why should I have to hide this for others' comfort or because I don't want people to say, 'You don't need medication. You just need to try harder,'" she says. Most of the responses to the T-shirt line have been positive with the odd negative comment where someone

says she is exploiting mental illness to make a quick buck. "They obviously don't understand the fashion industry. Quick buck? Fashion? They don't go together. I'm not exploiting it; it's me. It's me putting it out there," Colette says, a little annoyed at the ignorance. She says she realized after the first batch of T-shirts came out last year that she has to expand a bit beyond her personal style and not just aim for the younger crowd. "Mental illness doesn't only affect tattooed, pierced youth." Different styles are in the works and for now the newest addition is a line of panties with Marilyn Monroe's face printed on them and her famous quote, 'Madness is genius.' "She herself was mentally ill and actually taken to a psych ward in the arms of orderlies and that's back when they did lobotomies," Colette adds. Nervosa Clothing is a brand for everyone, not just those who relate to the illness depicted on a certain shirt. Colette says her dream is for her clothing line to have reached enough people that she hears feedback that there's been a change in society's perception about mental illness. Wearing a T-shirt shows your support. REBECCA MEDEL

// REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

COMMENT >> DRONE ATTACKS

Double tap assassins

Only two percent of those killed by US drones are intended targets "Double tap" is what mobsters do Human Rights and Conflict Resoluwhen they put somebody down. One tion Clinic and New York University bullet in the heart, one in the head. School of Law's Global Justice Clinic That way they stay down. It's practihave just released a report, based on cally standard operating procedure nine months of research and 130 inamong hitmen. terviews, which concludes that barely Then there's a different, nastier kind two percent of the victims of US of "double tap." Suppose you live in drone strikes were known militants. some hill village in western Pakistan, That's not to say that everybody else and one of the families nearby has a killed or injured was an innocent civilboy fighting with the Taliban who has ian, but these are definitely not "surgicome home for a visit, bringing sevcal" strikes. eral friends with him. It's worrisome, The best estimate of the number of because you are always hearing people killed in US drone strikes American drones overhead— over the past eight years and sure enough, one day comes from the Bureau of there is a terrifying exploInvestigative Journalism: kly.com between 2532 and 3251 sion and his house is deuewee v @ e n gwyn e stroyed. dead in Pakistan, Yemen and Gwynn r What do you do now? There Somalia. Of those, between e Dy was a whole extended family liv475 and 879 deaths were civilian ing in that house: children, old folks, non-combatants who just happened a cousin or two. Some of them are to be nearby when the Hellfire hit— probably still alive under the rubble, often because they were trying to perhaps badly injured. Do you rush rescue survivors from an earlier strike. over and help to dig them out? BetWashington doesn't formally admit ter not. The Predator or Reaper drone that the Central Intelligence Agency (lovely names) will wait until all the is running a remote-control assassinaneighbours have gathered round and tion program at all, because it is legalthen launch a second Hellfire missile ly a very doubtful area. At the same onto the site. Double tap. time, it strives to reassure the AmeriStanford University's International can public that there is almost no "col-

R DYEIG HT

STRA

lateral damage": that practically all the victims are "bad guys". Including the 175 children who, according to the Bureau's numbers, have been killed in the strikes. Let's be honest here: children always get killed in air strikes. When you explode 10 kg (20 lbs) of high explosives on a single target (the standard Hellfire load), there can be nothing surgical about it. The really questionable aspects of the CIA's drone program lie elsewhere. First, is it legal to make air attacks in a country that you are not at war with? Second, can you distinguish sufficiently between "militants" and civilians living in the same area? And, above all, why are you making doubletap attacks? It's the double tap attacks that are truly shameful. Do the controllers really think that the people rushing to rescue the survivors of a first strike are all "militants" too? Or are they just trying to deter people from helping those who were wounded in the first strike? That is certainly the effect of the policy: villagers now often leave the injured survivors of an attack in CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 >>

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

UP FRONT 9


Bursting at the seams

EVENTS WEEKLY

P

COMEDY

NEWS // DISTRICTS

Population growth means changes in Alberta electoral districts opulation shifts and population define Edmonton East and Edmonton "From a personal point of view, obvigrowth means the commission Centre. Edmontonians may also see a ously I would like to see my riding stay responsible for evaluating federal elecmuch smaller Edmonton–Mill Woods– as close as it is to what the boundartoral districts has proposed new disBeaumont, and Edmonton–Leduc. The ies are now, but the reality is with the tricts and the need to add seats to efareas that are currently in the southgrowth and the population of the provfectively represent citizens throughout ern regions of the latter two ridings are ince and the six new MPs, the boundthe province. The proposed changes being re-located in a new riding that aries are going to change," comments offer no new ridings in Newfoundland is primarily rural, though still within James Rajotte, member from the curand Labrador, New Brunswick, Nova the Edmonton City boundaries: Edrent Edmonton-Leduc which could see Scotia, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. monton–Wetaskawin. There are also a major change to the physical size of Ontario looks to gain 15 seats, Quebec proposed name changes for all ridings the district. Mr Rajotte believes the will gain one, British Columbia will gain except Edmonton–Strathcona, though rural-urban mix is a benefit to himself: six seats and so will Alberta. Edmonton–St Albert will only experi"As a member of Parliament, it gives The six new seats create new ridings ence a bit of a switch to St Albert–Edyou different perspectives because you in central Alberta, in the north and monton. have a large centre with Edmonton, south, as well as in Edmonton and Dave Cournoyer, political pundit and the city of Leduc which is a smaller Calgary. They compliment the bound"Daveberta" blogger, notes that these centre—you have those different perary changes that are proposed for the changes are unlikely to favour any one spectives. The one thing all these armajority of the existing federal disparty—despite the stronghold the eas share is a tremendous amount of tricts. In the north, the existing Peace Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) growth, both business and residential." River and Fort McMurray–Athabasca has electorally in rural Alberta. The The commission held open town halls ridings could be adjusted to cover less changes better reflect that "some of throughout September. They will now area alongside the addition of a Grande these rural ridings are being created take any and all suggestions and subPrairie riding. In the south, the city of not so much because of growth in the missions into consideration for the proLethbridge would be a stand alone rural areas as because of the growth posal presented to the Speaker of the riding with the House of Commons rural areas surWe are not in Toronto or Montréal where there in late December. rounding it split are hot competitive races. With the exception of Every proposal goes into existing rida couple of ridings, maybe in Edmonton, I don't through several reings. Macleod vision opportunities know if any MPs should really be afraid for would gain area and changes are their jobs. to the south made. and be re-named "I know the last "Foothills," and the existing Medicine in the small and medium sized cities. redistribution they did make changes Hat riding would expand north and Grande Prairie for example; Grande and some of them reasonably subwest. Central Alberta sees significant Prairie isn't a rural area. Grand Prairie is stantial. The one concern with making changes with existing districts and a a growing city. You see the same with major changes later is that there isn't a new second Red Deer riding. Red Deer and Lethbridge. second go around of hearings. If subDonna Wilson, part of the three"It's a little bit of a sticky issue bestantial changes are made, they are person commission that is charged cause it is about electoral politics made," Wilson notes. "The majority of with re-districting Alberta's federal when it comes down to it. These guys' people we will be hearing from will be ridings, explains population parity was (MPs) jobs depend on the electoral people that have some concern about paramount in their decision making: boundaries," Cournoyer adds. "Generwhat we have done. If there are future "The number we were looking at was ally, though, this is Alberta. We are not changes that need to be done we have 107  213, but we deviate from that to in Toronto or Montréal where there to consider them very carefully before have logical boundaries and we also try are hot competitive races. With the exwe do that." and look at communities of interests." ception of a couple of ridings, maybe MPs can submit any objections unWilson also notes that the commisin Edmonton, I don't know if any MPs til March, when the commissions will sion is conscious to not play politics. should really be afraid for their jobs." take any received feedback and incor"We purposely stayed away from lookporate that into any changes. The final ing at any past poll-by-poll and such Wilson recognizes there is an uneasireport will be be submitted in June of because our assignment is to imparness when it comes to any electoral 2013. The last act is for the CEO to tially create electoral districts that are change. "People like the status quo. draft the representation order, which fair." They're comfortable with it and they're describes the electoral districts estabEdmonton will see changes in almost not sure what change will mean. For lished by the commissions and send all of its existing eight districts with MPs, I'm sure it's unsettling when their it to the Minister designated for the the addition of Edmonton–Manning boundaries change. They know they purposes of the Act. By September in the northern corner of the city and have won in the old district and they 2013 the new districts will be publicly the removal of Sherwood Park (potenare probably uncertain if they could announced and officially submitted for tially situated within Sherwood Park– win in the the new electoral district, the 2015 federal election. JENN PROSSER Fort Saskatchewan). There could also and that would be disconcerting for // JENN@vueweekly.com be movement for the boundaries that anyone."

DRONE ATTACKS

<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

agony for hours before going to help them, for fear of becoming victims too. There's no point in telling the military and their masters that this tactic is counter-productive, generating more new "militants" than it kills. The bureaucratic machine doesn't respond to such subtle arguments. There's probably no point in talking about the moral problem of killing innocent people ei-

10 up front

ther. But the fact that some 50 countries now have drones should inspire a little reflection about this unwritten change in the rules of engagement. The latest proud possessor of these weapons is Iran, which has just unveiled a new drone with a range of 2000 km, capable of flying over most of the Middle East. If it is really copied from the US drone that Iran captured last year, then it has major air-to-ground capabilities.

So what if it starts using those capabilities over, say, Syria, against the rebels that the Syrian government calls "terrorists"? The US could not really complain (though no doubt it would). What's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. V Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

FAX YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO 780.426.2889 OR EMAIL LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3pm

Brixx Bar • 10030-102 St • 780.428.1099 • Troubadour Tuesdays monthly with comedy and music Century Casino • 13103 Fort Rd • 780.481.9857 • Open amateur night every Thu, 7:30pm

COMEDY FACTORY • Gateway Entertainment Centre, 34 Ave, Calgary Tr • Tom Liske; Oct 4-6 • Alvin Williams; Oct 11-13 • Dennis Ross; Oct 18-20 • Dave Stawnichy; Oct 25-27 • Ryan Wingfield; Nov 1-3 • Bob Angeli; Nov 8-10 • Phil Mazo; Nov 15 - 17 • That's Improv!; Nov 22-24 • Vilmos; Nov 29-Dec 1 • Leif Skyving; Dec 6-8

Comic Strip • Bourbon St, WEM • 780.483.5999 • Wed-Fri, Sun 8pm; Fri-Sat 10:30pm • Michael Somerville; Oct 3-7 • Jake Johannsen; Oct 10-14 • Darren Carter; Oct 17-21 • Mike Dambra; Oct 24-28 • Mike Vecchione; Oct 31-Nov 4; Greg Fitzsimmons; Nov 7-11 • Rocky LaPorte; Nov 14-18 • Loni Love; Nov 21-25 • Bryan Callen; Nov 28-Dec 2 Disorderly Conduct • Rexall Place, 7424 - 118 Ave • jeffdunham.com • 780.414.4000 • With Jeff Dunham • Nov 2, 8pm • $70

DRUID • 11606 Jasper Ave • 780.710.2119 • Comedy night open stage hosted by Lars Callieou • Every Sun, 9pm Edmonton Comedy Festival • Various events in Edmonton • Featuring national and international stand-ups including Andrew Grose, Atomic Improv, Big Daddy Tazz, Louis Ramey and Monique Marvez and more • Oct 17-21 Filthy McNasty's • 10511-82 • 780.996.1778 • Stand Up Sundays: Standup comedy night every Sun with a different headliner every week; 9pm; no cover Laugh for Life Gala • Winspear Centre, 99 St 102 Ave • 780.428.1414 • LaughforLife.ca • funny master Ken Davis, the music comedy duo Bare 'n Von Hair (Matt Day and Gord Graber) plus performance painter Lewis Lavoie in the 9th annual LFL Gala • Oct 20, 6pm (doors), 7pm (main event) • $39.50 $49.50 (plus service charges) Overtime Pub • 4211-106 St • Open mic comedy anchored by a professional MC, new headliner each week • Every Tue • Free Rouge Lounge • 10111-117 St • Sterling Scott every Wed, 9pm

Vault Pub • 8214-175 St • Comedy with Liam Creswick and Steve Schulte • Every Mon, at 9:30pm

Wunderbar • 8120-101 St, 780.436.2286 • Comedy every 2nd Mon Zen Lounge • 12923-97 St • The Ca$h Prize comedy contest hosted by Matt Alaeddine and Andrew Iwanyk • Every Tue, 8pm • No cover

Groups/CLUBS/meetings 30 Day Sunrise Yoga Challenge • Prana Yoga Studio • 780.761.2226 • pranayogastudio.ca • Attend 30 days of sunrise yoga classes taught by a team of dynamic teachers, and receive one month of free unlimited drop-in yoga • Sep 24 Oct 23, 6:15am-7:30am

Aikikai Aikido Club • 10139-87 Ave, Old Strathcona Community League • Japanese Martial Art of Aikido • Every Tue 7:30-9:30pm; Thu 6-8pm Amnesty International Edmonton • 8307-109 St • edmontonamnesty. org • Meet the 4th Tue each month, 7:30pm (no meetings in Jul, Aug, and Dec) E: amnesty@edmontonamnesty.org for more info • Free

Argentine Tango Dance at Foot Notes Studio • Foot Notes Dance Studio - (South side), 9708 - 45 Ave •

VUEWEEKLY October 4 – october 10, 2012

780.438.3207 • virenzi@shaw.ca • Join Vincenzo and Ida Renzi every Friday at Foot Notes Dance Studio for an evening of authentic Argentine tango • Every Fri, 8pm - midnight • $15 (per person)

AWA 12-STEP SUPPORT GROUP • Braeside Presbyterian Church bsmt, N. door, 6 Bernard Dr, Bishop St, Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert • For adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families • Every Mon 7:30pm Brain Tumour Peer Support Group • Woodcroft Branch Library, 13420-114 Ave • braintumour.ca • 1.800.265.5106 ext 234 • Support group for brain tumour survivors and their families and caregivers. Must be 18 or over • 3rd Tue every month; 7-8:45pm • Free

Drop-in Meditation Classes • Sherwood Park Community Centre (Mon); Amitabha Centre, 9550 - 87 St (Tue, Fri) • info@meditationedmonton.org • Every Mon, Tue 7-8:30pm and Fri 10-11:30am

Edmonton Bike Art Nights • BikeWorks, 10047-80 Ave, back alley entrance • Art Nights • Every Wed, 6-9pm Edmonton Nature Club • King's University College, 9125 - 50 St • With speaker: Dr. Stephen Flemming, Superintendent of Elk Island National Park. The story of how the plains and wood bison have been raised at Elk Island for the last hundred years now allowing them to be reintroduced to habitat they formerly occupied • Oct 19, 7pm • Admission by donation

Edmonton Needlecraft Guild • Avonmore United Church Basement, 82 Ave, 79 St • edmNeedlecraftGuild.org • Classes/workshops, exhibitions, guest speakers, stitching groups for those interested in textile arts • Meet the 2nd Tue each month, 7:30pm

Fabulous Facilitators Toastmasters Club • 2nd Floor Canada Place, 9700 Jasper Ave • 780.467.6013, l.witzke@shaw.ca • fabulousfacilitators. toastmastersclubs.org • Can you think of a career that does not require communication • Every Tue, 12:05-1pm

Fertility Awareness Charting Circle meeting • Cha Island Tea Co, 10332 - 81 Ave • faccedmonton@gmail. com • Learn about menstrual cycle charting and share your personal experiences in a supportive group environment • 1st of the month from Oct-Apr, 6:30-8:30pm • $5 suggested donation

FOOD ADDICTS • St Luke's Anglican Church, 8424-95 Ave • 780.465.2019/780.634.5526 • Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous (FA), free 12-Step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, under-eating, and bulimia • Meetings every Thu, 7pm Hands Off Iran! International Day of Action • Sir Winston Churchill Square • 780.435.6795, dougmeggison@ shaw.ca • A peace rally organized by the Edmonton Coalition Against War & Racism (ECAWAR) urging the Canadian government not to use military intervention in Iran • Oct 6, 2:30 - 4:30pm • Free

Home–Energizing Spiritual Community for Passionate Living • Garneau/Ashbourne Assisted Living Place, 11148-84 Ave • Home: Blends music, drama, creativity and reflection on sacred texts to energize you for passionate living • Every Sun, 3-5pm

Hows and Whys of a Raw Food Diet • Earth's General Store, 9605 - 82 Ave • vofa.ca • Learn the reasons behind a raw or high raw diet and how to easily incorporate more raw food into your diet • Oct 20, 7pm • $25 (cash, preregister and pre-pay)

Lotus Qigong • 780.477.0683 • Downtown • Practice group meets every Thu MADELEINE SANAM FOUNDATION • Faculté St Jean, Rm 3-18 • 780.490.7332 • Program for HIV-AID’S prevention, treatment and harm reduction in French, English and other African languages • 3rd and 4th Sat, 9am-5pm each month • Free (member)/$10 (membership); pre-register

Meditation • Strathcona Library • meditationedmonton.org • Weekly meditation drop-in; every Tue, 7-8:30pm


NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIATION • Duggan Commu-

& Critique" • Oct 18, 6-10pm • $40 (adv), $60 (door); register at radiostar.ca

nity Hall, 3728-106 St • 780.458.6352, 780.467.6093 • nawca.ca • Meet every Wed, 6:30pm

NOT JUNK FOOD • Earth's General Store, 9605 - 82 Ave • egs.ca/node/442 • Snacks CAN be healthy. Get ready to feature these raw stars as munchies for next movie night; ketchup-y chips, crispy kale chips, real ginger ale, nutty bark • Oct 14, 6:50 - 9pm • $25

OCCUPY EDMONTON GENERAL ASSEMBLY • Grant Macewan City Center Cafeteria, 10600 - 104 Ave • oc.yeg.info@ gmail.com • A leaderless space where everyone is welcome to organize and/or assist with all forms of Edmonton based non-violent activism • Every Tue from 6:30-8:30pm & Sat from 2-4pm

OKTOBERFEST 2012 • German Club, 8310 Roper Road • 780.466.4000 • germanclubedmonton.ca • Enjoy a great atmosphere with Oom Pah Pah music, Oktoberfest fare, prizes, and of course lots of beer • Oct 5-6 • $30 (includes food)

RAISING & GRAZING YOUR VEGAN DOG: FOR THE PLANET & YOUR POOCH • Earth's General Store, 9605 - 82 Ave • vofa.ca • Organised by Vegans and Vegetarians of Alberta. Part of Vegtoberfest • Oct 13, 7pm

TED TALKS @ LUNCH • Winspear Centre, 4 Winston Churchill Square • 780.492.2515 • TEDxEdmonton Education 2012 • Oct 13 • $99 (plus taxes/fees)

panel or potluck supper. Special interest groups meet for other social activities throughout the month. E: edmontonpt@ yahoo.ca

EPLC FELLOWSHIP PAGAN STUDY GROUP • Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • eplc.webs. com • Free year long course; Family circle 3rd Sat each month • Everyone welcome

FLASH NIGHT CLUB • 10018-105 St • 780.969.9965 • Thu Goth + Industrial Night: Indust:real Assembly with DJ Nanuck; 10pm (door); no cover • Triple Threat Fridays: DJ Thunder, Femcee DJ Eden Lixx • DJ Suco beats every Sat • E: vip@flashnightclub.com

G.L.B.T.Q SAGE BOWLING CLUB • 780.474.8240, E: Tuff@shaw.ca • Every Wed, 1:30-3:30pm

8:30pm

INSIDE/OUT • U of A Campus • Campusbased organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-identified and queer (LGBTQ) faculty, graduate student, academic, straight allies and support staff • 3rd Thu each month (fall/winter terms): Speakers Series. E: kwells@ualberta.ca

JUNCTION BAR AND EATERY • 10242-106 St • 780.756.5667 • junctionedmonton.com • Open TuesSat: Community bar with seasonal patio • Beat the clock Tue • WINGSANITY Wed, 5-10pm • Free pool Tue and Wed • Karaoke Wed, 9-12pm • Fri Steak Night, 5-9pm • Frequent special events: drag shows, leather nights, bear bashes, girls nights • DJs every Fri and Sat, 10pm

LIVING POSITIVE • 404, 10408-

PRIMETIMERS/SAGE GAMES • Unitar-

ORGANIZATION FOR BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISORDER (OBAD) • Grey

ian Church, 10804-119 St • 780.474.8240 • Every 2nd and last Fri each Month, 7-10:30pm

Nuns Hospital, Rm 0651, 780.451.1755; Group meets every Thu, 7-9pm • Free

ST PAUL'S UNITED CHURCH • 11526-76

SHERWOOD PARK WALKING GROUP + 50 • Meet inside Millennium Place,

Ave • 780.436.1555 • People of all sexual orientations are welcome • Every Sun (10am worship)

Sherwood Place • Weekly outdoor walking group; starts with a 10 min discussion, followed by a 30-40 minute walk through Centennial Park, a cool down and stretch • Every Tue, 8:30am • $2/session (goes to the Alzheimer’s Society of Alberta)

WOMONSPACE • 780.482.1794 • womonspace.ca, womonspace@gmail.com • A Non-profit lesbian social organization for Edmonton and surrounding area. Monthly activities, newsletter, reduced rates included with membership. Confidentiality assured

SOCIETY OF EDMONTON ATHEISTS • Centennial Rm, (basement) Stanley A. Milner Library • Monthly roundtable 1st Tue each month • edmontonatheists.ca; E: info@edmontonatheists.ca

WOODYS VIDEO BAR • 11723 Jasper Ave • 780.488.6557 • Mon: Amateur Strip Contest; prizes with Shawana • Tue: Kitchen 3-11pm • Wed: Karaoke with Tizzy 7pm-1am; Kitchen 3-11pm • Thu: Free pool all night; kitchen 3-11pm • Fri: Mocho Nacho Fri: 3pm (door), kitchen open 3-11pm

SUGARSWING DANCE CLUB • Orange Hall, 10335-84 Ave or Pleasantview Hall, 10860 - 57 Ave • 780.604.7572 • Swing Dance at Sugar Foot Stomp: beginner lesson followed by dance every Sat, 8pm (door) at Orange Hall or Pleasantview Hall

SPECIAL EVENTS

WASKAHEGAN TRAIL • 10 km hike in the Leduc section of the trail, Sep 30; Hike leader: Stella, 780.488.9515 • West of Edmonton to hike in the Blackfoot Recreation Area; Oct 7; Hike leader: Helen, 780.468.4331 • Camrose area for a hike on the Battle River; Oct 14; Hike leader is Marilyn 780.463.1207 • South of Edmonton for a hike on Saunders Lake; Oct 21; Hike leader is Sandra 780.467.9572

EDMONTON COMIC & ENTERTAINMENT EXPO • Expo Centre, 7515 - 118 Ave • edmontonexpo.com • Edmonton’s premier pop culture festival, featuring vendors, exhibitors, artists and celebrities such as Adam West and Billy Dee Williams • Oct 20-21 • $15-$30

EXPOSURE: QUEER ARTS AND CULTURAL FESTIVAL • Various events around Edmonton • exposurefestival. ca • Uncovers, highlights and celebrates queer arts and culture • Oct 20-23

WOMEN IN BLACK • In Front of the Old Strathcona Farmers' Market • Silent vigil the 1st and 3rd Sat, 10-11am, each month, stand in silence for a world without violence

P3 – PEOPLE. PASSION. PURPOSE. • Agora in the Community Centre, 501 Festival Ave • ivcstrathcona.org • 50 local organizations showcasing their volunteer opportunities • Oct 4, 1-7pm

Y TOASTMASTERS CLUB • Strathcona Legion, 9020-51 Ave • Meet every Tue, 7-9pm; helps members develop confidence in public speaking and leadership • Info: T: Antonio Balce at 780.463.5331

POKER FOR JOKERS - A TEXAS HOLD ‘EM TOURNAMENT • Casino Edmonton – 7055 Argyll Road • In support of the Edmonton International Street Performers Festival • Oct 24, 7pm • $110 (entrance into the tournament and a tax receipt for the eligible portion)

LECTURES/PRESENTATIONS CREATIVE SOUP & SALAD • Earth's General Store, 9605 - 82 Ave • egs.ca/node/442 • Add more living color and life-enhancing enzymes to everyday meals: V9 Soup, Dressing Like Caesar’s, Moroccan Honey Salad • Oct 21 • $25 (each class) COOL SMOOTHIES, ICY COOKIES & SALTY-SWEET • Earth's General Store, 9605 - 82 Ave • egs.ca/node/442 • Easy “icy” cookies melt in your mouth. Smoothies: Hot-ApplePie, Mint-Patty, Beauty Smoothie, Creamy-Chai, Butter-Tart, Strawberry-Shortcake; Icy Coco Cookies, Salty-Sweet Ginger Dots • Oct 28, 6:509pm • $25 (each class)

FOOD CRAVINGS & EMOTIONAL EATING • Earth's General Store, 9605 - 82 Ave • vofa. ca • Find out why you have food cravings or sometimes feel out of control around food • Oct 27, 7pm • $25 (paid in person in cash)

GREAT EXPEDITIONS • St Luke’s AnglicanChurch, 8424-95 Ave • 780.454.6216 • 3rd Mon every month, 7:30pm LIVING FOODS SUNDAY SUMMER SERIES • Earth's General Store, 9605-82 Ave • Every Sun, 6:50-9pm • Pre-register; $25 (each session); info: Robyn at rawrobyn@ gmail.com

NEW SONGWRITERS' WORKSHOP • Transalta Arts Barn, 10330 - 84 Ave • Includes workshops: "What's In A Song", "Music Publishing & Revenue Streams", "Film & Tv Placements" and "Song Review

Thu 6-8pm • QH Craft Night: every Wed, 6-8pm • QH Anime Night: Watch anime; every Fri, 6-8pm • Movie Night: Open to everyone; 2nd and 4th Fri each month, 6-9pm • Women’s Social Circle: Social support group for female-identified persons +18 years in the GLBT community; new members welcome; 2nd and 4th Thu, 7-9pm each month; andrea@pridecentreofedmonton.org • Men Talking with Pride: Support and social group for gay and bisexual men to discuss current issues; every Sun 7-9pm; robwells780@ hotmail.com • TTIQ: a support and information group for all those who fall under the transgender umbrella and their family/supporters; 3rd Mon, 7-9pm, each month • HIV Support Group: Support and discussion group for gay men; 2nd Mon, 7-9pm, each month; huges@shaw.ca

SHABAM BEER TASTING FESTIVAL GLBT SPORTS AND RECREATION •

QUEER AFFIRM SUNNYBROOK–Red Deer • Sunnybrook United Church, Red Deer • 403.347.6073 • Affirm welcome LGBTQ people and their friends, family, and allies meet the 2nd Tue, 7pm, each month

BISEXUAL WOMEN'S COFFEE GROUP • A social group for bi-curious and bisexual women every 2nd Tue each month, 8pm • groups.yahoo.com/group/bwedmonton BUDDYS NITE CLUB • 11725B Jasper Ave • 780.488.6636 • Tue with DJ Arrow Chaser, free pool all night; 9pm (door); no cover • Wed with DJ Dust’n Time; 9pm (door); no cover • Thu: Men’s Wet Underwear Contest, win prizes, hosted by Drag Queen DJ Phon3 Hom3; 9pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Fri Dance Party with DJ Arrow Chaser; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm • Sat: Feel the rhythm with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm

EDMONTON PRIME TIMERS (EPT) • Unitarian Church of Edmonton, 10804119 St • A group of older gay men who have common interests meet the 2nd Sun, 2:30pm, for a social period, short meeting and guest speaker, discussion

teamedmonton.ca • Co-ed Bellydancing: bellydancing@teamedmonton.ca • Bootcamp: Garneau Elementary, 10925-87 Ave. at 7pm; bootcamp@teamedmonton. ca • Bowling: Ed's Rec Centre, West Edmonton Mall, Tue 6:45pm; bowling@ teamedmonton.ca • Curling: Granite Curling Club; 780.463.5942 • Running: Kinsmen; running@teamedmonton.ca • Spinning: MacEwan Centre, 109 Street and 104 Ave; spin@teamedmonton.ca • Swimming: NAIT pool, 11762-106 St; swimming@teamedmonton.ca • Volleyball: every Tue, 7-9pm; St. Catherine School, 10915-110 St; every Thu, 7:309:30pm at Amiskiwiciy Academy, 101 Airport Rd

G.L.B.T.Q SENIORS GROUP • S.A.G.E Bldg, Craftroom, 15 Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.474.8240 • Meeting for gay seniors, and for any seniors who have gay family members and would like some guidance • Every Thu, 1-4pm • Info: E: tuff @shaw.ca

ILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB • Pride Centre, 10608 - 105 ave • 780.387.3343 • groups. yahoo.com/group/edmonton_illusions • Crossdressers meet 2nd Fri each month,

124 St • edmlivingpositive.ca • 1.877.975.9448/780.488.5768 • Confidential peer support to people living with HIV • Tue, 7-9pm: Support group • Daily drop-in, peer counselling

MAKING WAVES SWIMMING CLUB • geocities.com/makingwaves_edm • Recreational/competitive swimming. Socializing after practices • Every Tue/Thu PRIDE CENTRE OF EDMONTON • Pride Centre of Edmonton, 10608-105 Ave • 780.488.3234 • A safe, welcoming, and non-judgemental drop-in space, support programs and resources offered for members of the GLBTQ community, their families and friends • Daily: Community drop-in; support and resources. Queer library: borrowing privileges: Tue-Fri 12-9pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, closed Sun-Mon; Queer HangOUT (a.k.a. QH) youth dropin: Tue-Fri 3-8pm, Sat 2-6:30pm, youth@ pridecentreofedmonton.org • Counselling: Free, short-term by registered counsellors every Wed, 5:30-8:30pm, info/ bookings: 780.488.3234 • Knotty Knitters: Knit and socialize in safe, accepting environment, all skill levels welcome; every Wed 6-8pm • QH Game Night: Meet people through board game fun; every

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

• Mayfield Trade Centre, 16615 - 109 Ave • 3rd annual craft beer festival that features the regions finest handcrafted beers surrounded by food and carnival games such as Supersize Sumo Wrestling, Bouncy Boxing, Jousting, Ball Toss and more • Oct 6 • $25 or 2/$45 (online), $35 (per person, at door)

ST. ANDREW'S QUILTING GROUP ANNUAL FALL QUILT SALE • St. Andrew's United Church, 9915 - 148 St • Purchase precious hand-made quilts, comforters, afghans, and other comfort items. All proceeds go to charity • Oct 27, 10am 2pm • Free

URBAN MOMMY EXPO • WECA, 6315 - 199 St • info@urbanmommyexpo.com • facebook.com/urbanmommyexpo • a show featuring more than 60 vendors showcasing the latest finds for moms baby and parenting related items, fashion and home products, specialized services moms • Oct 27, 10am - 5pm • $2, free (kids 6 and under) WASTE REDUCTION WEEK 2012: SILENT ART ACTION • Habitat ReStore North, 8210 Yellowhead Trail • 780.479.3566 • Upcycled silent art auction featuring 18 artists • Oct 15-20

UP FRONT 11


FILM

PREVUE // NOT-SO-SILENT FILM

Staking a claim on the past

A classic Canadian silent film gets a sound-and-Shakespeare reworking

Fri, Oct 5 (7 pm) Metro Cinema at the Garneau, $25

N

ew life is being given to a Canadian silent-screen gem through a multidisciplinary remix of music, film and theatre. The commission, by the Yukon

Film Society to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Available Light Film Festival this past February, is touring across western Canada to pay tribute to The Grub-Stake director Nell Shipman, an iconoclast of the silent film era. The film was shot in 1923 and tells the story of a young girl

who makes her way to the Klondike during the 1898 gold rush in search of love and prosperity, but these dreams are derailed when she discovers that greed and villainy run the show in Dawson City. However, the film was never distributed, as the distributor went bankrupt.

Frankenweenie



E

verything distinctive and refreshing eventually gets watered down into trite cliché, but it's decidedly more discouraging when this cultural homeopathy is selfinflicted. Tim Burton is a director who's flirted with self-parody for more than a decade now, diluting and lightly shaking up his cartoongoth verve to the point where his films are largely macabre Mad Libs (and one of the prompts is usually "a pale actor with the last name Depp"). Leave it to a return to the past, then, to give Burton some unexpected juice. Based on a short film he made before even his Beetlejuice days, and shot through with

12 FILM

in silent films and help the audience understand what was going on. However, Janke notes the script only changed small details while leaving the original story arch intact. "It's like a third eye kind of approach to the film. I keep coming back to the idea of layers. What you have is an old language of silent film in the way the actors move and they relate to the camera and they do all that independent of the titles ... so you have this language, which is a very dated language of silent film—which is wonderful—but then you have an even older language of Shakespeare that tells this story in parallel," Janke explains. "The third language of course is the music score that drives the whole thing."

The script draws on the gamut of the Bard's works, and acts as a substitute for the title cards that were used to break up the action

MEAGHAN BAXTER // MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // MONSTER MASH-UP

REVUE // BURTON

Opens Friday Directed by Tim Burton Featuring Martin Short, Catherine O' Hara, Charlie Tahan

Now, decades later, Whitehorsebased composer filmmaker Daniel Janke has created The Grub-Stake Revisited, complete with a musical score performed live at each theatre by the Longest Night Ensemble, as well as a cast of voice actors who bring the on-screen characters to life with re-imagined Shakespearean text. "The story in the original Shipman film is very much an archetypical story of, you know, a young woman rising above the oppression that she experiences in life and making good ... it sort of cross the lines and boundaries of so many Shakespearean comedies and tragedies," Janke explains of the decision to use extracted Shakespearean dialogue to drive the story.

Hotel Transylvania

affection for the mid-century Hollywood horrors that are the bedrock of his style, Frankenweenie is lively and engaging in a way that Burton's recent work often misses in favor of set and makeup design; that a claymation kiddie romp feels less fussed-over and precious than Sweeney Todd says a lot about how style can become a trap. Frankenstein by way of a boy and his dog, the film opens with a spryly sweet scene of young Victor making his pooch Sparky the star of a homemade '50s monster mash. That's just one of the ways they play across the similarly dated suburbs of New Holland—speaking of Burton tropes—until Sparky meets an untimely end via car bumper. But it is, of course, not an end: Victor's mother tries to soothe his broken heart by promising, "We'd bring him back, if we could," and he sets out to do just that, with the help of lighting, a car battery and just a little bit of patchwork on Sparky's tail. From there, it follows the familiar beats of Frankenstein, albeit with a slight twist in the form of a school science fair that has Victor's fellow students copying alive! hisIt'ssure-to-win experiment, with monstrous—and monster-movie-referencing— results.

The mutants who make up Victor's class—in particular a bug-eyed blonde with a cat that uses its litter box as a crystal ball—resemble some of horror's oldest stars, and each are good for a laugh, particularly when it comes time for the climax. Better still are the bits of sweetness that wind through the black-and-white world, from Victor's very genuine interactions with his rein-canined best friend, to a nice little tribute to Vincent Price, who lends his visage to Victor's mentor, a science teacher run out of town by the myopic townsfolk. The appearance of Price calls back not only to the arch, campy horror stories woven through Frankenweenie's DNA, but also to another early Burton film, Edward Scissorhands: as with that classic, the basic, but unmistakable message here is that you shouldn't be afraid to follow what you love, even if it makes you an outcast. Burton's established enough that he doesn't exactly have that worry anymore, but the proof of that philosophy's success is nevertheless crafted right in to Frankenweenie's clay: the copious callbacks to childhood joys elevate a standard Burton exercise to a charming retro love letter.

The joys of Frankenweenie come in between its story beats, though.

DAVID BERRY

// DAVID@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Now playing Directed by Genndy Tartakovsky



I

t's more than 15 years since Pixar set off the CGI-animation-feature boom. But much of the California co's inventive DNA has devolved, with imitators' weak scripts, into formula: cute/smartass talking animals (or talking cars, in Pixar's own cash-grabber) or invading aliens or monsters. Sony's Hotel Transylvania could be called Monsters Inn—as in the Pixar film (now being spun into a sequel), monsters aren't actually scary, inhabit a world of their own, and are frightened of humans. So, in this flick's first of two clever touches, Dracula's (voiced by Adam Sandler) set up a hotel where his night-fright friends can rest in peace. It's been "Human-Free Since 1898," until a human backpacker shows up ... on the Count-rol freak's daughter's 118th birthday. Trouble is, the obviously meant-to-be-together twosome's frightfully uninteresting. Jonathan (Andy Samberg) is a dull dope while Mavis (Selena Gomez) is the blandest stereotype of a teen girl unimaginativable. There's love at first sight; lines like "go make your own paradise"; sunlight reflected in big manga eyes. That's all terrifyingly trite, folks.

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

From the spooked start, the comicrhythm dial's set to bulldozer. Director Tartakovsky refuses to let silence settle between moments or play with pauses before punchlines. Instead, Hotel Transylvania whizzes through the superficially amusing conceit of every single movie-monster staying in a resort together without actually taking much time to craft cunning comedy. Best, by far, is were-dad Wayne (Steve Buscemi), basically a suit-and-tie Wolfy Loman, harried and worn-down by his baying were-brood. This project, in development for six years, still ends up seeming like a sugarrushed Count Chocula-meets-FawltyTowers idea. The manic-ness continues; the token, jive-talkin' African-American character appears; some vocoded rapand-pop pap's plopped down to pander to the Bieber-fan demographic; the best animation in the whole movie is of roof shingles. At last, near the end, comes the second deft touch—a "Monster Festival" in which Drac and his buddies are happily helped out by their film-fans, who welcome their scares as comfortably predictable horror-acting. Now, if only we could be welcomed into a Hotel Transylvania that isn't so predictable and comedy-straining. BRIAN GIBSON

// BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


REVUE // FESTIVAL SHORTS

REVUE // FAKE GURU

Kumaré

EIFF

A

s the Edmonton International Film Festival heads into its final few days, it still has a sizeable smattering of films to be seen. Often neglected are the shorts programs, quicker, filmic bites that can still offer amplie yield to any viewer, and with that in mind, they make up the focus of our final few caps reviews. Reviews by Meaghan Baxter (MB) and Paul Blinov (PB). All screenings at City Centre Theatres.

The Borat of faith

Sun, Oct 7 – Wed, Oct 10 Directed by Vikram Ganghi Metro Cinema at the Garneau



S

ri Kumaré came to the USA from an Indian village so small it wasn't even on the map—any map, apparently. A yogi and meditation instructor, a pronouncer of clipped, chirpy, cryptic nuggets of maybesorta-wisdom, he immediately garnered a group of devout followers down in Arizona, some of whom were searching for something and found guidance in his words; some felt that meeting him was the greatest event of their lives. What those followers didn't know, apparently didn't even suspect, was that Sri Kumaré was really just some dude from Jersey named Vikram Gandhi, a young, urbane, collegeeducated, not very religious budding filmmaker who felt hugely skeptical of gurus, both Western and Eastern, and adopted the Kumaré persona as a wildly elaborate lark. The hardest part by far must have been learning yoga; otherwise he just grew

a big-ass beard, put on some robes, walked barefoot, carried a funny-looking stick, tried to listen a lot, appropriated his Indian grandmother's accent, chanted whatever came to mind (such as "Be All That You Can Be," that old slogan for US Army recruiters), made up his own yoga routines (including one seemingly inspired by Pete Townsend's windmill guitar moves), and concocted some generic mumbo-jumbo about a blue light—an image that a local yoga instructor took very much to heart, reshaping her entire practice around it. And that's where things got complicated. And where Gandhi's film about his hoax, simply titled Kumaré, gets more interesting than it initially seems, shifting away from a Boratlike impersonation stunt designed to send-up gullible Americans and changing into a deeply sympathetic examination of the varieties of spiritual hunger that linger in the modern psyche. The fact that so many folks—some of whom could be deemed as flaky, some simply young, some simply in a great deal of pain, some obviously intelligent, competent, social-

ized professionals—could project so much of their desires for guidance onto someone so utterly, almost transparently phony, becomes something greater than a sociological statistic to chuckle over while scanning the back of Harper's. Guilt-ridden and trying to make the best of an increasingly uncomfortable situation, Gandhi-as-Kumaré tries to boil down all of his teachings to the single notion of finding the guru within you. You'll have to watch Kumaré to see how it all works out, but I will tell you that the filmmakers seemed unprepared for everything that would transpire. Ultimately the coverage seems to be emphasizing the wrong themes, and there's a paucity of material that really interrogates Gandhi's own life and motivations and the more complicated, messy aftereffects of his experiment. Still, the film is captivating, often very funny and absolutely worth seeing for what it attempts to document: Gandhi's story is truly amazing, and the people he befriends along his path to anti-smugness are each fascinating in their own right. JOSEF BRAUN

// JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Fri, Oct 5 (10 am) Shorts Smorg 1: Dramatic Directed by Various Three stars The collection of dramas contains a wide range of films. Each comes with its own strengths and weaknesses, but overall it is a strong grouping, with stories of love and life that will captivate and entertain. It's a mixed bag for plot as well as production values, which span from tastefully low-budget to Hollywood blockbuster caliber. A highlight of the program is The Grand Design by Australian director Samuel Bartlett. The film takes viewers on an intriguing ride speculating the effects of the grand design theory, a scientific theorum that essentially proves fate. Bartlett utilizes spilt-screen scenarios which culminate in a thrilling conclusion, leaving viewers to ponder where their own fate may take them. MB Fri, Oct 5 (12:30 pm) Shorts Smorg 2: Documentary Directed by Various Four stars Condensing the documentary form into shorts,

while putting a squeeze on the amount of exploration possible, certainly allows filmmakers to intrigue with punchy tidbits. Such is the case in this collection of shorts: the just-over-90-minute program is actually a marvelous scattering of gems. The hand-drawn imagery of Being Norma, which possesses the feel of a vintage National Film Board short—hand-drawn animation, fauxold tape damage on the image—and lets a handful of women discuss body image, is an intriguing play with form, but the highlight here is Unravel, a 14-minute look at a place in Panipat, India where old clothes from North America are shipped to be made back into yarn, and where the factory workers wonder why western people would get rid of clothes that barely seem worn. It gives a fascinating glimpse into a practice most people don't know about, and intrigues you to further think or investigate on your own. Which is exactly what most of these shorts accomplish. PB Fri, Oct 1 (Noon) Subway Lunchbox Shorts 5 Directed by Various Three stars From fantasy, to humour to a lesson in generosity, Subway Lunchbox Shorts 5 is a packed, mixed bag of films that play to viewers' emotions as well as imagination. As with any assortment, and some are stronger than others. At the weaker end of the spectrum is Gay in the Attic, a black and white short that tries its best to be humorous, but comes across as stereotypical. One the opposite side is A Finger, 2 Dots, Then Me directed by David and Daniel Holechek. The film is driven by a powerful poem, written and performed by beat poet Derrick Brown. The poem follows two lovers as one explains to the other how to find them in the cosmos after death. The compelling look at life, death and love is juxtaposed with moments of humour and captivating visuals, both from Brown's words and directed images. On the same playing field is Good Karma $1, a short documentary by Jason Berger about advertising guru Alex Bogusky, who began collecting signs from the homeless in exchange for a donation, and a lesson about life and generosity. MB

REVUE // TIME TRAVEL

Safety Not Guaranteed Sun, Oct 7 – Mon, Oct 15 Directed by Colin Trevorrow Metro Cinema at the Garneau



D

on't be confused by the title: there's nothing that isn't played very, very safe in this calculatedly quirky shaggy sci-fi/rom-com. It has its charms, Aubrey Plaza's deadpan and Mark Duplass's ear being two of them. The title in fact comes from a classified ad found in a 1997 issue of Backwoods Home, placed by someone who said they invented a time machine and wanted a travel companion. Sometime later one John Silveira confessed that he placed the ad as a way to find a girlfriend. The movie would probably work better if it were also about a guy who just wanted to find a girlfriend. Seattle staff writer Jeff (Jake Johnson) somehow scores clearance to "investi-

Think this thing can hit 88 MPH?

gate" said ad in nearby Ocean View, with several days expenses and two interns thrown in. (Anyone who's ever worked for an alt-weekly is by this point guffawing.) One of the interns is Darius (Plaza), our mopey, wise-cracking heroine. The other's your token South Asian tightassed computer nerd who can't talk to girls. Jeff, we quickly realize, contrived the assignment so he could hook up

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

with an old flame. And he does! And the racial stereotype hooks up with a sympathetic local girl and Darius hooks up with Duplass's kooky survivalist with the Loverboy haircut and the weird ear. Can Duplass really travel back in time in that hovercraft of his? Boilerplate shifty dudes in suits seem interested. JOSEF BRAUN

// JOSEF@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FILM 13


SIDEVUE // FILM CRITICISM

REVUE // THERE WILL BE NO ENCORE

A critical decade

One of Vue's film writers reflects on 10 years of criticism

A

nniversaries offer a convenient numerical excuse for self-reflection. And I wouldn't be much of a critic if I didn't review myself occasionally. Ten years now, writing for Vue (FLASHBACK: my devirgination was the now rightly forgotten Mira Sorvino-Sophia Loren vehicle Between Strangers in October 2002), and what have I learned? Has my sharp tongue softened? Who cares about wanna-be Eberts as we snarl back at the flicks grinding us down or praise obscure beauties flitting past cineplexes? There's a nagging concern among silver-screen scribes (JUMP CUT: my only advice to would-be reviewers— it's not about liking movies; you have to like writing about movies) that the print era's thoughtful criticism is fading in the blank-screen face of chatboards, online comment sections, discussion pages, etc. I've found, because of the strange sound-off-board that is the Internet, any criticismgone-viral gets more noticed, yet less respectfully. It's one thing to be told you're "Saddam Hussein" amid emails shot north from a clutch of crazed Cuban-Americans in Miami after you pan the Andy Garcia-directed The Lost City (June 2006), set in '50s Havana. (Apparently—thanks, Internet!—77 percent of Rotten Tomatoes' "Top Critics" agree with me, but not Ebert, typically soft-as-runny-Brie.) Although I never mentioned the cigar-chomper, the e-missives not only tried to Castro-hate me—one accused me of being socialist-funded by the University of Alberta. It's another thing—"progress"?!?— when one of hundreds of responses, at RT and Vue, to my two-star¢¢ review (BACKSTORY: I dislike stars—they're a snappy visual for people too lazy

or busy to read 200 – 350 words of actual criticism) of the thankfully final Harry Potter film didn't liken me to Gadhafi, at least, but accused me of "trolling." And there were a few thoughtful comments sprinkled among the cyber-heckles. Still, if comment boards and other web-features keep people reading reviews, good, but I'm skeptical that, given the Net's speed and rant-and-rave-iness, any more people are embroiling themselves in critical, contextual, and historical discussions of films. Only a few commenters actually grappled with any of my 12 specific evaluative points about the HP8 movie. A review's an informed argument— as grounded in the movie's genre and socio-historical context and supported by evaluative analysis as can be, given its word count. Online, where everyone can pretend to be a critic, there's little point throwing out credentials to deny "trolling" status. (QUIRKY ART-FILM TANGENTIAL SCENE: Technology's also changed studios' faltering fight against piracy. A few times in 2004, I remember being wanded over with a metal-detector, airport security-style, outside the theatre, to ensure I had no recording electronics; this year, at last, a film's distributor provided me with a oneview-only screener I could upload.) All I can do is keep writing playfully thoughtful, in-depth analyses of films' esthetics and subtext—especially their politics—while avoiding much talk about actors (since celebrity-image becomes part of the mix and you risk turning off a reader who's, say, anti-Tom Cruise for whatever reason). My enthusiasm for film hasn't waned (I still eagerly await the next Studio Ghibli film or the year's truly smart blockbuster) but my skepticism about the Hollywood formulamachine's deepened (CASE-IN-POINT MONTAGE OF CLIPS from copycat fairy-tale and vampire-hunting flicks, 2011- ). I hope my critic's pencil hasn't lost its pointedness—with Tinseltown spending so much money on its products (which influence our language, attitudes, stereotypes and "liberal values" in all sorts of insidious ways), it's up to we critics to take them to task for lazy humour, clichéd writing or inane politics. Call me lofty-minded, but that's why I don't subscribe to the fashionable notion "so bad it's good." Or, as film editor Walter Murch puts it, "The danger of a well-made bad movie [when it's unambiguous or too literal] is that it crushes the imagination of the audience." So I distinguish a "movie" from a "film" and try to reflect the mood or tone of a flick as best I can to give its flavour to a reader without being snotty or dismissive (and apt puns

14 FILM

allow me to whimsically tweak my language to reflect the movie's preoccupations). In the past decade, some base Hollywood obsessions have continued (the man-child hero, gay-panic, comic-book adaptations, few roles for 40+ women, shockingly few female directors) even as VOD and the WWW make it easier to see more challenging, artful cinema outside major cities. And there's been a surge in top-drawer documentaries (from Capturing the Friedmans to Exit Through the Gift Shop), some exciting newcomer-directors (Andrea Arnold, Cristian Mungiu, Jeff Nichols, Andrei Zvyagintsev), promising filmmakers reaching maestro-status (PT Anderson, the Dardennes, Michael Haneke), and leading lights who've faded away (David Gordon-Green, Lukas Moodysson). I still remember the best films, especially one lustrous masterpiece I finally caught up with—Shinji Aoyama's Eureka (2000)—and I still hear, every month, the forsaken cries of three Chechen children who suddenly realize their mother's dying and they'll never see her again (in the documentary 3 Rooms of Melancholia). Those cries, and rending moments from other films, remind me that cinema must show us the difficult, even unbearable, moments that so many real people beyond the screen are simply, unartfully, living— the least we can do is bear witness. By contrast, my reviews are slight. But I hope, reader, you've been critically entertained by them; as much as I love the writing of them, I rarely end up liking them later (I'm proud of maybe five of my Vue reviews and columns over these 10 years). I hope, as Daniel Mendelsohn put it in an excellent contemplation of the critic's role, that I offer some passionate expertise and a clear sense of taste, adding up to a "meaningful judgement"—maybe even a gentle instructiveness, too, as Mendelsohn recalls from reading criticism when young: "I thought of these writers above all as teachers, and like all good teachers they taught by example; the example that they set, week after week, was to recreate on the page the drama of how they had arrived at their judgments." I can only trust that, in the strange, fleeting world of film reviews— where a brief criticism of a film, "new" for a week, appears in our little corner of the Net or newspaper page, soon to yellow and be blue-bagged— my analysis can, for a moment, jumpkick another insight, introduce a new favourite, or hair-trigger a thoughtful discussion. And that the best of my critiques can, somehow, honour the best of the cinema I've been lucky enough to view weekly. BRIAN GIBSON

// BRIAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Shut Up and Play the Hits

The long goodbye

Sun, Oct 7 – Mon, Oct 8 Directed by Will Lovelace and Dylan Southern Metro Cinema at the Garneau



'I

've never gone to a show and loved it without believing something about the people that are doing it," James Murphy admits in Shut Up and Play The Hits, sinking into a question posed by Chuck Klosterman from across the table in some ghostly quiet New York restaurant. He's about to reach the self-imposed end of his band, LCD Sounsystem, by playing a three-plus-hour sold-out Madison Square Garden show. The week leading up to it, the show itself and the morning after are all captured in Shut Up, a concert doc that gives you every reason to believe something about Murphy and the band he had, if you didn't already: highlighting a band ending its career on top of its game, and probing into the mind of the man behind its brilliance and its ending, either smart enough or self-conscious enough to embrace a burn-out rather than letting it all fade away. The film's structure is excellent: we get a scatter of songs throughout, performed in their entirety, probably the ones you'd want to hear (including "All My Friends," "Someone Great," "I Can Change" and the show-closing "New York, I Love You But You're Bringing Me Down"), all coming across as killer

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

live takes that are particularly well captured here. My favourite recurring camera shot is the static cam above the mosh pit. Interspersing those live cuts with the Klosterman interview gives it some beats (and insight into both Murphy and Klosterman's strangely brilliant minds). The only part of Shut Up that doesn't quite click is the "morning after" moments: elsewhere directors Will Lovelace and Dylan Southern's flyon-the-wall approach—no formal sit-down interview shots, never appearing before the camera—is skillfully executed, and fits: they don't give more context than is necessary, letting the captured footage do the work to highlight the sentiments of the moment. But the lack of acknowledgement starts to feel false as we follow Murphy along his morning after, mostly alone, walking his dog, and having a little cry in the old rehearsal space without ever acknowledging that there's a camera in the room with him. Still, it's used sparingly enough not to detract much from the concert film's other, much greater successes. Shut Up captures the exhilarating end to a band in a way that succeeds in living up to the film's title card boast, written across the opening black screen: "If it's the funeral, let's have the best funeral ever." PAUL BLINOV

// PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM


REVUE // TEENS FEELING STUFF!

The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Opens Friday Directed by Stephen Chbosky Princess Theatre



A

dolescence is a minefield, and no one seems to understand this better than Charlie (Logan Lerman), a freshman desperately counting down the days until he can leave the hell hole that is high school. Not to mention that he's embarking on that countdown in the wake of his best friend's suicide,

a constant battle with depression, a suppressed yet traumatic family secret coupled with an offbeat personality that doesn't quite fit in. A compassionate English teacher (Paul Rudd) notices Charlie's literary talents and intelligence on the first day, becoming a mentor for the teen, who dreams of becoming a writer. With a little new-found confidence during a football game, Charlie approaches a charismatic but outcast senior named Patrick (Ezra Miller), who's taking freshman

shop class with him. Charlie is immediately welcomed into the fold of Patrick's eccentric clique consisting of his poised step-sister Samantha (Emma Watson), who exudes an effortless sense of cool, and their friends—no questions asked. The group introduces him to a world removed from his own, where he feels a sense of camaraderie and acceptance that has become a foreign concept at school. As bad as things may seem for Charlie, he learns everyone has a little secret and things from their own past they're working through. Chbosky captures the highs and lows of adolescence, from a dizzyingly wonderful first kiss to crushing emotional blows with a sense of sympathy and profound insight. Perks avoids the pitfalls of cliché teen drama and brings a fresh take on the whole crazy time period, with the film's darker

undertones offset by clever, witty humour and solid, multi-dimesional characters effortlessly brought to life by the young cast.

with her own issues from her past and present. Sam is a departure from the cookie-cutter crush and a care-free spirit who Watson portrays with a polished performance that's a welcomed departure from her Hogwart's days. While Watson and Lerner shine, so does Miller as Patrick. Miller is able to embody his character to the fullest as he grapples with his sexuality and surreptitious relationship with the head jock of his school. His dark humour and sharp wit juxtaposes the powerful emotions he encounters, which are palpable through the screen. The Perks of Being a Wallflower is character-driven story where the bottom line is simply a strong plot with an impressive young cast, who create something honest and relatable.

Lerman is both heartbreaking and entertaining as Charlie, a young man with potential who has endured more than his fair share of hardships during his short life. Charlie inevitably begins to fall for Samantha, and his affection, although misplaced, as Sam continues to date another, is done with such endearing sincerity you can't help but root for him. Overall, Lerman portrays Charlie with a quiet sense of humour and maturity far beyond the young actor's years. Watson is the object of affection, but her character's personality runs far deeper, and she brings a sense of security to Charlie's life as she deals

MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAHGAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

REVUE // APARTHEID

Winnie

-Peter Travers

“THE BEST MOVIE I’VE SEEN ALL YEAR!”

during Winnie's 18-month stint in solitary confinement, where she has nothing but the ants in her cell to talk to as the poorly acted guards attempt to crack her.

Mother of a nation

Opens Friday Directed by Darrell James Roodt



T

he biopic of Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, second wife of revolutionary political figure Nelson Mandela, gives a well-intended glimpse into the life of the woman behind the apartheid revolution. However, when it's all said and done, Winnie doesn't quite hit the mark. The first half of the film, while mostly historically accurate, plays up a great deal of Nelson's (Terrance Howard) rise to the forefront of the revolution without developing Winnie's (Jennifer Hudson) story as much as it should have for a film based around her. The pair meet in Johannesburg while Winnie is attending school to become the country's first

black social worker, and after resisting his early advances, Winnie begins to fall for Nelson. Hudson portrays Winnie at this point in her life with an air of independence and ambition, while Howard captures the drive of Nelson's political efforts despite coming off as a bit of a playboy in others. The couple doesn't get to enjoy their romance for long, as government officials stand watch during their wedding ceremony and burst in to arrest Nelson not long after the wedding takes place. Conditions worsen for her husband, and Winnie begins to rise as the "Mother of a Nation," continuing her husband's fight even after he is sentenced to life in prison. Hudson delivers a commendable performance during her character's strong moments just as effectively as she does

Winnie becomes an internationally recognized figure, and gains tremendous support as she fights for racial equality, but falls from grace when a young activist in her care—part of the Mandela United Football Club, who are essentially a lynch mob—is accused of being a traitor and beaten to death. Her role in the case feels glossed over in the film, despite her actually serving jail time for the incident. Howard's portrayal of Nelson is strong at times, but uneven. As he ages, a poor makeup job that tends to give him a rubbery appearance doesn't help make him be any more convincing. It's a well-produced piece when it comes to nailing the look and feel of different decades, and while the story itself does shine during particular moments, such as when Winnie begins to take control and Hudson embodies her strong, ambitious character, but the film fails to dig a little deeper than the historical surface to give a more multi-dimensional account of who Winnie really is.

-A.O. Scott

“IT IS A MOVIE ABOUT THE LURE AND FOLLY OF

GREATNESS THAT COMES AS CLOSE AS ANYTHING I’VE SEEN RECENTLY TO BEING A GREAT MOVIE. JOAQUIN PHOENIX, PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN AND AMY ADAMS GIVE PERFORMANCES THAT DEFY COMPREHENSION... COUNT ME IN.”

Written and Directed by

PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON grey 50%, white backgound

MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PHILIP AMY JOAQUIN PHOENIX SEYMOUR HOFFMAN ADAMS

COARSE LANGUAGE, NUDITY, SEXUAL CONTENT

TheMasterFilm.com FACEBOOK.COM/EONEFILMS

NOW PLAYING

YOUTUBE.COM/EONEFILMS

CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORY FOR SHOWTIMES

AIM_VUE_OCT4_QTR_MASTER Allied Integrated Marketing EDMONTON VUE

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

FILM 15


FILM WEEKLY

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE'S MOST WANTED 3D (G)

DAILY 4:05, 6:40, 9:10

FRI, OCT 5 - THU, OCT 11, 2012

PREMIUM RUSH (14A) FRI-TUE 1:35, 4:10, 7:00, 9:20;

CHABA THEATRE–JASPER

TOTAL RECALL (14A violence) FRI-TUE 1:10, 4:30, 7:10,

6094 Connaught Dr Jasper 780.852.4749

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) FRI-SAT 7:00, 9:00; SUN-THU 8:00; SAT-SUN 1:30

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) FRI-SAT 7:00, 9:00; SUN-THU 8:00; SAT-SUN 1:30

DUGGAN CINEMA–CAMROSE 6601-48 Ave Camrose 780.608.2144 ALL NEW STATE OF THE ART DIGITAL

WED-THU 4:10, 7:00, 9:20

9:50; WED-THU 4:30, 7:10, 9:50

TED (18A crude content, substance abuse) FRI-TUE 1:45, 4:40, 7:30, 9:55; WED-THU 4:40, 7:30, 9:55 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (G) FRI-TUE 1:50, 4:35, 6:55, 9:15; WED-THU 4:35, 6:55, 9:15

HIT & RUN (14A nudity, crude coarse language, violence) FRI-TUE 1:25, 4:00, 7:20, 9:40; WED-THU 4:00, 7:20, 9:40

THE MISTRESS (14A coarse language, mature subject

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) DAILY 7:20, 9:25; SAT-MON 2:00

matter) FRI-TUE 12:55, 3:45, 6:35, 9:35; WED-THU 3:45, 6:35, 9:35

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) DAILY 7:00, 9:00; SAT-

BARFI! (PG) Hindi W/E.S.T. FRI-TUE 1:40, 4:45, 8:00; WED-

FRANKENWEENIE (PG) DAILY 7:10, 9:05; SAT-MON

HEROINE (PG coarse language, substance abuse) Hindi

MON 1:00, 3:00

THU 4:45, 8:00

FRANKENWEENIE 3D (PG) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI, SUN 1:10, 3:30, 5:50, 8:10, 10:20; SAT 11:00, 1:10, 3:30, 5:50, 8:10, 10:20; MON 12:30, 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:35; TUE-THU 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:35 RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION 3D (14A gory violence) Closed Captioned FRI-SUN, TUE-THU 2:00, 5:20, 7:45, 10:05; MON 1:10, 5:20, 7:45, 10:05 HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (14A violence)

Closed Captioned FRI, TUE-THU 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50; SATMON 2:30, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50

THE CAMPAIGN (14A crude sexual content, coarse language) Closed Captioned DAILY 4:20, 9:10

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) FRI, SUN-TUE,

THU 1:50, 4:45, 7:40, 10:30; SAT 11:15, 1:50, 4:45, 7:40, 10:30; WED 4:45, 7:40, 10:30; Star & Strollers Screening WED 1:00

DREDD 3D (18A gory brutal violence) Closed Captioned DAILY 2:20, 5:10, 8:15, 10:35

WON'T BACK DOWN (PG) Closed Captioned DAILY

ENGLISH VINGLISH (STC) Hindi W/E.S.T. FRI-TUE 1:00, 3:50, 6:45, 9:30; WED-THU 3:50, 6:45, 9:30

FINDING NEMO 3D (G) Closed Captioned FRI-WED 1:15,

SAT-MON 1:45

PITCH PERFECT (PG language may offend, crude

PINKY MOGE WALI (PG violence) Punjabi W/E.S.T.

5074-130 Ave 780.472.9779

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG violence, frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) FRI-TUE 1:00 THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 3D (PG violence,

frightening scenes, not recommended for young children) DAILY 3:55, 6:50, 9:45

MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE'S MOST WANTED (G) FRI-TUE 1:15

CINEPLEX ODEON NORTH

3:45, 6:45, 9:15; THU 1:15, 3:45, 6:45

5:40, 8:00, 10:15; TUE-THU 6:20, 8:45

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) Closed Captioned, No Passes SAT-MON 12:00

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG coarse language) OCT 5: 7:00, 9:30

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) OCT 5: 6:55, 9:35 METRO CINEMA AT THE GARNEAU Metro at the Garneau: 8712-109 St 780.425.9212

Admission Price, Dolby Stereo Digital, Reald 3D, Stadium Seating FRI-TUE 12:25, 3:15, 6:45, 9:30; WED 3:25, 6:45, 9:00; THU 3:25, 6:50, 9:45

GRUB-STAKE (1928) (G) FRI 7:00

PITCH PERFECT (14A language may offend, crude

KUMARE (STC) SUN 1:00, 7:00; MON 2:00, 9:15; WED 9:15

SING-A-LONG SOUND OF MUSIC (G) SAT 1:00, 7:00 SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED (14A coarse language) SUN 2:45; MON 4:00

SHUT UP & PLAY THE HITS (14A coarse language, language may offend) SUN 2:45; MON 7:00

EDMONTON FILM SCHOOL - 2012 FILMS (STC)

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG coarse language) END OF WATCH (14A coarse language, violence) DAILY 1:45, 4:30, 7:30, 10:10

PITCH PERFECT (14A language may offend, crude

content, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI, SUN-THU 1:40, 4:15, 6:50, 9:30; SAT 11:40, 1:40, 4:15, 6:50, 9:30

THE MASTER (14A coarse language, nudity, sexual

violence) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Reald 3D, Stadium Seating SUN-TUE 1:15, 4:10, 7:10, 10:20; WED 4:00, 6:25, 8:50; THU 4:00, 8:50

CLAREVIEW 10 4211-139 Ave 780.472.7600

RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION 3D (14A gory violence) Digital 3D FRI 9:35; SAT-SUN 4:15, 9:35; MON 4:15; TUE-THU 5:20 DREDD 3D (18A gory brutal violence) Digital 3D FRI 7:00; SAT-SUN 1:45, 7:00; MON 1:45, 8:05; TUE-THU 8:05

END OF WATCH (14A coarse language, violence) Digital

content) FRI, TUE-THU 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00; SAT-MON 12:45, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00

FRI 6:50, 9:25; SAT-SUN 1:35, 4:10, 6:50, 9:25; MON 1:35, 4:10, 7:45; TUE-THU 5:00, 7:45

THE SECRET GARDEN (STC) SAT 11:00

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG coarse language)

CINEPLEX ODEON SOUTH 1525-99 St 780.436.8585

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) No Passes FRI-MON 12:00, 2:35; TUE-THU 12:45, 3:05

Closed Captioned FRI-MON 1:15, 3:45, 7:20, 10:05; TUE-THU 1:45, 4:35, 7:50, 10:25

THE CAMPAIGN (14A crude sexual content, coarse

language) Closed Captioned FRI-MON 1:10, 3:25, 5:40, 8:00, 10:25; TUE-WED 1:30, 3:50, 6:00, 8:10, 10:25; THU 1:30, 3:50, 6:00, 8:10

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) FRI-MON 1:05, 4:10, 7:10, 10:00; TUE-THU 1:20, 4:10, 7:10, 10:00

DREDD 3D (18A gory brutal violence) Closed Captioned FRI-MON 1:25, 4:25, 7:30, 9:55; TUE-THU 2:00, 4:45, 7:30,

10:15

WON'T BACK DOWN (PG) Closed Captioned FRI-MON

12:05, 6:35; TUE-WED 12:50, 3:40, 6:40; THU 12:50

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (14A violence) Closed Captioned FRI-MON 3:00, 9:25; TUE-WED 9:25; THU 3:40 ARGO (14A) THU 10:25

Digital FRI 7:05, 9:30; SAT-SUN 1:05, 3:40, 7:05, 9:30; MON 1:05, 3:40, 7:55; TUE-THU 5:15, 7:55

1:10, 6:30; MON 1:10, 7:30; TUE-THU 7:30

SAT-SUN 3:50, 8:50; MON 3:50; TUE-THU 5:10

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) Digital FRI 6:40, 9:20; SAT-SUN 1:15, 4:00, 6:40, 9:20; MON 1:15, 4:00, 7:35; TUE-THU 4:50, 7:35

WON'T BACK DOWN (PG) Digital FRI-SUN 9:15; MON-

THU 7:45

FRANKENWEENIE (PG) Digital SAT-MON 1:40 FRANKENWEENIE 3D (PG) Digital 3D FRI 6:45, 9:00;

Closed Captioned FRI-MON 12:55, 4:05, 6:50, 9:30; TUE 12:55, 3:40, 6:40, 9:20; WED 12:55, 3:40, 9:35; THU 1:00, 3:45, 6:45, 9:25

END OF WATCH (14A coarse language, violence) FRI-

MON 1:00, 3:50, 7:00, 9:50; TUE-THU 1:40, 4:15, 7:30, 10:10

PITCH PERFECT (14A language may offend, crude content, not recommended for young children) No Passes FRI-MON 1:20, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35; TUE-WED 1:25, 4:05, 6:55, 9:50; THU 4:05, 7:45, 10:30; Star & Strollers Screening, No Passes THU 1:00 THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER (14A)

Closed Captioned FRI-MON 12:35, 3:20, 6:30, 9:15; TUE-WED 1:10, 3:55, 7:00, 9:45; THU 3:55, 7:00, 9:45; Star & Strollers Screening THU 1:00

THE MASTER (14A coarse language, nudity, sexual

content) FRI-MON 12:25, 3:35, 6:40, 9:45; TUE-THU 12:40, 3:45, 6:50, 9:55

THE SECRET GARDEN (STC) SAT 11:00 NT LIVE: THE LAST OF THE HAUSSMANS (Clas-

sification not available) THU 7:00

CINEPLEX ODEON WINDERMERE CINEMAS Cineplex Odeon Windermere & Vip Cinemas, 6151 Currents Dr Nw Edmonton 780.822.4250

NT LIVE: THE LAST OF THE HAUSSMANS (Classification not available) VIP 18+ THU 7:00

CITY CENTRE 9 10200-102 Ave 780.421.7020

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) Bargain Mati-

nee, Child Admission Price, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital FRI-TUE 1:05, 4:00, 7:00, 10:15; WED-THU 3:55, 7:00, 9:50

THE MASTER (14A coarse language, nudity, sexual

content) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI-TUE 12:10, 3:20, 6:30, 9:40; WED 3:15, 6:30, 9:40; THU 3:15, 6:30, 8:55

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG coarse language)

FRI 6:20; SAT-SUN, TUE 1:15, 3:50, 6:20; MON, WED-THU 5:30

WON'T BACK DOWN (PG) FRI-SUN, TUE 9:00; MON, WED-THU 8:00

FRANKENWEENIE (PG) SAT-SUN, TUE 1:10 SUN, TUE 3:30, 6:45, 8:50; MON, WED-THU 6:15, 8:45

4:30, 6:50, 9:40; MON, WED-THU 6:10, 8:40

PITCH PERFECT (14A language may offend, crude con-

tent, not recommended for young children) FRI 6:40, 9:15; SAT-SUN, TUE 1:20, 4:00, 6:40, 9:15; MON, WED-THU 5:45, 8:15

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) FRI 6:30, 9:10;

SAT-SUN, TUE 1:00, 3:40, 6:30, 9:10; MON, WED-THU 5:40, 8:20

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) FRI 7:00; SAT-SUN, TUE 1:40, 7:00; MON, WED-THU 6:00

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) Reald 3D FRI 9:20; SAT-SUN, TUE 4:20, 9:20; MON, WED-THU 8:30

PRINCESS 10337-82 Ave 780.433.0728

SAMSARA (PG nudity, mature subject matter) FRI 7:00, 9:10; SAT-MON 2:30, 7:00, 9:10; TUE-THU 7:00, 9:10

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) Digital, No Passes, On 2 Screens

FRI 6:45, 7:10, 9:05, 9:30; SAT-SUN 1:20, 1:50, 3:40, 4:20, 6:45, 7:10, 9:05, 9:30; MON 1:20, 1:50, 3:40, 4:20, 7:40, 8:10; TUETHU 5:00, 5:30, 7:40, 8:10

GALAXY–SHERWOOD PARK 2020 Sherwood Dr Sherwood Park 780.416.0150

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) Closed Captioned, No

Passes FRI-MON 12:00, 2:20

FRANKENWEENIE 3D (PG) No Passes FRI-MON 12:40,

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG coarse language)

FRI 7:10, 9:30; SAT-SUN, TUE 1:30, 4:10, 7:10, 9:30; MON, WED-THU 5:50, 8:10

PITCH PERFECT (14A language may offend, crude content, not recommended for young children) Digital, No Passes FRI 6:40, 9:15; SAT-SUN 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:15; MON 1:00, 3:45, 7:50; TUE-THU 5:10, 7:50

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI, SUN-MON 12:15, 2:40, 5:15, 7:40, 10:15; SAT 11:05, 2:40, 5:15, 7:40, 10:15; TUE-THU 1:05, 3:30, 6:45, 9:10 12:45, 3:10, 5:45, 8:10, 10:35; TUE-THU 1:35, 4:00, 7:15, 9:40

130 Century Crossing Spruce Grove 780.962.2332

HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (14A violence)

THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER (14A) FRI

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) Closed Captioned,

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) Ultraavx, No Passes FRI-MON

EMPIRE THEATRES–SPRUCE GROVE

SAT-SUN 4:10, 6:45, 9:00; MON 4:10, 8:00; TUE-THU 4:45, 8:00

FINDING NEMO 3D (G) Closed Captioned FRI-MON 12:40, 3:15, 5:50, 8:25; TUE-THU 12:50, 3:25, 6:00, 8:35

FILMS (STC) THU 7:00

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) FRI 6:50, 9:40; SAT-SUN, TUE 1:50,

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) Digital 3D FRI 8:50;

HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (14A violence)

SKIERS SPORT SHOP 5OTH ANNIVERSARY SKI

FRANKENWEENIE 3D (PG) Reald 3D FRI 6:45, 8:50; SAT-

FRANKENWEENIE 3D (PG) No Passes FRI-MON 12:20,

violence) Closed Captioned FRI-MON 12:35, 2:50, 5:25, 7:55, 10:20; TUE-THU 2:05, 4:50, 7:20, 10:05

WED 5:00

HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (14A violence) HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) Digital FRI 6:30; SAT-SUN

RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION 3D (14A gory

OUR CITY DREAMS (STC) TUE 7:00

Digital FRI 6:35; SAT-SUN 1:20, 4:00, 6:35; MON 1:20, 4:00; TUE-THU 4:45

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) No Passes FRI-MON 5:10, 7:45, 10:10; TUE-THU 5:25, 7:45, 10:05 2:55, 5:30, 8:05, 10:30; TUE-WED 1:00, 3:20, 5:40, 8:00, 10:20; THU 1:05, 3:20, 5:40, 8:00, 10:20

16 FILM

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) OCT 5: 7:05, 9:20

RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION 3D (14A gory

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) Closed Captioned, No

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) No Passes FRI-MON

OCT 5: 6:50, 9:25

7:10, 9:40

TUE-THU 2:15, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40; SAT-MON 12:00, 2:15, 4:40,

Closed Captioned DAILY1:05, 3:50, 6:40, 9:20

1:00

HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (14A violence)

THE ROOM (14A nudity, sexual content) SUN 9:00

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) No Passes FRI-MON 1:00, Passes SAT 11:30; Closed Captioned, No Passes SUN-MON 12:15; Star & Strollers Screening, No Passes WED

FRANKENWEENIE 3D (PG) Bargain Matinee, Child

4702-50 St Leduc 780.986-2728 ALL NEW STATE OF THE ART DIGITAL Date of Issue Only:

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI,

1:20, 3:40, 6:00, 8:20, 10:40; SAT 11:05, 1:20, 3:40, 6:00, 8:20, 10:40

3:15; TUE,THU 1:10, 3:30; WED 3:30

sion Price, Closed Captioned, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI-TUE 12:55, 3:50, 6:50, 10:10; WED-THU 3:50, 6:55, 9:30

LEDUC CINEMAS

Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating SUN-TUE 12:15, 3:05, 6:05, 9:25; WED 3:20, 6:00, 8:55; THU 3:20, 6:00

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) Ultraavx, No Passes FRI, SUN-THU

14231-137 Ave 780.732.2236

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) Bargain Matinee, Child Admis-

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG coarse language)

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) DAILY 6:45, 9:15;

CINEMA CITY MOVIES 12

Digital, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI-SAT 12:40, 3:45, 7:00, 10:10; SUN-TUE 12:50, 3:40, 6:40, 10:00; WED-THU 3:30, 6:20, 9:10

ARGO (14A) THU 10:00

1:30, 6:30

W/E.S.T. FRI-TUE 1:05, 4:20, 7:45; WED-THU 4:20, 7:45

FRI-TUE 1:30, 4:25, 7:25; WED-THU 4:25, 7:25

WON'T BACK DOWN (PG) Child Admission Price,

content, not recommended for young children) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, Stadium Seating FRI-TUE 12:45, 3:30, 6:30, 9:50; WED-THU 3:40, 6:35, 9:20

1:15, 3:15

content, not recommended for young children) DAILY 6:50, 9:20; SAT-MON 1:50

END OF WATCH (14A coarse language, violence) Bargain Matinee, Child Admission Price, Digital Presentation, Dolby Stereo Digital, P.M. FRI-SAT 12:35, 3:25, 6:20, 9:35; SUN-TUE 12:35, 3:25, 6:20, 9:40; WED 3:45, 9:35; THU 3:45, 6:45, 9:35

No Passes FRI-MON 4:40, 7:00, 9:20; TUE-THU 7:00, 9:20

3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00; TUE-THU 7:40, 10:00

RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION 3D (14A gory vio-

lence) Closed Captioned FRI-MON 4:15, 9:30; TUE-THU 9:30

HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (14A violence) Closed Captioned FRI-MON 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:35, 10:10; TUE-THU 7:35, 10:10

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) FRI-MON 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:15; TUE-THU 7:30, 10:15

DREDD 3D (18A gory brutal violence) Closed Captioned FRI-MON 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:40; TUE-THU 7:10, 9:40

WON'T BACK DOWN (PG) Closed Captioned FRI-MON

1:20, 6:40; TUE-THU 6:40

FINDING NEMO 3D (G) Closed Captioned FRI-MON 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55; TUE-THU 7:20, 9:55

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI-

MON 12:50, 3:10, 5:30, 7:50, 10:15; TUE-THU 7:50, 10:15

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG coarse language)

Closed Captioned FRI-MON 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:35; TUE-THU 6:50, 9:35

PITCH PERFECT (14A language may offend, crude

6:50, 9:00; SAT-MON 2:00, 6:50, 9:00; TUE-THU 6:50, 9:00

SCOTIABANK THEATRE WEM WEM 8882-170 St 780.444.2400

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) No Passes FRI-TUE, THU

12:45, 3:00; Closed Captioned, No Passes WED 3:10; Star & Strollers Screening, No Passes WED 1:00

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) No Passes FRI-TUE, THU 5:20, 7:40, 10:00; Closed Captioned, No Passes WED 5:20, 7:40, 10:00

FRANKENWEENIE (PG) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video, No Passes DAILY 12:45, 2:50, 5:10

RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION 3D (14A gory violence) DAILY 12:50, 3:10, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30

THE EXPENDABLES 2 (14A gory violence) Closed Cap-

tioned FRI-WED 1:40, 4:20, 7:25, 10:15; THU 1:40, 4:20, 10:40

HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (14A violence) Closed Captioned DAILY 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 10:10

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) FRI-TUE, THU

2:00, 5:00, 7:50, 10:45; WED 5:00, 7:50, 10:45; Star & Strollers Screening WED 1:00

DREDD 3D (18A gory brutal violence) DAILY 1:00, 3:25, 5:45, 8:15, 10:40

WON'T BACK DOWN (PG) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video FRI-WED 1:15, 7:00; THU 1:15

ARGO (14A) THU 10:00 FINDING NEMO 3D (G) FRI-TUE 1:45, 4:30, 7:10, 9:45; WED 1:30, 4:00, 9:45; THU 1:45, 4:30, 7:10

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video, No Passes DAILY 7:30, 10:00

TAKEN 2 (14A violence) Ultraavx, No Passes DAILY 1:20,

3:40, 6:00, 8:20, 10:45

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG coarse language) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video DAILY 4:00, 9:50

content, not recommended for young children) Closed Captioned, No Passes FRI-MON 1:40, 4:20, 7:05, 9:45; TUETHU 7:05, 9:45

END OF WATCH (14A coarse language, violence)

THE SECRET GARDEN (STC) SAT 11:00

FRANKENWEENIE: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE

GRANDIN THEATRE–ST ALBERT

DAILY1:50, 4:40, 7:45, 10:20

(PG) No Passes DAILY 1:10, 3:30, 5:50, 8:10, 10:25

FRANKENWEENIE (PG) DAILY 12:45, 2:30, 4:15, 6:05,

PITCH PERFECT (14A language may offend, crude content, not recommended for young children) Closed Caption & Descriptive Video, No Passes DAILY 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:40

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) DAILY 1:45,

sification not available) THU 7:00

Grandin Mall Sir Winston Churchill Ave St Albert 780.458.9822

7:55 9:30

4:20, 7:00, 9:15

HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (14A violence)

NT LIVE: THE LAST OF THE HAUSSMANS (ClasWETASKIWIN CINEMAS Wetaskiwin 780.352.3922 Date of Issue Only:

DAILY 9:05

THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (G) DAILY 12:55, 2:55

HOPE SPRINGS (14A) DAILY 4:55, 7:05 TAKEN 2 (14A violence) DAILY 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:20, 9:25 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG) No free admission passes accepted DAILY 1:00, 3:00, 4:50, 6:50, 8:45

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

HOUSE AT THE END OF THE STREET (14A violence) OCT 5: 6:50, 9:25

TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG coarse language) OCT 5: 7:00, 9:30

LOOPER (14A violence, coarse language) OCT 5: 6:55, 9:35 HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3D (PG) OCT 5: 7:05, 9:20


ARTS

PREVUE // DANCE

Caught in the inbetween Inheritor Album explores the tension of a plateau

Fri, Oct 5 – Sat, Oct 6 (8 pm) Inheritor Album Presented by the Brian Webb Dance Company Timms Centre for the Arts, $20 – $35

I

Bodies in motion: the 605 Collective

t's the feeling of reaching an artistic plateau: not quite at the peak but far beyond the first steps, existing somewhere between the two. A transitional place that the 605 Collective, a particularly athletic dance corps on the rise, seems to find itself caught up in now. "It's frustrating and exciting," explains Josh Martin, attaching a knowing sort of laugh to the statement. "There's the feeling that you're stuck behind, you're not quite far enough along to feel like you're really making huge impact, but at the same time you can see that there's this younger generation coming up and you want to make sure that you're setting the right pathway for them, or that you're doing things that will positively affect them. And so you don't really have your hands on the reins yet, but you know what you'd do if you had them." With that in mind, the 605 Collective's Inheritor Album, explores tension of that plateau, of artistically being caught in the inbetween. The idea came from the collective's core—Martin, Lisa Gelley and Shay Kuebler—looking to find an agreedupon term to ground their collaborative creation process. "This word, 'inheritor' came out, and thinking about where we were, in terms of age and generations and finding ourselves starting to kind of bridge in that

middle period now," explains Martin, who originally hails from Camrose. "Where we're starting to see what we're leaving behind and what we're now receiving from the people in front of us. And so it was just kind of a perfect place to start approaching that idea." The idea proved itself a particularly rich vein to tap into, becoming a flow of short works instead of one encompassing piece (hence "album"), featuring six dancers and integrating some projected film/animations from Miwa Matreyek alongside an electronic score. Even in as physically demanding a discipline as dance, the 605 Collective are known for pushing the levels of exertion a little beyond, Martin notes, what they're actually able to do. But reaching past their limits is one way the collective looks to forge a connection

between artist and audience. "I think that a lot of the times, you go see a ballet performance and it's all about perfection, seeing these people gracefully and so easily float across the stage and do these amazing things with their bodies," he says. "But you don't get a sense of how hard that is. And how much struggle and effort has gone into that. And I think by showing that, and by pushing ourselves just slightly beyond what we're capable of, you start to have a bit more in terms of your connection of it. "It feels much more natural onstage to let the audience empathize with what they're seeing," he continues. "To see that it's not about being perfect, it's not about hiding anything. It's about showing everything." PAUL BLINOV

// PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

October 13: Poetry Cabaret. This unique gathering of celebrated Canadian voices represents the past, present and future of poetry that breathes new life into the language as it stirs the audience’s imagination. 9:30 p.m. at The Club, Theatre Complex in Banff. Tickets are $20.

October 27 – November 4: The 2012 Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival. Celebrate the 37th Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival!

Experience the adventure of climbing, mountain expeditions, remote cultures, and the world’s last great wild places – all brought to life at The Banff Centre.

October 27 & 28: Opening Weekend Film Screening. The opening weekend of the 2012 Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival features four unique film programs delivering adventure from around the world. Saturday and Sunday at 12:00 p.m. & 3:30 p.m at the Eric Harvie Theatre in Banff. Tickets are $10 per program. November 15 - 25: Bon Appetit Banff. Send your taste buds to new heights during this ten day culinary festival. Get amazing value for money as participating restaurants offer unique course menus.

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

ARTS 17


REVUE // VISUAL ARTS

Around the Sun

A change of seasons: a moment in Dan Hudson's Around The Sun // Dan Hudson

Until Sat, Oct 13 Works by Dan Hudson Harcourt House Gallery

I HARCOURT HOUSE ARTIST RUN CENTRE

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS | FALL 2012 FABRICATION: YOUTH SOFT SCULPTURE CLASS instructed by Carly Greene September 19th –October 10th | 4 Weds, 5:30pm –8:30pm

ANIMAL ANATOMY BASICS PART 1 & PART 2 instructed by Daniel Schneider October 13th, 14th, 20th & 21st | Sat & Sun 10am –5pm

NOT YOUR GRANDMA’S ART CLASS! instructed by Angela Skaley October 4th –October 18th | 3 Thurs, 5:30pm –8:30pm

AND MORE... for more info or to register visit our website at harcourthouse.ab.ca or call us at 780.426.4180 edmonton

arts council

Alberta

Foundation for the Arts

THE CITY OF

VUE WEEKLY

n our fast-forward world it's easy to tire of nearly everything. Groundbreaking news is soon forgotten. Innovative technologies grow out of date. Only a few things never grow tiresome. No matter how old or how young, it's eternally fascinating to see trees turning rainbow colours, or to watch city streets transform to rivers in the spring. Those long awaited seasonal changes have been miraculously condensed for us into a mere four-minutes through the carefully crafted video technology of Dan Hudson in his installation Around the Sun. Hudson created this time machine magic through a labourious process of nearly daily videotaping in identical locations for a year. He used trees and other markers as his guides to make sure that his camera was in exactly the same spot—hoping that his markers would not be cut down as one of the trees was during the process. He went out no matter what the weather: sleet, snow or hot summer days. The result of his labours is a video environment that encompasses the viewer. Three wall-sized projections greet me at the entrance of the show.

Simple white benches in the gallery beckon. I sit as in a park: reflect and watch the surrounding scenery. On the south wall is a video of a desolate mountain range. To the east, is the busy hubbub of a sidewalk with streaming tourists. Across, a semi-remote park that comes alive with skaters and picnickers. These common postcard views have an extraordinary twist: seasons change with breathtaking speed. Time rushes in endless cycles. The repetitive drone of an instrument—perhaps a sitar—permeates the gallery. It gives these videos a vivid flavour of India. I begin to feel as if the artist was transporting me to an Ashram: not listening to a guru, but looking at a discourse on time. It's a concept that Hinduism contemplated for centuries. Unlike western ideas where time is secular and linear (Genesis is the beginning that leads to an inevitable end) Hindu perceptions are cyclical. There is no end to time. Destruction leads to creation. Winter portends new beginning. It makes for fascinating cultural differences: in Judeo Christianity, God creates time; in Hinduism, Brahman is time.

acceleration of time, are disrupted by his choice of simultaneous audio tracks that creates a cacophony in an otherwise contemplative atmosphere. It's impossible to discern anything but fragments of words. The artist statement explains these are news broadcasts from various time periods. There is no such thing as the good old days; yesterday's news is recycled like old leaves. Yet, these fragmented, undecipherable broadcasts become little more than noise pollution, the kind that disrupts contemplation of this deeply philosophical artwork. Despite mixed success of the jarring audio superimposed onto hypnotic videos, Hudson's theme of time is remarkable and almost historically unprecedented. It may be a fascinating coincidence that another video artist, Christian Marclay has addressed this theme in his show The Clock, currently on display at the Harbourfront Centre in Toronto. Perhaps the time to contemplate time has grown urgent, the speed of life perilous. Shows like Hudson's seat me down for a few minutes on a white bench, as on the edge of a river, and help me watch and contemplate time's flow.

My ruminations on Eastern philosophy, inspired by Hudson's uncanny

AGNIESZKA MATEJKO

The Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival’s

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14

7 pm ● $20 Adult / $15 Student CALL 780-459-1542 ● ARDENTHEATRE.COM OR Cultural Services

18 ARTS

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

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PREVUE // CLEAN LAUGHS

E D M ONTO N O P E R A P R E S E NTS

Joe Avati

TH E AN N UAL PART Y O N TH E O PERA S E T SATU R DAY, OC TOB E R 20, 2012 PM

// J U B I L E E AU D ITO R I U M S TAG E

ST ST O AG R M E

9

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– featuring performances by –

MITCH MATIC // F&M E D M O N TO N O P E RA C H O R U S – fashion show by –

TH R E AD H I LL

Keepin' it clean: stand-up comedian Joe Avati

Sat, Oct 6 (8 pm) Back to Basics Tour Citadel Theatre, $53

J

oe Avati is the most famous comedian you've never heard of, but he wouldn't have it any other way. Avati has travelled the world and lived a rockstar lifestyle, minus being hounded by the paparazzi day and night. He flies under the radar, but still effortlessly sells out arenas and has launched himself into the upper echelons of the comedy industry with the likes of Jerry Seinfeld, Russell Brand, Robin Williams and Bill Cosby. After flexing his comedic chops for friends at parties, Avati moved on to larger venues, and did his first show at age 21. It wasn't long before Avati left his day job as a food scientist developing ice creams for a full-time comedic career. Now, at 38, despite the confidence he exudes onstage, Avati admits he's a shy guy, and stadium crowds—which can mean up to 9000 people—haven't become any easier to tackle with time. "Anywhere from 500 to 3000 seats is easy, but once you start getting into stadiums it becomes a lot harder, because how do you control 9000 people at the same time and get them to laugh at a same time? It's a completely different animal that's daunting but very, very rewarding," Avati says. Fame is great, but the rewarding aspect of comedy for Avati is the metaphysical side and its effect on people. He says comedy can bring people together and evoke great, positive energy, which also has the strength to heal. "I've had a few people who have said they've taken my CDs or DVDs into chemotherapy with them and I've helped them get through that," he recalls.

Avati's brand of comedy is one that has been able to resonate across generations, particularly thanks to its clean nature. However, it could have very well gone in the opposite direction, considering he apprenticed under Austen Tayshus, a comedian known for offending audiences. "I always thought if my parents or grandparents were in my audience, would they be offended by what I'm saying? If I thought they would, I wouldn't do it; I felt embarrassed," Avati says, adding Bill Cosby is one of his influences when it comes to the style. Avati keeps his material current by focusing it on the happenings within his vivacious Italian family, and speaks in Italian and English when performing to capture the nuances of each character's personality. His Back to Basics tour may be a return to the straight-up stand-up style that launched his career, but he promises a host of new characters and material along with his trademark cultural flair. "It's easier to be funny in both languages. Being funny in Italian adds a lot of depth to the characters I play onstage because your Italian grandmother, when she talks to you, she throws in words in Italian. She doesn't speak all English, so it's more realistic," he says of his shows, where he tends to make fun of himself as well, something his says is a very Australian thing to do and doesn't happen a lot in North American comedy. "Making fun of myself as an Italian was unique and also being an Italian/Australian ... everyone's looking at me going, 'You look like a wop from Brooklyn, but you sound like the Crocodile Hunter,' so it's almost exotic to a lot of people." MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

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ARTS 19


ARTS WEEKLY FAX YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO 780.426.2889 OR EMAIL LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3pm

rose • 780.672.5510 • baileytheatre.com • Charlotte's Web (G); Oct 14, 2pm; $5 (door) • Aliens (R); Oct 14, 7pm; $5 (door)

CINEMA AT THE CENTRE • Stanley A. Milner Library Theatre (basement) • Surviving Progress (PG); Oct 10, 6:30pm EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY • Royal Alberta Museum Auditorium, 12845-102 Ave • royalalbertamuseum.ca • $6 (adult)/$5 (senior 65 and over/ student)/$3 (child) • Houseboat; Oct 15, 8pm

DANCE

GLORIA! • Timms Centre for the Arts (112 St &

87 Ave) • citieballet.ca • A mixed program of pointe, modern and neoclassical dance • Oct 12 at 7:30pm, Oct 14 at 2:30pm

MILE ZERO DANCE • Secret Location (will be disclosed upon purchase of ticket) • milezerodance.com • October: By Tedi Tafel • Oct 10 - 13, 7:30pm & 8:45pm • $20, $15 (members); call or email for reservations: 780.424.1573, admin@ milezerodance.com

FILM FORUM • Stanley A. Milner Library • Series

of film screenings followed by facilitated discussions. Join us this summer for another round of intriguing films and guest speakers • Mulholland Drive; Oct 13, 1:30pm

FROM BOOKS TO FILM SERIES • Stanley

A. Milner Library, Main Fl, Audio Visual Rm • 780.944.5383 • Gunga Din (PG); Oct 5, 2pm • Bringing Up Baby (G); Oct 12, 2pm

UP FOR DISCUSSION: A FILM SERIES • Stan-

FILM ARDEN THEATRE • 5 Anne St, St. Albert • 780.459.1542 • ardentheatre.com • Radical Reels: The Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival's travelling movie event. Featuring an entire array of extreme sports; Oct 14, 7:30 pm • $20 (adult), $15 (student) BAILEY THEATRE–Camrose • 5041-50 St, Cam-

ART BEAT GALLERY • 26 St. Anne St, St. Albert • 780.459.3679 • artbeat.ab.ca • Opening show: New artwork by Fatima Khair; Oct 4, 6-9pm

CROOKED POT GALLERY–Stony Plain • 4912-51 Ave, Stony Plain • 780.963.9573 • LEAVING SUMMER BEHIND: featuring works of Clarice Cameron and Dianne Brown; Oct 2 - 31; Opening reception: Oct 6, 11 - 3pm•

Winston Churchill Sq • 780.422.6223 • youraga.ca • BMO Work of Creativity: METHOD AND MADNESS: Family-focused interactive exhibition created by Gabe Wong; until Dec 31 • THE AUTOMATISTE REVOLUTION: MONTREAL 1941-1960: Until Oct 14 • ABSENCE/PRESENCE: Catherine Burgess; until Oct 14 • BEHIND THIS LIES MY TRUE DESIRE FOR YOU: Mark Clintberg; Until Dec 30 • MISLED BY NATURE: CONTEMPORARY ART AND THE BAROQUE: Key artists include David Altmejd, Lee Bul, Bharti Kher, Tricia Middleton, Yinka Shonibare, Sarah Sze; Sep 15-Jan 6, 2013 • All Day Sunday: Art activities for all ages 3rd Sun every month, 12-4pm; free with admission • Studio Y Youth Drop-in: Perspective: Photographic Installation (Oct 4), Sketch: Experimental Drawing (Oct 11): Thu, 3:30-5:30pm; $10 • Adult Drop-in: Blot: Watercolor Automatic Painting (Oct 4), Tone: Still Life Drawing Collage (Oct 11): Thu, 7-9pm, $15/$12 (member) • Talk And Performance Lecture: Negative Cosmopolitanisms (Oct 11);$40/$25 (member/student/senior)

an ensemble cast of International Indies, Canadian Independents and Provocative Documentaries • Sep 28 - Oct 6 • $12.50 (single), $62.50 (6-pack), $129 (reel deal pass)

(112 St & 87 Ave) • A fusion of urban culture and contemporary dance • Oct 5-6

Loft Gallery/A.J. Ottewell Gallery, 590 Broadmoor Blvd, Sherwood Park • Artwork is changed on approximately eight week rotations, the gallery includes a small gift shop of artist made items; open Oct - Dec, Feb - Jul • Workshop: Susan Casault (colored pencil), Oct 6

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA (AGA) • 2 Sir

EDMONTON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL • Empire Theatre (City Centre) • Features

605 COLLECTIVE • Timms Centre for the Arts

ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY • 10186-106 St • 780.488.6611 • albertacraft.ab.ca • BENTS CUP PROJECT: Cathy Terepocki’s ceramic “souvenirs”; Sep 15-Oct 20 • Feature Gallery: PASSAGES: a group exhibition exploring the passage of time; Oct 6 - Dec 24

ley A. Milner Theatre (basement), Stanley Milner Library • Oct 11

ART GALLERY OF ST ALBERT (AGSA) • 19

GALLERIES + MUSEUMS

Perron St, St Albert • 780.460.4310 • artgalleryofstalbert.ca • GUILDED: selected works from local artists and celebrates diversity in the Visual Arts in St. Albert; Oct 4-27; Opening reception: Oct 4, 7-9pm

AGNES BUGERA GALLERY • 12310 Jasper Ave •

780.482.2854 • agnesbugeragallery.com • New work by artist David Wilson; Oct 6 - 19; Opening reception: Oct 4, 5 - 8pm, artist in attendance

ART SOCIETY OF STRATHCONA COUNTY •

FAB GALLERY • Department of Art and Design,

VAAA GALLERY • 3rd Fl, 10215-112 St •

FRONT GALLERY • 12312 Jasper Ave •

VASA GALLERY • 25 Sir Winston Churchill Ave, St. Albert • 780.460.5990 • vasa.ca • 5 TALES ON ABSTRACTION: A group exhibition; Oct 3 - Oct 27; Reception: Oct 11, 7 - 9pm, artist in attendance

U of A, Rm 3-98 Fine Arts Bldg • 780.492.2081 • Gavin Renwick: counterpoint: the aesthetics of postcolonialism: Sep 4-Oct 13 • Graduate Design Group Show 2012: A selection of work by students graduating in the Master of Design program; Oct 2 - 27

780.488.2952 • New Work by Verna Vogel; Oct 6, 2 - 4pm

GALLERIE PAVA • 9524 - 87 St, 780.461.3427 •

AME NUE: Artwork by Sabine Lecorre-Moore; Sep 22-Nov 14

GALLERY AT MILNER • Stanley A. Milner Library Main Fl, Sir Winston Churchill Sq • 780.944.5383 • epl.ca/art-gallery • RENAISSANCE MADONNAS: Paintings by Kristine McGuinty; Edmonton Weavers' Guild: View items created by the Edmonton Weavers' Guild; Whimsy, Wonder and Women: Collaged artworks by Rona Anderson • Oct 1-31, 2012

112 St • Main Gallery: NEWS, WEATHER & SPORTS: Artworks by Dan Hudson; Sep 13-Oct 13 • Front Room: MY DARLING DEVIANTS: Artworks by Marcia Pitch; Sep 13-Oct 13

HARRIS-WARKE GALLERY–Red Deer •

Sunworks Home and Garden Store, Ross St, Red Deer • 403.346.8937 • harriswarkegallery.com • TRANSPARENT SHADOWS: Artwork by Andrea Simpson; Sep 17-Oct 20; Reception: Oct 5, 6-8pm • IN THE BLINK OF A SMILE: Artwork by Andrea Simpson; Sep 17-Oct 20; Reception (Part of First Fridays): Oct 5, 6-8pm

HUB ON ROSS–Red Deer • 4936 Ross St, Red

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Deer • 403.340.4869 • hubpdd.com • Michener Art Divas: Michelle, Alexa, and Donna; Oct 1-31; Reception: Oct 5, 12-3pm

JAKE’S FRAMING • 10441 - 123 St • Gallery Show: featuring selected works by Edmonton Art Club members; Oct 6-Oct 26; Opening reception: Oct 5, 7-9pm

KIWANIS GALLERY–Red Deer • Red Deer

Public Library • PULSE OF ISTANBUL: Works by Asta Dale; Until Oct 14

LATITUDE 53 • 10248-106 St • 780.423.5353 •

latitude53.org • HOW THE WEST WAS WON: by Aimée Henny Brown; Sep 28-Nov 10 • CIRCUMSTANCES WITH SOME EARTH AND SKY: by Kent Tate; Sep 28-Nov 10

An Original Musical by

Nick Green

MANDOLIN BOOKS • 6419 - 112 Ave • nvsart.ca • NVSArt: Textured abstract art • Oct 2012 - Jan 2013

Composed by

Darrin Hagen

MCMULLEN GALLERY • U of A Hospital, 8440-

112 St • 780.407.7152 • GLASS JOURNAL: by Manola Borrajo-Giner; Sep 1 - Nov 4

MISERICORDIA COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

• 16940 - 87 Ave • 780.432.6678; wands@web.net • Reflectivity: a series of mixed media assemblages completed within the past year • Sep 30-Nov 10

MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM–St Albert • 5

Dinner & Theatre

October

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October 12, 19 & 21 Tickets:

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St Anne St, St Albert • 780.459.1528 • Each month of ArtWalk the Musée Héritage Museum displays part of the Victor Post collection. The complete exhibition of Victor Post’s work: Aug 28 - Oct 21 • CUT AND PASTE: features family albums, personal collections and scrapbooks from clubs and community groups covering over 100 years of history; Sep 4 - Oct 21

NAESS GALLERY • Paint Spot, 10032-81 Ave •

780.432.0240 • paintspot.ca • Wanda Benterud (Collage/Mixed Media); Oct 5 - 31

NINA HAGGERTY–Stollery Gallery • 9225-118 Ave • 780.474.7611 • ninahaggertyart.ca • THE AVE WE HAD: interactive photographic display; Oct 4 - Nov 5; Reception: Oct 11, 7-9pm

October 20 - 2pm matinee

language

• PRAIRIE DARKNESS: Artwork by Jim Davies; Sep 22-Oct 9

STRATHCONA COUNTY GALLERY@501

780.760.1278 • daffodilgallery.ca • Saeed Hojjati: Oil paintings featuring big, colourful landscapes with a dreamlike quality; Early Oct 2012

HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY • 3 Fl, 10215-

“Best Animal Hospital, 1st Runner Up”

SCOTT GALLERY • 10411-124 St • 780.488.3619

DAFFODIL GALLERY • 10412-124 St •

HAPPY HARBOR COMICS V1 • 10729-104 Ave • COMIC JAM: Improv comic art making every 1st and 3rd Thu each month, 7pm

Thanks for the votes, Edmonton!

Dead Birds, Millinery Craft and the Plumage Trade; examines the effect of fashion's demand for beautiful feathers on bird populations at the beginning of the twentieth century; until Jan 6 • THE ART OF SEATING: Two Hundred Years of American Design: until Oct 6 • THE TSARS' CABINET: 200 Years of Russian Decorative Arts under the Romanovs: Oct 6 - Jan 2

• 501 Festival Ave, Sherwood Park • 780.410.8585 • strathcona.ca/artgallery • SPYDER BITES (working title): Sep 14 - Oct 28 780.421.1731 • HOMEWORK: Artwork by David Cantine, Karen Cantine; Sep 13 - Oct 13

LITERARY GENDER CULTURE & RELIGION: TACKLING SOME DIFFICULT QUESTIONS • Lister Centre,

Wildrose Room, University of Alberta • Book launch and panel discussion • Oct 11, 7 - 9pm • Free; registration required

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB • 15120 Stony Plain Rd •

780.915.8869 • Edmonton Story Slam: writers share their original, 5-minute stories; followed by a music jam • 3rd Wed every month, 7pm (sign-up); 7:30pm (show) • $5

ROUGE LOUNGE • 10111-117 St • 780.902.5900 • Poetry every Tue with Edmonton's local poets

UPPER CRUST CAFÉ • 10909-86 Ave •

780.422.8174 • strollofpoets.com • The Poets’ Haven Weekly Reading Series: every Mon, 7pm; Sep 17 (launch; not a sign-up event) presented by the Stroll of Poets Society • $5

WUNDERBAR ON WHYTE • 8120-101 St • 780.436.2286 • The poets of Nothing, For Now: poetry workshop and jam every Sun • No minors

THEATRE A FEW GOOD MEN • Citadel Theatre, 9828 - 101A Ave • citadeltheatre.com • A fast-paced, thrilling military courtroom drama written by Oscar winner Aaron Sorkin. Made famous by the 1992 film starring Jack Nicholson and Tom Cruise • Sep 15 - Oct 7 CAVALIA: A MAGICAL ENCOUNTER BETWEEN HUMAN AND HORSE • Edmonton

City Centre Airport • Featuring 49 horses and 39 riders, acrobats, aerialists, dancers and musicians from around the world, Cirque du Soleil co-founder Normand Latourelle created this dream-like performance that explores man’s longstanding relationship with horses • Sep 11 - Oct 21 • $39.50 - $124.50 + applicable taxes and fees

CHIMPROV • Citadel Theatre, 9828-101 A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Rapid Fire Theatre’s longform comedy show: improv formats, intricate narratives, and one-act plays • First three Sat every month, 10pm, until Jul 2013 • $12 (door or buy in adv at Tix on the Square) FOUR LADS WHO SHOOK THE WORLD - THE BEATLES STORY: PART 2 • Mayfield Dinner Theatre, 16615 - 109 Ave • 780.483.4051, tf: 1.877.529.7829 • mayfieldtheatre.ca • Back from America and determined to never perform live again, The Beatles embarked on the most creative and incredible journey in pop music history • Sep 7 - Nov 4 POOF! THE MUSICAL • Capitol Theatre • The tale of a tween-aged witch who just wants to be normal, and her twisted mother who wants her to continue their evil lineage. What will happen when she has to choose between her wicked family name, and the teenage boy of her dreams • Oct 11 - 21, 8pm; Oct 20, 2pm STARDARK - THREE STORIES OF MENTAL ILLNESS • Westbury Theatre (Trans Alta Arts Barn), 10330 - 84 Ave • 780.414.6300, main@ cmha-edmonton.ab.ca • The stigma, the struggles, and finding the light in the midst of night • Oct 5, 7:30pm • $5 - $20 (pay what you can) THEATRESPORTS • Citadel Theatre, 9828 - 101 A Ave • rapidfiretheatre.com • Improv • Every Fri, 7:30 and 10 pm

PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY • 12304 Jasper Ave • 780.455.7479 • probertsongallery.com • Best Foot Forward: Jonathan Forrest; Oct 6-23; Opening reception: Oct 6, 2 - 4pm

THE IRRELEVANT SHOW • Roxy, 10708-124

PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES OF ALBERTA • 8555

TYPHOON JUDY • Roxy, 10708-124 St • atther-

Roper Rd • 780.427.1750 • provincialarchives.alberta. ca • The People Who Built Alberta: A Centennial for Alberta Workers: examining labour’s role in the growth and prosperity of the province • Sep 6 - Dec 21

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM • 12845-102

Ave • 780.453.9100 • FASHIONING FEATHERS:

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

St • attheroxy.com • A live recording of CBC Radio's award-winning sketch comedy show • Sep 29-Nov 10

oxy.com • As Typhoon Viola swirls around Hong Kong, Judy Garland lies comatose in a hospital, the victim of a storm of her own making. As she drifts towards the light, “Typhoon Judy” enters a desolate rehearsal hall with a lone piano player and begins to tell tales of her life with comedy, anecdotes and of course, song • Oct 11-Oct 29


DISH

Raised Italian

Find a restaurant

ONLINE AT DISHWEEKLY.CA

(traditional thin crust pizza)

PROFILE // NEW AND IMPROVED

The New Savoy's Health Café South Indian cuisine in South Edmonton

da capo 8738 -109 street and 8135-102 street dacapocaffe.com

The New Savoy's Health Café South Indian Restaurant 11010 - 51 Ave 780.437.7718

N

estled in a strip mall in south Edmonton is The New Savoy's Health Café. It's not a new addition to the Edmonton dining scene, but with new owners and a makeover from its former run-down appearance, it's becoming an up-and-coming destination for South Indian cuisine in the city. Under its previous owners, Savoy served strictly vegetarian dishes. However, the new owners, Sajai Sebastian and Shaji Mathews, along with their partner Darren George, have added a lineup of meaty creations to the menu, which are currently served on weekends. These South Indian delicacies include chicken biriyani, parotta with butter chicken and casava with fish curry. Although meat has been added to the menu, George says vegetarians can rest assured in the fact that Savoy is meticulous in its cleanliness and avoids any chance of cross-contamination with meat-free dishes or prep areas. Sebastian and Mathews immigrated to Canada several years ago, and George knew the pair back home in India, but has come onboard the restaurant team as a silent partner to help the new owners along with paperwork and necessary permits. The new owners officially took over Savoy's this July, and plan to bring in two more chefs to allow the restaurant to take on more catering in the future. "Being born and brought up here, I know you've got to be on top of these things and, you know, the permits and all that is huge for us. If Alberta Health Services is

happy, that's the first step towards people being happy because, you know, in the past there were people concerned about the cleanliness of the place, so we took it upon ourselves to gut the place, knowing that we had issues, or some issues that the old owner said were all dealt with," George explains, adding the team worked closely with a health inspector to ensure Savoy was brought up to standard, which had not been done by the previous owner. "You've got to provide that sense of quality. If I can't eat here myself, I can't expect anyone else to." The result has been a fresh coat of paint, new flooring, new chairs that actually match and new kitchen equipment. The restaurant was closed for over a week to make it all possible, but George says the investment has been worth it in reactions from customers, both to the decor and the food, which is made fresh to order. "This is all new to us, so we're here riding the wave and making a go at it and hopefully doing our part in offering the community a variety of flavours. We stand by it; we're open to comments because we're only as good as our last customer," George says. The New Savoy's Health Café prides itself on serving authentic South Indian cuisine, which is not commonly found in Edmonton. The majority of Indian food Edmontonians are used to is North Indian, George notes. The difference is in the spices and cooking techniques, which tend to be more vegetarian-friendly. There's a large focus on health-conscious ingredients and avoiding frying whenever possible.

For vegetarians, George says the dosas are a must. The thin, crispy crepe-like wrap, is a blend of lentils and rice. Inside, the filling is a mixture of potato, onion and flavourful spices. The dish is served with sambar, a lentil-based vegetable soup that is spicy enough to add an extra kick, but not overpower the flavours of the ingredients. In addition to the dosas, which have been carried over from the previous menu, The New Savoy's Health Café continues to serve housemade samosas, which are cooked fresh to order every time—no exceptions. The crispy triangles are filled with potatoes and vegetables that are spiced just enough to add some heat, but not have you reaching for water with each bite. As with the dosas, samosas are served with a helping of sambar.

George adds that the beverage menu will include two signature fresh fruit and vegetable juices. One is the energizer, a blend of carrots, apples, oranges, beets and ginger, and the other is a body cleanse featuring carrots, oranges, peppers, grapefruit and ginger. Prior to new ownership, Savoy's hours were sporadic, making it difficult for customers to visit. George says for now, they will be sticking to 11 am to 7 pm, with the potential of extending them in the future. However, he says with a small restaurant and small team, it can be detrimental to take on too much too quickly, so he is content with starting simple. "It's a service that takes time and we want to be here long-term," George adds.

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VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

LEDUC COMMON - 5401 DISCOVERY WAY

Kingsway • Westlawn • Leduc North • Jasper Ave • St Albert South Edmonton Common • Red Deer • Edmonton City Centre Spruce Grove • Namao • Mill Woods • Ft. Saskatchewan www.gotorickys.com DISH 21


COMMENT >> WINE

The magnificent seven

A selection of potential wines for Thanksgiving dinner The typical Thanksgiving dinner is a veritable smorgasbord of flavours: there's buttery turkey, sweet ham, or hearty roast beef, alongside which is an onslaught of various side dishes. There isn't a single wine that will pair with every single item on the Thanksgiving table, so don't even bother trying—just use the following guidelines, and pick something that you want to drink. Sparkling Wines You know how beer goes with pretty much anything? The same is true for sparkling wine. The reason? Carbonation. The bubbles act as a palate cleanser, meaning that you can chow on the wildly different types of food at a Thanksgiving dinner and keep your palate fresh between bites; it's as good a universal pairing as you're going to get. Plus, bubbles are always festive.

styles to suit everyone's particular taste: Riesling choose an unoaked Chardonnay for Riesling is a rock star when it comes to something very crisp and refreshing, or food pairing. This wine is naturally high in an oaked version (especially from Caliacidity, meaning it's great at cleansing the fornia) for something buttery and rich— palate between bites as well as able to perfect with turkey. handle a wide range of flavours. Off-dry Riesling is particularly great with Pink Wine I D I the sweeter dishes at a ThanksIt's easy to overlook pink wine V VENI, giving dinner—Germany has (aka rosé) at Thanksgiving, some lovely sweeter Riesling but pink wine straddles the kly.com uewee (hint: pick one that says Spatline between white and red mel@v Mel lese or Auslese on the label), as wine, meaning that it has the ey Priestl does New Zealand and Ontario. higher acidity of a white and the darker fruits of a red. Pink wine is Chardonnay also often a little sweet, which makes For those who don't like sweet wines, it a great partner to the sweetness in Chardonnay is a classic choice. It's also many Thanksgiving dishes. pretty easygoing in terms of food pairing and is made in two very different

VINO

Pinot Noir With lively acidity and smooth, easy drinking berry flavours, Pinot Noir is a classic food partner that doesn't conflict with most dishes. For Thanksgiving dinner, stick with Pinot Noir from the New World as it's more approachable than Old World versions: Chile has some great Pinot, especially from the Casablanca Valley, as does New Zealand and Oregon. Zinfandel For those who want a hearty red no matter what is on the table, it's best to choose one with rich fruit flavours and even a bit of residual sweetness—making Zinfandel a solid choice. Most Zinfandel comes from either California or Italy (where it is known as Primitivo). Though

it's probably better with roast beef than turkey, Zinfandel is fairly low in tannin so it won't overpower lighter Thanksgiving foods. Fruit Wine There are several fruit wines made right here in Alberta that are fantastic partners to Thanksgiving dinner—after all, it makes sense that a dish containing cranberries would taste great with a wine made from highbush cranberries. Honey mead is also another intriguing choice, as it is surprisingly dry and has a range of flavours that work with a wide array of foods. Look for the spiced meads from Fallentimber Meadery, as well as a range of fruit wines from Barr Estate Winery, Field Stone Fruit Wines, Birds & Bees Winery, and Chinook Arch Meadery. V

PROVENANCE

Six things about pumpkin pie Grab a fork ... or two The world's largest pumpkin pie was made in New Breman, Ohio at the New Bremen Pumpkinfest on September 25, 2010. The giant confection consisted of 1212 lbs of canned pumpkin, 109 gallons of evaporated milk, 2796 eggs, seven pounds of salt, 14.5 lbs of cinnamon and 535 lbs of sugar. The final weight for the behemoth was 3699 lbs, measuring 20 ft in diameter. Something was missing It has been said that pumpkin pie was not served at the first Thanksgiving. However, pumpkin was used in other recipes at that time. Pumpkin pie as we know it today didn't make its debut until the 1700s, with the first recorded recipe published in 1796 in American Cookery by Amelia Simmons.

That's a lot of pumpkin The largest pumpkin on record was grown in Pennsylvania and weighed a whopping 1131 lbs.

A much easier way Canned pumpkin was introduced to the United States in 1929 by a company called Libby's, which has since been taken over by Nestle.

Not quite on top Pumpkin pie ranks second, right behind apple, when it comes to favourite pie varieties in North America. V

Don't use just any old kind Not just any pumpkin has what it takes to be used for pumpkin pie. The Dickinson variety, which is what goes into many of the cans sold in grocery stores, is used for its smooth, sweet pulp, which it tends to have more of than the variety used for carving at Halloween.

DISHWEEKLY

MEAGHAN BAXTER // MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

One One Eight / Grand Opening A new go-to destination has made established itself on Jasper Ave's bustling entertainment district. One One Eight opens its doors for a four-day launch starting at 4 pm on Wednesdsay, October 10. The establishment is characterized by contemporary comfort food and a fullservice bar of carefully selected beers and liquor with an interior boasting east coast inspired decor and an old world take on quality. (11806 Jasper Ave) Draft City Wide Food and Urban Agriculture Strategy Open House / Thu, Oct 4 (4 pm – 8 pm) Highlights of the City of Edmonton's draft City Wide Food and Urban Agriculture Strategy will be available for public viewing. Citizens will have an opportunity to share their views about the strategy—which aims to address issue such as increasing access to

22 DISH

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

local food in the city's neighbourhoods and reducing Edmontonians' ecological footprint—with members of City Council at a subsequent public hearing on Friday, October 26. More information about the city's food and agriculture project can be found at edmonton.ca/ foodandag. (TransAlta Arts Barns) Shabam Beer Tasting Festival / Sat, Oct 6 (5 pm) The third annual craft beer festival presented by Sherbooke Liquor Store, is a chance for beer geeks—and those who are less familiar with beer beyond the usual pub fare—a chance to sample some of the region's foremost handcrafted varieties. In addition to more than 50 specialty beers to sample, visitors can sample food, try their luck at carnival games and enjoy live entertainment. Proceeds in support of the Kidney Foundation. (Mayfield Inn & Suites, $25 in advance, $35 at the door) V


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FALL STYLE

PREVUE // FALL STYLE

Edmonton's design force

Local designers share their inspiration and tips for fall style ALISHA SCHICK (SUKA CLOTHING)

Ballroom and Meese have all been very supportive and nurturing. It's just as hard in Edmonton as it is anywhere else no matter what people say. It comes down to four major factors: networking, talent, money and passion. I have many friends designing in other cities at many levels and they run into the same set backs. Who or what is your style inspiration? My inspiration comes from '80s postapocalyptic movies, music, street style and friends. I love to people watch and I find it fascinating the way people put looks together. I also love a lot of high fashion. It's a whole other lifestyle, but if I could afford Alexander McQueen I would wear it every day.

How many years have you been in the fashion industry? A long time! I graduated from MC College in 2001 and I was 18 at the time.  I started my career working random jobs in every area of fashion from making mascot heads to illustrating catalogues for Blue Skys Sportswear.  Why did you choose a career in fashion? I fell into the entire thing. Literally, I had no idea what I wanted to do. Originally I wanted to be a physiotherapist or nutritionist. I took sewing as an option in high school  and my teacher gave me a fashion illustration module. That's when I experienced for the first time the possibility of being able to draw a garment and make it from scratch. A friend who was also in sewing class mentioned she was going to MC College to take the hair program and she said they also offered a fashion program. She made my decision very easy; I just went with it and never second guessed signing up for the class. What is your specialty as a designer? Feminine pieces with edge and practicality. I make clothing for real people and a lot of my friends. It's a lifestyle brand, but not in an "I hang out at the beach and surf" kind of way! What has it been like starting a fashion line in Edmonton? Very hard! Like any city, you create opportunity for yourself and you have to stick to what you do best.  I have been very lucky to have friends who can provide opportunity for me to grow. MC College, Foosh,  Bamboo

What are your tips for navigating fall fashion? Stick to what you know. Accept your style for what it is and go with it no matter what. Having a sense of style rather than keeping up with fast trends will set you apart from the crowd. My favourite quote from Coco Chanel is "Fashion fades, only style remains"  and it's so true  It's hard not to get caught up in the hype of "fast fashion," but who needs a shirt that only lasts one wear. If readers were to invest in one piece this fall, what should it be? A pair of leather chap pants from my Gothic Cowboy collection, a crop chunky sweater and/or a mod style coat. How would you describe Edmonton's style? Practical, polished, eclectic. I see a lot of confused styles in a lot of other cities  It seems a lot more natural here. We really don't have that much to prove because people don't see us as fashionable and I think this gives us the freedom to be comfortable in our choices. We are very lucky to have some very influential boutiques and stores to nurture our style choices  and you see a lot in the mix from urban to high-end to bohemian and punk all together in a utopia,  and that makes us dynamic and unique.

JESSILYN STEINWAND (EVE AND ENOCH)

A

mongst the malls and box stores, Edmonton has its own growing fashion industry, complete with a host of talented, diverse designers helping to shape the city's fashion landscape. As fall hits full force, Vue rounded up a collection of local designers to share their experience, style tips and what they think of Edmonton's style. design, and people appreciate knowing they will have something that no one else or very few people have.

KELLY MADDEN

(KELLY MADDEN CLOTHING)

What has it been like starting a fashion line in Edmonton? I love having my business in Edmonton and I have found that the community is willing to help in so many ways. There is definitely a market for local, independent and stylish clothing in Edmonton. I'm having a lot of fun meeting people and showing them what I have to offer. At the same time, I do find it difficult finding local supplies and I'm having to look beyond Edmonton for that.

How many years have you been in the fashion industry? I graduated from Marvel College in 2010, and have been selling clothing since January 2011. However, I have been interested in fashion since I was quite young. I started sewing with a needle and thread at age five and on the machine at age seven. I made my grad dress in Grade 12 and that was when I decided I wanted to make a career of it. Why did you choose a career in fashion? I always knew I wanted to be in an industry where I could create art, but it was my talent at sewing that made me pick fashion. I love being able to make a piece of art from nothing that has real functionality. I also love making clothing that makes people feel good about themselves. I find it extremely satisfying when someone tries on something I've made and they absolutely love it. You can tell they feel good in their body, and their self esteem has been boosted, and I like being able to help them achieve that feeling. What is your specialty as a designer? I try to offer my customers clothing that is trendy and unique, but also very wearable. I'm also really conscious of my construction to make quality a priority in my products. So far I only make women's clothing, but plan to make some men's in the near future. Generally I provide one to 10 of each

Who or what is your style inspiration? Most of the time my inspiration comes from my sister, who has a great sense of style and puts her outfits together really well. She is also on top of trends and what's out there, but interprets it in her own way. When I'm designing, I picture her in the clothing and ask myself if she would wear it. Yes? I make it. No? I toss it! What are your tips for navigating fall fashion? I think it is important to remember that just because it is fall/winter, does not mean we should forget to wear colour! Even if it is just one item of your outfit that has colour, it makes a difference. For myself, I have a hard time not wearing all black and grey the whole season, which gets boring! If readers were to invest in one piece this fall, what should it be? I think a great investment this season would be a dress that can be layered to go with a variety of outfits and weather situations. Alberta weather is so unpredictable and having a dress that can be worn alone, or under your many layers of sweaters, coats and scarves to survive the cold, is a good way to still feel stylish. I always feel I sacrifice my style for warmth in winter, which can put anyone in a winter schlump.  How would you describe Edmonton's style? I feel that Edmonton's style is so diverse, I hardly know where to begin to describe it! This means to me anything goes, which opens up all kinds of possibilities. We are style conscious and always looking for new trends to mix with our current wardrobes. 

How many years have you been in the fashion industry? Five years. Why did you choose a career in fashion? I love anything visually stimulating, mainly with a human subject. I have always been drawn to fashion magazines and would study every aspect of the photo, not just the clothing, but the hair and makeup, photography, set design, styling etc etc. I have been interested in fashion since I was little, making my friends dress up in ridiculous outfits and take their picture. When it came time to decide on post-secondary schooling I didn't even entertain the idea of any other career. What is your specialty as a designer? Coats and tailored items. I am one of the few local designers who make them and people seem to really be drawn to my jackets. What has it been like starting a fashion line in Edmonton? It has been interesting. I have definitely seen Edmontonians grow in their style and have become more and more aware of supporting local which is very encouraging. When I first started I found it hard to CONTINUED ON PAGE 28 >>

26 FALL STYLE

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012


EDMONTON WOMAN’S SHOW

MAKEOVER

John Chwyl ‘The Fashion Guy’ is looking for some brave, yet not so style savvy women to let him into their homes, raid their closet and help them Reveal Their Style with Kingsway Mall! Two women will be chosen. After their head-to-toe makeover they will walk the runway during the Kingsway Mall Fall Fashion Shows at the Edmonton Woman’s Show October 13th and 14th. The winners will receive a $500 Kingsway Mall Gift Card* to purchase their hand-picked looks.

ENTER ONLINE BY OCTOBER 8, 2012 at Kingswaymall.com/EWS

*Redeemable at Kingsway merchants that accept American Express. Entries must be received by 11:59pm on October 8, 2012. For full details, terms and conditions go to Kingswaymall.com.

1110-18994 OctVueWeeklyAdEdmWomenShow v1.indd 1

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FALL STYLE 27


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<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

STANLEY CARROLL (STANLEY CARROLL)

TRESSA J HECKBERT (SESSA WEARABLES)

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break through the jeans and T-shirt crowd to find those who wanted something a little more unique. But things are going great and I think I have really found my place in the market.

declare your independence How many years have you been in the fashion industry? I've been designing for almost 30 years.

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Who or what is your style inspiration? I am influenced a lot by the music I listen to, I think that is where the 'edge' comes from, but then I mix it with what I see around me and what I think people want to wear to create something sophisticated out of something that might otherwise be labelled as 'goth' or 'punk'. What are your tips for navigating fall fashion? One big trend for fall is print. The head-to-toe print you are seeing in such things as pant suits might not be for everyone, so I suggest getting a few standout pieces in a great pattern but break it up with some solids so that you can still get the look without being too loud (if that isn't something you are comfortable with). If readers were to invest in one piece this fall, what should it be? A great winter coat. It is something that you wear every day, so why not buy something that makes you feel good rather then blending into the sea of black wool coats? Even a jacket that you might think "Where would I ever wear this" can easily be dressed down with a pair of jeans and some sensible boots. Just because you are going to the grocery store doesn't mean you can't be fashionable while doing it, and a great coat is the easiest way to accomplish it. How would you describe Edmonton's style? I would say Edmontonians like to be comfortable while still looking polished. Easy, non-fussy fashion suits us best, nothing too complicated. Soft fabrics are great, a bit of stretch is even better. Any items that are multi-functional that will transition us from day to night is great as well.

28 FALL STYLE

Why did you choose a career in fashion? I grew up in an environment where it seemed fashion or style played a big role so it only seemed natural to try to do something within the industry. What is your specialty as a designer? Generally I try to create pieces that are on one hand simple and believable yet have some aspect to them that does make them distinct. What has it been like starting a fashion line in Edmonton? When I started, I think that it was a little easier than I feel it might be now. Not so much that the fashion industry was bigger then, it has more to do with the fact that people were very much into trying new things and experimenting. That not only applies to fashion, but ran true for music, art, etc. It was just a fun time where there were all these people trying to do their own thing. Who or what is your style inspiration? What inspires me changes from season to season. It can be books, movies, travel, or art. As far as people go, the people I will always admire the most are those that have developed a style of their own regardless of trends. What are your tips for navigating fall fashion? As a designer I have never felt comfortable telling people how to navigate through trends or styles. It makes it seem like some dangerous minefield that if they fail they lose. People need to experiment and experimenting by definition means taking a chance at failing. So if you become preoccupied by rules, you lose that sense freedom to develop a style of your own. If readers were to invest in one piece this fall, what should it be? I don’t think as a designer that I am important enough to tell people how to spend their money, and if they were to invest in anything it should be an education or travel. Fashion items are not an investment they're just trivial fun things that can make you feel better. How would you describe Edmonton's style? I don’t think that Edmonton has a style. It just has some stylish people and a lot that aren’t.

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

How many years have you been in the fashion industry? I have been in the industry since graduating from the fashion design and apparel production program at Marvel College in 2001. Why did you choose a career in fashion? Fashion design is an "art" to me and fabric is my medium. It consumes me, and I could not imagine myself doing something different.  What is your specialty as a designer? My specialty is urban contemporary, modern pieces for the working woman. I incorporate classic lines and tailoring with unique fabrics and detailing. What has it been like starting a fashion line in Edmonton?   Its been great! Edmontonians are amazing supporters of their local artists and talents. Being a local designer, I have had the opportunity to grow with the city as we become more of a fashion destination. Who or what is your style inspiration?   I am inspired daily, all of my collections come to me organically. Inspiration can come from fabric, a button, from the look of the sky, even to the leftovers on my breakfast plate.   What are your tips for navigating fall fashion?   This fall, when layering, focus on textures and lengths to create variety in silhouettes. More is definitely more this year, so no need for editing ... just wear it all!    If readers were to invest in one piece this fall, what should it be? Since this fall is about layering textures, I would suggest to readers a netted turtle-neck like the 'Talia' top offered in my fall line. This piece is light weight with impact! The texture is interesting and can be worn in multiple ways throughout the season. How would you describe Edmonton's style? Eclectic and growing!  MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

FALL STYLE 29


STYLE SPOTLIGHT

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VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

12-09-12 8:41 AM


LINDA HA IS THE FOUNDER OF BARBER HA, SPECIALIZING IN GENTLEMEN’S CUTS AND SHAVES. THIS WEEK, SHE OPENS IN AN EXPANDED NEW LOCATION AT #202, 10011 - 82 AVENUE.

LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE,

OMAR MOUALLEM IS A RAPPER AND WRITER, AND THE ASSOCIATE EDITOR OF EDMONTON’S AVENUE.

She is wearing a red felt fedora by Rag and Bone and a silk pheasant print dress by Le Sete Ritrovate, found at Gravity Pope Tailored Goods. Pellet gun, picnic basket and ladies gloves from the stylist’s collection

He is wearing slim chinos in Vino by life/after/denim and a Naked and Famous black dress shirt from Jaisel. The Peter Jensen tan leather belt and Maison Kitsuné brown wool cardigan are available from Gravity Pope Tailored Goods.

ACCOUTREMENTS Metal peter pan collar at The Bay Lipstick by Benefit in “Espionage” at Sephora Suede Timex Watch at The Bay Ciaté velvet manicure set in Berry Poncho from Sephora Peter Jensen ankle boots at Gravity Pope Shoes Leather belt by Sofie D’Hoore at Gravity Pope Tailored Goods

Corduroy bowtie from H&M Burgundy leather gloves at H&M Fjällräven Kånken BackPack from Jaisel Wool scarf from H&M Red Wing leather boots at Gravity Pope Shoes Leather Pack Horse Rucksack at Eddie Bauer

STOCKISTS Sephora, Kingsway Mall The Bay, Kingsway Mall Gravity Pope Tailored Goods, 8222 Gateway Boulevard

Eddie Bauer, Kingsway Mall H&M, Kingsway Mall Jaisel, 8133 - 104 ST llustrations, layout design and styling by Chelsea Boos Photography by Meaghan Baxter

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

FALL STYLE 31


STYLE // COLOUR

The culture of colour

Our colour choices make a statement whether we realize it or not

Osase Emokpae's flamboyant jewelry makes quite a statement and is available at orese. etsy.com

L

et's face it: colour influences your style choices. You, yes you, who is too trendy to be influenced by anything. Oh, maybe you haven't had a favourite colour since you were 10 (but you're lying anyway, aren't you? We know it's black. Or rainbow. No, it's eggplant). But let's delve a little into this colour thing and see what our choices say about us. We start our journey at a little Edmonton tattoo shop that you just have to know where it is to know where it is. I can't tell you. El artisto wanted to remain anonymous, something about shooting off his mouth too much and not wanting to affect business. "Right now it's all traditional Americana stuff. When I started out (10 years ago) it was a lot of really super fat-lined, overly swoopified cartoony stuff. It's like everything else out there, it's just one more trend." Inky says that this Americana stuff, "hipsters and their fucking sailor tattoos," is basically from a three-colour palette of black, blue and red just like in the early days of American tattooing. It's a trip down memory lane, the

nostalgia of times gone by when men rolled up their cigarettes in their shirt sleeves and Bette Davis was a hottie. That cartoony stuff from the '90s and early 2000s was bright and colourful: playful and exciting. He also does a lot of basic black and grey, but usually not by choice. "You get this whole pile of dudes who are like, 'Well, I'm just going to get black and grey with a little bit of red.' And I'm like, 'So you're going to get the easiest shit, followed up by the hardest shit.' [Red is the hardest colour to tattoo into the skin.] ... I can't say just gangster guys are getting black and grey, because personally I think that portraits look a million times better in black and grey than they do in colour." But he tells his clients that as soon as they start introducing colour into the skin, the whole design becomes a lot more clear and legible. Moving on from permanent skin etchings, it's time for some talk of hair and makeup. At least this stuff washes off. Or grows out. Who doesn't love roots? Fareeda Mohammed is the salon

manager at MC College. She's been in the style and beauty business for 30 years and has seen trends come and go and discovered what's timeless. "I've always based colour on the seasons," Mohammed says referring to clothing, hair and makeup. "It's lighten in the spring, darken in the fall. And that's how our sun rays are. It just makes us feel alive, different. We're part of the environment." Mohammed says the natural environment becomes the background for how we get inspired. For example, spring is a time of the earth's awakening after a long winter. Flowers bloom, colours burst forth and eye makeup is sparkly, with clothes to match and hair to complement it all. Mohammed isn't excluding men, either. She says when men look through magazines and see strong designers introducing bold colours it makes them feel a little bit strong and manly because they know these designers are creating clothes for the everyday man. "You can tell when people feel awake and alive because there's something in that outfit, whether it be bright lips or eyes or a T-shirt." See, there's a science to it. Or pseudo-science. Regardless, certain colours do evoke certain frames of mind. "Look at caucasian women wearing East Indian outfits. Look at the bangles. We're taking traditions from all these different cultures and implementing it into our mood. And I think it's beautiful." Incorporating the style of a different culture into Edmonton style is what local jewelry designer Osase Emokpae is all about. Her family is from Nigeria and she got inspired one day while living in the bleak and brown wilderness two hours north of Fort McMurray to use bright West African fabric to create show-stopping, statement pieces of jewelry. "I felt like it kind of balanced me out a little bit," Emokpae says about adding the bright colour pieces into her wardrobe. "It was dark all the time, dirty, the animals are even grey, it's all one colour. The kind of person I am is very creative, I'm very visual as well, so to see that everyday was very uninspiring. So when I got home it was the brighter the better; the bigger the better. It definitely helped to balance me out and change my mood a little bit." Many Nigerians have their clothes tailor-made in very flamboyant styles and vibrant colours. Emokpae says that as we don't dress so much that way in Canada but are more of an offthe-rack society, a good way to personalize is through accessories and say, "OK, I'm going to put my stamp on it today through colour." So stamp your style. Do it. Or just gangster it up and go black and grey. REBECCA MEDEL

// REBECCA@VUEWEEKLY.COM

32 FALL STYLE

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; OCTOBER 10, 2012


MUSIC

PREVUE // THAT '59 SOUND

A state of love and trust

New Jersey's Gaslight Anthem feels every note and lyric on Handwritten

Sun, Oct 7 (7 pm) With Rise Against, Hot Water Music Edmonton Expo Centre, $52.50

G

aslight Anthem was playing the DeLuna music festival in Pensacola, Florida a few weeks ago when Eddie Vedder wandered on stage. He joined the band for a Pearl Jam cover. "His idea, actually," guitarist Alex Rosamilia explains. "I guess he knew that we played 'State of Love and Trust,' and he told a mutual friend of ours that we should put it in our setlist. "I guess he would surprise us by coming out and singing, but when somebody says to do that, and when you're playing with [both bands at the same festival], it's kinda safe to assume that Eddie Vedder is gonna come out and sing it," he laughs. The band's in a place where some of the greats of generations before

it have taken notice. Before Vedder, it was Bruce Springsteen, who joined the band onstage in Jersey back in 2011. He's the man whose sound Gaslight Anthem's perhaps most often compared to, and, geography aside (both hail from Jersey: Gaslight from New Brunswick, NJ, The Boss from Long Branch), both play music with a similar down-but-not-out urgency propelling it, though Anthem bolsters its driven rock with an extra emphasis of punk-rock bombast backing its everyman sound. Both cases of guests from rock's royalty are some serious ratification. "The fact that these people are just even acknowledging what we do," he continues, "I guess, for a lack of a way to put it, I feel like I'm not worthy. It's humbling. It's a very humbling experience, and it's awesome. I played air guitar to Ten when I was 11 years old, and now

Eddie Vedder's on stage, playing with me. It's pretty amazing." The release of Handwritten, Gaslight Anthem's fourth album, seems perhaps a culminating moment of that growing acclaim. Handwritten is the band's first release with Mercury Records, a very major label after years on the independent SideOneDummy (and XOXO Records before that). The production quality seems richer, the songs reaching for bigger emotions in the music backing Handwritten's tales. Lyrically, it seems to dig into the notions of this sort of everyman storytelling: on "Too Much Blood," vocalist Brian Fallon sings "What's left for all of you to take / If I put too much blood on the page? / If I just tell the truth, are there only lies left for you?" Rosamilia calls Handwritten the album where the band members found what they're really good at doing.

"You spend your first couple records trying to figure out what we are as a band, by basically playing like the people that we like," Rosamilia says, "And throughout the course of the years— we've been a band now for seven years—by playing with the same three people for seven years you kinda figure out where they're going, when we improv and stuff like that. And aside from that, your musical tastes start becoming more of a collective thing rather than four individual people. And then on top of all of that, hopefully you're becoming a better musician. So where we are now, I think, we're finally comfortable in our own shoes, and playing ... I wouldn't have put a guitar solo on anything else I like before this. I'd be too afraid. But I'm competent enough to pull that off now. I think they're OK." In the moments before Vedder took

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

to the stage at DeLuna, Fallon introduced him by talking about a guy who doesn't phone it in, and the importance of doing just that: not just making something that could very well be a gaslight anthem, but truly meaning it, night after night, every time you step on a stage and play it. "Some days are harder than others," Rosamilia admits. "But if you're in it for the right reasons, then playing the songs should bring you back regardless of how many times you've played it or what the rest of your day's been like." So if the songs are there, the rest will follow? "If the songs mean it," he clarifies. "You know what I mean? If you're not playing stuff that you mean, or meant nothing when you wrote it, then it'll have no feeling when you replay it." PAUL BLINOV

// PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

MUSIC 33


PREVUE // RELATIONSHIPS

Ariane Mahrÿke Lemire Thu, Oct 4 (7 pm) Empress Ale House Fri, Oct 5 (8 pm) Accent European Lounge Part of Edmonton Chante Festival

A

fter sitting on it for three years, Edmonton singer-songwriter Ariane Mahrÿke Lemire is releasing her first full-length English album to the masses. To keep the album, titled Wrecked Tangles and Love Knots, under wraps until now hasn't been entirely by choice. Lemire suffered two highway roll-overs in the span of two years and in one, crushed her left wrist, resulting in two surgeries. The second accident required physiotherapy, meaning she wasn't able to tour and promote the album properly. "I physically wasn't able to hit the road, no pun intended. I hit the road, so it made it impossible to hit the road," she says with a laugh. "I could have released it a lot earlier in the year, but I wanted to do a better job of releasing it than the last two, and it also was the most personal album I've done, so I feel really vulnerable having it out there." Prior to this album, Lemire had kept a lot of her personal side reserved for her French releases, as she felt closer to the language. She grew up in a Frenchspeaking household until her parents

divorced—then it became English with her father and French with her mother. While Wrecked Tangles and Love Knots is considered her first full-length English album, she did slip one French song into the mix as the album's closer. "In the last few years, I've had a lot of relationships with Anglophones and it's really changed my relationship to the language," says Lemire, who made the conscious decision to become a writer at age 10. "I think the nice thing musically is I see the French and the English getting closer and closer and I see myself bridging the gap between those two identities

that I carry." Wrecked Tangles and Love Knots delves heavily into relationships, but Lemire does so without directing blame and says the songs are never about just one guy, but rather a mash-up of experiences and images. "It has a lot to do with relationships, but with me and how I cope with those things, and I think a lot of people, they spend a lot of time blaming their problems on outside sources, when really it comes from within." MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

PREVUE // FOLKY ELECTRO

Humans

Homo sapiens

Sat, Oct 6 (9 pm) Wunderbar

A

chance meeting in 2009 has proved to be a fortunate one for Robbie Slade and Peter Ricq, also known as Humans, an electro duo redefining the genre one song at a time with its new EP Traps. Slade commissioned Ricq to do merch design for a folk-music project he was working on, and when Ricq pulled out a sampler and began jamming with the band, the beginning of something new started to take shape. Ricq invited Slade to create a vocal sample for his solo electronic project and it wasn't long before a new duo was created. At the time, Slade wasn't into electronic music and was somewhat opposed to the genre, but after Ricq

34 MUSIC

began to show him different facets of the style, he was hooked. Now, Slade finds it amusing to see other people react to electronic music, recalling a night when his friend's conservative father was introduced to it, and ended up enjoying what he heard. "I was basically showing him music that Peter had shown me and that was a bit of an 'ah ha' moment for me," Slade recalls. "I think in the formulative years of electronic music, it was a really interesting time, but a lot of that stuff went way over people's heads, I think, like early techno stuff ... a lot of people think electronic music is that stuff. They think back to techno and go, 'I don't like that,' but they have their own little 'ah ha' moments when they hear how far the genre has progressed."

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

Humans is a testament to this evolution, with Slade's background being in folk and Ricq's being purely electronic. The contrast has allowed the duo to formulate its own flavour of electronic music that fuses folk influences with electro beats. "I think anyone who's in a band, at some point you want to blend in with the crowd, but you also want to have something completely different with your music, so I think it's just finding that new way to be creative and really stick out and kind of break new ground," Slade notes. Breaking this new ground is achieved through a unique collaboration that relies on free-flowing ideas and inspiration. For Ricq in particular, this happens when he's out biking and allows his mind to be completely present and void of distractions. He also notes he does not ever sit down and tell himself he has to write a song, he just allows ideas to formulate. "I don't have any distractions, and also, my breathing is kind of a rhythm," Ricq says of his biking. "There's a lot of people, when they take a walk or bike, when they're not supposed to be creating, it actually comes easier. I think there's less stress and you come up with all your ideas." MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM


The Haven Band Jam, every Wednesday of the month. October featuring Boogie Patrol Wed. Oct. 3 EDMONTON BLUES SOCIETY MEMPHIS BOUND BLUES CHALLENGE & THE HAVEN BAND JAM WITH BOOGIE PATROL Fri. Oct. 5

THE THREADS, BIKINI ISLAND RADIO, LEUVEN

Sat. Oct. 6

CALISTA, CALL APOLLO

Wed. Oct. 10

THE HAVEN BAND JAM WITH BOOGIE PATROL Fri. Oct. 12

JENN GRANT & CUFF THE DUKE Sat. Oct. 13

JENN GRANT & CUFF THE DUKE 15120 A Stony Plain Road http://thehavensocialclub.com/

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

MUSIC 35


PREVUE // SIX-STRING

Thomas Viloteau Fri, Oct 5 (9 pm) Presented by the Edmonton Classical Guitar Society Muttart Hall, $25, $20 students, seniors and ECGS members

O

ne year after picking up the guitar, French six-string virtuoso Thomas Viloteau took the stage in front of 200 people. Today, he is recognized worldwide as one of the finest classical players, having been awarded top prize at the Guitar Foundation of America (GFA) International Competition and the Francisco Terrega Competition, two of the industry's most prestigious honours. Viloteau began studying the guitar at age 12, which might seem late for an internationally recognized musician, but it does not appear to have

been a disadvantage. Viloteau's parents are fine arts enthusiasts, and he recalls falling asleep to musical compositions such as the "Symphony No. 1" by Jean Sibelius when he was very young, or coming home to his father playing Vivaldi on the violin, which he tried to teach Viloteau without success. When his parents decided to enroll him in music lessons in their hometown of Point-Saint-Louis-du-RhĂ´ne, Viloteau gravitated to the guitar. "Guitar seemed like a cool object to have at the time, so I told them I wanted to learn to play it. I mostly just wanted the actual guitar and didn't really think that I would be able to play it," says Viloteau, who is now working on an English translation of a book about practice habits and technique.

Turns out Viloteau could play guitar, and play it well. He notes that his brief foray into learning the violin made him understand the way a guitar's fretboard worked. "I just remember thinking, 'Oh, then it's easy. All you have to do is put the right finger in the right fret.' I guess it was the right approach," he says. "I think I just loved it and never felt like it was difficult, so I was spending an hour a day, on average, playing when I was 12. It's more than most beginners. Now, to keep a good level, I need four to five hours a day." Viloteau didn't set out to be a professional musician, but things started to snowball little by little. He began moving to work with good teachers, practising seven to eight hours a day and then winning competition accolades, along with the

records that come with winning. Albums released on Naxos Records in particular were an inspiration to Viloteau, and when he won the GFA, he was able to record his own with the label. "It always seemed like the highest possible achievement to me. It was sort of my goal for a while when I was young," Viloteau says, adding that his win at the Terrega competition last month has allowed him to do a second Naxos recording. "I have learned since then to be more focused on the music I am playing than on winning prizes, and I think it is the only way for me to even conceive a whole life spent playing the guitar. I view competitions as very useful, but they shouldn't be a goal in themselves." MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

36 MUSIC

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; OCTOBER 10, 2012


MUSICNOTES

MEAGHAN BAXTER // MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

FRI OCT 5

CJSR FUN DRIVE FEATURING NO HEAT TOMORROW W/ RAPTORS, CYGNETS & THE GIVE ‘EM HELL BOYS SUN OCT 7

DIRE OMEN

Smashing Pumpkins / Fri, Oct 5 (7 pm) For the first time in a decade, Billy Corgan and the gang are headlining a major tour on Canadian soil, and Edmonton made the cut. The tour means a lineup of tunes from the band's latest album Oceania, plus the classics. (Rexall Place, $49.50 – $79.50)

T. Buckley and Karla Anderson / Fri, Oct 5 (7 pm) It's back! The Full Moon Folk Club has kicked off its 27th season with a diverse and entertaining lineup, including the likes of Dala, Red Molly/ Dave Gunning, Kane Welch Kaplin and The Tequila Mockingbird Orchestra, to name a few. This week: T. Buckley and Karla Anderson (St. Basil’s Cultural Center, $18 – $22)

CD RELEASE PARTY W/ AKAKOR & TERRORFIST FRI OCT 12

SECRET RIVALS

Efa Etoroma Trio / Tue, Oct 9 (7:30 pm) The 2011 Festival de Jazz Montréal Grand Prix nominees and 2011 Galaxie Rising Star Award winners bring unique jazz flavour to Tuesday Night Sessions, a chance for jazz musicians to play together. (Yardbird Suite, $5)

CD RELEASE PARTY

W/ RANDY GRAVES, SHELBI, STRONG HEARTS & RINGLEADER

SAT OCT 13

early show

THE RETURN OF

Mark Knopfler / Tue, Oct 9 (6:30 pm) Hey, if you just picked up some money for nothing and you want to spend it on something, why not check out Mark Knopfler opening up for Bob Dylan? (Rexall Place, $39.50 – $124.50)

DOWNWAY W/ THE WEEKEND KIDS, PIND, FRESHMAN YEARS THUR OCT 18

THE STANFIELDS & GLORYHOUND

THE GREAT CANADIAN SLUGFEST W/ FIRE NEXT TIME & TALLEST TO SHORTEST Solidarity Rock / Fri, Oct 5 (9 pm) Cuban punk band Arrabio is heading north to Canada for the first time, plus a subsequent tour of western Canada. The band has been making some serious noise in its home country for more than a decade, but hasn't had the opportunity to stretch beyond that. Until now, that is, with the help of Solidarity Rock, an artist-run organization working to partner up musicians, artists and creatives in Cuba, Canada and beyond. Also performing will be Knucklehead, the Vicious Cycles and Nervous Wreck. (Artery, $10)

FRI OCT 19

SOULICITORS

‘MOVES’ CD-RELEASE PARTY Balconies / Thu, Oct 11 (8 pm) This charismatic trio has had a whirlwind 2012 and it doesn't appear to show any signs of slowing down. Balconies are hitting the west coast with Big Sugar and Wide Mouth Mason for another road trip to add to its already jam-packed year of transient experiences. (New City, $15)

W/ THE WHYTES & RANDOM FALTER

FOR TICKETS- PLEASE VISIT WWW.YEGLIVE.CA

SAT OCT 6

FREE SHOW 4PM

YOUNG BENJAMINS

W/ GARRETH BURROWS Revolvr / Sat, Oct 6 (8 pm) Hype Machine sensation Revolvr takes to the turn tables with a host of electro headliners including Avicii for Pure: The White Party. Revolvr's latest EP, out on Steve Aoki's label Dim Mak, hits airwaves this November. (Shaw Conference Centre, sold out)

Born Gold / Fri, Oct 12 (8:30 pm) Cecil Frena, Edmonton's own high-energy, futuristic noise-pop aficionado, is dropping his LP Little Sleepwalkers on the masses at what is anticipated to be a party for the ages. (Wunderbar, $10 in advance, $12 at the door)

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

STAND UP COMEDY

SUNDAYS MUSIC 37


VUEWEEKLY NEWSOUNDS AWESOME

Kid Koala 12 Bit Blues (Ninja Tune) 

SAUCE

THUR, OCT 11, AVENUE THEATRE //////////////

TRUMAN

WITH INDIGO JOSEPH (REGINA), AND REVENGE OF THE TREES

SAT, OCT 13, AVENUE THEATRE //////////////

TERRACE

WITH ALL OUT DJ’S, MARK ELLIS, AND DJ READYMADE

FRI, OCT 19, AVENUE THEATRE //////////////

AIDAN KNIGHT

WITH LEIF VOLLEBEKK, AND GUESTS WITH GUESTS

THUR, OCT 25, AVENUE THEATRE //////////////

100 MILE HOUSE AND FOAM LAKE WITH KALLE MATTSON

FRI, OCT 26, THE ARTERY //////////////

SUNPARLOUR PLAYERS SAT, OCT 27, ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM THEATRE ////////////// ALL AGES & LICENSED

BAHAMAS

WITH JASON COLLETT

JCL AND PERRYSCOPE CONCERTS PRESENTS SUN, OCT 28, THE PAWN SHOP////////////// NO MINORS

MEN WITHOUT HATS

WITH GUESTS

SUN, OCT 28, THE STARLITE ROOM ////////////// NO MINORS

THE DEEP DARK WOODS

WITH GUESTS

FRI, NOV 2, ROYAL AB MUSEUM THEATRE ////////////// ALL AGES & LICENSED

WITH GUESTS

SAT, NOV 10, THE PAWN SHOP ////////////// NO MINORS

JULIE DOIRON & THE WRONG GUYS MON, NOV 12, AVENUE THEATRE ////////////// NO MINORS

WITH TONEDEFF, SADISTIK & DJ FLIPFLOP

FRI, NOV 16, AVENUE THEATRE //////////////

PAPER LIONS

WITH GUESTS

SAT, NOV 17, ROYAL AB MUSEUM THEATRE ////////////// ALL AGES & LICENSED

AMELIA CURRAN

WITH JOE NOLAN & GUESTS

FRI, NOV 23, ROYAL AB MUSEUM THEATRE ////////////// ALL AGES & LICENSED

THE WOODEN SKY

WITH WILDLIFE, AND THE PROVINCIAL ARCHIVE

FRI, NOV 30, AVENUE THEATRE //////////////

TOM FUN ORCHESTRA

WITH GUESTS

FRI, DEC 7, THE ARTERY //////////////

WIL

WITH RYAN MCMAHON, AND GUESTS

JCL, PERRYSCOPE CONCERTS, AND SONIC 102.9 FM PRESENT: WED, DEC 19, STARLITE ROOM//////////////

JAPANDROIDS

38 MUSIC

PAUL BLINOV

// PAUL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

AN INTIMATE EVENING WITH SHANE KOYCZAN

CUNNINLYNGUISTS

Who would've thought, in an era of laptop mash-ups and button-pusher programming, that a guy can still just scratch up a turntable with minimal artifice and offer up just as much of a good time? As the title riff of 12 Bit Blues— an update of the genre's most induring structure—suggests, Kid Koala's first album since 2006's Your Moms' Favourite DJ finds him exploring the blues genre. In a way, it seems the action of letting two circles overlap is a perfect fit: the blues cherishes repetition and reinterpretation as virtues, newcomers putting their own spins on old structure, and that seems mimicked today by an increasingly remixhappy digital culture. Koala applying more modern cut-up techniques to the simple, aged beauty of the blues results in a a marvellous slow-groove record. Almost every song is called "Bit Blues"; if there's a standout, it might be the way "6 Bit Blues" recontextualizes a mournful line—"I feel so lonely"—with timpani rolls and a climax of ghostly wails. The review copy sadly didn't include what sounds like an even greater treasure here: the "JR Hand Powered Turntable Kit," a DIY construction that apparently will actually let you scratch, without batteries and constructed in simple ways. That's, frankly, so rad: working with the most stripped down of sounds and forms, but that doesn't mean Kid Koala can't still be an innovator.

WITH GUESTS

Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell Don't Hear It ... Fear It (Metal Blade)  This feels like the kind of record you'd put on in a dimly lit, hazy basement, letting the sludgey, distorted grooves wash over you. It's good stuff, especialy during the rumbling, rolling bass lines of "Scratchin and Sniffin" and the punked-up metal thrashing of "The Last Run." Singer Johnny Gorilla's voice is overdriven throughout the album, pushing it deep into the mix alongside the instruments, which intensifies the careening path that the band rockets along, guitar, bass, drums and vocals all merging into one monstrous beast. Sure, the likes of Black Sabbath and Budgie have travelled this path before, but these guys walk the walk pretty damn well. EDEN MUNRO

// EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Steve Harris British Lion (EMI)  The good news is that Iron Maiden bass player and mainstay Steve Harris has made his first solo album into something that he couldn't have done with in his day job. The bad news is that Harris's work in Maiden is far, far superior to what he's done here. British Lion sounds like some old friends having a go at some '70s-style clas-

FOUR IN 140

sic rockers in the garage. There are moments of the bass brilliance you might expect from a Harris solo album—a couple melodic riffs in "The Chosen Ones"—but those are few and far between and inevitably crushed by the mediocrity of the rest of the songs—the bland pop of "Eyes of the Young" and the midtempo sludge of "These Are the Hands." The album's best track is closer "The Lesson," which also happens to be the easiest to envision as an Iron Maiden song. Unfortunately, even that falls short, illuminating just how important the other five members of Maiden are when it comes to giving life to Harris's songwriting and bass playing. EDEN MUNRO

// EDEN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

Great North Blues Band Great North Blues Band (Independent)  On its self-titled release the Great North Blues Band brings together a lineup of stellar musicians for a recording with a big-band feel of bygone eras. It's entertaining overall, with a sonically interesting palette consisting of upbeat, swinging horns, keys and a host of other musical ele m e n ts r o o ted in traditional blues. The band is best when forging ahead at full-throttle on upbeat tracks like the aptly titled "Got the Blues" and "Parchman Farm," but the group might benefit from showing off more range in the future to compliment its diverse pool of talent. MEAGHAN BAXTER

// MEAGHAN@VUEWEEKLY.COM

@CURTISTWRIGHT

Ellie Goulding Halycon (Universal) @VueWeekly: Emotional electro-rock finds a somewhat nice place where parts of Rihanna hang out with Florence and her machine.

Flying Lotus Until the Quiet Comes (Warp) @VueWeekly: Album with no tangible "hit," but a masterwork of innovative & very tricky electro filled w/ layers on layers. A lot of beauty here.

Miguel Kaleidoscope Dream (RCA) @VueWeekly: Smoothed out & sultry—this is a gem amongst a new era in homage-paying R&B. Drenched in sex and talent, Miguel is making a big name.

Muse The Second Law (Warner) @VueWeekly: Pomp & produced madness has led this arty-3 to kick sand into the pond of much greater, more realized Brits. Not sure what’s going w/ this.

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012


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VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

MUSIC 39


MUSIC WEEKLY FAX YOUR FREE LISTINGS TO 780.426.2889 OR EMAIL LISTINGS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

DEADLINE: FRIDAY AT 3PM

THU OCT 4 ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE folk/jazz/pop/

singer-songwriter live music Thu: this week with Denise Mackay and The Blackstone; 9:30pm11:30pm; no minors; no cover

ARDEN Whitehorse;

7:30pm; Sold out

BLUES ON WHYTE Ross

Neilsen And The Sufferin Basterds; Sep 30-Oct 7

BOHEMIA Not The Wind

Not The Flag; 8pm; $5 (door)

BRITTANYS LOUNGE

Kenny Hillaby hosts a jazz session night every Thu with Shadow Dancers, Maura and Jeanelle; no cover; EVENING: Harpdog Brown w/Yukon Slim; 9pm; $15 CAFÉ HAVEN A.O.K. w/

Ron Weasley; 7pm; No cover

CARROT CAFÉ Zoomers Thu afternoon open mic; 1-4pm DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

every Thu at 9pm DV8 Built On

Despondency with Days to Dust; 9pm

Dragonette with Young Empires; 8pm (doors); 18+

WILD BILL’S–Red Deer

Fundrive Folkus Group!: Fire Next Time, Sumner Brothers, Swear By The Moon, James of Dark Wood, Rusty, Matt Murphey; 8pm

Classical DOW CENTENNIAL CENTRE – FORT

SASKATCHEWAN The

Winners' Tour Featuring Georgy Tchaidze with Cecilia String Quartet; 7:30pm; $24.50 (adv)

WINSPEAR CENTRE The

Phantom of the Opera feat. Edmonton Symphony Orchestra; 8pm; $20 (adv) DJs

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

MARYBETH'S COFFEE HOUSE–Beaumont

Open mic every Thu; 7pm NAKED CYBERCAFE & ESPRESSO BAR Open

APEX CASINO Red Hotz;

RENDEZVOUS PUB

Oct 5-6

ARTERY Knucklehead

with Arrabio and The Vicious Cycles along with Nervous Wreck and guests; 8:30pm ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Dirty Seas; Oct 5-6 BAILEY THEATRE

Oktoberfest Dance with The Emeralds; 7pm (door) BISTRO LA PERSAUD

Blues: every Friday Night hosted by The Dr Blu Band; 8pm (music); drblu.ca

Christian and Justin of Canyon Rose Outfit: Open turntables; E: kevin@ starliteroom.ca to book 30-min set

CENTURY ROOM Lucky

7: Retro '80s with house DJ every Thu; 7pm-close

THE COMMON

BLACKJACK'S

Neilsen And The Sufferin Basterds; Sep 30-Oct 7

BOHEMIA Zombie Walk

Afterparty

BRIXX BAR Early Show:

GRAIN with Hear/Say; 9pm; 18+; Late Show: XoXo to follow (every Fri) CARROT Live music every Fri; all ages; 7pm; $5 (door)

STARLITE ROOM Order of Chaos (EP Release), Unleash the Archers, Armifera and Bring Us Your Dead; 9pm (doors) WILD BILL’S–Red Deer

TJ the DJ every Thu and Fri; 10pm-close WUNDERBAR Nova,

Berner Quintet; 8pm (doors), 9pm (show); $16 (members), $20 (guests)

ELEVATION ROOM

FLUID LOUNGE Take

Over Thursdays: Industry Night; 9pm Ave Requests every Thu HALO Fo Sho: every Thu

with Allout DJs DJ Degree, Junior Brown

GOOD NEIGHBOR PUB T.K. and the Honey

DJs

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

every Fri; no cover

Every Friday DJs on all three levels

BLACKSHEEP PUB Bash:

every Fri; 8pm; no cover

DJ spinning retro to rock classics to current

every Thu with DJ Mark Stevens; 9pm

JEFFREY'S CAFÉ Billie Zizi

BONEYARD ALE HOUSE

LEVEL 2 LOUNGE Funk

JEKYLL AND HYDE PUB

LUCKY 13 Sin Thu with DJ Mike Tomas

PAWN SHOP Edmonton

ON THE ROCKS

LB'S PUB Studebaker

OUTLAWS ROADHOUSE

LIZARD LOUNGE Rock 'n' roll open mic every Fri; 8:30pm; no cover

Food Bank show: Enemy Surplus with Kryosphere and Anubian; 8pm; $5 (adv)

Salsaholic: every Thu; dance lessons at 8pm; salsa DJ to follow

RICHARD'S PUB An Evening With Brian Pottie; 8pm

Wild Life Thursdays

OVERTIME–Downtown

RIC’S GRILL Peter Belec

Thursdays at Eleven: Electronic Techno and Dub Step

SHERLOCK HOLMES –

night every Thu

RENDEZVOUS Metal TAPHOUSE–St Albert

Eclectic mix every Thu with DJ Dusty Grooves THIRSTY CAMEL The

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

John; 9:30pm

NEW CITY LEGION A Celebration For Lindsay; 8pm - 3am, 18+

SUEDE LOUNGE House, electro, Top40, R'n'B with DJ Melo-D every Fri SUITE 69 Release Your

Inner Beast: Retro and Top 40 beats with DJ Suco; every Fri

TEMPLE Silence be Damned: with DJs Gotthavok, Siborg, Nightroad; 9pm

Tyco and Ernest Ledi; no line no cover for ladies all night long

UNION HALL Ladies Night

every Fri

VINYL DANCE LOUNGE

Connected Las Vegas Fridays Y AFTERHOURS

Foundation Fridays

SAT OCT 6 ALBERTA BEACH HOTEL

Open stage with Trace Jordan 1st and 3rd Sat; 7pm-12

Andersen; 7:30pm; Sold out

BUFFALO UNDERGROUND R U

Aware Friday: Featuring Neon Nights

Oct 5-6

ARDEN THEATRE Matt

ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL Dirty Seas; Oct 5-6 BAILEY THEATRE

CHROME LOUNGE

Platinum VIP every Fri

Rocktoberfest 2012 with Joe Solo, The S.I.N. and The Hip-Thrusts; 8pm (doors); $12

THE COMMON Boom

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

THE DRUID IRISH PUB

Econoline Crush - Live Concert; 8pm

with Crewshtopher, Tyler M, guests; no cover

BUDDY’S DJ Arrow Chaser every Fri; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm

OUTLAWS ROADHOUSE

ON THE ROCKS Bonafide;

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE Fuzzion Friday:

APEX CASINO Red Hotz;

9pm; $5; Oct 5-7

week with: Bobby Austin; Oct 1-6

RED STAR Movin’ on Up: indie, rock, funk, soul, hip hop with DJ Gatto, DJ Mega Wattson; every Fri

The Rock Mash-up: DJ NAK spins videos every Fri; 9pm; no cover

The Box: every Fri; nu disco, hip hop, indie, electro, dance with weekly local and visiting DJs on rotation plus residents Echo and Shortround

NEW WEST HOTEL This

Gravy from the Source 98.5 every Fri

TREASURY In Style Fri: DJ

RCCO Sundays at 3 Organ in Concert Series: 10th anniversary with Jeremy Spurgeon and the Richard Eaton Singers; 8-10pm; $28, $25 (seniors/students)

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB

and The Gypsy Jive; $15

REDNEX–Morinville DJ

WINSPEAR CENTRE

IRISH CLUB Jam session

KAS BAR Urban House:

Fridays at Eleven: Rock hip hop, country, top forty, techno

THIRSTY CAMEL The Sinder Sparks Showwith Stratosphere; 10pm - 2am

BAR-B-BAR DJ James;

Bikini Island Radio with The Threads; 8pm; $7 (adv), $10 (door)

O2'S ON WHYTE DJ Jay

Viloteau (guitar); 8pm; $25 (general), $20 (students, seniors and ECGS members)

Badgers every friday; 8:30-midnight; no cover

blues, jazz, Top 40); 9pm2am every Thu; no cover

WEM Party Hog; Oct 2-6

OVERTIME–Downtown

No cover

FILTHY MCNASTY’S

Headwind (classic pop/ rock); every Fri; 9pm; no cover

SHERLOCK HOLMES –

PANTRY Sharkfist; 9pm;

Thu

Bunker Thursdays

Oct 2-6

every Fri and Sat

MUTTART HALL Thomas

FESTIVAL PLACE Alfie Zappacosta; 7:30pm

dance mix every Fri with DJ Donovan

SIDELINER'S PUB &

Knifedogs and Rhubarbs; 9pm

Steve Saba; 8pm

Rotating DJs Fri and Sat; 10pm

Sat

DV8 Royal Red Brigade,

EXPRESSIONZ CAFE

Del Son a la Salsa: Lessons in Son,Cha Cha Cha,Salsa Rueda de Casino and more with Orlando Martinez (Fiesta Cubana Dance School); 9:30pm; $5

SHERLOCK HOLMES – WEM Party Hog; Oct 2-6

ELECTRIC RODEO– Spruce Grove DJ every

Indust:real Assembly: Goth and Industrial Night with DJ Nanuck; no minors; 10pm (door); no cover

with DJ Damian; every Fri

FUSIA/CORAL DE CUBA

O2'S TAPHOUSE AND GRILL DJs every Fri and

Oct 2-6

Classical

FLASH NIGHT CLUB

FUNKY BUDDHA–Whyte Ave Top tracks, rock, retro

DOWNTOWN Rob Taylor;

YARDBIRD SUITE Doug

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK Jesse Peters (R&B,

DOWNTOWN Rob Taylor;

SHERLOCK HOLMES –

CROWN AND ANCHOR PUB Whiskey Business;

Marie-Josée Houle with Tanyss Nixi and Dean Lonsdale; 8pm

FLUID LOUNGE Hip hop and dancehall; every Fri

NEWCASTLE PUB House,

Hobbs; Oct 5-6

DEVANEY'S Alesha & Brendon; Oct 5-6

Something Diffrent every Thursday with DJ Ryan Kill

Shake yo ass every Fri with DJ SAWG

ROSE AND CROWN Lyle

Pumpkins with Anberlin; 7pm (doors); All ages

COAST TO COAST Open

9:30pm

FILTHY MCNASTY'S

JUNCTION BAR AND EATERY LGBT Community:

Jesse Labourdais, with Guests; 12pm

stage every Fri; 9:30pm

ELECTRIC RODEO– Spruce Grove DJ every Fri

REXALL PLACE Smashing

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

NEW WEST HOTEL

(jazz); most Thursdays; 7-10pm

Inside It Failed, Leave The Living, VanGost, Practical Slackers; 8pm (door); $10

BLUES ON WHYTE Ross

with DJ Damian

Jam by Wild Rose Old Time Fiddlers every Thu

Amber Suchy Duo; 8pm

dueling piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Fri; 9pm-2am

BRIXX Hosted by

FUNKY BUDDHA–Whyte

NORTH GLENORA HALL

ALE YARD TAP & GRILL

CENTER T. Buckley / Karla Anderson; 7pm (doors), 8pm (show); $18 (adv), $22 (door)

stage Thu; all ages; 9pm; no cover

Canadian Country Hall of Fame Guest host Bev Munro; This week with: Bobby Austin; Oct 1-6

RED PIANO BAR Hottest

The Nash Ramblers; Oct 5-6, 8pm; No cover

every Thu; 9pm

with Kenny Skoreyko, Fred LaRose and Gordy Mathews (Shaved Posse) every Thu; 9pm-1am

FunDrive Event Featuring No Heat Tomorrow with Raptors and Cygnets along with The Give Em Hell Boys; 8pm; $10 (adv)

ST. BASIL’S CULTURAL

JEFFREY'S CAFÉ Kayle

L.B.'S PUB Open jam

FRI OCT 5

PAWN SHOP CJSR

ROADHOUSE – NISKU

J R BAR AND GRILL Live

Open stage; 7pm; no cover

the DJ every Thu and Fri; 10pm-close

PARK Dueling Piano's,

Main Floor: wtft w djwtf - rock 'n' roll, blues, indie; Wooftop Lounge: Musical flavas incl funk, indie, dance/nu disco, breaks, drum and bass, house with DJ Gundam

Down Thu at the Crown: D&B with DJ Kaplmplx, DJ Atomik with guests

KRUSH ULTRA LOUNGE

all request live; 9pm-2am every Fri and Sat; no cover

WILD BILL’S–Red Deer TJ

CROWN PUB Break

Hotte and her Rodeo Pals; $10

UNION HALL 3 Four All

WUNDERBAR CJSR

FESTIVAL PLACE

Jam Thu; 9pm

OVERTIME SHERWOOD

TJ the DJ every Thu and Fri; 10pm-close

Time Jamboree with Charlie Scream every Thu Norman Foote; 7pm

Sinder Sparks Show; every Thu; 8 - 12pm Thursdays: rock, dance, retro, top 40 with DJ Johnny Infamous

Uncommon Thursday: Indie with new DJ each week with resident

EDDIE SHORTS Good

40 MUSIC

STARLITE ROOM

DJ every Fri; 9pm

Hair of the Dog: Wafer Thin Mints (live acoustic music every Sat); 4-6pm; no cover BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE – NISKU

The Nash Ramblers; Oct 5-6, 8pm; No cover


BLUE CHAIR CAFE JWJones and band; 8:30pm; $15 BLUES ON WHYTE Every

Sat afternoon: Jam with Back Door Dan; Ross Neilsen and the Sufferin Basterds; Sep 30-Oct 7

BOHEMIA Display of

Decay, Weirding, Cathar & Psychotik Tantrum

BRIXX BAR Who's the Hero? with Killstarand PPL Call It Home; 9pm (doors) CAFÉ CORAL DE CUBA

Cafe Coral De Cuba Marco Claveria's open mic (music, poetry, jokes); every Sat, 6pm; $5 CARROT CAFÉ Sat Open

mic; 7pm; $2

COAST TO COAST Live

bands every Sat; 9:30pm

CROWN PUB Acoustic

blues open stage with Marshall Lawrence, every Sat, 2-6pm; every Sat, 12-2am DEVANEY'S Alesha & Brendon; Oct5-6 DEVON HOTEL PALS

Acoustic Open Mic with Tim Harwill; Every Sat 4-6:30pm

TRANSCEND COFFEE J.

Eygenraam with with City of Champions and The Archers; 8pm; $7 (door)

EMPIRE BALLROOM

French Montana

FESTIVAL PLACE An Evening with Ian Thomas; 7:30pm FILTHY MCNASTY'S

Young Benjamins with guest Garreth Burrows; No cover; 4pm GARNEAU THEATRE

Sing-A-Long Sound of Music; 1pm & 7pm GAS PUMP Saturday

Homemade Jam: Mike Chenoweth

HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB

Calista with Call Apollo; 8pm; $7 (adv), $10 (door) HILLTOP PUB Sat

afternoon roots jam with Pascal, Simon and Dan, 3:30-6:30pm; evening HOOLIGANZ Live music

every Sat

HORIZON STAGE –

SPRUCE GROVE Steven

Page; 7:30pm; $30 (adv)

HYDEAWAY Marleigh

WETASKIWIN Silvertrain

JEFFREY'S CAFÉ Devin

Hart; $10

L.B.'S PUB Sat afternoon

Jam with Gator and Friends; 5-9pm; Guests: Canyon Rose Outfit; 9:30pm

LOUISIANA PURCHASE

RIVER CREE–The Venue

NEW WEST HOTEL

Country jam every Sat; 3-6pm; This week with: Bobby Austin; Oct 1-6 O’BYRNE’S Live band

every Sat, 3-7pm; DJ every Sat, 9:30pm ON THE ROCKS Bonafide;

9pm; $5; Oct 5-7

OUTLAWS ROADHOUSE

Curtis Grambo - Live Concert; 8pm

OVERTIME SHERWOOD

with Jake Ian and The Haymakers; 9pm

PAWN SHOP Better Us Than Strangers with Thompson Highway & Guests; 6pm; $8 (adv)

ELEVATION ROOM –

JAMES THEATRE –

QUEEN ALEXANDRA

COAST TO COAST 5552 Calgary Tr, 780.439.8675 COMMON 9910-109 St CROWN PUB 10709-109 St, 780.428.5618 DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB 9013-88 Ave, 780.465.4834 DEVON HOTEL 1 Huron Street, Devon, AB THE DISH 12417 Stony Plain Rd, 780.488.6641 DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave, 780.454.9928 DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 Ave, 780.474.5554 DV8 8307-99 St EARLY STAGE SALOON– Stony Plain 4911-52 Ave, Stony Plain EDDIE SHORTS 10713-124 St, 780.453.3663 EDMONTON EVENTS CENTRE WEM Phase III, 780.489.SHOW ELECTRIC RODEO–Spruce Grove 121-1 Ave, Spruce Grove, 780.962.1411 ELEPHANT AND CASTLE– Whyte Ave 10314 Whyte Ave EXPRESSIONZ CAFÉ 993870 Ave, 780.437.3667 FESTIVAL PLACE 100 Festival Way, Sherwood Park, 780.449.3378 FIDDLER’S ROOST 8906-99 St FILTHY MCNASTY’S 1051182 Ave, 780.916.1557 FLASH NIGHT CLUB 10018105 St, 780.996.1778 FLUID LOUNGE 10888 Jasper Ave, 780.429.0700 FUNKY BUDDHA 10341-82 Ave, 780.433.9676 GOOD EARTH COFFEE HOUSE AND BAKERY 9942-108 St GOOD NEIGHBOR PUB 11824-103 St HALO 10538 Jasper Ave,

780.423.HALO HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB 15120A (basement), Stony Plain Rd, 780.756.6010 HILLTOP PUB 8220-106 Ave, 780.490.7359 HOGS DEN PUB 9, 14220 Yellowhead Tr HOOLIGANZ 10704-124 St, 780.995.7110 HYDEAWAY 10209-100 Ave, 780.426.5381 IRON BOAR PUB 4911-51st St, Wetaskiwin J AND R 4003-106 St, 780.436.4403 JEFFREY’S CAFÉ 9640 142 St, 780.451.8890 JEKYLL AND HYDE 10209100 Ave, 780.426.5381 JUNCTION BAR AND EATERY 10242-106 St, 780.756.5667 KAS BAR 10444-82 Ave, 780.433.6768 L.B.’S PUB 23 Akins Dr, St Albert, 780.460.9100 LEGENDS PUB 6104-172 St, 780.481.2786 LEVEL 2 LOUNGE 11607 Jasper Ave, 2nd Fl, 780.447.4495 LIT ITALIAN WINE BAR 10132-104 St LIZARD LOUNGE 13160118 Ave MARYBETH'S COFFEE HOUSE–Beaumont 5001-30 Ave, Beaumont, 780.929.2203 NAKED CYBERCAFE & ESPRESSO BAR 10303-108 St, 780.425.9730 NEWCASTLE PUB 6108-90 Ave, 780.490.1999 NEW CITY 8130 Gateway Boulevard NISKU INN 1101-4 St NOLA CREOLE KITCHEN & MUSIC HOUSE 11802-124 St, 780.451.1390, experiencenola.

all request live; 9pm-2am every Fri and Sat; no cover

BLACKSHEEP PUB DJ

every Sat

BONEYARD ALE HOUSE

ROSE AND CROWN Lyle

every Sat with DJ Phon3 Hom3; 8pm (door); no cover before 10pm

SHAW CONFERENCE

Audio/Rocketry, The Evidence, Morals, Flint, Crad Apples (solo); 8pm (doors), 9pm (shows); 18+

Sessions: Alt Rock/ Electro/Trash with Miss Mannered; Wooftop: Sound It Up!: classic hip-hop and reggae with DJ Sonny Grimezz; Underdog: Dr. Erick

Sinatra Sings Sinatra with Frank Sinatra Jr.; $44.50; 18+

NEW CITY LEGION

IRON BOAR PUB Jazz in Wetaskiwin featuring jazz trios the 1st Sat each month; $10

DV8 A Bunch Of Marys

RED PIANO BAR Hottest dueling piano show featuring the Red Piano Players every Sat; 9pm2am

Hobbs; Oct 5-6

PARK Dueling Piano's,

every Sat, 6pm

Lowe; 7pm (doors), 8pm (show); $18 (adv), $22 (door)

Suchy Sister Saturdays: Amber, Renee or Stephanie with accompaniment; 9:3011:30pm; no cover

and Mueller (classic pop/ jazz/musical theatre); 8pm; 3rd Sat each month; $10

THE DISH NEK Trio (jazz);

COMMUNITY HALL Jez

CENTRE Revolvr

DJ Sinistra Saturdays: 9pm BUDDY'S Feel the rhythm

BUFFALO UNDERGROUND Head

SHERLOCK HOLMES – DOWNTOWN Rob Taylor;

Mashed In Saturday: Mashup Night

SHERLOCK HOLMES –

every Sat; 9pm

SIDELINERS PUB Sat

ELECTRIC RODEO– Spruce Grove DJ every Sat

Oct 2-6

WEM Party Hog; Oct 2-6

open stage; 3-7pm

STARLITE ROOM Jungle

Fever and Step's Up Present the First Annual Blakout with Drumsound & Baseline Smith; 9pm (doors) WUNDERBAR Humans

with Spurs and Boosh Aok; 9pm

YARDBIRD SUITE Tom

van Seters Quintet; 8pm (doors), 9pm (show); $16 (members), $20 (guests)

DRUID IRISH PUB DJ

FILTHY MCNASTY'S

Fire up your night every Saturday with DJ SAWG FLUID LOUNGE Scene Saturday's Relaunch: Party; hip-hop, R&B and Dancehall with DJ Aiden Jamali FUNKY BUDDHA–Whyte Ave Top tracks, rock, retro

every Sat with DJ Damian

FUSIA/CORAL DE CUBA

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Mixing in the House every Sat: DJ Fuego and his Latin Groves with Mojito in Hand From Cuba; 9:30pm2am; $5

Main Floor: The Menace

HALO For Those Who

DJs

VENUE GUIDE ACCENT EUROPEAN LOUNGE 8223-104 St, 780.431.0179 ALE YARD TAP 13310-137 Ave ARTERY 9535 Jasper Ave AVENUE THEATRE 9030-118 Ave, 780.477.2149 BISTRO LA PERSAUD 861791 St, 780.758.6686 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 780.439.1082 BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE– Nisku 2110 Sparrow Drive, Nisku, 780.986.8522 BLACKSHEEP PUB 11026 Jasper Ave, 780.420.0448 BLUE CHAIR CAFÉ 9624-76 Ave, 780.989.2861 BLUE PEAR RESTAURANT 10643-123 St, 780.482.7178 BLUES ON WHYTE 1032982 Ave, 780.439.3981 BOHEMIA 10217-97 St BONEYARD ALE HOUSE 9216-34 Ave, 780.437.2663 BRITTANY'S LOUNGE 1022597 St, 780.497.0011 BRIXX BAR 10030-102 St (downstairs), 780.428.1099 BUDDY’S 11725B Jasper Ave, 780.488.6636 CAFÉ CORAL DE CUBA 10816 Whyte Ave CAFÉ HAVEN 9 Sioux Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.417.5523, cafehaven.ca CARROT CAFÉ 9351-118 Ave, 780.471.1580 CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argylll Rd, 780.463.9467 CASINO YELLOWHEAD 12464-153 St, 780 424 9467 CENTURY CASINO 13103 Fort Rd, 780.643.4000 CHA ISLAND TEA CO 10332-81 Ave, 780.757.2482 CHROME LOUNGE 132 Ave, Victoria Trail

com NORTH GLENORA HALL 13535-109A Ave O’BYRNE’S 10616-82 Ave, 780.414.6766 ON THE ROCKS 11730 Jasper Ave, 780.482.4767 O2'S ON WHYTE 780.454.0203 O2'S TAPHOUSE AND GRILL 13509-127 St, 780.454.0203 OVERTIME–Downtown 10304-111 St, 780.465.6800 OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK 100 Granada Blvd, Sherwood Park, 790.570.5588 PAWN SHOP 10551-82 Ave, Upstairs, 780.432.0814 PLAYBACK PUB 594 Hermitage Rd, 130 Ave, 40 St PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL 1086057 Ave REDNEX BAR–Morinville 10413-100 Ave, Morinville, 780.939.6955 RED PIANO BAR 1638 Bourbon St, WEM, 8882-170 St, 780.486.7722 RED STAR 10538 Jasper Ave, 780.428.0825 RENDEZVOUS 10108-149 St RICHARD'S PUB 12150-161 Ave, 780-457-3117 RIC’S GRILL 24 Perron Street, St Albert, 780.460.6602 ROSEBOWL/ROUGE LOUNGE 10111-117 St, 780.482.5253 ROSE AND CROWN 10235101 St R PUB 16753-100 St, 780.457.1266 SECOND CUP–89 AVE 8906-149 St SECOND CUP–Sherwood Park 4005 Cloverbar Rd, Sherwood Park, 780.988.1929

• Summerwood Summerwood Centre, Sherwood Park, 780.988.1929 SIDELINERS PUB 11018-127 St, 780.453.6006 SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE 12923-97 St, 780.758.5924 SPORTSMAN'S LOUNGE 8170-50 St STARLITE ROOM 10030-102 St, 780.428.1099 STEEPS TEA LOUNGE– Whyte Ave 11116-82 Ave SUEDE LOUNGE 11806 Jasper Ave, 780.482.0707 SUITE 69 2 Fl, 8232 Gateway Blvd, 780.439.6969 TAPHOUSE 9020 McKenney Ave, St Albert, 780.458.0860 TREASURY 10004 Jasper Ave, 7870.990.1255, thetreasurey.ca TWO ROOMS 10324 Whyte Ave, 780.439.8386 VEE LOUNGE, APEX CASINO–St Albert 24 Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 780.460.8092, 780.590.1128 VINYL DANCE LOUNGE 10740 Jasper Ave, 780.428.8655, vinylretrolounge.com WILD BILL’S–Red Deer Quality Inn North Hill, 7150-50 Ave, Red Deer, 403.343.8800 WINSPEAR CENTRE 4 Sir Winston Churchill Square; 780.28.1414 WUNDERBAR 8120-101 St, 780.436.2286 Y AFTERHOURS 10028-102 St, 780.994.3256, yafterhours. com YELLOWHEAD BREWERY 10229-105 St, 780.423.3333 YESTERDAYS PUB 112, 205 Carnegie Dr, St Albert, 780.459.0295

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

MUSIC 41


Know: house every Sat with DJ Junior Brown, Luke Morrison, Nestor Delano, Ari Rhodes

Celtic open stage every Sun with Keri-Lynne Zwicker; 5:30pm; no cover

JUNCTION BAR AND EATERY LGBT

every Sun; 3-8pm

Community: Rotating DJs Fri and Sat; 10pm NEWCASTLE PUB Top

40 requests every Sat with DJ Sheri

THIS WEEK’S ENTERTAINMENT: OCT. 5-6 SUNDAY OCT. 8

Alesha & Brendon Celtic Music 5-8pm Singer/Songwriter 8pm with host Nadine Kellman WEDNESDAY Open Stage with Duff Robison

O2'S TAPHOUSE AND GRILL DJs every Fri and

Sat

O2'S ON WHYTE DJ Jay every Fri and Sat OVERTIME–Downtown

hop, and electro every Sat with DJ Hot Philly and guests

ROUGE LOUNGE Rouge

Saturdays: global sound and Cosmopolitan Style Lounging with DJ Rezzo, DJ Mkhai

SOU KAWAII ZEN LOUNGE Your

OCTOBER 5 & 6

THE KICKIT BROS. OCTOBER 12 & 13

In Sutton Place Hotel #195, 10235 101 Street, EDMONTONPUBS.COM

electro, Top40, R'n'B with DJ Melo-D every Fri

SUITE 69 Stella Saturday:

O2'S TAP HOUSE AND GRILL Open stage

hosted by the band the Vindicators; 4-8pm every Sun PAWN SHOP CD Release

Party Featuring Dire Omen with Akakor and Terrorfist; $10 (adv)

RICHARD'S PUB Sun Live

every Sun with Jeremiah; 5-9pm; no cover; $10 (dinner)

YELLOWHEAD

(Fernie) with Guests; 9pm

Snap with Degree, Cool Beans, Specialist, Spenny B and Mr. Nice Guy and Ten 0; every Sat 9pm

BREWERY Open Stage:

UNION HALL Celebrity

ROBERTSON WESLEY UNITED CHURCH

Every Sun, 8pm Classical

Enterprise Quartet; 2pm

Signature Saturdays

DJs

Y AFTERHOURS Release

BACKSTAGE TAP AND GRILL Industry Night:

Saturdays

Open mic every Sun hosted by Tim Lovett BLUE CHAIR CAFE

42 MUSIC

Strings Sun: Bonafide; 9pm; $5; Oct 5-7

TEMPLE Oh Snap! Oh

BLACKJACK'S ROADHOUSE – Nisku

EDMONTONPUBS.COM

ON THE ROCKS Seven

Sunday Brunch: Jim Findlay Trio; 10:30am2pm; donations

BLUE PEAR RESTAURANT

Jazz on the Side Sun; 5:308:30pm; $25 if not dining BLUES ON WHYTE Ross

Neilsen And The Sufferin Basterds; Sep 30-Oct 7

BRIXX BAR Thx for the

every Sun with Atomic Improv, Jameoki and DJ Tim BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: Soul Sundays: A fantastic voyage through '60s and '70s funk, soul and R&B with DJ Zyppy LEVEL 2 LOUNGE

Stylus Industry Sundays: Invinceable, Tnt, Rocky, Rocko, Akademic, weekly guest DJs; 9pm-3am SAVOY MARTINI LOUNGE Reggae on

Whyte: RnR Sun with DJ IceMan; no minors; 9pm; no cover

MON OCT 8 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Sleeman Mon: live music monthly; no cover

Rock Frankie McQueen with the Electric Religious and Guest; 9pm (doors)

BLUES ON WHYTE John

CAFFREY'S–Sherwood

DJs

DJs

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: Blue Jay’s Messy Nest: mod, brit pop, new wave, British rock with DJ Blue Jay CROWN PUB

Mixmashitup Mon Industry Night: with DJ Fuzze, J Plunder (DJs to bring their music and mix mash it up)

Singer/songwriter open stage every Mon; 8pm

Metal Mondays with DJ Tyson

TUE OCT 9 BAILEY THEATRE THE

Bryan Strand Band; 7pm (doors), 8pm (show); $10 (door) BLUES ON WHYTE John

Primer; Oct 8-13

BRITTANY'S LOUNGE

Phat Tuesday in The Quarters, The Rooster Davis Group, New Orleans Jump & Boogie; 8-11pm BRIXX BAR Ruby Tuesdays

with host Mark Feduk; $5 after 8pm; this week's guests: Comedy & Music collide with Wolfheart and Matchbreaker with comedy by Brett McCrindle, Keith Sarnoski, the Movie Jerks; 8pm (doors)

DRUID IRISH PUB Open

Bokononists, The Hustle, Guest TBA; 8pm (doors), 9pm (show); 18+ NEW WEST HOTEL

Double Highway; Oct 8 - Oct 13 O’BYRNE’S Celtic jam every Tue; with Shannon Johnson and friends; 9:30pm OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK The Campfire

Hero's (acoustic rock, country, top 40); 9pm-2am every Tue; no cover

PADMANADI Open stage

every Tue; with Mark Davis; all ages; 7:3010:30pm

R PUB Open stage jam

every Tue; hosted by Gary and the Facemakers; 8pm

RED PIANO All request

band Tuesdays: Joint Chiefs (classic rock, soul, R&B) every Tue

REXALL PLACE Bob

NEW WEST HOTEL

SECOND CUP– Summerwood Open

CHA ISLAND TEA CO

Stage

Live on the Island: Rhea March hosts open mic and Songwriter's stage; starts with a jam session; 7pm DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB

OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK Monday Open PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

Acoustic instrumental old time fiddle jam every Mon; hosted by the Wild Rose

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

stage/open mic every Tue; 7:30pm; no cover

STARLITE ROOM

Wolfheart - Subtle Bodies Tour

YARDBIRD SUITE Tue

Night Sessions: Efa Etoroma Trio; 7:30pm (doors), 8pm (show); $5

Free classic country dance lessons every Wed, 7-9pm; This week: Double Highway; Oct 8 - Oct 13 OVERTIME SHERWOOD PARK Jason Greeley

(acoustic rock, country, Top 40); 9pm-2am every Wed; no cover

PLAYBACK PUB Open

Stage every Wed hosted by JTB; 9pm-1am

PLEASANTVIEW COMMUNITY HALL

DV8 Creepy Tombsday:

RED PIANO BAR Wed Night Live: hosted by dueling piano players; 8pm-1am; $5

every

Hop Tue: freestyle hip hop with DJ Xaolin and Mc Touch Psychobilly, Hallowe'en horrorpunk, deathrock with Abigail Asphixia and Mr Cadaver; every Tue

RED STAR Experimental

Indie Rock, Hip Hop, Electro with DJ Hot Philly; every Tue RED PIANO All Request

Band Tuesdays: Classic rock, soul and R&B with Joint Chiefs; 8pm; $5

SUITE 69 Rockstar

Tuesdays: Mash up and Electro with DJ Tyco, DJ Omes with weekly guest DJs

WED OCT 10 BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: Glitter Gulch: live music once a month; On the Patio: Funk and Soul with Doktor Erick every Wed; 9pm

CHA ISLAND TEA CO

NEW CITY LEGION The

NEW WEST HOTEL

CROWN PUB Live Hip

BUDDYS DJ Arrow Chaser

L.B.’S Tue Blues Jam with

Ammar; 9pm-1am

(show); 18+

Acoustic Bluegrass jam presented by the Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society; every Wed, 6:3011pm; $2 (member)/$4 (non-member)

BLUES ON WHYTE John

Jam: hosted by Kevin and Rita McDade and the Grey Cats Blues Band, guests every week; 5-9pm; no cover

Double Highway; Oct 8 - Oct 13

Main Floor: alternative retro and not-so-retro, electronic and Euro with Eddie Lunchpail; Wooftop: It’s One Too Many Tuesdays: Reggae, funk, soul, boogie and disco with Rootbeard

stage every Tue; with Chris Wynters; 9pm

DEVANEY'S IRISH PUB

Park The Sunday Blues

JUBILEE AUDITORIUM

from Bands; 9pm

Dylan & His Band, Mark Knopfler; 6:30pm (doors), 7:30pm (show); $39.50, $65.50, $89.50 & $124.50; all ages

Primer; Oct 8-13

Classical

WUNDERBAR Dudes

LUCKY 13 Industry Night every Mon with DJ Chad Cook

every Sun; 9:30pm-1am

(members & guests)

Alan Tam Shine A Light Charity Concert Tour 2012; 7:30pm; $40, $60, $80, $100, $150

stage every Mon; 9pm

O’BYRNE’S Open mic

WUNDERBAR Shred Kelly

VINYL DANCE LOUNGE

LOUNGE Acoustic open

FILTHY MCNASTY'S

retro, old school, top 40 beats with DJ Lazy, guests

Saturdays: every Sat hosted by DJ Johnny Infamous

ROSE BOWL/ROUGE

Soul Service (acoustic jam): Willy James and Crawdad Cantera; 3-6:30pm

TWO ROOMS Live Jam

Open stage/jam every Sun; 2-6pm

Oct 4 - 6 PARTY HOG Oct 9 - 13 TONY DIZON SUNDAY NIGHT KARAOKE

HOGS DEN PUB Open

SUEDE LOUNGE House,

BEER HUNTER–St Albert

WEM

and Soul Sundays with DJ Sadeeq

Jam hosted by Carson Cole; 4pm

ARTERY Sean Burns with Guests; 7pm

Oct 4 - 6 ROB TAYLOR Oct 9 - 13 ANDREW SCOTT

FILTHY MCNASTY'S Rock

Famous Saturday with Crewshtopher, Tyler M

SUN OCT 7

DOWNTOWN

Against the Gaslight Anthem; 6pm (doors); all ages

NEWCASTLE PUB Sun

RED STAR Indie rock, hip

LYLE HOBBS

EXPO CENTRE Rise

PALACE CASINO Show

Transmission Saturdays: Indie rock, new wave, classic punk with DJ Blue Jay and Eddie Lunchpail; 9pm (door); free (before 10pm)/$5 (after 10pm)

LIVE MUSIC AT “THE ROSE”

stage with Dan Daniels every Sun

Saturdays at Eleven: R'n'B, hip hop, reggae, Old School

PAWN SHOP

9013-88 Avenue 780.465.4834 edmontonpubs.com

EDDIE SHORTS Open

Jam: hosted; open jam every Sun, all styles welcome; 3-7pm

Lounge DJ every Sat

DEVANEY’S IRISH PUB

DOUBLE D'S Open jam

Old Tyme Fiddlers Society; 7pm

Primer; Oct 8-13

RICHARD'S PUB Live Latin Band Salsabor every Wed; 9pm SANTA MARIA GORETTI COMMUNITY LEAGUE –

THEATRE HALL PIA's Fun(d) Night, Featuring Maria Dunn; 7-10pm; $50 (per person), $500 (tables of ten)

SECOND CUP–149 St

Open stage with Alex Boudreau; 7:30pm

WINSPEAR CENTRE

Angélique Kidjo; 8pm;$42 (adv) WUNDERBAR Grant

Davidson, with Guests; 12pm

ZEN LOUNGE Jazz Wednesdays: Kori Wray and Jeff Hendrick; every Wed; 7:30-10pm; no cover

Classical ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA – LEDCOR

THEATRE Opera 101; 7 -

9pm; Free

Whyte Noise Drum Circle: Join local drummers for a few hours of beats and fun; 6pm

JUBILEE AUDITORIUM

CROWN PUB The D.A.M.M Jam: Open stage/ original plugged in jam with Dan, Miguel and friends every Wed

MCDOUGALL UNITED CHURCH Jennifer Bustin,

DEVANEY'S Duff

Robinson

EDDIE SHORTS Electric open jam with Steven Johnson Experience every Wed ELEPHANT AND CASTLE–Whyte Ave

Storm the Stage; 9pm; $25, $20 (explorer & encore members)

with Josephine van Lier; 12pm DJs

BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE

Main Floor: RetroActive Radio: Alternative '80s and '90s, post punk, new wave, garage, Brit, mod, rock and roll with LL Cool Joe

Open mic every Wed (unless there's an Oilers game); no cover

BRIXX BAR Really Good... Eats and Beats: every Wed with DJ Degree and Friends

FESTIVAL PLACE

BUDDY'S DJ Dust 'n' Time

Oysterband; 7:30pm

FIDDLER'S ROOST Little

Flower Open Stage every Wed with Brian Gregg; 8pm-12 GOOD EARTH COFFEE HOUSE AND BAKERY

Breezy Brian Gregg; every Wed; 12-1pm HAVEN SOCIAL CLUB

Open stage every Wed with Jonny Mac, 8:30pm, free HOOLIGANZ Open stage

every Wed with host Cody Nouta; 9pm; This week with special guest: Lyndsay Burnett; 9pm NEW CITY LEGION

“Manatees & Jack-OLanterns” Launch Party!! Ben Olson, Worst Days Down (Tour Kickoff Show!), Djs Nick K & Big Loaf and more; 8pm (door), 9pm

every Wed; 9pm (door); no cover

THE COMMON

Treehouse Wednesdays FILTHY MCNASTY'S Pint Night Wednesdays with DJ SAWG FUNKY BUDDHA–Whyte Ave Latin and Salsa music

every Wed; dance lessons 8-10pm

LEGENDS PUB Hip

hop/R&B with DJ Spincycle

NIKKI DIAMONDS Punk

and ‘80s metal every Wed

RED STAR Guest DJs every

Wed

TEMPLE Wild Style Wed: Hip hop open mic hosted by Kaz and Orv; $5


JONESIN'CROSSWORD MATT JONES // JONESINCROSSWORDS@VUEWEEKLY.COM

"Come On, Daddy Needs a New Pair of Shows!"

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Across 1 Flying matchmaker 6 "Fear of Flying" author Erica 10 Its lowest point is the Dead Sea 14 Get wild and woolly? 15 Psychic "Miss" in late-night 1990s ads 16 "Shall we?" response 17 Completely clean out 18 Arthur C. Clarke's "Rendezvous with ___" 19 Some hosp. staffers 20 Show about a guy who spins those giant signs on the street? 23 Negative vote 24 Word in four state names 25 Old-school "Yeah, right!" 26 Emerald or ruby 27 Picked 29 One of the 30 companies that makes up the Dow Jones Industrial Average 32 Nest eggs of sorts 33 He's Batman 37 Show about an engaged couple's Plan Z? 40 LaBeouf of the last Indiana Jones movie 41 Latch (onto) 42 County in a 2008 Tony-winning drama 43 Olympic soccer player Rapinoe 45 "Them!" creature 46 Garden hose bunches 48 Word before or after "thou"

3 Katy who kissed a girl 4 "Othello" antagonist 5 Got closer 6 Prep's paradise 7 Name for Norwegian kings 8 Fish sought out by Marlin 9 What a shot might hit in soccer 10 Generic greeting card words 11 Shade in old pictures 12 "Cool ___" (New Edition song) 13 One A in AMA 21 Band from Athens 22 Constitution opener? 26 "You busy?" 27 Sing like Bing 28 Do damage 29 "Happy Days" diner 30 "Well, ___-di-dah!" 31 Show where they often use Luminol 32 Fisher of "Wedding Crashers" 34 Palindromic honorific 35 Internet connectivity problem 36 It's opposite WNW 38 Sandwich order 39 "The Sound of Music" surname 44 Shady figure? 45 Story line shape 46 Raccoon relative 47 Responded to fireworks 48 Firing offense? 49 Refine metal 50 Barroom brawl 51 Detox center guests 52 "My word!" 53 Head honcho 54 Princess Fiona, really 55 "This'll be the day that ___..."

49 Home to the Mustangs 52 Show about helping out with bank heists and kidnappings? 56 Waikiki's island 57 Centipede's features 58 "21" singer 59 "Leave it in," to a proofreader 60 Revolver's hiding place in "Foxy Brown" 61 Person with a messy desk 62 Duck out of sight 63 Paula from Savannah 64 "For ___ sake!"

Down 1 They broadcast the Senate a lot 2 "Star Trek" crew member

©2012 Jonesin' Crosswords

Volunteer at Bissell Centre's 11th Annual Round Dance on Thursday, October 25th. Shifts times vary throughout the event from 3pm-11pm at Alberta Aviation Museum (11410 Kingsway Ave).We need help with set up, clean up, concession, meal service, greeters and more! Contact Amanda: 780-423-2285 x134 or aalmeida@bissellcentre.org

1600.

Volunteers Wanted

Volunteers needed for upcoming events Edmonton Women's Shelter Ltd. (WIN House) is hosting an Open House and Orientation for new volunteers on October 26th, from noon until 2:30 pm. Volunteers are required to have a clean police record and child welfare check. This will be available at the open house. To register or fore more information, call 780-471-6709 ext 225

2001.

Acting Classes

FILM AND TV ACTING Learn from the pros how to act in Film and TV 6 month f/t program 1-866-231-8232 www.vadastudios.com

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Artist to Artist

A group for multicultural/immigrant visual artists in Edmonton area www.meetup.com/a-group-formulticultural-artists/ For newcomers as well as for the artists established in Canada!

2005.

Artist to Artist

CALL FOR ESPA BOARD MEMBERS Edmonton Small Press Association (ESPA) is a registered & award winning nonprofit arts society and is currently seeking more artists & advocates to join our Board governance team. Includes local programming, general fundraising, communications and acting as general ambassadors at events. Board directors are expected to volunteer a minimum of 4 hrs per week and terms are one full year (Nov 1 - Oct 31). Please send ESPA a letter of interest & related experience if you are able to participate in this exciting next stage of our evolution: contact@edmontonsmallpress.org or 780-434-9236 Habitat For Humanity Edmonton presents Art For Humanity Bringing new life to items too good to waste in a show too good to miss! Upcycled Art Auction featuring 18 Artisans. Art is constructed from ReStore Materials Bidding begins October 15th @ 9 am to October 20th. Habitat ReStore North 8210 Yellowhead Trail 780-479-3566

BOOK YOUR CLASSIFIED AD TODAY! CALL ANDY 780.426.1996

2005.

Artist to Artist

STAGE STRUCK 2013! CALL FOR ENTRANTS Submissions for ADFA/Edmonton one-act adult play festival on February 22/23, accepted until December 17, 2012. Information and registration package from Mary-Ellen at 780-481-3716 or mperley@shaw.ca

2020.

Musicians Wanted

Bass player wanted for modern rock trio. Please be able to gig once per month & Sunday rehearsals. Call or text: 780-299-7503 Guitarists, bassists, vocalists, pianists and drummers needed for good paying teaching jobs. Please call 780-901-7677 Musicians Wanted for Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society Join the circle EVERY Wednesday at 7pm at the Pleasantview Hall 10860 - 57 Ave www.BluegrassNorth.com We are the jamming club

2060.

Music Services

Do you wanna learn guitar and enjoy it? From three chord rock to crazy shredding, found online stuff not helping? mattportas@hotmail.ca 780-299-0435 $50/HR $25/1/2HR

2200.

Massage Therapy

RELAX AND LET GO Therapeutic massage. Appointments only. Deena 780-999-7510

Are you thinking about investing in real estate? In a condo, perhaps? Then don’t miss an evening of free advice from Robert F. McLeod. Robert is a successful broker and investor who specializes in condos. He’s the winner of the Real Estate Investment Network’s Leslie Cluff Memorial Player of the Year Award for innovation, mentorship and support of the Alberta real estate market. His success also earned him a spot in the 2011 Avenue Edmonton Top 40 Under 40.

LAST WEEK'S ANSWERS

Wednesday, October 17 7 to 9 p.m. Jasper Gates Condominiums Main floor, 10140 150 St. One block NORTH of Stony Plain Rd. No cost. No obligation. Limited seating. RSVP to 780.453.1108

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

ROB BREZSNY // FREEWILL@VUEWEEKLY.COM

ARIES (Mar 21 – Apr 19): Ten percent of all sexually suggestive text messages are delivered to the wrong number. Take precautions to make sure you're not among that 10 percent in the coming weeks. It will be extra important for you to be scrupulous in communicating about eros and intimacy. The stakes will be higher than usual. Togetherness is likely to either become more intensely interesting or else more intensely confusing—and it's largely up to you which direction it goes. For best results, express yourself clearly and with maximum integrity. TAURUS (Apr 20 – May 20): If it were within my power, I'd help you identify the new feelings you have not yet been able to understand. I would infuse you with the strength you would need to shed the wornout delusions that are obstructing your connection to far more interesting truths. And I would free you from any compulsion you have to live up to expectations that are not in alignment with your highest ideals. Alas, I can't make any of these things happen all by myself. So I hope you will rise to the occasion and perform these heroic feats under your own power. GEMINI (May 21 – Jun 20): Dutch graphic artist M.C. Escher (1898 – 1972) was a Gemini. He liked to depict seemingly impossible structures, like stairways in which people who

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

climbed to the top arrived at the bottom. I nominate him to be your patron saint in the coming week. You should have his talent for playing with tricks and riddles in ways that mess with everyone's boring certainties. Here are four Escher quotes you can feel free to use as your own. 1. "Are you really sure that a floor can't also be a ceiling?" 2. "My work is a game, a very serious game." 3. "I think it's in my basement; let me go upstairs and check." 4. "Only those who attempt the absurd will achieve the impossible." CANCER (Jun 21 – Jul 22): The Venus flytrap is a remarkable plant that gobbles up insects and spiders. Its leaves do the dirty work, snapping shut around its unsuspecting prey. Evolution has made sure that the flowers of the Venus flytrap sit atop a high stalk at a safe distance from where all the eating takes place. This guarantees that pollinators visiting the flowers don't get snagged by the carnivorous leaves below. So the plant gets both of its main needs met: a regular supply of food and the power to disseminate its seeds. I'll ask you to derive a lesson from all this, Cancerian. Be sure that in your eagerness to get the energy you need, you don't interfere with your ability to spread your influence and connect with your allies. LEO (Jul 23 – Aug 22): A sinuous and CONTINUED ON PAGE 45 >>


FREEWILL

<< CONTINUED FROM PAGE 44

shimmering archetype that begins with the letter "s" has been trying to catch your attention, Leo—sometimes in subliminal and serpentine ways. Why haven't you fully tuned in yet? Could it be because you're getting distracted by mildly entertaining, but ultimately irrelevant trivia? I'm hoping to shock you out of your erroneous focus. Here's the magic trigger code that should do the trick: Psssssssssst! Now please do what you can to make yourself very receptive to the slippery, spidery signals of the simmeringly sublime surge. VIRGO (Aug 23 – Sep 22): Don't burn down a bridge you haven't finished building yet. OK, Virgo? Don't try to "steal" things that already belong to you, either. And resist the urge to flee from creatures that are not even pursuing you. Catch my drift? Stop yourself anytime you're about to say nasty things about yourself behind your own back and avoid criticizing people for expressing flaws that you yourself have and don't go to extraordinary lengths to impress people you don't even like or respect. Pretty please? This is a phase of your astrological cycle when you should put an emphasis on keeping things simple and solid and stable. LIBRA (Sep 23 – Oct 22): "Hello Dear Sir: I would like to place a large order for yellow chicken curry, cherry cream cheese cupcakes, and sour, malty Belgian golden ale. It's for my birthday party this Saturday, and will need to serve exactly 152 people. My agent will pick it up at 11 am. Please have it ready on time. —Ms. Lori Chandra." Dear Ms. Chandra: I am an astrologer, not a caterer, so I'm afraid I can't fulfil your order. It's admirable that you know so precisely what you want and are so authoritative about trying to get it, but please remember how crucial it is to seek the fulfillment of your desires from a source that can actually fulfill them. You're a Libra, right? Your birthday is this week? Thanks for giving me an excuse to send this timely message to all of your fellow Libras. SCORPIO (Oct 23 – Nov 21): Here comes the big reveal of the month; the trick ending of the year; and maybe the most unusual happiness of the decade. Any day now you will get the chance to decipher the inside story that's beneath the untold story that's hidden within the secret story. I won't be surprised if one of your most sophisticated theories about the nature of reality gets cracked, allowing you to recover at least a measure of primal innocence. I suggest you start practicing the arts of laughing while you cry and crying while you laugh right now. That way you'll be all warmed up when an old style

of give-and-take comes to an end, ultimately making way for a more profound new give-and-take. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 – Dec 21): There's almost nothing about the dandelion that humans can't make use of. People of many different countries have eaten its buds, leaves, and greens. Besides being tasty, it contains high levels of several vitamins and minerals. Its flowers are the prime ingredient in dandelion wine and its roots have been turned into a coffee substitute. Herbalists from a variety of traditions have found medicinal potency in various parts of the plant. Last but not least, dandelions are pretty and fun to play with! In the coming weeks, Sagittarius, I invite you to approach the whole world as if it were a dandelion. In other words, get maximum use and value out of every single thing with which you interact. CAPRICORN (Dec 22 – Jan 19): "Intellect confuses intuition," asserted painter Piet Mondrian. I don't think that's always true, even for creative artists. But in the coming week I suspect it'll be important for you to take into consideration. So make sure you know the difference between your analytical thinking and your gut-level hunches and don't let your thinking just automatically override your hunches. Here's more helpful advice from painter Robert Genn: "The job of the intellect is to give permission to the intuition, and it's the job of intuition to know when intellect is once again appropriate."

COMMENT >> SEX

Stonewalled in New York

A trip to NYC spurs reflections of the origins of gay rights Two weeks ago I embarked on a long In June of 1969, the New York City dreamt-of trip to New York City. Of Police raided the Stonewall. This was, course, I was excited about taking sadly, nothing new. At that time, the in all the art and culture and iconic police regularly raided gay clubs and landmarks, but what I was secretly arrested people who were involved most excited about was getting in any display of affection with to see some New York sex someone of the same sex. shops! I was staying two Drag artists and men who blocks from Times Square, dressed in ways that were m o eekly.c @vuew so you would think I would considered to be feminine brenda Brendear were also frequent tarhave a veritable smorgasKerb bord just outside my doorstep. gets. But on June 28, 1969, But former Mayor Rudy Giuliani the patrons of the Stonewall Inn cleaned up Times Square in the '90s. decided they had had enough. They Instead of adult stores and massage resisted arrest, turned on the police parlours, Times Square is now filled and forced the police to barricade with flagship retail shops and netthemselves in the bar. A full-scale work television headquarters. riot broke out. Several people were So to get my sex shop fix, I headed injured and 13 were arrested. Riots down to Christopher Street—Mancontinued over the next few days. Our hattan's gay community. Surely there modern day Pride parades have their I would get my fill of sex shops and roots in those 1969 riots. gay bars. But when I emerged from The Stonewall Inn closed shortly the subway at Christopher Street, I after the riots. The building was comwas floored when I ran into not just pletely renovated and reopened again gay bars, but THE gay bar, the Stonein the '90s. It got another facelift wall Inn. I thought cruising New York recently, reopening to the public in leather shops would be a fun time, 2007. It may look very different than but happening upon the Stonewall it did 40 years ago, but the Stonewall meant so much more. still stands in its original spot. It is still The Stonewall Inn is the bar that an active and vibrant gay bar. Even in is widely considered to be the flashits current state, it very much reflects point for the gay rights movement in and honours its history. New York, if not all of North America. Across the street from the Stone-

LUST E LIF

FOR

wall is a small, quiet, triangular park surrounded by a low fence. In the park are four bronze figures, two men and two women—a monument put here to commemorate the incidents at Stonewall. George Segal, the artist who was commissioned to do the sculpture, was told that it "had to be loving and caring and show the affection that is the hallmark of gay people ... and it had to have equal representation of men and women." When you think about it, this is all the patrons of the Stonewall wanted too—equal representation and the right to show love and affection just as everyone else does. The monument is simple and beautiful and the park is a nice place to get away from the noise and busyness of New York. After more than 40 years of standing up and speaking out, the gay rights movement finally won a major battle. Last July, New York legalized same sex marriage. It is one of only six states in America to do so. There must have been quite the party at the Stonewall. V Brenda Kerber is a sexual health educator who has worked with local not-forprofits since 1995. She is the owner of the Edmonton-based, sex-positive adult toy boutique the Traveling Tickle Trunk.

AQUARIUS (Jan 20 – Feb 18): It's time to seek help from outside the magic circle you usually stay inside. You need to call on extracurricular resources—people and animals and deities who can offer useful interventions and delightful serendipity and unexpected deliverance. The remedies that work for you most of the time just won't be applicable in the coming days. The usual spiritual appeals will be irrelevant. I'm not saying that you are facing a dire predicament; not at all. What I'm suggesting is that the riddles you will be asked to solve are outside the purview of your customary guides and guidelines. PISCES (Feb 19 – Mar 20): These days lobsters are regarded as a luxury food, but that wasn't the case among early Americans. In the 17th and 18th centuries, the large crustaceans were meals that were thought to be suitable only for poor people and prisoners. Wealthy folks wouldn't touch the stuff. After examining your astrological omens, Pisces, I'm wondering if your future holds a similar transformation. I think there could very well be a rags-to-riches story in which an ignored or denigrated thing ascends to a more important role.

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

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COMMENT >> STUDENT SEX QUESTIONS

Dead body STIs and other what-ifs Dan's best answers for some unanswerables at a university Q and A Last week, I appeared at a "Savage I really like this guy and I know he likes Love Live" event at Radford Univerme, but he is so unapproachable! He sity in Radford, Virginia. Questions always seems to be pissed off about are submitted on index cards at something. How can I get his attention SLL events, which allows questionwithout practically throwing myself ers to remain anonymous and at him? E forces them to be succinct. Someone who knows you're G SAVA The crowd at Radford was interested in him and who's large and inquisitive. The genuinely interested in m kly.co uewee students submitted more savagelove@v you but who affects an Dan questions than I could posunapproachable, pissed-off Savage demeanor is a game-playing sibly hope to answer in two hours—and Radford students douchebag, and game-playing also managed to stump me. Twice. I douchebags are lousy boyfriend mapromised the crowd that I would get terial. Surely there are some attracanswers for the two stumpers and antive guys on your campus—guys you swer as many of their other questions like, guys who like you—who aren't as I could in this week's column. And grumpy, game-playing assholes. You here we go … know, nice guys. Maybe you could date one of them? When I sneeze, I ejaculate. Is this normal? Is it normal for girls to orgasm from Yes, totally. Nothing to worry about. dry humping alone? This happens to all guys. That's why Many girls learn to masturbate by they make men's underwear out of grinding their crotches/clits against cotton, dude. something—a pillow, typically—and dry humping is a pretty effective way Why do all the beautiful girls only go to re-create that particular sensation, for guys who are assholes? i.e., it provides her with the intense, Why do all the guys only go for the direct clitoral stimulation she needs beautiful girls who only go for assto get off. holes? P.S. You might want to skip the next question. Can you get AIDS or an STI from a dead body? Just wondering.

LOVE

This is one of the two questions that stumped me. I promised to get an answer, and here it is: "As long as this isn't a thinly veiled necrophilia question, the answer is no," says Caitlin Doughty, a mortician, founder of the Order of the Good Death, and the star of the popular, hilarious and informative "Ask a Mortician" YouTube video series. "When the AIDS epidemic first hit in the '80s, there were terrible stories about funeral homes that would charge more for bodies with HIV/AIDS or flat out tell the family the body was a threat and needed to be cremated immediately. Thankfully, that's now considered wildly unethical and incorrect. Unless you're an embalmer or coroner and dealing closely with all manner of fresh corpse fluids, there should be almost zero risk to you." Is it OK to want to be single for 15 more years? More and more people are delaying marriage or remaining single—you might want to read Hanna Rosin's The End of Men and Eric Klinenberg's Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone—so yeah, it's OK. It's generally OK to make your own choices and live your own life. Should I not have sex with my best friend's babydaddy even though he was my boyfriend before he was hers and we were about to get back together before I found out my best friend was pregnant? Yes, you should not. Why can some girls only orgasm on top? Because the angle of penetration provides them with the direct, intense clitoral stimulation they need to get off.

Do you have any advice for non-openly-gay people at a school where gays are almost nonexistent? Recognize that you're part of the problem. The non-openly-gay people at your school—you and the other closeted gays—create a negative nonexistence feedback loop. You don't come out because no one's out, and no one comes out because you're not out. My advice: if you're in a position to come out, come out. If you're not in a position to come out, make plans to get to a place where you can come out. And in the meantime, refrain from whining about a problem that your choices and/or limitations contribute to creating. Can you come out your butt? Um, sure, but only if someone else came in it first—and no one should be coming in your butt without a condom on his dick. How do you tell someone that they are bad at sex? You don't. You tell someone that there are particular ways you like to be touched/kissed/fucked/whipped/ bound/whatever and you encourage someone to touch/kiss/fuck/whip/ bind you in those particular ways. Hopefully this will lead to someone getting better at sex over a few months. If someone doesn't get better at sex in that time frame, well, then someone either is incapable of getting better at sex or doesn't care that you're unhappy with the sex and it's time to dump someone. Can you get a yeast infection from licking a yeast infection? Another stumper, another guest expert: "Wet folds are a great place for yeast to grow," says Dr. Anna Kaminski, associate medical direc-

tor for Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest, "especially if other things are a little out of balance. For example, a woman might be more prone to yeast infections due to other things in the vagina—spermicide, blood, antibiotic-induced changes in vaginal pH balance, or hormonal changes. But mouths are really good at keeping yeast in check. So it would be unusual for a person to get a yeast infection orally—unless you suffer from something that predisposes you to oral yeast infections, e.g., you are on antibiotics, you are immunocompromised, you have bad oral hygiene." If a guy asks a girl if she wants to have anal sex, is he curious about gay sex? No. Why do straight guys like doggiestyle so much? Because they're gay. What does it mean when you're a girl and the guy you're hooking up with keeps introducing you to his best girl friends? It means you're hooking up with a gay. Why do guys think threesomes are so amazing? Because they are—especially the gay ones. I'm a guy who does not find guys physically attractive. Even so, I like to give and receive blowjobs with men. Does this mean anything about my sexual orientation? Yes. I've always considered myself a lesbian, but a few weeks ago, I got really drunk and slept with one of my male best friends. Am I not a lesbian? Female sexuality is a lot more fluid, as they say, and many lesbian-identified women have slept with men. Your sexuality identity—the label you choose to apply to yourself— should communicate the essential truth about your sexual interests and partner preferences. So you're free to identify as a lesbian even if you slip and fall on the occasional dick. Who is your dream guy? Janice from The Muppets with a dick. OK, Radford, that was fun, but we're out of room. Thanks for the invite and the great event! V Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage. @fakedansavage on Twitter

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VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012


BACKWORDS

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012

CHELSEA BOOS

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48 EVERY END IS A NEW BEGINNING

VUEWEEKLY OCTOBER 4 – OCTOBER 10, 2012


Vue Weekly Oct 4-10 2012